The Last Ten Seconds of Life – The Violent Sound


Having beat up on and seduced the US metal scene, Pennsylvania hailing The Last Ten Seconds of Life are abut to do the same to a global attention with new album The Violent Sound. It is a success not too hard to imagine almost expect as the release unleashes twelve brutal alternative/nu/groove metal furies that just grip and excite ears and imagination. The band’s sound has plenty more in its arsenal of flavours and temptation but a mix of Korn, Mudvayne, and Britain’s own Anti-Clone is a fair indication to the downtuned tempest the Mansfield based quartet uncage.

Formed in 2010, The Last Ten Seconds of Life has risen through the local and national US metal scene, earning a potent reputation for their fearsomely impressive live shows and releases like debut album Know Your Exits of 2011. The past year though has seen the band evolve their sound into a whole new and striking adventure with new vocalist John Robert C. coming in, his irritable grouchy growls and impressive broader versatility seemingly, on the evidence of The Violent Sound, just bred for the band’s evolution in songwriting and imagination.

Engineered by Grant McFarland and produced by Carson Slovak (August Burns Read, Texas in July), The Violent Sound is the first offering from the new line-up and pretty much goes straight for the jugular as Little Black Line opens things up. Its initial lure though is the clean tones of John Robert, enticing within brewing discord honed tempestuousness which blossoms into a predatory stroll that as good as stalks the senses. The harsh rhythmic tenacity of drummer Christian Fisher is bound to the barbarous groove and tone of Mike Menocker’s bass, both a formidable invasion of ears as the guitar of Wyatt McLaughlin creates a sonic smog of portentous temptation.

Though the song never brutalises, its intent and weight takes no prisoners, setting the listener up for the intensive examination of The Drip. That Korn-esque texture to the band’s sound swiftly seduces ears within the encounter, interrupting a primal trespass equipped with scything grooves and vocal antagonism around rhythmic animosity. The track is glorious, another aural predator further impressing in melodically bred moments of emotive resonance before Bloodlust lives up to its name in tone and emotion. It is a savage uncompromising affair but again one with twists into unpredictable and sinister passages which even if only brief draws the imagination further into the violating tempest.

cover_RingMasterReviewThe following Six Feet is just as diverse in its attack and simply imperious, its volatile climate and grievous intensity skilfully contrasted by the melodic and harmonic swoops upon ears; the two colluding in bewitching espionage before the track is back devouring all before. As much death metal seeded as any of the flavours previously suggested, the track is a carnal incitement igniting an already keen appetite with the album’s title track reinforcing its increasing hold. The Violent Sound roars with sonic spittle lying upon vocal ire as rhythms pounce with animalistic predation, a vicious stalking leading to the calmer melodic and cleaner vocal enterprise of the band which is as virulently infectious as anything escaping the crushingly relentless ferocity.

A Marilyn Mansion air accompanies the flirtatious swagger of Casanova, an irresistible track with all the grooved swerves and salacious moves of a venomous pole dancer while Bag of Bones worms into the psyche with a niggling groove prone to discord fuelled expulsions of sonic unpredictability. Around it, the track brews another fury which buffets and abuses the senses, every swipe and incursion eagerly welcomed as the track swings like a hungry hound with a creative deviousness just as eagerly abound within successor Switch, a volatile fusion of metal and heavily boned rock which either licks at the psyche like a demonic lecher or presses in on the senses like a murderous vice.

That sanguine essence is even more prevalent and zealous within next up Blind Faith but equally the band’s harmonic imagination is a rich lure, so much so that you do not know whether to bow to its seduction or run for the hills, the former ultimately the only reaction to the brilliant protagonist.

It is a success and creative endeavour matched by that within Wise Blood, The Last Ten Seconds of Life again creating a concussive, sublimely seductive siege of ears and senses, trapping the imagination with exotic grooves and spicy melodies amidst vocal dexterity before Social Suicide casts a paradox of contrasting textures which simply captivates with ridiculous ease.

With the groove entangled, sinisterly shadowed Last Words completing the ferocious proposition, The Violent Sound is destined to push The Last Ten Seconds of Life firmly into the broadest metal scene. If not, there is something seriously wrong.

The Violent Sound is released by Siege Music on October 21st.

