Aspherium – The Embers of Eternity

Pic -kim gøran høiberg

Aspherium is a band we knew by name and reputation but never quite found the moment to give the richness of attention that all bands deserve. That has forcibly been amended with the release of their third album The Embers of Eternity, which with thanks to our friend Andrew at Stencil PR who directed us its way, suggests we have definitely been missing out.

Hailing from Moss/Oslo in Norway, Aspherium began in 2007 and took little time in brewing up a progressive death metal sound which was unafraid to embrace plenty of additional flavours; a fusion now in full bloom and imagination within The Embers of Eternity. 2011 saw the release of debut album The Veil of Serenity to a host of positive reviews which its successor, The Fall of Therenia, eclipsed as it took the band’s sound to new heights. Slots at major festivals followed as too a couple of tours alongside Decapitated. A swift hindsight exploration in the wake of the release of The Embers of Eternity revealed why the band received strong acclaim and attention at the time but all before has been just the teaser for the might of Aspherium’s third full-length.

The Embers of Eternity is a concept album imagining the future of our own Earth; “The world has become a desolate wasteland, the album about what happened and why humanity did nothing to save our planet.” Lyrically and in story it quickly proved a compelling adventure which is majorly accentuated again by the exploration of sound and imagination around it as immediately proven by the album’s opening title track. Immediately drama and tension soaks the notes and presence of the emerging track; the guitars of Marius Skarsem Pedersen and Morten Nielsen weaving the intimation. Equally they are the instigators of the erupting surge of aggression and melodic enterprise which descends on the senses soon after, the rhythmic voracity of drummer Bjørn Tore Erlandsen and bassist Torgeir Lyby Pettersen fuelling the upsurge. Similarly too, the vocals of Pedersen make for an uncompromising and magnetic proposition amidst thrash bred riffs and the blackened textures which shape the death bred incitement. As each subsequent track reveals, it is part deceptive too, the viciousness of the assault veined and aligned with melodic intricacies and dexterity as their inherent creative emprise though bred on discontent of a world descending into chaos relishes its beauty too.

It is a striking and compelling start to the release but one still eclipsed by the following As We Walk Through the Ashes. It too launches on thrash nurtured hostility with grooves that wind around the senses with lustful toxicity and similarly revels in the more delicate but no less hungry imagination which subsequently makes every twist and passage until the next aggressive captivation as riveting. Unpredictability also shapes the track and in turn the whole album but with a craft and invention which soon becomes expected and keenly devoured. As its predecessor and the songs to come, it weaves a multi-flavoured incitement which took no time to fully immerse in.

The evocative and melancholy opening of The Fallen Monument bewitches before the track explodes in another cauldron of pugnacious trespass and imagination woven fertility; a tapestry of flavours and creative agility breeding a glorious and rousing proposal lustfully devoured by ears and passions alike. It is the album’s finest moment for us but constantly challenged as A Voice For the Silenced and its successor The Shadows of Creation quickly show. The opening atmospheric suggestion of the first had the imagination immediately submerged in its insinuation, its haunting caresses continuing to manipulate as the track erupts with the second casting matching persuasion in its physical venting and melodic storytelling. It is a volatile and gripping mix which savages as it seduces, preys on fears as it nurtures raw hopes.

Through the individual but unitedly insightful and adroit exploits of Echoes of A Lost World and The Beckoning Spire, Aspherium and their album only increased the magnetism. Neither track quite matched up to the heights of the triumph before them had but each gripped with bold ferocity and unpredictable landscapes before Beneath the Shattered Sky bore its own soulful voice and rich adventurous  enterprise on ears to equally inflame those self-same eager reactions.

Until the Embers Fade completes the album, it’s near on eleven minutes alone a journey and exploration worth investing in the sensational The Embers of Eternity for. It is an engrossing and fascinating end to an increasingly compelling release and a fine example as to why like us once you engage in the Aspherium ravening craft and sound there is no turning back.

