Doomed From Day One – Nine Fingers

Doomed From Day One Online Promo Shot

It has been two years since the release of their acclaimed debut EP The Wasted World but on the evidence of its successor Nine Fingers, UK progressive death metallers Doomed From Day One have not been resting on its laurels. The new EP is six tracks of confronting and impacting enterprise which leaves predictability a dormant factor and intrigue a toxic substance within its consuming presence. The Surrey quintet has honed their already impressive songwriting and intensive sound into a real predator of senses and emotions, an accomplished brutality which is sculpted by feisty invention and incendiary imagination, and though arguably the new release lacks those moments which impact after the event, it is a magnetically striking and creatively dominant beast during in its company.

Formed in 2009, the Guildford band has been on a formidable rise through the ranks of UK extreme metal, their passionate fanbase recruited not only by their first release but their formidable live reputation and presence.  Through impressive shows alongside the likes of Malefice, Martyr Defiled, The Defiled, Gallows and most recently Black Dahlia Murder, Sylosis, Bleed From Within and Thy Art Is Murder, as well as world media acclaim, Doomed From Day One has earned a worldwide attention which you can only imagine the strength of Nine Fingers will cement and accelerate. Released as the band share dates with Red Seas Fire and Fathoms, the EP confirms Doomed From Day One as one of the most potent, imagination tipping encounters with an immense depth of promise.

The title track opens up the release; an enthralling instrumental which introduces itself and the album with a sunrise of excellent guitar Doomed From Day One Cover Artworktemptation and orchestral bred elegance. It then evolves into a fire borne sonic blaze of craft and evocative textures whilst melodic flames scorch the ears for a wholly persuasive invitation into the release and the following Cut And Hunt. The second track takes little time in testing the senses with a crippling array of spiteful rhythms, corrosive riffery, and equally caustic gutturally primed vocals from Sean Scott. The track rages and ravages with craft and malevolence but equally exports a range of hooks and barbed grooves which dig deep and contagiously from within the dangerous tempest. It is a breath-taking companion which increases it’s tempting further with an excellently progressive, almost avant-garde teasing from the guitars of Charlie Griffiths and Charlie Frederick which evolves from their persistently impressive skills.

The immense full start to Nine Fingers is backed up by At Graves End, a song which falls short of the plateau just set but creates its own unique stature of imaginative and mercurial invention. As the drums of Daniel Ristic sculpt a web of bone splintering craft and force, the guitars again send spirals of sonic ingenuity through the heart of the vitriolic intensive track whilst vocals quall and scar the surface of the ear with the great tones Scott first successfully unveiled on the EPs predecessor. Creatively antagonistic and fuelled by enthralling enterprise, the song drifting into a progressive jazz spawned landscape at one point before returning as ferocious and dramatically impacting as it started, there is little to dismiss about the track but it does like most of the others lack that ignition to remain a potent instigator away from its destructive arms.

The Promise does verge on that break through, the delicious irritant of flesh scorching sonic toxicity and rhythmic barbarism a vicious alchemy which lays down the strongest inventive bait upon the EP. With the bass of Eifion Sweet prowling with predatory glee and menace across its length, the track like its predecessor is unafraid to explore a slower melodic beauty and progressive tapestry. The skill of the band and the imaginative songwriting is impressive and again bordering spellbinding but still without that lingering claw for the mind, though when it sounds this good in the claws of the song and EP is it really an issue?

Dread and In This Life Not The Next complete the release; the first an insatiable fury of lethal rhythms and riveting riffing which is just as inciting through its mordant touch with the vocals of Scott a ferocious maelstrom of passion and maliciousness upon the outstanding blend of vindictive and seductive musical craft. Personal favourite of all the tracks, it spears the body with imaginative violence to provoke the strongest satisfaction before its successor finishes things off with a thrilling torment sculpted by a technical fire of extreme and fertile aural retribution. The track unleashes everything which is good about the band and the release in a seven minute deeply pleasing scourge.

Nine Fingers is an excellent release which as mentioned only misses out on finding that one element which plays in thoughts and memory long after it takes its leave. All the same Doomed From Day One has created a release which when standing in front of the body feeds every want and hope for an extreme metal offering whilst reinforcing the band as one of the finest and most promising to emerge in the UK in recent years.

http://www.doomedfromdayone.co.uk/

8/10

RingMaster 21/10/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.