The Slytones – Shake The Cage

slytones_RingMaster Review

There is no precise way to describe the rich sound of The Slytones and no way to stop it crawling under the skin and enslaving the psyche. This has been proven over previous releases but is at its most seductive and darkly magnetic in new single Shake The Cage. The song and the accompanying Thomas Thumb making up the release cast a kaleidoscope of ravenous flavours, styles, and warped imagination whilst their characters are as relevant to the carnival as they are to voodoo bred escapades. They both epitomise the heart of The Slytones sound whilst simultaneously creating their own new and unique imagination romancing adventures.

The British band began as a trio, expanding its line-up over time whilst quickly alluring keen appetites with their The Psychedelic Sounds of EP in 2011. It is fair to say that the Brighton hailing sextet of Ashley Edwards (vocals/guitar), Bradley Wescott (lead guitar), Chip Phillips (vocals/keys), Freddie Hills (drums), Chris Warren (vocals/bass), and Robin O’Keeffe (percussion) have drawn comparisons, in an attempt to describe their sound, as broad in the diversity of bands as the mix of ingredients colluding to ignite their individual incitements. There are few bands which can conjure such variety within a single song let alone a whole release, but as Shake The Cage proves it is child’s play to The Slytones.

The striking of a match sparks a fanfare of enticement, its blowing out the trigger to a feisty stomp built on ska clipped riffs and jazz seeded swing. Keys and guitars instantly have feet and hips involved whilst the dark tones of the bass along with the infectious hooks, simply work on the imagination. The track continues to stroll along with 12 Stone Toddler/ Mynie Moe like devilry, a flowing torrent of unpredictability lighting up and bewitching from every move taken before it all gets turned on its head for a garage rock prowl reminiscent of Th’ Legendary shack Shakers. Grisly barker like vocals leads the fresh parade of sinister carnival-esque flirtation, keys and rhythms an insatiable romp in the shadow soaked shuffle now toying with ears and brewing even thicker enjoyment. All the time the song is still weaving a virulent swing and psychotic drama, every passing minute an adventure of individual design with superbly woven styles but always leading back to the rich contagion of its original psych kissed and energetically rabid swing.

As if one irresistible treat was not enough, Thomas Thumb brings its own maze of ingenuity in sound and invention. Opening with a gospel seeded dose of harmonies and ambience around the leading edge of the main vocals and narrative, the song subsequently opens into mystique lined psychedelic scenery brimming with creative theatre and picturesque tempting. Like a blend of The Doors, Arthur Brown, Rocket From The Crypt, and Tankus The Henge, the song swarms over ears with invasive magnetism, every touch a slight evolution from the last before the track bursts into a sturdy garage rock canter which steers towards a Queens Of The Stone Age meets Faith No More/6:33 devilment.

Both tracks are glorious, a must for anyone with a taste for avant-garde and psychedelically warped adventure, but songs which flow with a natural and skilfully infectious, and wonderfully unpredictable, waltz. The Slytones is a carnival of invention, mischief, and most of all unstoppable fun so do yourself a favour and check them and especially Shake The Cage out.

Shake The Cage is out now.

Dates for The Slytones and Moulettes tour this September! :

16th September                   Southport                     Atkinson

17th September                   St Helens                       Citadel

18th September                   Halifax                           Square Chapel

19th September                     Morecambe                  Hothouse

20th September                   Ramsbotton Festival   Manchester

http://www.facebook.com/theslytones    https://twitter.com/theslytones

Ringmaster 01/08/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Patriot Rebel – Propaganda

Patriot Rebel Promo Shot_RingMaster Review

British alternative/hard rockers Patriot Rebel provide raw and rousing rock ‘n’ roll as virulent as it is ravenously aggressive. They proved it with their outstanding Two Worlds EP in 2013 and do so again with new single Propaganda. The song is a raw and explosive confrontation, an anthem to get fully involved in straight away but emerging even stronger and more impressive with every listen.

Though formed around 2007, it was arguably when the current line-up of vocalist Paul Smith, guitarists Danny Marsh and Dave Gadd, bassist Will Kirk, and drummer Aaron Grainger came together that the Nottingham hailing Patriot Rebel found the truly potent spark to their sound and in awakening eager attention. Inspired by the likes of Stone Temple Pilots, Alter Bridge, Black Stone Cherry, and Velvet Revolver, the quintet created a musical proposal which was soon invigorating ears and appetites, shows with bands such as Tesseract, Jettblack, Skarlett Riot, Cornerstone, Earthtone9, Spirytus and Violet over the years the live proof and Two Worlds the potent studio evidence. The Matt Elliss (Black Spiders, Terrorvision, Skarlett Riot) produced EP certainly drew acclaim and keen focus from old and new fans as well as the media upon its uncaging, which the band’s live presence has only driven on and now Propaganda can only kick into greater reaction again.

