Pryapisme – Diabolicus Felinae Pandemonium

band-_RingMasterReview

The press release for Diabolicus Felinae Pandemonium, the third album from the creative diablerie that is avant-garde/experimental metallers Pryapisme, declares it is “definitely the album of immaturity”. In truth it is the most accomplished, dare one say inventively mature offering from the Clermont-Ferrand hailing outfit yet. That growth has not defused the rousing bedlamic imagination of the band, in fact it seems to have escalated its mischief but where previous releases might be called schizophrenic such the mayhem of their head spinning diversity, Diabolicus Felinae Pandemonium feels in control of its creative chicanery; the result importantly again, a hell of a lot of fun and another irresistible infestation of psyche and spirit by the French outfit.

Their latest release is the first recorded with the band’s actual live formation rather than the core trio, the full quintet of Benjamin Bardiaux (keyboards), Nils Cheville (guitar), Antony Miranda (bass, guitar, moog, vocals), Nicolas Sénac (guitar), and Aymeric Thomas (drums, clarinet, keyboards) revealing their off-kilter craft and imagination. The album itself reveals the “advent of the Era of the Cat, the one which will replace mankind. After the arrival of the lol-cats all over internet, which constitutes the last conspiracy, well after the one of Ancient Egypt where the cats were already ruling the highest spheres of power, the diabolical felines are now preparing the birth of Satan’s cat, the Chosen One which will tame humanity and in the end, conquer the whole galaxy with the help of its pentagram of cat food.” Further music to our ears as we always claimed they were the devil’s spawn.

It opens up with Un max de croco, coaxing Middle Eastern vines escaping the guitar as rhythms shuffle around, ready to dance in the subsequent blossoming of melodic frivolity. There is a restraint to it all though, a reserve which accentuates the glint in the eye of hooks and keyboard spun melodies. In saying that, the infectiousness of the track is rampant and only strengthened by the jazzy twist and throaty throb of the contrabass provided by guest Matthieu Halberstadt (Ogino, Please lose battle). Never predictable but as expected and welcomed, the band and song turn on a spin of notes through varied styles and flavours, each move enslaving body and imagination in active participation.

artwork_RingMasterReviewLa Boetie stochastic process follows, flowing with summery warmth and flirtatious catchiness through darker shadows and dirtier street corners, every crevice a well of human drama and devilish enterprise. As with every song, thoughts have a field day interpreting and playing with the suggestiveness offered and the melodic painting shared, hips swinging with zeal to funk infused turns as the sax of Adrien Daguzon (Zibeline) flames in the midst of it all. There is a touch of 6:33 to the track, a whiff of Trepalium in its rowdier twists but as ever expectantly unique to Pryapisme.

The tenacious stroll of 100 % babines, pur molossoïde! roams ears and imagination next, its wave of hookery and sonic theatre if not cinematic resembling themes of those old sixties detective/sci-fi shows around floral melodies and darker, almost sinister beauty. Its individual escapade and canvas of sound just confirms another release driven by unbridled diversity, A la Zheuleuleu backing its affirmation with its celestial, moon lit saunter into a hectic and aggressively boisterous romp while Tau Ceti Central immerses the listener in another jazz scented, smoky adventure.

The album is like a travelogue, glimpses at landscapes and intimate insights discovered and invaded by its theme’s protagonists though Tête de museau dans le boudoir (Intermezzo) is more of a captivating and increasingly weird caress allowing for mental refreshment though to be fair it engages with the imagination as much as any other proposal within the album such its loco array of styles.

Myxomatosis against architektür vol IV is equally a rich tapestry of styles, its psychotic nature a trespass of extreme and melodic metal bound in the virulent revelry of varied flavours and pure manna for body and soul before Carambolage fillette contre individu dragon non-décortiqué casts its Nintendo spun contagion, a lure becoming more tempestuous with time as guitars and rhythms add their cartoonish devilment.

The album is completed by firstly C++ and its mesh of cosmopolitan spicing and endeavour, not forgetting mewing cats, and lastly Totipotence d’un erg, an epic thirteen minutes of dawning power, imposing contagion, and majestic wickedness. Flying by such the consuming potency of its evolving drama and kaleidoscopic soundscape, the track alongside its predecessor provides a compelling end to another thrilling outing with the instinctive insanity of Pryapisme.