The Embers of Eternity is available now @ https://aspherium.bandcamp.com/album/the-embers-of-eternity

http://www.aspherium.com/    https://www.facebook.com/Aspherium    https://twitter.com/aspherium

Pete RingMaster 25/01/2020

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

AdvenA – Realität

While the band set about writing their second album, a look at the debut full length from German metallers AdvenA does not go amiss, especially if like us you missed it upon its release a while back. Offering eleven slabs of progressive death metal with a craft and imagination unafraid to add other styles and flavours, Realität is a potent introduction to the Bad Griesbach in Bavaria hailing quintet. It is not overtly unique but has certain moments of real invention which made it stand out and an inescapable potential which made anticipation of its successor almost inevitable.

Formed in 2012 by Chris Kolias and Florian Havemann, the band’s initial instincts and sound was metalcore based but has evolved to embrace the progressive and more intensively weighted extreme metal textures as evidenced by Realität. With a line-up of vocalist Daniel Esterbauer, bassist Florian Gumpoldsberger, and drummer Dennis Stirner alongside guitarists Dominik Jagenteufel and Kolias, AdvenA nudged strong attention with the release of their first album, and is still doing so as we can attest to.

The album opens with its title track, wintery winds bringing in the scenic lures and stormy breath of Realität which soon entices the melodic coaxing of keys before fiercer more imposing textures descend with Esterbauer throat gravelled tones leading the way. In no time, the progressive imagination of the band is steering the roar, guitars weaving a tempting web as rhythms entice and pounce. It is a fascinating beginning which is as seductive as it is barbarous, unpredictability lending a weighty lure to the track’s  often familiar but boldly fresh textures,

The following Herztod immediately aligns melodic intrigue and suggestion with irritable intensity, guitars casting a magnetic drape around the bestial toned vocals as the song rises to its creative feet. Lyrically song and release has a conceptual theme but with each track sung in the band’s home language we cannot share their individual focus, yet it matters little as the sounds paint a potent enough tale as this and the following Lass es regnen! prove with their individual adventures. Whereas the first has a smouldering soundscape for the main, its successor has a far more volatile climate but one boiling with thrash nurtured intent around clean vocals, presumably provided by Jagenteufel, as well as Esterbauer’s enjoyably abrasive snarls.

Best track honours are seized by Splitter next, the rhythmic entrapment of Gumpoldsberger and Stirner inescapable from its opening strains and only intensified by the rolling attacks and belligerent grumble of drums and bass thereon in. Spice loaded grooves and a general rock ‘n’ roll swing only add to the track’s might with only the clean vocals for some reason and for once not quite connecting. Nevertheless it is a storming encounter which alone could have sparked an appetite for the band’s sound but is more than backed by the likes of Aurora and Phoenix. The first is an atmospheric tempting with alluringly portentous shadows around a rhythmic resonance, a union beguiling ears and imagination before its dark side rises up in invasive riffs and sonic trespass. That also brings a melodic and electronic enterprise which suggestive mystique setting up the adventurous rock ‘n’ roll of the second with the added attraction of female vocals and melody encased endeavours.

Am siebten Tag unleashes a blistering charge next, thrash and death instincts driving its cantankerous rock ‘n’ roll to mark another highlight within Realität before FFA matches its hellacious dexterity with its own senses withering, appetite stoking assault. Heavy metal tendrils vine the imposing roar, enticingly uniting with atmospheric winds and progressive intricacies; a stylish weave then emulated in its own individual way by Der Wille, electronic imagination lining and occasionally nurturing new twists in its design.

The album closes up with the two instrumentals in firstly the thought rousing, body firing rock ‘n’ roll of Alles was glänzt and lastly the melody rich and suggestive Wasser zu Wein. It too is a contender for best song, keys and guitars casting a beguiling tapestry of intimation and beauty with an underbelly of darker intent and volatility. Both tracks hit the spot whilst highlighting the music and creative prowess of AdvenA and though we might have questioned the success of having two instrumentals closing things up it works a treat.

Realität made a potent ear pleasing proposition from the first listen but it is an album which grows and impresses further by the listen. Ahead of its successor, it makes a timely gateway into the AdvenA sound for newcomers and a highly enjoyable reminder of their strengths and potential for all.

Realität is available now @ https://advena1.bandcamp.com/releases

https://www.advenaband.de/     https://www.facebook.com/officialadvena/   https://www.twitter.com/AdvenaBand

Pete RingMaster 21/03/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Xerosun – This Dark Rage

Photography by Olga Kuzmenko

Time for another catch up moment, this time with the This Dark Rage EP from Irish melodic death metallers Xerosun released a handful of months back. It is fair to say that since we covered and enjoyed the band’s debut album Absence of Light way back in 2011, they and their sound have quite simply evolved into completely new attention grabbing beasts, changes and evolution leading to their latest impressive  proposition more than deserving of a belated look.

With a just as hungry progressive bent to their ravenous sound, the Dublin quintet has persistently drawn greater praise and support in recent times. Building on previous successes like that first album and sharing stages with the likes of Avenged Sevenfold, Soulfly, Xerath, and In This Moment, the past two years have been exceptionally busy for Xerosun. Two headline UK tours have been accompanied by performances at festivals such as Mammothfest and Siege of Limerick, times capped off by the release of EP/mini album This Dark Rage and the Olga Kuzmenko created video for its title track, both themed around the Craigslist killer Miranda Barbour, a subject set to be further explored in the band’s new album set for later this year.

This Dark Rage opens with that title track, vocalist Martyna Halas-Yeates’ raw throated scowls courted by the predatory prowl of guitars and rhythms; it all soaked in venom and spite. As riffs continue to gnaw and beats stab, the primal instincts of the track suddenly flip into a groove driven canter, Halas-Yeates’ tones becoming a siren of beauty before the beast returns in voice and song again. The rapier like jabs of drummer Damian Dziennik hold even more spite while David Kuchar’s bass is savage in tone and flirtatious in swing matching the now established web of hostility and grooving. It is a compelling blend and result, the guitars of Fiachra Kelly and Gareth Jeffs rich in craft and enterprise while Halas-Yeates captivates in her dual persona. She is angel and demon and though her melodic prowess feels more natural, her vocal causticity only convinces within the adventurous tapestry around her, wicked grooves deviously colouring the unfolding lyrical drama.

Anatomy of a Lie follows the great start, even overshadowing it as it creates its own groove sculpted temptation, one again bred from ruinous fractions of intent and a blossoming of magnetic melodies and harmonic flames again led by Halas-Yeates’ kind side. It is a song which has grown and evolved since its first outing within a great video back in 2013 and another sign of the band’s hunger to grow and draw every ounce of their imagination to the fore. As all tracks, it is a fusion of flavours beyond the description we first gave you, a controlled but bold maelstrom of antipathy and warmth lighting the senses much as the tempest within next up I Spared Hundreds succeeds in. With electronic essences almost taunting ears from its shadows, the song is a carnal provocation with a relatively latent but openly glimpsed peace. Harmonies and keys temper the cancerous instincts surrounding them, while imagination is an increasingly riveting trait in the song as innocence and insanity mingle in the corners of its psychosis.

The release is brought to a close by firstly The Mother of Morality, a corrosive web of sound with Middle Eastern veining radiated in suggestive melodies and vocal elegance. At times it is like a mix of The Agonist and Motherjane, in other moments more Scar Symmetry and Arch Enemy nurtured, and quite beguiling. As the EP, the track just grows with every listen, the enjoyment of its first appraisal becoming more lustful and impressed with every venture into its passionately lit caverns.

Repent, Rewind, Reset brings it all to an end, its seven minutes plus a spiral into emotional and mental turbulence matched by a soundscape of volatile and schizophrenic sound. Though for whatever reason the track does not grab as powerfully as its predecessors, it makes for a fine and fascinating conclusion to a release which only impresses more and more. Xerosun is a band on the ascent with a potential driven, imagination powered sound to match.

This Dark Rage is available on CD and download @ https://xerosun.bandcamp.com/

http://www.xerosun.com/    https://www.facebook.com/xerosun   https://twitter.com/xerosun

Pete RingMaster 31/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Ethmebb – La Quête du Saint Grind

ethmebbok_RingMasterReview

The band’s Facebook profile tags their sound as epicleptic power death / progressive metal; a description which pretty much does sum up the anarchic fun of the Ethmebb if still leaving their imagination short changed. Their music is crazed, it is drunk on almost schizophrenic adventure, and at times it certainly leaves the imagination intoxicated but as shown by new album La Quête du Saint Grind, it is also a myriad of flavours, skilfully sculpted, and downright fun.

Apart from emerging in 2012, apparently from “the still-smouldering ashes of Grindcore band Ethmeb”, there is little more we can tell you about the Paris hailing quartet but then again their debut album does all the talking. Wrapped in the fine artwork of Nicolas Dubuisson, the release swiftly makes a potent impression, first track Tathor, l’Echalote de ses Morts soon feeding and adding to the intrigue already sparked by its cover.

Opening up a tale of a mighty warrior and his adventures as he tries to get back his Grind stolen from him “so he can get laid again”, the starter is an atmospherically suggestive, melody caressed instrumental. It is ‘similar’ to many imagination stroking starts that metal and progressive releases seem to hold but a vibrantly pleasing one, its more straight forward body a deception to the mania to follow.

ethmebb-album-artwork_RingMasterReviewrvbThat creative ‘insanity’ is uncaged through Lost my Grind. Riffs rifle the senses immediately, their enjoyable invasion soon joined by the dawning of melodies and floating harmonies as wiry grooves entangle the progressively nurtured blossoming of the track. A tenacious blend of power and death metal with that progressive nature envelops ears though it is only part of the picture as symphonic elements merge with grouchily aggressive and subsequently blackened essences, not forgetting various other unpredictable twists of fun. The vocals of guitarist Rémi Molette are a guttural trespass enjoyably tempering and complimenting the melodic quest of his and Victor Tunidjah’s guitars, their sonic web radiant and evocative within the epic nature of the song.

It is an excellent start soon eclipsed by next up Orlango Blum. From caressing harmonies it surges through ears with cantankerous riffs and majestically flourishing keys. The bass of François Santenoff throbs provocatively in the midst of the enticing tempest as the rapier like swings of drummer Damien Baissile pierce the folkish lined melodic death canvas. There is a touch of Trepalium to the song, 6:33 too, but quickly it stretches its already riveting tapestry of sound and imagination into something irresistibly unique and compelling. Melody soaked passages are oases in the storm yet every imposing second is a conjuring of raw aggression, creative ferocity, and seductively bedlamic enterprise.

The warrior’s quest continues through GPS: Gobelin Par Satellite and A la recherche de la découverte de la quête pour trouver le Saint Grind, the first a thrilling mix of the raw folk ‘n’ roll of Ensiferum and the creative psychosis of Carnival in Coal involved with plenty of other strains of imagination while getting involved with a great array of clean and dirtier vocals. Its successor is just as eclectic, from an acoustic stroll weaving a colourful intrusion of extreme and melodic endeavour all bound in an unhinged devilry.

It is fair to say that the Ethmebb sound is not going to connect with those only hankering for straightforward metal but for an appetite for creative boldness bordering on the meshuga; it is manna for the ears as proven yet again by next up Pirates of the Caribou. Concussive in its touch, promiscuous in its flavours, the folk/power metal fusion roars with drama and prowls with venomous intent, guitars spinning another inventive web as vocals anthemically unite and melodies swagger with boozy spicing. Its ebb and flows in intensity are just as masterful and alluring, as too its aggressive invention and multifarious nature.

Bruce Lee mena l’Amour brings the release to a close, the track probably the most loco of the lot though smouldering in persuasion initially before growing into its inventive skin with every passing minute to heartily convince. With a growing theatre of sound it is a fine end, though listen out for the Pryapisme like hidden track, to a thoroughly enjoyable and impressive debut album from Ethmebb and the beginning here to a greedy appetite for their insanity kissed world.

La Quête du Saint Grind is out now and available through https://ethmebb.bandcamp.com/album/la-qu-te-du-saint-grind

https://www.facebook.com/ethmebb

Pete RingMaster 01/02/2017

 

The Replicate – A Selfish Dream

artwork_RingMasterReview

A riveting mix of progressive and technical death metal, A Selfish Dream is one of those releases which may not have you falling back in love with the genres breeding it but certainly inspires a new appetite to go exploring them and the inspirations to the project such as Death, Cynic, Atheist, and Carcass. The new EP from LA based band The Replicate, it is a brief imagination stroking, ear striking proposal as unpredictable as it is highly enjoyable.

The Replicate is the brainchild of Sandesh Nagaraj whose CV includes being part of nineties Indian death metallers Myndsnare, Extinct Reflections, and Stranglehold. Uniting with a host of friends for his project, guitarist/bassist Nagaraj needs little time to grab the imagination and keen attention with A Selfish Dream, its opening track casting a web of sonic and technical temptation.

thereplicate-artwork_RingMasterReviewChainsaw Of God instantly wraps a spicy groove around ears, a persistent lure soon joined by a canter of robust rhythms and the raw throated rasps of guest vocalist/lyricist Morgan Wells. His irritable yet compelling tones stand astride the driving beats of Ray Rojo and Nagaraj’s nagging riffs. It is a tenaciously magnetic affair especially when grooves with clinging spice entwine the impassioned ire of the track and a solo from William Von Arx which brings an almost sinister cosmic shade to the outstanding track.

The following Eugenicide has its own suggestive drama in sound and presence, grooves again evocatively wrapping the senses with an almost picturesque quality as the predacious gravelly tones of vocalist Jordan Nalley trespass ears with his rich words. Also featuring the dark alluring basslines of Kaitie Sly, the track is an absorbing, haunting assault as different in nature and captivating enterprise to its predecessor as it is similar in compelling invention.

A rawer edge and climate descends through The Saline next, its initial sonic intrusion the spark to another virulent canter twisted into a passage of varying energies and unpredictable imagination. Arun Natrajan takes on vocals and lyrics for the EP’s third song; he also providing a rapacious growl within a controlled yet tempestuous surge of enmity and corrosive yet inviting sound.

Completed by the short instrumental of its title track, a shimmering piece of emotional starkness, A Selfish Dream is as gripping as it is imposingly intrusive. Its briefness of length is the only niggle, each song successfully never pushing its stay but combined providing a mere ten minutes of excellence; a moment in time admittedly very easy to replay and en joy time and time again.

A Selfish Dream is out now @ https://thereplicate.bandcamp.com/releases

https://www.facebook.com/thereplicateband

Pete RingMaster 18/01/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Markradonn – The Serpentine Deception

Markradonn Serpentine Deception EP cover_RingMaster Review

Whether calling the Markradonn sound experimental death metal, brass death metal, progressive death metal or any other variation of its invention you wish to describe it as, and all potently applicable terms, the broad brush is that it is one truly unique proposition igniting ears and the imagination. Real and bold originality is a relatively scarce commodity in the music world let alone metal scene right now it seems but the Florida hailing Markradonn is one of those creative protagonists wearing uniqueness as openly as craft and invention. The band’s acclaimed 2013 debut EP Final Dying Breath revealed the rich potential and fiercely imaginative songwriting/composing fuelling the conspicuous sound of the band and now its successor The Serpentine Deception takes it all to another striking and mouth-watering level.

Markradonn is a death/extreme metal band, that is their heart but with its live brass section and similarly bold timpani temptation to simplify the rich flavours and textures woven into their music, they create an emotively dramatic and creatively dynamic proposal unlike anything else out there. As suggested, The Serpentine Deception finds the band exploring their most imaginative work yet. The EP’s tracks reveal more intricacy in their design and sound, a fiercer roar in their bracing confrontation, and thicker intensity in their atmospheric lures, a new evolution in an already fluid sound making a thick impact straight away.

Initiation Through Torment opens up The Serpentine Deception; a cinematic/vocal sample coaxing ears and attention as a portentous whisper skirts the background. In a matter of a few more breaths, the stirring resonance of rhythms and warm swipes of brass unite as a similarly potent predation is uncaged by guitars and the dark rasping tones of vocalist/guitarist/songwriter Haniel Adhar. The blend instantly swamps ears in drama and intrigue, their contrasts colluding in an inviting yet ravenous consumption of the senses. It is a stirring and compelling incitement, the light and almost celebratory blaze of brass, as well as the timpani led rhythmic swing, merging with the dark predatory blackened death honed textures cast through guitar, bass, and voice. There is a feeling of coming of age in the tone of the track too, its protagonist journeying through the song’s title with celebration and tempestuousness around them.

Already hooked, body and imagination is swiftly and fully engaged again as the rhythmic entrance of NIN.GISH.ZI.DA God Of The Tree Of Life draws the listener into a jazzy web sculpted in the embrace of a primal and deviously tempestuous sound. The tapestry crafted is fascinating, a seamlessly and inspired fusion of conflicting elements which leave thoughts as bewildered as they are bewitched and ears eagerly trapped within the hellacious waltz.

The EP’s title track is equally spellbinding; the instrumental a shamanic visitation upon body and emotions as tribal rhythms and the raw tonal call of a didgeridoo magnetically involve the listener in atmospheric adventure. There is a great essence of shadow hued distortion to the track too which shows its ingenuity in brief but masterful glimpses. As meditative as it is evocatively invasive, the outstanding track makes way for The Veil Of Negative Existence Part 1- Ain, Nothingness; an instinctively infectious trespass with its own individual bedlam of resourcefulness and dramatic virulence. There is a touch of Trepalium to the track, a vague scent in the cosmopolitan yet melodically intimate weave conjured by Markradonn, which in turn is walled in by a blackened causticity soaked in rancorous imagination and veined by Adhar’s enticingly cancerous tones. The track is a labyrinth of simultaneous seductive and venom, an invigorating intrusion leaving bodies swinging and appetite inflamed.

Closing instrumental Stillness, Silence Of The Primal Mind is a gentler tantalising of the senses, a sonic travelogue of emotive scenery in an aural landscape painted by melodic guitar and melancholic brass. An immersive flight to which thoughts are given the freedom to cast their own poetic narrative, it brings the release to an enthralling end, well until pressing that play button again which is the instinctive next move.

Working towards the release of their debut album Ceremonial Abnegation Part 1: Excoriation Of The Flesh, Markradonn is one of the true fresh breaths in metal, from its underground to its broadest landscape. As for The Serpentine Deception, that is simply a must investigation for all with the heart for real and rewarding adventure.

The Serpentine Deception EP is available in association with Bluntface Records from December 15th through the band’s GoFundMe page where news of the album and details of a DVD, which will have a collection of performances, a full show with multiple camera angles, and clips from production videos and practices can also be found.

Recording Line-up for The Serpentine Deception:

Haniel Adhar: All Guitars; Vocals

Tim Carter: Drums and Percussion

Jonathan Gabriel Katz: Timani and Concert Percussion; Drums

Richard Blankenship: Principle Trombone and Brass

Dennis Bottaro: 6 string bass, Didgeridoo , Hand Percussion, Guitar

Drew Prichard: Cimbasso; Tuba

Robin Sisk: Tuba

Danny Rowland: Tuba; Euphonium

Austin Kinard: Trumpet and Brass

Gavin Pritchard: Hand Percussion

Nicholas Weaver: Fretless bass, French Horn, and Trumpet (Live)

Beka West: Euphonium, Trombone (Live)

Allen C Raia: Rhythm Guitar (Live)

Jesse Hudson: Vocals and Trombone (Live)

https://www.facebook.com/Markradonn  https://twitter.com/Markradonn

Pete RingMaster 15/12/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Barús – Self Titled EP

Barus_Cover__RingMaster Review

Let us introduce you to Barús, a death metal band from Grenoble in France. There is little more we can offer you about the band except from quoting their bio. “Barús evokes a weight, a burden. Through music, it reveals an introspective state of mind: A grain of sand lost in the vastness…A questioning of all things…Death.” What we can say is that their self-titled debut album is one potential swamped and seriously compelling proposition you should take a look at.

Sometimes you get an inner twinge of something special in the making when being introduced to a band or release and that certainly applies to Barús. Through four rigorously challenging and thickly satisfying tracks, band and release provide a journey through the darkest, hellish climates and depths. They are burdensome, uncompromising songs which are as fearsome as they are imaginative. Tracks which all the time lyrically and musically question thoughts, instincts, and the senses. The band has been labelled as progressive death metal and though you can sense why with the invention fuelling unique songs primarily Barús’ sound is a malevolent cauldron of death voracity with black malice and doom oppressiveness.

The release opens with Tarot and a chaotic tempest of intensity and energy driven ravenous sound. Everything is in rabid turmoil, only settling down a touch with the addition of the grievous tones of the vocals. In time as searing grooves entwine fierce riffs and rhythms, an order as such comes over the track whilst still flirting with a bedlamic soundscape of ideas and textures. Contrastingly the vocals grow more psychotic, emotionally tarred roars bellowing and stalking the senses as the guitars spin a jagged djent seeded violation and seduction through ears. The track is breath-taking, an energy sapping, body staggering onslaught and quite irresistible.

The following Disillusions is equally as tempestuous at heart and in presence but with a more restrained character initially, though that line is blurred with every predatory torrent of riffs and scything swing of rhythms. The listener soon finds itself in an aural coven, one lorded over by savage guitar enterprise and vocal malevolence, but also a landscape which perpetually wrong-foots and fascinates. A mellow embrace midway comes with great clean vocals but it is merely a demonic deceit, the track soon casting a spell of sonic voracity and emotional malefaction. Emulating the first track, it is an exhilarating trespass on the senses and psyche; the two alone making Barús a seriously potent proposition for extreme metallers to check out.

Chalice is simply a stalking of the listener and a continuation of the raw sorcery brewing in its predecessor. Spoken commands and chants swiftly evolve into a ruinous transgression, the music from an initial almost anthemic enticing exploding into a cancerous animus of noise and intent. Again though the band fluidly and impressively disorientates and spellbinds through the merger of extremes and contrasts, the collusion of vitriolic and melodic beauty. This is where those progressive tags are suggested, though Barús offer it in the most barbarous form possible.

The EP closes with Cherub; a doom laded crawl of an incitement which as you may suspect grows and blossoms into a viscerally sonic profanation of sound and air. Though not quite matching the previous three tracks in impact, the track just absorbs attention as it devours the soul to provide a final raw treat to fear and greedily embrace.

Barús have made a mouth-watering entrance upon the extreme metal landscape with their first EP, and if this is the sign of things to come, even without the natural evolution and maturity that assumedly will follow becoming involved, the French band is going to be a major favourite with a great many.

The Barús EP is available now as a name your price download at the band’s Bandcamp profile.

Pete RingMaster 09/09/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent check out http://www.zykotika.com/