Patriot Rebel Cover Artwork_RingMaster Review     The single is taken from that earlier EP but manages to hold a fresh breath and character now standing alone as the band’s new protagonist. It is also a teaser of sorts for things to come, Patriot Rebel most likely in the studio, again with Ellis, as you read this. Sometimes tracks show a new light upon their depths and presence when taken away from an album or EP, and fair to say Propaganda, for whatever reason, manages to do the same as it roars from its opening second through to its last. From an initial sonic lure of a second of two, thumping rhythms prowl and riffs stalk the senses; their intimidation crouched over by the distinctive tones of Smith. The predatory start of the song and his croon subsequently triggers the embedded contagious might and stride of the encounter, grooves and melodies entangling in an irresistible tempting still graced by the formidable and throaty nature of bass and drums.

The song is a blaze of anthemic rock ‘n’ roll, luring the listener with its verse and leads into the irresistible chorus where full involvement from band and listener is a given. There are no truly major surprises within the song, the band’s influences open spices, yet it has a resourcefulness and enterprise which leaves expectations empty and enjoyment full to bursting.

Patriot Rebel continues to impress and though Propaganda is taken from their previous release it only thrills and ensures anticipation for the band’s next exploit will be greedy. Completed by a great acoustic version of Propaganda too, and accompanied by one equally enjoyable video, this is one single for new and old fans to spend a riotous summer with.

Propaganda is available from 3rd August.

https://www.facebook.com/patriotrebel        https://twitter.com/patriotrebeluk

Read our interview with Patriot Rebel @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/06/19/rousing-spirits-the-patriot-rebel-interview/

RingMaster 01/08/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Daycare For Jedi – Worst Things First

DFJ _RingMaster Review

If you have a striking name, which Daycare For Jedi does, it is not a bad thing to back it up with a sound which grips attention with equal strength, and that is certainly what the Danish pop punksters have as evidenced by their debut EP Worst Things First. Uncaging four songs which are as contagious as they are inventively sculpted, the release is a magnet for ears and imagination, not one re-inventing the pop punk arena but one certainly giving it something fresh and tenacious to think about.

Formed in 2014, the Aarhus quartet openly embraces the origins of pop punk whilst giving it their own, if not startling, certainly invigorating twist. Early songs such as Throwing Dirt and Last Pages sparked eager intrigue and appetites to their potent emergence and sound whilst their live presence, which made its debut at the Distortion Festival in Copenhagen in the band’s first year, has only cemented and pushed their reputation for unleashing seriously energetic, hook laden, and intense rock ‘n’ roll. The early songs were a teaser of things to come, of the thoroughly enjoyable and impressive Worst Things First which should put Daycare For Jedi on broader genre maps from hereon in.

Cover_RingMaster Review   The Jacob Hansen recorded EP opens up with Outcome, quickly entangling ears in a web of melodic enterprise and sonic suggestiveness. Quickly riffs and forceful rhythms are joining the affair, as too the potent tones of vocalist Jens Erik, his expressive voice a magnetic lure alongside the resourceful endeavour of his and Mikkel Rohde’s guitar play. There is a touch of bands like Millencolin and Blink 182 to the song, but nothing too strong amidst other spices of familiarity in sound and texture. It all adds up to a strong and engaging start to the EP but just a taster to bigger things which start with its successor.

Broken Bones instantly flirts with a stirring rhythmic coaxing, its bait soon joined by great niggly hooks and an infectious raw caress of riffs. Into its even more energy driven stride, the song soon employs a great mix of vocals from across the band around the again inviting delivery of Jens Erik, whilst around them the heavier dark throated bass of Jacob and the crisp beats of Kristian provide intimidating contrast. Again the canvas of the song has a recognisable flavour but it is the inventive twists and turns, musically and vocally, which bring the track alive and into its creative own, as with the following Sinking Adventure. It too is a swiftly engaging and persistent protagonist unafraid to infuse its more straight forward spine with sparkling melodic imagination and juicy hooks aligned to fiercer adventure and unpredictable revelry.

Worst Things First increasingly impresses and grows stronger with every song, the third a potent peak but quickly eclipsed by the closing Gain And Lose, a light-footed agitation of infectious devilry shaped with sonic radiance and aggressive rhythms. The bass brews a delicious dirty tone whilst the vocals, singularly and united, have a slight belligerence to them which only lifts the song to greater impact and rigorous persuasion. The best song on the EP, it is a rich and thrilling climax to one thoroughly enjoyable encounter.

It is still early days for Daycare For Jedi but Worst Things First suggests not only are they heading in the right direction but they have the potential to become one of those names a genre is especially noted for.

The Worst Things First EP is available from August 3rd via Prime Collective.

https://www.facebook.com/DayCareForJedis

RingMaster 01/08/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

The Kingcrows – Funland

 

Kingcrows_RingMaster Review

For all the exceptional punk releases and bands igniting the rock scene over recent years, there is no still no substitute yet for the special tingle which only lifts its head with a ‘77 found roar. As we all know, it is a never diminishing inspirational period for punk rock and the never ending torrent of bands spawning their own identity with its antagonistic hues. Some breed a sound which is as close a cousin as you could wish for, amongst them The Kingcrows who are simply a rousing bridge between the late seventies and modern punk ‘n’ roll. Their previous releases have already made that declaration but new album Funland sets it in stone, the UK quartet involving the listener in something energetically aggressive, attitude driven, and most of all undiluted sleaze wrapped fun.

Hailing from Leeds, the quartet of vocalist Phil E Stine, guitarist Lee J., bassist Rocco, and drummer Ratbag have been a bruising and thrilling live presence across the north of England moving outwards. Emerging in 2005, The Kingcrows has torn up stages with their filthy rock ‘n’ roll ever since, playing alongside the likes of Spear Of Destiny, UK Subs, The Rezillos, TV Smith, Anti Nowhere League, Tokyo Dragons, Vice Squad, The Lurkers, 999, The Vibrators, Red Alert, The Outcasts, Peter & The Test Tube Babies and many more legendary and emerging bands over the years. They have also released a clutch of attention grabbing EPs, which made an even bigger impression when collected together and released in the shape of Corvus Maximus through STP Records in 2013. The album awoke a broader focus and awareness of the band’s unfussy and virulent sound, which Funland should now push into new spotlights and recognition.

The album erupts with Here We Go, the first riot initially blooming from a fairground organ and its warm invitation. Soon rhythms rumble with attitude and riffs stir up the air as the opener’s eager rock ‘n’ roll seizes ears and attention. The song is quickly into its virulent and persistent stride, cruising with jabbing beats spearing grouchy guitar and bass tenacity. The track is like a mix of Spunk Volcano and The Eruptions and The Adicts, similarity and nostalgia colluding with fresh attitude and revelry.

cover_RingMaster Review     A potent start to the album is further ignited by the following She’s My Rock ‘N’ Roll and its thrilling tempting. An alluring rhythmic enticing sparks a rockabilly bred grooving flirted with by spicy harmonica, they in turn kick-starting a heavy anthemic canter of contagious rhythms and incendiary sonic enterprise led by the ever magnetic tones of Stine. The track is glorious, punk rock at its tenacious and riotous best, and again as old school as it is imposingly new. The album’s first major pinnacle is backed, if not quite matched, by On The Road Again, a swiftly engaging and infectious stomp which has ears, feet, and appetite locked in within a handful of chords and resourceful seconds. There are no big surprises within song and arguably Funland in general, yet they only provide a nonstop and fully satisfying stomp to get eagerly involved in.

A southern whisper lines the lure and rampage of Rock ‘N’ Roll Rebel Songs, the track aflame with sultry guitar endeavour, inviting group vocals, and the breath and atmosphere of ’77. Lyrically it also sparks memories of times past, it all colluding in one easy going and gripping persuasion, though outshone by Forgotten Son straight after. Its opening riff comes with dark intent and imagination igniting attitude, its bait continuing to enthral as the song grows and breeds new sonic colour and lyrical drama around it. There is a touch of Angelic Upstarts to the encounter though that is but one flavour within the emotive shadows and provocative narrative on offer.

The album’s title track kicks up a storm of attitude and insatiable rock ‘n’ roll next, the track forcibly prowling with essences of bands like Suburban Studs and Crisis in its armoury before making way for the irresistible presence of Kick ‘Em Down. The album is truly at its loftiest height at this point, the tasty provocateur, and its predecessor, unleashing welcomingly bullying and virulently infectious rock ‘n’ roll with the second also unveiling another tonic of harmonica belligerence, before the brilliant Apocalypso steals the whole show. Opening on a delicious throaty bass riff with tendrils of guitar adding their spice before the drums create a brooding and catchy confrontation, the track evolves into one seriously magnetic shuffle. The beats of Ratbag continue to incite song and ears with their anthemic swings, whilst around them voice, riffs, and contagion ebb and flow like virulent waves soaked in inescapable temptation.

Never Gonna Fall continues the album’s elevated and invigorating energy and enjoyment with ease, its thumping presence and gait luring many strains of rock into one bulging incitement whilst Sick Of Love Songs creates its own individual fusion of old school punk and new rock ‘n’ roll. The bass of Rocco breeds a bestial snarl to its tone whilst Lee J. once again leaves sonic vapours from his searing and ever to the point exploits. Led by the beckoning delivery of Stine, the track is another hitting the sweet spot whilst proving to be another proposition you only wish its two or so minutes was stretches longer.

Funland ends with Beer and Whiskey, arguably the weakest song on the album. In context though, with it holding ears and pleasure firmly in its rip-roaring escapade, it simply reinforces the might of the tracks which over shadow it. It is indeed a fine end to an excellent slab of rock ‘n’ roll, Funland rigorously feeding appetites for seventies punk and today’s punk ‘n’ roll from start to finish.

2015 has already been blessed with some mighty punk offerings which The Kingcrows now rival if not surpass with their new proposal, but few of those others will become as big a favourite as Funland is destined to be we suggest.

Funland will be released through STP Records at Rebellion on August 6th and then available @ http://www.stprecords.co.uk/page4.htm

http://www.kingcrows.com/     https://www.facebook.com/kingcrows

RingMaster 31/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Eva Plays Dead – Sounds of the Written Word

EPD Light-7468_RingMaster Review

UK rockers Eva Plays Dead have been stirring up plenty of attention and praise loaded support over the past couple of years through a potent live presence and a host of songs and debut album fuelled by with impressing adventure and the potential of even greater things to come. The Sounds of the Written Word EP continues the band’s potent emergence and evolution of sound with five rousing slices of undiluted rock ‘n’ roll. It is an encounter which confirms the Nottingham/Derby bred quartet as ones to watch and to find plenty of flavoursome enjoyment with, but also suggests that they are still only at the beginnings of exploring their creative depths.

Formed in the January of 2013, Eva Plays Dead weave inspirations from the likes of The Dirty Youth, LostAlone, Marmozets, Joan Jett, and QOTSA into their diversely spiced sound. Thick strains of metal, hard and alternative rock, and even punk are entangled and fused together as proven by the band’s new encounter, which relentlessly entices and holds attention. Live the band has frequently drawn acclaim too whilst supporting the likes of We Are The Ocean, LostAlone, Max Raptor, Canterbury, and also across their own country wide tours. The band’s 2013 album Guilt Trips & Sins equally drew its plaudits though it took the single of earlier this year, Wonderland to spark and lure in the increasing focus of the likes of Team Rock and Kerrang. The song was a rich taster of Sounds of the Written Word which itself is already creating a bit of a feisty stir since its release via SoundHub Records.

EP Artwork_RingMaster Review     The EP opens with Live Again and a rich torrent of fiery riffs, pungent rhythms, and a sonic enticing impossible to ignore. In fact the whole song is a wall of persuasion, especially once the rich voice and expressive delivery of Tiggy Dee joins the muscular party. Her tones wrap syllable and ears with tenacious seduction yet carries a raw edge which only adds to the aggressively creative enterprise of sound around her. The guitar of Matt Gascoyne is just as lively in its imagination and craft, its melodies and Dee’s siren-esque roar in turn trapped by the masterful and fiercely magnetic rhythmic cage cast by bassist Zach Shannon and drummer Seb Boyse.