Diabolicus Felinae Pandemonium is arguably the band’s most fluid and persistently contagious release yet, certainly it is their most skilfully woven and a treat for the bold and the insane.

Diabolicus Felinae Pandemonium is out now through Apathia Records @ https://apathiarecords.bandcamp.com/album/diabolicus-felinae-pandemonium

https://www.facebook.com/pryapisme    https://twitter.com/Pryapisme

Pete RingMaster 08/02/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Czar – Life Is No Way To Treat An Animal

cover-front_RingMasterReview

Finding something which stands out from the crowd let alone presents something truly unique gets harder and harder but Czar and their new album Life Is No Way To Treat An Animal easily tick both boxes. Creating a compelling experimental, bordering on psychotic, brew of sound bred in the raw essences of anything from progressive metal, hardcore, and grind to mathcore, post punk and more, all woven with avant-garde tendencies, the Tacoma, Washington based Czar infest ears and infect the psyche with relish. Certainly it is a challenge not all will take to, yet every intrusive assault, off-kilter trespass found within their album has an instinctive infectiousness which rewards as it devours. Like a mix of Dillinger Escape Plan, Mr. Bungle, and Psyopus, yet as suggested creating its own individual character, sound and indeed Life Is No Way To Treat An Animal is one of those times when you really feel something special is in the making.

The album makes a subdued entrance with the beginning of Owls, etc; electronic throbs and melodic coaxing a minimalistic but potent lure. Soon the enjoyably strained and captivating tones of vocalist Dr. Landon Jared Wonser join in with lively beats and a brooding bassline alongside. The track is still restrained but smouldering greater volatility in its belly. With the funk of Red Hot Chili Peppers and the progressive lilt of The Fall of Troy laced into its Every Time I Die like swing, the song never does explode and only benefits from that teasing of expectations for a thrilling start to the release.

Too Many Yetis quickly follows; its agitated heart and enterprise a caustic invasion as the guitar of Nicholas J. McManus drizzles sonic psychosis upon the rhythmic battering of drummer David Joseph Dorran Jr. and Peter Joseph Ruff’s throbbing bass meandering. Its brief but potent escapade further whets an already awoken appetite before Arachnochondriac casts its unhinged waltz on the senses, guitars a web of irrational melody and bass a roaming grumble as the keys of Christopher Duenas intensely sizzle. It is a frenzied ear twisting affair as magnetic as those before it with its unstable yet skilfully nurtured trespass.

Antelope Mask steps to the fore next, it’s extremely short hunt the perfect appetiser for Beware the Flies, Orestes and its unleashing of a post punk woven landscape littered with cold stabbing riffs, steely grooves, and vocal predation. The eye of its tempest sees keys sharing a classical beauty as harmonies float behind the corrosive squalls of Wonser, the combination as riveting as it is enjoyably testing as it leads ears into the Latin kissed melodic festivity of Vultures Never Eat In Peace. This is a hot bed of unpredictability and cracked emotional turbulence hugged by the toxic sonic craft of guitar and the perpetual imposing enticement of rhythms; drama soaking every twist, sinister deceit each throat spewed syllable.

With a psychedelic lining, The Worm Enters the Moon prowls the listener next, its theatre of sound and imagination sharing attributes found in UK band Japanese Fighting Fish and indeed Dillinger Escape Plan. The open variety of the flavours making up the band’s sound and individual songs is already clear and only reinforced by Canine, No Eyes Just Teeth, spoken word nestling in raw lo-fi sound and straight after the ferocious punk and metal bedlam of Shark Cancer, a track suffocating and igniting the senses simultaneously. Its mordant assault is then matched by that of The Golden Calf, its breath scathing and touch scalding yet equally captivating as it fluidly shifts from venomous pattern to corrosive irritability; and even when the movement is more of a clunky sidestep it works perfectly.