Pete RingMaster 20/10/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Defy The Ocean – Elderflower EP


Ignore the post rock tagging when seems to accompany UK duo Defy The Ocean as their sound is so much more than that. Well not exactly ignore as it is one prevalent texture within a proposition which commands attention but as their new EP Elderflower reveals, the band is as eager to embrace alternative and melodic rock as they are grunge and many fiercer flavours. It results in a sound which captures the imagination across seven intriguing tracks within Elderflower, songs which are a mix of sheer bewitchment and less dramatic adventures but all offering company that only firmly satisfies.

Defy The Ocean consists of vocalist/guitarist Chris Theo and drummer/guitarist Marcos Economides, a pair which met at high school and began jamming together at the respective fifteen and nine. Having gone their separate ways the duo reconnected and musically linked up again in 2009, Defy the Ocean emerging from their songwriting and playing. Their first two singles were released in 2010 with the Myopic EP unveiled late 2012; its well-received release followed by the single Gold & Green the following year.

Working on Elderflower since then, Theo and Economides have pushed their sound to another level, weaving soundscapes of dramatic textures within melancholic atmospheres coloured with matching emotions. Equally they have drawn on more virulent forms of rock to add an inviting catchiness which whether subtle or forthright is another potent draw on ear and imagination.

The EP opens up with Rest, a sombre introduction sharing its shadowed heart through the first melancholy hued strains of guitar. As more creative detail appears, the song comes to life, its emotive intensity as dark and troubled but shaped by melodic suggestion and graced by the excellent vocal harmonics of Theo. Ebbing and flowing with energy and raw emotion, the track grips ears, seizing the imagination as forcibly in less than three minutes of striking enterprise.

elderflowercoverart_RingMasterReviewThe following Veil equally opens in calmer sorrowful waters, wrapping downcast yet vibrant melodic strands around ears as a dirtier bass line walks the shadows bringing a portentous air to the blue but radiant captivation. Along its body, the track continues to grow in layers and ear snatching textures, as with the EP as a whole needing numerous listens to appreciate the levels and nuances making up an ultimately enthralling body with increasing impressiveness following every venture into its riveting downcast landscape.

The EP’s title track comes next, casting a theatre of emotion and sound with essences of bands like Tool, Pelican, and Grenouer in its tempestuous landscape. Both Theo and Economides entangle each other’s enterprise and technical prowess, rhythms a rousing often destructive element as sonic adventure links up with rawer trespasses for one infectious tempting.

Brine follows with its own thick canvas of dramatic sound and emotional turbulence, Theo vocally emptying the song’s heart as the guitars cradle his dejection. Again it is beguiling stuff if at times lacking the last few sparks that lit up its predecessors, though to be fair there are moments it radiates like a creative sun to dynamically pleasure the senses before Vessel soulfully caresses ears with its atmospheric despondence and warm understanding. The most adventurous track so far, it transports thoughts into exotic places over time, always sharing compelling emotion and an understated yet powerful catchiness which just as potently fuels the impressive tones of Theo and his and Economides’ invention.

The piano bred instrumental of Poisoned leads into final track Bones, its brief heavyhearted beauty the appetiser to the woeful and epically shadowed closer. With moments of melodic clarity and stormy intensity, all swept across by the vocal and harmonic elegance of Theo, the last song is emotional turbulence within a musical tempest and quite beguiling with greater command on the passions with every listen.

Within Elderflower, Defy The Ocean merges recognisable essences and textures with their own stirring invention. It makes for a masterfully powerful release becoming more striking with time shared.

The Elderflower EP is out now @

Pete RingMaster 20/10/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Outright Resistance – Me Vs I EP

Outright Resistance

Outright Resistance

There has been a following roar of impressed voices and recommendation to the ascent of UK metallers Outright Resistance within the UK metal scene and especially over recent weeks with the release of the band’s new EP Me Vs I. It is a defiant and aggressive growl of raw groove woven metal often openly suggesting inspirations from bands such as Lamb of God, Chimaira, Stone Sour, August Burns Red, The Agony Scene, and Pantera but unleashing its if not fully unique certainly own kind of irritable sound.

Formed in 2011, the Stevenage bred band soon had debut EP Don’t Eat My Organs stirring up awareness whilst hitting the local live scene with a raw passion. Shows with the likes of Hacktivist and TRC were including in a host of gigs across Hertfordshire, Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire, and London, all adding to a growing reputation which was invigorated further by last year’s Poveglia EP and especially now through Me Vs I, with being one of six finalists in the 2015 London arm of the Bloodstock Metal to the Masses competition in between.

Me Vs I opens with its title track, a short piece of drama which finds more sense and potency once having journeyed through the whole EP and its honest no punches pulled look at prejudices and ignorance among other things. Maimed In Chelsea is the next proposal and boy does it start off with a wallop, riffs nagging the senses before being quickly joined by thumping rhythms and the grasping roars of vocalist Paige Lee. In no time it is into a grouchy stroll with Pantera-esque grooves entangling harsher rhythmic predation. Backed by the band, Lee continues to orchestrate the venomous nature of the track with her imposing vocal trespasses, the guitars of Michael Worsley and Joe Jacobs creating a contagious web of grooves and riffs for an outstanding full start to the EP which just becomes more addictive and viciously dynamic with each passing minute.

me-vs-i-artwork_RingMasterReviewProve Them Wrong steps forward next, displaying an even eager desire to consume the senses as riffs and the scything beats of Michael O’Neill descend. Soon displaying a more familiar heavy metal nature to its onslaught and melodic toxicity, the track is a hungrily enjoyable canter with the bass of Chris Everett a predatory incitement alongside the growling antagonism of Paige. Missing some of the extra sparks which ignited its predecessor, the song nevertheless leaves a heavily satisfied appetite behind before the outstanding Pain grabs attention next. From its first rhythmic coaxing there is a belligerence and defiance to the character of the song, a tempestuous attitude which fuels riffs and voice but still content to share its moments with spicy melodies and electronic intrigue across an increasingly rousing and enjoyable encounter.

An echo of Paige’s own personal journey having to deal with transphobia, Gee, Dysphoria challenges as it roars, rhythms a concussive assault and riffs a relentless incursion on the senses as vocals uncage an animosity toned but plaintive call for understanding. With melody spiced grooves and fiery enterprise straddling its intensive outpouring of the heart, the song demands attention being soon matched by successor Destiny Is All and in turn outshone by the closing ravaging of Take The Blame.

The first of the two stalks the senses; riffs again a niggling proposition as beats cantankerously swipe and vocals crawl with similar intent over song and listener while the second is a thrash/death metal spiced tempest as virulently catchy as it is violently imposing and bound in short but flavoursome grooves. Standing alongside Maimed In Chelsea as the EP’s best moment and showing the most adventurous nature of all, the song is a fine end to a thoroughly enjoyable release.

Me Vs I lives up to the promise and potential suggested by plaudits towards the band so far, suggesting greater things to come from Outright Resistance while leaving keen enjoyment.

The Me Vs I EP is out now @

Pete RingMaster 20/10/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Coalition – Bridge Across Time


Coming almost five years after the band’s last album, British progressive rockers Coalition release Bridge Across Time, an encounter which takes ears and imagination on a colourful creative journey. Over nine melodically and lyrically suggestive tracks, the album engages on every level, sweeping the listener up in accomplished and stylish endeavours sure to please all prog rock favouring appetites.

Since the release of In Search of Forever as 2012 opened its eyes, the 2010 formed, Reading hailing Coalition has seen its line-up change around the constant presence and songwriting of multi-instrumentalist Steve Gresswell, the man also behind the just as enthralling project The Inner Road. A long time in the making, Bridge Across Time sees guitarist Colin Tench of BunChakeze/Corvus Stone and vocalist/lyricist Blake Carpenter from The Minstrel’s Ghost/Corvus Stone alongside Gresswell, both adding their own distinctive presence and talent to a release showing Coalition at a whole new level of songwriting and adventure.

Steve Gresswell

Steve Gresswell

With Gresswell handling keyboards, drums, and bass guitar, Bridge Across Time swiftly captures the imagination through opener Across the Sea. From the inviting sound of a coastal scene, a picture of melodic beauty courtesy of Tench quickly involves the imagination with darker rhythms in close attention as the warm tones of Carpenter caress the senses. Straight away the gentle climate and welcoming air of the song seduces; its subsequent catchy stroll just as persuasive as Tench’s captivating melodies and craft wrap around it. It is a potency matched in Gresswell’s keys, their presence floating across the picturesque landscape with the emotive heart of the song portrayed by the fine vocals. Jazzier elements add to the enjoyable aural scenery though the operatic background cries do less for the appetite.

It is a potent start to the album which only blossoms further as Fantasy Island escapes the imagination of the trio. For no apparent reason thoughts of a Wicker Man solitude and secrecy is sparked by the opening setting of school children within another pastoral setting, though soon lost as keys and guitar weave an intimate yet broad canvas of sound and suggestion. A festival of riveting hooks and infectious ideas, whether brief or lingering, the track hits the spot in no time, Carpenter’s voice a thought engaging narrator to it all. Across its eight minutes, there is a plethora of things going on which eventually unveil themselves across further listens, something applying to the whole of the release, with the wonderful almost mischievous flames of sax a treat which instantly excites, as too the rolling bouts of piano and floral strings.

From its initial colder climate, the following Labyrinth becomes a festival of folkish hues and catchy revelry, again a more insular atmosphere to the song’s story coming over; a village bound character accompanying its sound as emotive outpourings line words and voice. That operatic texture is repeated again and makes a better fit if still not for personal tastes but only adds to the eventful elements and character of the magnetic track before Land of Dreams serenades with its simple but so potent melodies and Carpenter’s intimate presence within rising orchestral breezes. Bewitching and increasingly powerful with every outing, the track keeps the album in command of attention with sublime ease especially as its livelier side takes care of a physical involvement.

Through the melancholic yet vivacious Lost Soul and the Celtic spiced River Song, the track more with an undercurrent of that flavouring than openly wearing its charm, Bridge Across Time invites greedier attention from ears and imagination, that even though neither quite matches up to their predecessors. This alone shows the strength and quality of the album, a potency more than reinforced by The Light with its flirtatiously bubbly keys and evocative melodies and Valley of Shadows where wistful but bold melodies join the poetic enticement of brass and strings.

Completed by the worldly and epically compelling exploits of The Watcher, a final major highlight, Bridge Across Time is a progressive treat to embrace and take your time with, the rewards a continuous offering. Its tracks are certainly lengthy but no track feels anywhere near its distance and only holds ears and focus tight throughout to defuse any prior objections from a punk bred appetite.

Coalition is back and revelling in the imagination of three rather talented and technically adventurous musicians.

Bridge Across Time is out now and available @

Pete RingMaster 21/01/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Stoor – Self Titled

stoorJosef K meeting Wall Of Voodoo at the behest of Dead Kennedys with the rhythmic virulence and discord of The Fire Engines

No idea what is in the water over at Stereogram Recordings but this past twelve months has seen the label release a clutch of albums that simply ignite ears and connect with the imagination like no others. Amongst them have been encounters with bands such as St. Christopher Medal, The Filthy Tongues, and The Eastern Swell. Now adding to that adventurous collection of treats is the self-titled debut album from Dundee based outfit Stoor, a release which just might be the most impressive and ridiculously addictive of the lot.

The Stereogram Recordings offering is actually a full re-release of the band’s first album which was self-released on vinyl last year but sure to be the first real engagement for a great many with a quartet which rose up back in the first breaths of the nineties. Musically Stoor seem to embrace post punk/new wave sounds found in the couple of decades before their emergence, and though it is bordering on impossible to pin down their sound imagine Josef K meeting Wall Of Voodoo at the behest of Dead Kennedys with the rhythmic virulence and discord of The Fire Engines and the warped imagination of Pere Ubu in close attendance.

Centred around the off kilter invention of bassist/vocalist Stef Murray, drummer Scott McKinlay, and guitarist Ross Matheson with guitarist Davie Youngblood completing the current line-up, Stoor get straight into ears and psyche with album opener Secret World Of Cement. It is an instrumental which gets right into our already existing passion for post punk devilry, sparking the imagination with its cinematic urban soundscape. Hips and feet are swiftly indulging in its virulent Fire Engines hued strains as hooks and melodies tease and tantalise within something wonderfully akin to the most addictive sixties TV theme tunes.

It is a wonderful start quickly matched up by Liberator, a track just as rapid in its persuasion as spicy lures of guitar link up with the tenacious rhythmic bait laid down by McKinlay. The vocal tones of Murray attract like a mix of Jello Biafra and Pere Ubu’s Dave Thomas, expelling their earnest cries from within another seriously catchy stretch of invention before the brilliant Aye, No raises the ante. A fiercely seductive bass line invades first, strolling from the initial clash of sound to be quickly joined by equally salacious guitar hooks following the same route as Murray’s grooving. Like a pied piper the union draws the listener into an explosive crescendo, riffs and rhythms colliding before the temptation begins all over again with even greater strands of delicious discord involved. All the time Murray places a potent vocal grip on an already eager appetite, backed by the band within what is one gloriously repetitive and enthralling swagger of a song.

art_RingMasterReviewInfect Me steps forward next to keep the enslaving of ears tight, its Gang Of Four like rhythmic escapade chaining attention alone, the brooding basslines and stabs of guitar extra chains to trap attention and ardour. Bursts of raw rock ‘n’ roll only adds to the magnetism as too the distinctive and increasingly flavoursome vocals of Murray, here finding a Stan Ridgway flavour to his excellent theatre of voice. Between them Murray and McKinlay rhythmically have the passions chained up like Houdini, though no escape is possible especially as Matheson and Youngblood create a web of melodic intrigue and deranged drama.

Through the heavier almost muggy escape of Devil Rides Out, a song with a touch of Scars meets again Pere Ubu to it, and the pulsating psych rock infested instrumental of March Of The Molluscs, the album adds further diversity and creative theatre to escalate an already established habituation to its additive prowess, backing their success up with the punk rock of Frack where thoughts of bands like Swell Maps and television Personalities are sparked, though, as constantly across the release, Stoor conjure up proposals unique to their own senses entangling invention.

The calmer saunter of Open The Box comes next, its character a more stable affair but prone to Devo-esque twists and turns before making way to allow the psychedelically spiced Hold That Thought to serenade ears. To its warmer and gentler nature though, there is an underlying tempestuousness which channels its energy into a swinging post punk canter a la The Three Johns.

The bands new single Witchfinder General has ears and lust over excited next, its rhythmic romp alone an unshakeable grip with Murray’s bass swing a predacious seduction reinforced by the tangy weave of guitar and the eager dance of the vocals. Dark and mischievous, compelling and shadowy, the track is superb, a certain doorway into the album come its release though fair to say any track is a suitable invitation.

Going out as it came in with a mouth-watering, imagination stoking instrumental going by the name of Sure Beats Me, a piece which plays like B-52s engaged in carnal knowledge with The Shadows, the album leaves only an urgent urge to dive right back into its body of fun.

Stoor may have been around for a fair few years now but this is the moment they should be enveloped by the biggest spotlights, courtesy of an encounter which has to be considered as an album of the year contender.

Stoor the album is released October 28th on Stereogram Recordings digitally and on CD with the single Witchfinder General out on October 21st.

STOOR are supporting Brix Smith & The Extricated on Sunday 30th October 2016 and The Membranes on Friday 27th January 2017, both nights at Beat Generator in Dundee.

Pete RingMaster 19/10/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Mannequin Death Squad – Eat Hate Regurgitate


After the rousing scuzz enticement of latest single KYMS, Australian duo Mannequin Death Squad uncage their debut mini-album Eat Hate Regurgitate to confirm all the mightily good things found in said single and it’s just as magnetic predecessor.

Emerging last year, Mannequin Death Squad consists of El and Dan; one girl, one boy who between them play and swap guitar and drums whilst offering their potent union of vocals. A striking presence on the Melbourne underground scene, the pair sparked attention with the single Sick earlier this year, following it up with the even more impressive and gripping KYMS a few weeks back. Both feature upon Eat Hate Regurgitate alongside a trio of new proposals which simply whip up attention and appetite for their scuzz punk devilry.

Released via the excellent UK indie Integrity Records (Million Dead, Horse Party, Valentiine), the release opens up with the raw magnetism of KYMS, a track raging “against the relentless pollution of our planet, the song inspired by a hatred of those who continue to defile and pollute the earth.” Plaintive strains of guitar make the first touch, swinging rhythms and caustic riffs the next as Dan vocally bursts into view with the warm tones of El in close attendance. It is raw and inviting, fiery and captivating, hooks and grooves a weave of temptation as the pair vocally dances around the senses. The track’s infectiousness is virulent but only part of the picture as darker shadows and textures blossom as the song progresses, its finale of an imposing and enjoyably oppressive nature breeding blues grooves and a sludgy climate before going out in a blaze of raw rock ‘n’ roll.

The impressive start is followed by Sick, a volcano of scathing pop punk with more bluesy flames in its melodic kiln as thumping and slightly predacious rhythms roam. Like a mix of My Baby, Karn8, and Valentiine, the track seizes ears and appetite swiftly, only tightening its hold midway as again the band suddenly twist into a whole new creative landscape which lifts things to another addictive level.

The muscular poppy romping of Sky comes next, its feisty canter carrying hues of bands such as Jack Killed Jill and The Melvins whilst creating its own character of unpredictability while Van Gogh snarls and aggressively bounces along before slipping into something more melodically and seductively comfortable. It is a strain of persuasion which switches between full-on assault and that bordering on salacious coaxing, casting a tempting which weakens knees in between having them feverishly stomping around. A great live air to the track only accentuates its glory, it challenging the opener for best track honours.

The album is concluded by the similarly addictive and enterprising Down, another swinging from bold energy to harmonic calm and leaving a greed for more in its wake. The track sums up everything great about Eat Hate Regurgitate and the Mannequin Death Squad sound in its four minutes plus and why so many are becoming rather excited about the twosome.

Eat Hate Regurgitate is released October 21st via Integrity Records.

Pete RingMaster 19/10/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Dead Hands – Nobody Exists on Purpose EP


Just over a year ago, we were taken by and aback by the noise infested fury of British band Sexwolf! and their debut release, the Hangin’ With The Boys EP. Our submission to their senses devouring sound was followed by their demise in the first half of this year. It was a frustration though quickly replaced by intrigue as three quarters of the band, linking up with one half of fellow Midlanders A Werewolf and a second guitarist, emerged as Dead Hands. They have just released debut EP Nobody Exists on Purpose and fair to say any gap left by the loss of one band has been more than filled by a new encounter which sears ears as it excites them.

Creating a maelstrom of fiercely infectious noise from texture reaped from the likes of mathcore, hardcore, grind, and numerous other punk and metal based savagery, Dead Hands have taken little time to stir up attention and it is easy to hear why with Nobody Exists on Purpose. The six track violation is an irritable tempest of abrasive sound and toe curling intensity delivered through an invasion of twisted hooks and demented grooves within a sonic savaging fuelled by some viciously catchy enterprise. It is merciless, at times painfully inhospitable, and constantly a joyously addictive abuse of body and senses.

It all starts with the band’s recent acclaimed single Open Bracket. Straight away guitars are squirting sonic toxicity, tangy riffs soon joined by the heavy insatiable rumble of bass and the scything viciousness of drummer Jenks’ rhythms. It is intensive furious stuff just as infectious as it is barbarous with Richard Phillips spilling his lyrical and vocal venom into the compelling mix. All the flavours mentioned above and more are in open sight within the furious turbulence, all adding to the thick lure of the track.

It is a sign of things to come within the EP, the following Elephants Crush People just as crabby and uncompromising and just as fascinatingly littered with unpredictable trespasses, inventively virulent hooks, and ear catching twists. A mix of The Chariot, Every Time I Die, and Dillinger Escape Plan is an obvious but maybe closest equivalent to the Dead Hands roar with additional Cancer Bats/Brutal Truth hostility.

Diving Board (Jack Christ-Ho) instantly and fractiously devours and punishes while gripping the appetite with more virulently contagious enterprise, it all springing from the Jenk’s initial rolling rhythms. Guitarists Niall Jones and Dabby Gough in turn lay their creative snares, further unavoidable traps as the song overwhelms and sparks body and mind into lustful responses. Of course this is not going to be for everyone but if noise does not annoy but inspires than Dead Hands have the ability to raise the strongest ardour through songs like this and its successor Buck Angel’s Challenging Movies. Arguably the catchiest proposal within the release, the track is a quarrelsome stomp led by the deliciously testy tone and grooves of Daniel San Mogg’s bass, its truculence matched by that of the guitars and vocals. Moments of calmer, post punk lined imagination only adds to the thrilling character of the song, the pinnacle of the EP with ease.

The closing pair of 7 Days (of Craig David) and Close Bracketté finish off Nobody Exists on Purpose, the first a mouth-watering ear plundering wall of heart bled enmity and sonic rancor while the last blasts and tangles ears in a tetchily red-blooded incursion of technical and emotional fury. Both tracks also come equipped with even bolder invention and experimentation and it is no coincidence that as each song gets braver the EP only gets stronger and more irresistible ending on a rousing high.

 Nobody Exists on Purpose is superb, a triumph in many ways with its seeds in the previous exploits of Dead Hand members but blossoming into not only something totally new to them but distinct to pretty much anything else out there. It is a must!

The Nobody Exists on Purpose EP is out now @

Pete RingMaster 14/10/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright