Acid Brains – Thirty Three

ACID-BRAINS_COVER2_RingMaster Review

Rampant with a torrent of diverse flavours all uniting in one mighty slab of punk ‘n’ roll, Thirty Three is one of those proposals which out of the blue sets energies racing and thick pleasure flowing. The rousing success of the new encounter will probably be no surprise for fans of and those in the know about Italian band Acid Brains, a quartet previous full-lengths having earned the band a potent reputation in their homeland’s rock scene, but for the rest of us the album is an impressive introduction to a thrill we have all been missing out on.

Hailing from Lucca and formed in 1997, Acid Brains create a sound which merges alternative and punk rock with grunge and new wave, amongst many flavours, a mix brewed with devilish invention and thick imagination. 2004 saw debut album The End Of The Show released after a trio of demos before it; its well-received outing more than matched by its successor Far Away two years later and Do It Better in 2009. As the new proposition, fourth album Maybe was unveiled via Red Cat Records in 2012 to show more of the evolving enterprise and boldness in a sound now inflaming ears in Thirty Three.

Produced by Gherardo Monti and Acid Brains, Thirty Three comes in two parts; the first consisting of five tracks sung in English and the second with four songs sung in the band’s native tongue. Why the segregation of languages we cannot say but the parts are a CD equivalent to the side A and side B on a vinyl release or like on a double EP.

Band and album have attention and ears in the palms of their creative hands from the off, opener Make Up Your Mind laying down an initial lure of confrontational yet controlled bass and guitar before bursting into a fiery punk rock escapade with, whether intentional or not, a more than familiar relationship to The Damned’s Neat Neat Neat. The track proceeds to stop and flow with magnetic invention and aggressive ferocity throughout, creating a compelling proposal easy to get greedy over long the way, just like the following Halloween. The second track strolls in with its own slightly belligerent character, the bass of Antonio Amatulli devilishly prowling amongst the sonic tempting of guitarists Alfredo Bechelli and Stefano Giambastiani. The latter’s vocals equally engage with grouchy persuasion as the song explores a post punk/new wave fuelled slice of raw power pop, it already showing the strong variety within the album as it has the imagination bound and ears again aroused.

Sometimes steps up next, tantalising initially with a dirty flame of riffs before hitting a grunge/punk canter playing like a feisty mix of Nirvana, The St Pierre Snake Invasion, and Feud. Antagonistic but with an anthemic welcome rather than a nasty intent, the track stomps along recruiting body and appetite before On The Borderline takes over with its post punk laced, rhythmically gripping prowl. The resourceful beats of drummer Luca Bambini masterfully shape the track and entice instincts to which guitar and vocals offer their inventively bracing assets. With a spice of Gang Of Four meets Gruntruck to it, the track continues the impressive and increasingly gripping persuasion of the album, and the enjoyable wealth of diversity.

Adding a touch of glam rock swagger is Answers next, but equally a healthy scent of old school punk is the order of the day within the slimline and enjoyable canter before Tu throws some rhythmically tenacious garage rock into the album’s mix. A bracing stomp bouncing aggressively around with sonic colouring maybe best described as NOFX and The Pulsebeats in league with the punkier side of Les Négresses Vertes, it sets the second part of Thirty Three off in fine style to be quickly backed and surpassed by the outstanding nagging tempting of Mi Sorprendi. Riffs and rhythms provide a great worrisome yet addictive beckoning for the vocals of Giambastiani to stir things up in potent style within. Once more that post punk spicing add to the varied punk ‘n’ roll adventure of the track whilst hooks and the throaty tones from Amatulli’s strings only add to the inescapable captivation.

The final pair of songs ensures the album ends with as much variation and resourcefulness as it has perpetually offered already. All’infinito is first, a heavily enticing slice of drama with sinister electronics courting a grunge punk aggravation whilst closing song Solido has its own dark theatre through haunting keys within a rawer coaxing of guitar. Soon it raises its temperature and contagion with a glorious roar of a chorus that has listener participation involved with ease. Subsequently leading into another hungrily virulent blaze of rich grooves and deeply embedding hooks; that in turn the passage into an attitude loaded punk bellow of a blistering finale, it and its predecessor provides a thumping close to an increasingly persuasive and impressive album.

Acid Brains is rock ‘n’ roll to get excited and greedy over; something fresh to get lusty with through an album that flicks all the right switches.

Thirty Three is out now via Red Cat Records across most online stores.