Through the creative surf hued snare of Mister Reindeer and the melodic calm of Domesticated Wolves, ears and imagination are effortlessly reeled in with the rest of the body disturbed into compliance by the predatory jazz infested mania of the exceptional first and the poetic serenade of the second. That track is an oasis in the certifiable invention and nature of the album, a gripping dementia fuelling the crumbling climate and emotional erosion of You Were a Comatose Lion and in turn the jazzily bipolar Wine Hog, both revealing an array of crazed facets to their attention demanding personalities.

So often a nineteen track release is sharing a filler or four along the way but there is no such moment within Life Is No Way To Treat An Animal, the celestially bent x̌ʷiqʷadiʔ provoking grateful reactions while Blind Mice provides a bewitching espionage of twisted enterprise and haunted frenzy with interruptions of dark repose with their successors in Prawn and after that RxABBITS invasively exploring and stretching the psyche respectively. The later of the songs is especially striking with its incendiary fusion of raw and composed sonic belligerence.

Concluded by the minimalistic lure of Taking Roadkill to the Vet, a track warming up to the task of seducing the listener with sonic malignancy through every second of its low key but haunting  electronically spun three minutes,  Life Is No Way To Treat An Animal is a rare gem as creatively murderous as it is formidably tempting. Czar themselves are a fresh breath which you will not have to go searching for; their music and talent will do the hunting.

Life Is No Way To Treat An Animal is out now @ https://czar.bandcamp.com/album/life-is-no-way-to-treat-an-animal

http://czarband.com/   https://www.facebook.com/czartheband

Pete RingMaster 08/02/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Wills & The Willing – Butterflies

wills-pic-2_RingMasterReview

Any song which simply bewitches ears and imagination just has to be shouted out about and that is exactly what is happening to Butterflies, the new single from Wills & The Willing; we now joining in the chorus of lusty praise. The song is irresistible, its intimacy raw and honest, like an aural L. S. Lowry reflection, and its lively melancholic outcry of a chorus spirit rousing; a combination which simply and totally captivates.

Beginning to stir when poet/lyricist Ian Wills linked up with Brendon Taylor, Jesse Wood, Jason Knight, and Martin Wright late 2004 and bursting to life in the spring of the following year, Wills & The Willing has since seen a ‘revolving door policy’ in its line-up while coming under bigger spotlights over time through their gigs and two seriously well-received albums. Returning from an eight year hiatus with Wills joining up with Sean Genockey, Charlie Morton and John Hogg (Moke, Rich Robinson, Roger Daltrey) for its creation, third album Dream In Colour, released last year and spawning their new single, has been no exception.

Inspired by the town of Wotton Bassett and the tearful repatriations it embraced, Butterflies instantly tugs at thoughts and emotions as Wills slips through ears with his poetic craft to put the listener at the heart of the emotion drenched moment imprinted on people, thoughts, and history. That alone, as a single piano melody courts the words, is powerful enough but add a soaring spirit lifting chorus and there is no escaping a real sparking of the heart. The music is just as cinematic in its own way as the Will’s words, his reflection vocal in its honesty and stirring in its touch to transport the listener.

To be honest, no words truly echo the raw power and impact of the song, so allowing its melancholic beauty into your ears is the only thing we can further add and urge.

Butterflies is out now.

http://www.willsandthewilling.com/   https://www.facebook.com/Wills-The-Willing-945565462157130/   https://twitter.com/IWILLS

Pete RingMaster 09/02/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

My Son The Bum – Mad Man (Playing in a Mad World’s Game)

 

my-son-the-bum-mad-man-artwork_RingMasterReviewWe are all partial to a treat or two, especially if it comes with little cost. So we offer up Mad Man (Playing in a Mad World’s Game), the new free to download single from US band My Son The Bum. The track is a tasty slice of infectious rock ‘n’ roll as poppy as it is instinctively grouchy and one of those devilish things which never seems to leave you alone even after its physical parting.

My Son The Bum is the creation of Oceanside, New York hailing songwriter/guitarist Brian Kroll. Bringing it to life in 2007, the band has proceeded to explore and weave into its music almost every style of music under the sun, persistently keeping fans guessing and so far keenly satisfied. It is something not likely to change in the near future either going by the latest single.

Alongside Kroll has been a host of like-minded musical friends including John O.Reilly of Trans-Siberian Orchestra West who has been the exclusive My Son The Bum drummer to date, vocalist Mike Wuerth, bassist Mike Frost, and Matt Graff.

From metal to rock, punk to pop, My Son The Bum has uncaged a host of strikingly individual albums, to each other and to the crowd around them. Mad Man (Playing in a Mad World’s Game) itself is a rousing adventure into pop punk ‘n’ roll but with a fine strain in heavier rock essences making one meaty and compelling proposition.

From the wonderful earthy groans of bass and the equally heavy wiry signs of what seems like something cello related to the alluring spicy grooves and melodies around the song’s rapacious stroll, it has ears and appetite hooked. Add the keen lure of the vocals and beats which with relish flick out their bait, and you have a song which only leaves a hunger for more.

It is impossible to predict what will come next from My Son The Bum but taking Mad Man (Playing in a Mad World’s Game) alone, it is going to be well worth waiting for.

Mad Man (Playing in a Mad World’s Game) is free to download now @ https://mysonthebum.com/home

https://www.facebook.com/mysonthebum/    https://twitter.com/mysonthebum

Pete RingMaster 09/02/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Mean Messiah – Hell

mm_RingMasterReview

As January shared its last days, Hell was unleashed in the form of the debut Mean Messiah album. It was the re-release of an invasion of the senses which left only one question in its furious wake. Just how did we like so many others, miss it first time around.

The release is an ear withering, pleasure igniting storm of industrial death/thrash metal with much more to its irritable heart and searing blaze of sound. To simplify things it is a tempest resembling a raging tapestry of Revocation, Strapping Young Lad, and Fear Factory woven with strands of the likes of Cryptopsy, Blood Simple, and Static X yet stands as something distinctly individual to the imagination and roar of Mean Messiah.

The Czech Republic hailing band started out as the one man project of multi-instrumentalist and producer Dan Friml, formerly of Sebastian, Apostasy and many other projects. The winter of 2005 saw him begin work on his first album, its release intended for the following year but delayed and delayed by numerous problems and complications before being completed in 2013. Since then its line-up has expanded, bassist Veronika Smetanová and drummer Honza Šebek joining Friml as he took Mean Messiah live, proceeding to play the biggest festivals in the Czech Republic such as Masters Of Rock, Czech Death Fest, Agressive Fest, Basinfirefest, and Gothoom.

With the band working on a second album for release later this year to follow 2016 EP Let Us Pray, Mean Messiah and Via Nocturna has uncaged Hell again for a formidable and compelling reminder and wake up call for fans and newcomers alike. With its concept themed by people´s varied complicated journeys and destinies inevitably leading to hell, the album makes a calm, welcoming entrance though dark clouds and portentous sounds are soon looming over and invading the imagination as opener Temple of Hell grows in ears. Melodies are enticing yet sinister, rhythms predatory but restrained until throwing off their deceit and storming the barricades. From there grooves and hooks seduce as riffs and beats persist in their invasive intent as Friml’s potent tones snarl. That earlier descriptive comparison is in full swing as the track shares its dangerous and captivating virulence.

cover_RingMasterReviewThe track is superb, using familiar textures in a new and fresh design before being matched in might and success by King Pathetic. The strong unpredictability underlining its predecessor is potent again, and across the whole album to be fair, prowling the vicious rhythmic tenacity and intoxicatingly venomous melodic and sonic web covering the song. Bracing and intrusive, things are punishingly catchy as thrash and death metal enterprise roar with angry rapacity as industrial essences beckon further involvement in the progressively toned fury.

As the second built on and eclipsed the first, Spiritual Resolution breaches a new plateau of persuasion next, scavenging and thrilling the senses with its nagging choleric character while The Death Song with matching toxic dispute stalks and savages the listener with raw infectious enterprise. The first of the two weaves progressively honed melodic suggestiveness while the second lets its bestial ferocity drive the thrilling show.

Hell is the perfect name for sound and theme within the album, the first echoing and fuelling the latter as found in The Last Ride which follows. In many ways the outstanding song is the least corrosive on the album, its swinging rhythms and magnetic grooves rousing infection but there is no escaping its instinctive animosity and barb littered acrimony. With orchestral beauty and atmospheric harmonies colluding with warm melodies, it is sheer magnetism, only intriguing and griping tighter as its growing imagination borders schizophrenic.