The tracks’ bluesy air and hard rock enticing continues in the more predatory Bad Girl, the song with the sinister persuasive lure of a temptress prowling the listener musically and vocally. It is dark, dirty, and a weave of sonic resourcefulness seeded in classic and alternative rock. As its predecessor, the song is firmly infectious whether roaring with full passion or delving into more concentrated tapestries of thick texture and invasive spicing. It easily continues the strong start to the release, though both songs get outshone by Wonderland. From its first dark rumble, the track is sheer addictiveness, riffs and grooves a flirtatious confrontation over the anthemic twist of rhythms and subsequently stalking beats. Dee again sits astride the magnetic drama at play, her voice attitude fuelled yet with a raw regal air as the equally riveting sounds dance around her with bright invention and raucous energy. It is no surprise that the song stirred up ears and appetites as a single as here it pretty much steals the show, though it is quickly rivalled by the closing pair of songs on the EP.

We Ain’t A Family uncages its own virulent hooks and tangy grooves in short time, rhythms showing more restraint amidst the melody rich proposal though again the bass finds an intimidating snarl to drool over. Like the last track, it shows an eagerness to explore an undulating landscape of ideas and evolving sound, crescendos of energy and skilful ebbing and flowing of intensity and passion alone an enthralling tempting.

Final track 1950’s Woman has a similar template to the previous pair but finds its own individual character within a familiar bellow of rigorous sound and bewitching vocal theatre. The song maybe does not define its distinctiveness as much as others on the EP, but when it leaves ears basking, imagination smiling, and emotions hungry for more, there is little more you can ask of it.

There is definitely the sense that Eva Plays Dead has more in the locker than shown on Sounds of the Written Word which only makes their future something to keenly anticipate. This is a band to keep close attention on with an EP to thoroughly enjoy.

Sounds of the Written Word is available now via SoundHub Records through most online stores

http://www.evaplaysdead.com/     https://www.facebook.com/EvaPlaysDead

RingMaster 31/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Refuelling the snarl: chewing the Sonick Plague flesh with Ken Cuccaro

Ken_RingMaster Review

Already this year, many old treats and classics which were lost to the radar of the many originally, have been unleashed again on the metal scene from decades past. Many of the bands are seeing a new lease of life and one certainly looking like re-igniting a previous blaze and more is West Virginian thrashers Sonick Plague. Linking up with Pavement Music, the band has re-recorded and re-energized their 1988 debut album What’s the Purpose, breathing new ravenous breath into it as it comes now as a self-titled proposal. We as so many missed the band and record first time around and were caught by surprise by the new release because of it. Now all we want is to hear and know more, so with thanks drummer Ken Cuccaro who kindly sat down to indulge our nosiness, we explored band, album, and plenty more…

Hello Ken and many thanks for sparing time to talk with us.

The band has just re-released 1988 debut What’s the Purpose via Pavement Music; but not just set the same version free again or simply re-mastered it as so many old encounters being uncaged again are, but re-recorded it. Was there a particular reason for going down that route?

We really needed to. The first one sounded pretty bad, we lost the masters and really just wanted to start fresh again. It’s very much like giving the old stuff a shower.

SP_RingMaster ReviewDid you look at the songs any differently for the fresh recordings from first time around and they take on a new relevance for you when approaching them?

I wouldn’t say we looked at them differently, but as far as new relevance absolutely! Damn a lot’s happened in 30 years! I’m laughing my ass off right now because of how we approached them. Very carefully, like sneaking up on a gator. We had to make sure we could still play that stuff. Although we all kept playing over the years we’re older and beat up. Hell poor Sean had 2 broke feet when we first got back together.

Obviously technology has changed over the decades. Did you make particular use of modern possibilities in recording the songs or went for a more raw and organic approach to again and successfully ignite the same vital character of their first appearance?

We went for the more organic thing. We played live in the studio and really wanted to try to capture the energy again. There were definitely some modern amenities [the studio did have a great blender] we used but not too much. We didn’t want it to sound robotic and triggered, and all that shit. Not knocking anybody’s stuff, I just personally feel the metal and thrash stuff now is so electronic, click tracked, and feels the same. Some of these guys are awesome but everything sounds the same and is just so cut up. Again not knocking their musicianship there are so many great bands out. Right now there’s a guy reading this saying “these guys are so fu@#$kin old they don’t even know how to use the shit and they suck!” That’s ok; we probably could still kick your ass. I think the people that listen to this stuff want to feel that energy and little variations in the music, it makes it human. We recorded at the Carriage House Studio the place was incredible.

Apart from the obvious change in sound quality etc. did anything else brew up in songs when recording the new versions which maybe was unexpected or added something different to additionally enjoy?

I only know one way to play ‘em. Chuck and Matt put their own stink on it. I personally was shocked how well Sean’s voice held up over the years he can still belt it out. But all in all we kept it very close.

Obviously the original recording of the album was with guitarist Tony Teodoro in the band. Sadly he died a few years ago. Did you find there was some emotional intensity around the new recordings because of his passing and presence first time around?

Absolutely! Me personally whenever I get an ache or pain I think of what he went through, it kept me going. I don’t think anybody in the band didn’t think of him every day we were recording this.

It was his death, which the press release said, brought the three of you together again and talking music, the band eventually to full strength with the addition of Matt Dupre. Was that indeed the spark or were there already thoughts of maybe reuniting in maybe one or two of you?

No that was it. That got us talking about it again. It’s strange how a tragedy can change things.

The new album is simultaneously a reminder, revisit, and introduction to Sonick Plague for fans old and new. Is it also any sort of teaser to the new songs and sounds you guys are working on?album-cover-_RingMaster Review

Well sort of, we still got some tricks up our sleeves. That was kinda what we had in mind, turn some new people on to our old stuff and some of the old timers on to our new stuff. A lot depends on the listeners, if we’re lucky enough for them to like it we’ll do some more…Maybe in less than 30 years.

Can you give us any clues as to what you next release and songs will offer? Any spoilers?

I’m not going to tell you shit. It’s a surprise!! It’s definitely heavy metal rock and roll. You can get sweaty to it with your girl.

Between the two periods of the band, how musically were all your times taken up?

We all played in different bands, definitely kept playing and raising our kids. Myself I did a lot of hunting and a retreat in New Zealand where I was taught the ways of a true warrior killer. I had to do it for work. They wouldn’t use me as an extra on the Lord of the Rings set. I was sad about that.

Are these experiences you would say have impacted or certainly are spicing up the heart and nature of your new tracks?

The warrior thing yes. The guys are in constant fear of my wrath. I could snap any of their necks in a second for no reason what so ever. We all still have a lot to be pissed about and we’re broke. That’s what keeps us young and energized.

There is no denying something very familiar to the album yet that comes from the bands and releases filling ears and lighting appetites since the songs were first impacting on the thrash scene. Has it frustrated that some others have found greater recognition with a sound you all helped originate way back and which has obviously inspired them?

I’m asked that a lot. I wouldn’t say frustrated …yea let’s stick with frustrated. We worked our asses off, but it is what it is. I wouldn’t have minded making a living playing drums but things happen for a reason. I’m not pissed that other people “made it” I think it’s cool whenever anybody gets success in what they’re doing. I just find it extremely sad that nobody picked up any of the great bands in Connecticut back in the day. You had Liege Lord, Skeletal Ambitions, Disaster, Forced Reality, our old touring buddies Lost Generation, that’s not even scratching the surface. It seemed if you weren’t from the bay area they didn’t want to know you. It’s too bad there were some great music people missed out on. Maybe we should have switched to rap.

How did the link up with Pavement come about?

Chuck busted his ass hookin’ this stuff up. He’s the motor, our little energizer bunny. He never stops working at this. Pavement has been incredible, great bunch of guys.

SP2_RingMaster ReviewThe live side of Sonick Plague is as alive as the recording side?

Better! I always thought we we’re a workin’ man’s band. I love that energy you can only get from a crowd.

What have you got planned for the rest of the year?

We’ll see. It’s our middle aged crisis experiment. It really depends how the music sells. Hopefully people will dig hearing our old brand of thrash. I know we’re having fun playing again.

Once again thanks so much for chatting with us, anything you would like to add before we let you go?

YUP! Thank you so much to all the people who are still showing an interest in this band this has been really cool! I never thought in a million years people would even remember us. We wouldn’t be shit if it weren’t for all the great people in the metal community. Its guys like you who keep this stuff pumping. THANKS

https://www.facebook.com/sonickplague    http://www.sonickplague.com/

Read the review of the Sonick Plague album @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/07/28/sonick-plague-self-titled/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 30/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Sonick Plague – Self Titled

SP6_RingMaster Review

You have to be grateful to Sonick Plague and Pavement Music for bringing us not only a blast from the band’s past but giving it a fresh breath and energy, though it is easy to suspect a straight release of their 1988 debut album would have been a treat too for those us missing it first time around. The West Virginian thrashers though have re-recorded and re-energized that rampage, originally titled What’s the Purpose, and uncaged it as a self-titled offering and attention filler whilst the band works on new material. It is old school thrash dosed up with punk and classic metal ferocity, and yes the band’s sound has been emulated, reworked, and twisted many times over the years since Sonick Plague unleashed their album, but still the songs just stir up ears and appetite.

Formed in 1984, the band’s first ‘memorable’ line-up of Ken Cuccaro (drums) and Tim Meehan (guitars), alongside Tony Teodoro (guitars) and Sean Donnelly (bass, vocals) came a few years later, the four behind the band’s 1988 debut album. Though it swiftly gained hordes of new fans and attention, not long after it’s unveiling, Meehan left the band to be subsequently replaced by guitarist Chuck Crilly. From there Sonick Plague undertook their own self-supported tour and shared stages with the likes of Death Angel, Voivod, Gwar, Pantera, Ludichrist, Crumbsuckers and many more. The intensity of that tour and surrounding shows saw the band’s stability shaken, and after a few unsuccessful line-up changes the band parted. It was apparently the sad passing of Teodoro in 2012 that sparked Cuccaro, Donnelly, and Crilly to begin talking musical things again, and with the addition of Matt Dupre, Sonick Plague reformed and set about re-recording their first offering.

album-cover-_RingMaster Review     Recorded at the legendary Carriage House Studios, the album quickly gets down to business with Street Wars. An alluring melodic entrance gives no indication of the sonic rioting to come but it does wake up ears and imagination nicely. Increasing its muscle and drama with every passing chord, riff, and spiky beat, the track eventually hits full steam, the vocals of Donnelly ripe with attitude and aggression. We are as many, not able to bring a comparison to the first version of the album but it is hard to imagine his delivery being any more potent first time around. Musically, with age and maturity involved, you can assume the release also has a richer and thicker body, and certainly the opener rumbles and grumbles as if old school thrash was a fresh proposition.

The great starts continues with My Gun, the throaty bass of Donnelly a great coaxing alongside the virulence of driving riffs and concussive swings cast by Dupre, Crilly, and Cuccaro respectively. Settling with an attack somewhere between a lively prowl and an all-out charge, the track bites and snarls whilst a solo lights the air. Of course we have heard this all before in many ways, but from those coming after and being inspired by Sonick Plague and the bands around them in the eighties, and a great many of them definitely labour to make the same highly satisfying assaults as the reworked but undiluted proposals offer on this release.

Both AA and I Don’t Want to Relax churn up air and the senses, the first with a rabid nagging of riffs and crisp beats led by the grouchy tones of Donnelly, and its successor through its military and Celtic teased imagination. The second of the two is pure anthem, enslaving from its opening contagious moments to and across a ravenous landscape of psychotic grooves and quarrelsome riffing speared by rhythms as hellacious as they are viciously precise. The track is thrash bred but simply rock ‘n’ roll in its most irresistible form, and easily our favourite, and probably the best track on the album, despite many challengers. Its punkish character also adds to the anarchic glory before making way for the crushing yet infectiously tempting turbulence of View of Death and straight after the middle finger growl of One Swift Kick. Each keeps body and appetite greedy, the first with its predatory and unrelenting gnawing at the senses and the second courtesy of a deliciously bestial bass sound and another scourge of heavy niggling riffs and contagion spilling grooves; the mesmeric melodic oasis deep into its tempest is pretty juicy too. The track stands aside I Don’t Want to Relax as the pinnacles of the album, each the perfect invitation to newcomers to Sonick Plague past and present.

The pair of Misc Bullshit, with its classic metal hued enterprise within another savaging embrace, and finally NRG brings the album to a great close. The last track simply brawls with the listener vocally and musically, leaving no attitude coated stone unturned in its tenacious and uncompromising carnage, and both songs again showing plenty of accomplished and inventive touches not always fuelled by hostility.

As mentioned we cannot say how much the songs have changed during their re-recording etc. but there is no denying the unfussy but skilled craft and technical ability set loose. This is certainly an album in many ways you already know thanks to those who have followed over the years employing the sounds Sonick Plague and their like inspired originally. It is going to be interesting how the band’s new songs shape up, but easy to suspect they will also offer a thoroughly enjoyable ride.

Sonick Plague is available now digitally via Pavement Music and on CD @ https://squareup.com/market/sonickplague/sonick-plague-cd

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RingMaster 28/07/2015

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