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Acid-Brains/50227931347   http://twitter.com/AcidBrains

Pete RingMaster 08/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Dollyrots – Mama’s Gonna Knock You Out EP

dollyrots_RingMaster Review

Currently romping around the UK alongside Bowling For Soup on their How About Another Round Tour, Californian pop punks The Dollyrots certainly got things off in fine style with the release of new EP Mama’s Gonna Knock You Out. The three track escapade is a prime slice of the band’s melody fuelled, hook enriched bubblegum punk, and a piece of tempting sure to entice a great many more to the host of dates already past and ahead.

Formed in 2001 and centred round vocalist/bassist Kelly Ogden and guitarist/vocalist Luis Cabezas, the Los Angeles band has released over twenty increasingly potent proposals across a host of singles and EPs as well as a clutch of eagerly received and devoured albums over the past decade. For a great many, the band’s last album Barefoot and Pregnant breached a new plateau in attention and their distinctive sound which their new John Fields produced EP rousingly continues, starting with opener Save Me.

MGKYO - cover_RingMaster ReviewBeats and guitar strikes immediately tempt with the nagging melodic prowess of the band at close quarters, they setting the scene for the mischievously toned vocals of Ogden to begin leading the revelry within. Her bass provides a shadowy tempering to voice and the vibrancy around it, especially when the song relaxes into a reflective moment, whilst the fiery enterprise cast by the strings of Cabezas collude fluidly with electronic spices additionally colouring the song’s infectious theatre.

The seriously energetic and engaging lure of pop ‘n’ roll is matched in kind by the punkier flirtation of Little Medusa. Buzzcocks like hooks soon emerge as the track breaks into a virulent canter lit again by the ever drawing tones of Ogden with guitar and keys courting her persuasion with matching temptation. If The Shangri-las were a punk band it is easy to suggest they would sound like The Dollyrots, especially listening to pop contagion like this.

Closing romp Sweaty Hug My Love is the rawest of the three encounters within the EP but still an inimitable hug on ears and appetite as the band creates something which incites like a mix of UK band The Poly-Esters and The Go-Go’s with a Bikini Kill snarl to the sonic beauty. Feisty and knowingly devilish, the track is a superb end to another invigorating stomp of feel good rock ‘n’ roll from The Dollyrots.

With a live CD/DVD release called Family Vacation scheduled for March, 2016 is already looking like another exciting year for band and fans wherever they are.

The Mama’s Gonna Knock You Out EP is available now @ https://thedollyrots.bandcamp.com/album/mamas-gonna-knock-you-out-ep

Remaining dates on the 2016How About Another Round UK Tour featuring Bowling For Soup, The Dollyrots, Lacey, and MC Lars.

10 Feb – Guildford G Live

11 Feb – London Roundhouse

12 Feb – O2 Academy Bournemouth

13 Feb – Southampton Guildhall

14 Feb – Cardiff Great Hall

15 Feb – O2 Academy Bristol

https://www.facebook.com/thedollyrots   https://twitter.com/TheDollyrots   http://www.dollyrots.com/

Pete RingMaster 08/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Audio Poets – Make a Scene

artworks_RingMaster Review

Such the almost scattergun diversity escaping Make a Scene there are times you wonder how it works with such coherent unity but it does and what is on offer is one gloriously rousing and dynamically imagination incitement for ears and emotions. The new album from US rockers Audio Poets, it is a thumping merger of pop punk, alternative rock, and unbridled rock ‘n’ roll, to try and slim it down, which leaves an increasingly greedy appetite breathless for more.

Formed in Dallas as 2014 made its goodbyes, Audio Poets quickly hit the live scene the following year, playing their first show in Buffalo with Rookie of the Year. Debut EP Colours had its successful release the following month before the quartet spent the spring of 2015 recording Make A Scene. The latter months of the year saw the album uncaged and the band relocate to Los Angeles, as well as hungrily hitting the live scene across the US. The UK and Mainland Europe are now in their live sights for 2016, the band ready to pounce on the already eager reactions to the galvanic sounds and the quickly impressing adventure of Make a Scene.

Recorded with producer Geoff Rockwell (Forever The Sickest Kids, Memphis May Fire, Crown The Empire), the band’s album swiftly hits a rousing plateau with opener The Anthem. A scuzz lined guitar makes the first invitation with its sultry hues, the lead vocals of guitarist Chris Durio quickly adding their punch to the attitude loaded proposal. As the track develops there is no escaping the potent and enjoyable Rage Against The Machine essence to the track, it coming bound in just as appealing stoner-esque grooves from the fiery guitar enterprise of Bru Whitley and Durio who create a magnetic web around the increasingly defiance loaded narrative and vocal tones.

It is a riveting and contagious start to the release but soon overshadowed by the outstanding Wake Up. Straight away that variety in sound and imagination is arousing ears and thoughts, the second song bounding around with pop punk energy and revelry whilst casting an aggressive CIV like snarl and melodic tempting. There is a touch of UK band Hawk Eyes to the romping escapade too, enslaving hooks aligned to rowdy but controlled dynamics colluding excitedly with the darker inviting prowess of bassist Mike Knight and the sinew swung beats of drummer Landon Jett.

Next up Not My Time is a triumph to match the last, this time the band exploring a My Chemical Romance meets Fall Out Boy like theatre of invention and creative mischief. Feet and hips are soon seriously involved with the more restrained, compared to its predecessors, yet feistily swinging canter of the spellbinding song and its unpredictable invention. There is a serious urge to dive right back into the track after its conclusion, though that is soon diverted by the punchy roar of Burn and after that, the album’s Marilyn Mansion scented title track. For the first, Durio mixes his strong clean tones with more rap bred vocal jabbing, though this time The Kennedy Soundtrack is a closer hint to the adventure of sound and voice on offer. As the song evolves between standing toe to toe with grouchy agitation and seducing with poetic melodic infectiousness, a touch of Lost Prophets slips into the captivation, that one more arguably familiar colour which, as within every song, simply helps flavour something openly unique. Next up Make A Scene flirts with and barges across ears with a virulence of craft and sound which again has the body and emotions subservient; electronic and industrial ingredients as powerfully persuasive as the punk infused rock ‘n’ roll at its heart.

Fiery interlude Space is more the doorway into a new turn to the album than a break, its cosmic air a progressively textured tempting for the imagination before Revolution stands tall and defiant in attitude and sound. Featuring Jay Miller of Texan band Drudge, the song is a brooding maelstrom of imposing rock ‘n ‘roll spiced with melodic hardcore imagination and an array of intriguing sonic colours and styles. It easily holds attention and enjoyment tight and leaves satisfaction full though it is maybe not as inventively bold and tenacious as earlier songs, a success found by the equally weighty emotive and tempestuous embrace of Wounded Eyes. Mixing a rich blend of varied metal infused rock flavours, the track is again an encounter fulfilling all wants and hopes if without quite breaching the same plateau the album set in place early on.

Do You Feel It (Now) brings a feistier and in some ways creatively livelier proposal with its tapestry of styles soon after, vocals and sounds from every corner of the band helping draw physical participation before closer Make It Through, escorts ears into a broader electronic landscape that sees the album go out on a potent high.

For personal tastes the album produces its richest and most ingenious mastery across the first five or so tracks, exploring more emotively shadowed and intensive depths to matching success thereafter, and from start to finish Make a Scene is one irresistible and rousing temptation from a band surely heading towards major attention.

Make a Scene is out now through most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/audiopoetsmusic   https://twitter.com/audiopoetsmusic

Pete RingMaster 07/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Odyssey – Voids

Odyssey_RingMaster Review

Feeding the imagination as boldly and adventurously as it does ears, Voids is quite simply an enthralling kaleidoscope of invention and craft. The ten track encounter is the new album from US progressive instrumentalists Odyssey, a Spokane, Washington based trio who are no strangers to acclaim thanks to their striking sound and creative dexterity. This new offering though simply towers over all that came before and other like styled bands around with in its multi-faceted aural emprise.

Emerging in 2007, Odyssey has increasingly impressed through a pair of albums in Objects in Space (2009) and An Abstract Existence (2011) as well as a trio of EPs in Schematics, The Conscious Device, and The Turning Tide; the last two splitting Voids and the band’s last album with the latter igniting the senses in 2014. As no better evidenced than within their new endeavour, the threesome of guitarist Jerrick Crites, bassist Jordan Hilker, and drummer Lukas Hilker sculpt exploits and scenarios which are as melodically spellbinding as they are tenaciously imposing, at times even carnivorous in their snarl and dynamics. Excesses are also conspicuous by their absence, not something which can always be said about instrumental metal and rock, but the individual skill and invention of each member is never hidden away either. The result, taking Voids as proof, is a gripping and ravenously boisterous collection of imagination fuelled canvases for the listener’s own thoughts to play within.

cover_RingMaster ReviewEmerge. Evolve. Adapt. opens up Voids, engulfing ears in a sonic mesh around the instantly flirtatious bass and thumping beats adding inviting bait. The track is soon strolling along with a vibrant air bound in sultry tendrils of guitar though, but an easy going proposal soon evolving into a more agitated and addictively volatile passage as riffs and beats chip away at the senses as the bass offers its throatier support. Continuing to twist and turn within a landscape of intrigue, every one of the song’s five minutes is a suggestive narrative to be revealed and captivating drama to explore. It is a glorious start to the album, like a portrait of a meeting between Arcade Messiah and Chimp Spanner with Native Construct whispering amongst them.

That is a description which often applies to the release, though the Odyssey style and imagination defies any direct comparisons as shown by the sterner but no less resourceful character of Negate The Infinite. Both Hilkers create a frame around and a floor of addictiveness for the enterprise flowing from Crites’ strings; the union a virulent proposal which is as imposing as it is seductive and irresistible to the imagination as equally so in the creative nagging of Like Moths to the Flame. Darker again, the song is a frontline of cantankerously gnawing riffs and a bestial bassline tempered this time by the lighter touch of sticks on skin and the sonic persuasion of guitar. As its title suggests, there is persistence to the song which will not desist, an undeterred drive and repetitious temptation which gets under the skin as a rhythmic flickering intermittently escalates with the same successful intent.

Through the frenetic virulence of Motives and the ethereal elegance of Echoes, the band nudges thoughts into new escapades with their creative hints. Both tracks again cast a sublime mix of contrasting textures which would be at war in the hands of others but here simple embrace and revolve around each other. The latter also has a reflective lustre which charms until Before There Were Eyes To See comes from the other side of light to take over with its dark intimidating shadows and predatory wave of riffs and beats bound to another sinisterly alluring bass incitement. As expected but always unpredictable, each piece of music takes ears and thoughts through a creative gest that has both enslaved and bold in their interpretations, visions that enjoyably change with every listen such the depth to the musical narratives offered.

The Plot Thickens is a rousing slice of rock ‘n’ roll but of course one which from its anthemically invigorating first breath soon opens up into a provocative climate of hint loaded musical espionage keeping body and mind on their toes before making way for the calmer radiance and spatial yet intimate temptation of Delineation. Once more shadows crowd in close to the sonic sun of the track, making their impact as heavier and grouchier elements seeping into the dramatic and increasingly clearer psychosis of the track.

The melodic hug of Left Unspoken brings an oasis of perpetual calm to ears next, though there is still a shadowy lining through the melancholic tone of the bass, before Voids is concluded by its outstanding title track. If you want a physical clue to the album the song has it all, all the attributes and diversity summed up in its maelstrom of genre skipping, imagination igniting revelry that gives expectations no inkling of where it is going to go or the turns it is going to fluidly and infectiously take.

The album is quite superb, almost a brand new adventure with every listen such its textural and suggestive depths, and an early benchmark for progressive adventure for the year ahead.

The self-released Voids is available from February 5th @ http://odysseyspokane.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/odysseyspokane    https://twitter.com/OdysseySpokane

Pete RingMaster 05/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Sealclubber – Stoical

pic Richard PJ Lambert

pic Richard PJ Lambert

Bludgeoning the senses with the same barbarism as its creator’s name would suggest, Stoical is a nastily and invasively compelling proposition that leads to a greed for more. The release is the debut album of UK band Sealclubber, a tempest exploring the potential found in the band’s first release back in 2013 whilst breeding new intrigue and promise to get wound up in. As their sound, the album is as corrosive as it is adventurously imaginative and certainly not going to be for everyone, but with its ferocious blending of sludge metal with crust infested hardcore and post metal ambiences, it is a proposal confirming Sealclubber as an impressively challenging incitement for ears and emotions.

Hailing from the Black Country, the Sealclubber stepped forward late 2012 and swiftly sparked attention and acclaim in the underground scene the following year with their Witch Hunter Records/ Carnage Club released Sticky River EP. Also nudging mainstream media focus in certain quarters with their first offering, the Stourbridge quartet backed up their potent emergence with a praise luring live presence which soon spread across the UK. 2015 was a quieter affair with line-up changes and setbacks but now the foursome of vocalist/guitarist Simon Blewitt, guitarist Joe Parkes, bassist Stephen Williams, and drummer Simon Ingram are ready to infest the world with their sludge punk trespasses through Stoical which is unleashed courtesy of North American label Medusa Crush Recordings.

sealclubber_art_RingMaster ReviewBand and release consume the senses in epic style with its nine minute opener Tales of a Romanian Horse Whisperer. Instantly an atmospheric bitterness confronts ears as climate and guitars boil with their relative intent until it all explodes in a ravenously rousing hardcore/punk ‘n’ roll onslaught led by the throat bred squalls of Blewitt. No mercy is given by the raging yet it is soon showing another side to its nature by twisting and turning in on itself with stabbing rhythms and a creative discordance which is not that far removed from post punk and math core agitation. The track continues to masterfully and enthrallingly roar through a host of flavours infused into its volatile hardcore trespass; every new turn the giver of mouth-watering enterprise and imagination and a ferocity of heart and attack. At one point the guitars are spiced with a spicing which is best described as Devo-esque but as everything, rabid through to atmospheric, it evolves into another freshly magnetic intrusion in the blink of an intimidated eye.

The outstanding start is matched in sonic kind and rhythmic antagonism by Haima; a predatory violation led in, amidst a collage of guitar cast venom, by the dirtiest primal bassline likely to be heard this year. Tar thick yet blisteringly athletic, the track infests body and psyche with its creative vehemence and raw vocal animosity. It too provides a horde of riveting hooks and anthemic turns from within a destructive fever before stepping aside for Catalogue of Failings which uncages its own doom seeded depression of tone and emotion. Like a hungry bog on Dartmoor, the song sucks the senses and imagination into an unforgiving animus of emotionally corrupted sound, proceeding to prowl around them with hostility thereon in whilst suffocating any light or hope which might make a defence to the thrilling creative pestilence.

Leaving a lingering impact, the song slips into St Jude’s Waiting Room, Dead For 12 Days and a haunting imagination sparking interlude/detour resembling a limbo-esque netherworld which inspires different ideas to its presence with every listen. It in turn flows into the stark and cold landscape of Vows of Silence and initially another great post punk like coaxing before the track descends on the listener with rancor and corrosive intensity. The song takes a moment out as the wake from its initial assault continues to resonate before exploring a tempestuous and emotionally provocative post metal/ambience sculpted landscape which in turn only builds itself up into another fearsome outpouring.

I Only Desire The Things That Will Destroy Me In The End completes the release, its twelve minute instrumental a darkly cinematic and emotional flight through sinister atmospherics and melancholic ambience. It too is a canvas for the imagination to adventurously explore whilst closing Stoical with a fiercely dramatic yet seemingly accepting embrace of emotional suffering and turbulence.

In some ways Stoical is an incitement of two halves; its first trio of tracks are a gloriously and creatively volatile theatre of craft and virulent enterprise with the final three immersions into dark and debilitating depths and emotions. They are two plateaus though which thrill and increasingly impress as Sealclubber more than live up to their early promise and the more demanding expectations bred within the anticipation for its release.

Stoical is released on February 5th via Medusa Crush Recordings on CD, limited cassette form, and digitally with a vinyl version possibly on the cards later.

https://www.facebook.com/sealclubbersludge   https://sealclubber.bandcamp.com/

Pete RingMaster 05/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Meter Bridge – It Was Nothing

Meter Bridge _RingMaster Review

It Was Nothing is the new single from Canadian duo Meter Bridge and a song which again shows the ability of the band to create a sound seeded in eighties synth pop but equally revelling in the genre’s modern invention. It is a quality which was already in evidence and acclaimed in the band’s debut album Slow Motion, from which It Was Nothing is taken, but it never does any harm to remind especially with virulent infestation of ears like this.

Meter Bridge single cover_RingMaster ReviewMeter Bridge is the pairing of Richard Kleef and Jill Beaulieu, a Nelson based duo which came together in 2011 and quickly began picking up a keen following. 2014 saw the release of their self-titled debut EP with Slow Motion coming a year later, both stirring up potent attention on the international electronica scene. The twining of their vocals within rich electronic caresses alone had ears enticed whilst the melodic simmers and livelier eruptions explored only added to the inviting drama of sound in especially the latter release, as now epitomised by It Was Nothing.

References to bands such as Kraftwerk and Ladytron are seemingly a regular comparison to the band, and understandable as the single strolls in with dour yet smiling bass pulses aligned with a flowery breeze of melodic tempting. The contrasting yet potent pairing of Kleef’s dark tones and Beaulieu’s warmer vocal caresses makes for quick magnetism, they enhanced further by a spice of variety which also tempts from within the music as a touch of Landscape smoulders alongside a Human League like air which bridges the two eras of the Sheffield band. Throw in a splatter of Thomas Dolby and Hot Chip and you get a scent of the rich enticement of It Was Nothing.

The single comes with a remix by Rodney Cromwell; a version which in many ways gives It Was Nothing a new side to its character rather than just a makeover. It opens with an Altered Images like electro shimmer which soon takes on a more Visage like nature musically and a Calling All Astronauts sounding adventure to the leaner vocal mix and rawer textures. Though not a big fan of remixes, the track certainly held the ears and appetite as firmly as its source and helps give a new nudge to those still unaware of the band’s synth pop adventure.

It Was Nothing is available now as a name your price download @ https://meterbridgeweatnurecords.bandcamp.com

http://www.meterbridge.ca/   https://www.facebook.com/meterbridgeband

http://twitter.com/meter_bridge

Pete RingMaster 05/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Massacres – Brutus

Massacres Promo Shot_RingMaster Review

With a sound that does a fair job on the senses replicating the suggestiveness of their name, UK hardcore quartet Massacres have announced their introduction in ferocious and heftily enjoyable style with debut EP Brutus. The four-track fury is a merciless tempest of hardcore antagonism and belligerence loaded with punk rock hooks and a rock ‘n’ roll breeding which just compels ears and incites the body. Bolder things may be heard this year but for thoroughly exhilarating and fresh imaginative hostility, Massacres hits the floor running with Brutus.

Formed in the Spring of 2015, Massacres swiftly set about creating a collection of ravenous tracks before unleashing them on the live scene to increasingly fevered and acclaiming responses. Soon references were understandably offered to the likes of Every Time I Die, John Coffey, Pissed Jeans, and Cancer Bats; spices easy to bring up whilst listening to Brutus which the band began working on last summer. Uniting in Stakeout Studio with producer Jason Wilson (Reuben, Fightstar, The Ghost Of A Thousand), the London quartet emerged with an EP that barges into ears, bullies the senses, and ignites a keen appetite for more.

Massacres Cover Artwork_RingMaster ReviewOne Of The Boys launches at ears first, a nagging sonic scything from the strings of guitarist Kris Mayzee colluding with the similarly stabbing vocal spikes of Dave Rogers as the track gets a foothold in the psyche straight away. Soon venomously prowling the senses with urgency and grouchy invention, bruising intensity and burrowing hooks aligning for a potent lure, the song irritably stomps like a mix of Every Time I Die and Reuben with the additional animosity of Cancer Bats yet equally Norwegian band Shevils and British noise fiends The St Pierre Snake Invasion are nudged into thoughts to describe the predominantly individual flavour of the song and indeed subsequent release.

It is a rousing and increasingly addictive offering powerfully backed by the rawer viciousness of Death Knell. Again hooks and grooves are a persistent tonic in the volatile climate and character of the track; grooves especially spicy and insatiably alluring as they wind around the pleasing vocal variety shown by Rogers. The bass of Martin Walker is a bestial incitement, though it too develops an irresistible swing at times as it bridges the scorching temptation of guitars and the insistent brutality of Andy Sartori’s rhythmic swings.

New single Everything I Want To Do Is Illegal rages next; exploding off of a singular tendril of guitar bait with robust rhythms, fiery grooves, and the uncompromising emotive squalls of Rogers. As Max Raptor like infectious as it is The Ghost of A Thousand like choleric, the track is a dynamo of energy, hook loaded enticement, and unbridled emotion with the band giving their virulent all in craft and arousing intensity.

To The Victor, The Spoils brings the release to a close by crowding in on ears with a controlled barrage of predatory rhythms and vocal crabbiness amidst intrusive sonic enterprise. Within the stormy confrontation though, kinder melodies hang in the shadows where equally a catchy gait lurks, both waiting to escape the combative swell of sound and discontent. It is a intent that never occurs as such but all the time they add inescapable imagination to the unforgiving animus of the song.

Brutus is a strong and, more importantly, thoroughly riveting entrance by Massacres on the UK hardcore scene, an area of ferocious rock ‘n’ roll easy to see the band growing to be a driving force of if they fulfil their potential.

The Brutus EP is available through all platforms on from February 5th.

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Pete RingMaster 04/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/