The Game gnaws on the senses next, its riffs and beats an enjoyably persistent abrasion colluding with lust igniting electronics. Its irresistible stomp provides another appetite inflaming highlight within Hell, one more to the growing list joined by the dark instrumental climate and dance of Saltatio Mortis and the fiercely catchy caustic devouring of ears and soul cast by The End. Folk bred hues unite with extreme and groove spawn endeavour in the first with its successor a brawl of truculent rock ‘n’ roll, both as imaginative and expectations defeating as they are, certainly in the case of the second, emotionally primal.

Completed by bonus track Remedy, another ridiculously tempting slab of thrash nurtured, creatively evocative music which needs no vocal side to excite and inspire the imagination, Hell grabs the listener by the throat and takes them on one brutally thrilling ride from start to finish. It also lays down a mighty benchmark its successor will be judged by but it is hard to imagine Mean Messiah failing to live up to the challenge with their now keenly anticipated second full-length.

Hell is out now through Via Nocturna across most online stores digitally and on CD.

http://www.meanmessiah.com   http://www.facebook.com/meanmessiah   http://twitter.com/MeanMessiah

Pete RingMaster 07/02/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Pink Pussycats From Hell – Hell-P

pink_pussycats_photo_RingMasterReview

Supposedly “A bizarre and unlikely alliance between one mad hunter and a dangerous rabbit gave birth to Pink Pussycats From Hell, a power rock duo formed decades ago just outside Hellsinki, not the capital of Finland, but a remote village buried deep in the forests of Portugal.” Whatever the origins, Pink Pussycats From Hell is a highly enjoyable invasion of the senses casting raw and scuzzy rock ‘n’ roll trespasses which only leave a want for more.

Debut album Hell-P growls and roars with abrasive lo-fi and viscerally raw sound, spreading blues and garage rock toxicity into the primal heart of their music and listener. It is fair to say that it is a challenge which is not going to be for everyone but whether the duo of guitarist/vocalist Mighty Hunter and drummer/vocalist Danger Rabbit simply wore us down or there was an instinctive appetite for their ballsy invasion of sound, by its close on just the first listen The RR was swinging and throwing itself around like a beast in heat.

Creating a caustic sound bound in essences recalling the likes of The Stooges, The Cramps, In The Whale, and Jackson Firebird, Pink Pussycats From Hell introduce themselves with Hello on the album, a fuzzy spillage of blues rock ‘n’ roll prowling the senses as vocals provoke attention. Initially subdued, rhythms soon become a punchy provocateur alongside the molten melodies and scavenging riffs of guitar.

Beats make a far livelier incitement in the following Hellmet, its blues rock straight forward but with the unpredictability which is swiftly revealed as a potent ingredient across the album and the Pink Pussycats From Hell sound. The song itself is a highly satisfying proposal if lacking the persuasion of the first or indeed of Hellga which follows which brings a smile to the face to match its own mischievous grin. The track is charred punk ‘n’ roll blessed with increasing irritability and bracing infectiousness which inflames ears and appetite ready for the even more heated and addictively enjoyable blaze of Hellvolution.

pink_pussycats_cover_RingMasterReviewThrough the baked or should that be half-baked stroll and declaration of Hellbow, the crunchy stomp of Hellephant, and the electrified blues blaze of Hellectric, the album continues to tempt and share more manic traits to its increasingly captivating character. The last of the three is equipped with the most irresistible hooks and pleasing rock ‘n’ roll cantankerousness subsequently matched in its individual way by those within Hellvetica, both tracks lava-esque rock to sear the senses.

Hellicopter pleases with its blues spiced garage punk assault next though it offers teases of mouth-watering enterprise and striking elements rather than actually releasing them to frustrate a touch. Its successor Hell Dorado is built on the same crazed imagination but is far more open as the track builds its schizophrenic rock ‘n’ roll but it too lacks the potency of earlier tracks though the sweltering Latin/mariachi hued melodies later on just hit the spot.

The next pair of tracks leaves ears and passions truly alive. Hell is Regina is first and unleashes a slice of dirty punk rock which just stays with the listener for hours after. A rousing celebration of personal differences with a snarl in its gut, the track is pure rock ‘n’ roll virulence you will find dancing around your head for ages after, especially its participation seizing chorus. Hellzheimer is the same in its own way, grooves and rhythms a familiar but rapacious invitation ridden by the pair’s catchy vocal trap.

The duo brings the album to a spirit inciting close with a raucous cover of the Berry Gordy and Janie Bradford written classic, Money (That’s What I Want). It is a galvanic senses roasting version ensuring Hell-P ends on another high, the listener too with an eager taste for the Pink Pussycats From Hell devilry in place.

Hell-P is out now via Raging Planet @ https://ragingplanet.bandcamp.com

http://www.ppfh.rocks   https://www.facebook.com/ppfhell

Pete RingMaster 07/02/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

King Colobus – Self Titled EP

king-colobus-promo-shot_RingMasterReview

There are times when something just clicks with ears and imagination, instincts instantly seizing the day and directing responses with almost lustful energy. That is what happened to The RR when facing the self-titled debut EP from UK rockers King Colobus. From virtually its first breath on the opening listen, the four-track theatre of blues and alternative rock trespassed and seduced the imagination and passions. It is pure drama, creative adventure as bold and ballsy as it is imaginatively intricate and sinisterly persuasive.

With its seeds sown in 2013, King Colobus officially stepped forward two years later. Vocalist/guitarist Stewart MacPherson and bassist James Bailes had already collaborated on ideas and songs for a future project when independently they both relocated to Devon. There they linked up with Plymouth based guitarist Gavin Huck and drummer Simon Marsh, uniting as King Colobus.

There is no escaping inspirations found in the likes of Queens Of The Stone Age, Soundgarden, Johnny Cash, and Interpol in the band’s sound but equally they have a personality and character to their music and songwriting which is sure to intrigue fans of others like Japanese Fighting Fish, Damn Vandals, and Inca Babies. There is uniqueness to their sound though which is most vocal and suggests why the quartet has already earned a potent live reputation whilst taking in shows supporting artists such as Sea Sick Steve, Band Of Skulls, De Staat, and Crazy Arm.

king-colobus-cover-artwork_RingMasterReviewRe-released this past week, the first King Colobus EP is a majestic introduction to the band and needs mere seconds to grip attention and appetite through opener Get Up. From its initial dark minatory melody, its texture wiry and tone ominous yet pure enticement, the track bounds in with swinging rhythms and a growling bassline supported by just as primal riffs. MacPherson instantly engages and recruits already persuaded ears, the song itself bluesy in air but pure virulent rock ‘n’ roll with an underlying punk snarl. It is a controlled web though, teasing and taunting rather than assaulting and only increasing its grip as a shimmer of guitar around alluring vocals breaks the tenacious trespass before breaking into an even bolder compelling incitement.

It is a stunning start swiftly reinforced by the song King Colobus, it too opening with a juicy lure before uncaging its heavy blues rock saunter. Bass and vocals stand individual in tone but equal in temptation as beats jab with relish at the senses, the song’s flames waiting to erupt in a sizzling blaze before settling down again until further incendiary expulsions throughout its compelling body. Showing an array of flavours making up their sound, at times the track reminds thoughts of Josh Homme and co and indeed The Doors but again the result is individual to the foursome.

Tits and Teeth steals its fine share of the passions next, its dark vaudevillian devilry carrying an air of sadly demised circus punks The Shanklin Freak Show, further evidence of the host of spices in the King Colobus invention. The song as good as stalks its victim but relishing its creative invasion of ears and imagination with energy eager to consume its prey whilst, with virulent catchiness, recruiting their participation.

Final track Wait immediately reminds of nineties band Skyscraper, having their instinctive rock ‘n’ roll infectiousness and tenacity to command attention; invention and imagination blossoming in its success. Grooves and hooks tangle the senses as rhythms ground out an easily given submission to their insistent prowess, vocals leading it all with their own rousing presence.

It is a glorious end to a must hear release not only bringing King Colobus to wider attention for the first time but suggesting there is really something major brewing down on the south coast.

The King Colobus EP is out now through all stores.

http://www.kingcolobus.com/    https://www.facebook.com/kingcolobus/

Pete RingMaster 07/02/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright