Kristy And The Kraks – Self-Titled EP

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Casting a seductive web of sixties and garage punk, Kristy and the Kraks has a sound which sidles up to the imagination with lips pouted and provocatively swaying hips before adding a sonic glaze to the affair which permeates psyche and passions with equal tenacity. Hailing from Vienna, the band has just released their debut self-titled EP, a release consisting of four songs said to be inspired by Le Tigre and Julie Ruin. It is a raw and enchanting blaze of punk enterprise which croons and teases as its scores the senses in a presence which for us is best described as The Cramps and The Creeping Ivies meets The 5 6 7 8’s and The Crystals.

Kristy and the Kranks is the creation and union of Kate Kristal (Rabe, Dot Dash) and Ana Threat (The Happy Kids, Bretzel Krake Hoffer), the two coming together for the project in the spring of last year. Providing a temptation of two sets of vocals, a single guitar, and a basic stand-up drum set, the pair alternating instruments for certain songs, Kristy And The Kraks mesmerise with their sound. Like the best strains of garage punk the band makes a startling first impression, one which challenges and intrigues predominantly but it is not long before their lo-fi wiles and simple melodic toxicity become an irresistible and captivating temptress.

A resonance of drums opens up the EP as I Don’t Love You No More steps into view, the initial beckoning soon joined by sultry calls of coverguitar, both aspects gentle in their persuasion and gait at first. As the vocals come forward a more flaming voice emerges in the guitar strokes, their acidic tempting deliciously raw edged as they align with the smouldering harmonies which skirt the similarly heated vocal lead. The chorus brings a flush of urgency behind its melodic enticement which then switches to and fro with the previous more even tempered but fiery narrative. The song and sound is quite compelling, like a humid union of The Shangri-Las and The Fall and thoroughly absorbing.

The following Twentyone is forty two seconds of irresistible addictiveness. It is simply a hypnotic stride of beats inflamed by scuzz grilled guitar with intermittent vocal shouts striking across its bow. There is very little more to it but boy is it effective and inflammatory for the passions, riling and lighting them up for the next up No No No No No. The third song, which has also been the source of the band’s debut video, opens on a sensational throaty twang of guitar, its resourceful baiting of the imagination complemented by harmonic waves of vocals and a courting percussive coaxing. The song flirts with its moves and sounds, its swerves and tempting as raw and seductive as you could wish for. There is something primal about the song and the overall sound of the band, an instinctive lure which you cannot tear yourself or emotions away from, with this track arguably the most naturally bewitching of the four.

The just as masterfully magnetic Suicide completes the contagious incitement, the song veining its shadows with sirenesque harmonies entwined in rich guitar colour as well as a rhythmic punctuation. It all combines to provide a gripping drama with a healthy whisper of The Slits to its invention.

The EP is a magnificent debut, a release which increases its persuasion and beauty over each dive into its vibrant uncluttered depths. A release for garage punk, post punk, and lo-fi melodic punk fans, Kristy And The Kraks has announced themselves with one lingering fascination of a debut. Expect to hear and enjoy a lot more of this charismatic band.

The EP is available as a limited edition 7″ as well as a digital download via Totally Wired Records now!

http://totallywiredrecords.bandcamp.com/album/kristy-and-the-kraks

http://www.facebook.com/kristykraks

9/10

RingMaster 19/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Dark Century – Murder Motel

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A release which can just as easily raise a wide grin as it can an urge to go violate something, Murder Motel is an exhaustive and exhilarating corruption from a band clad in imposing and compelling devilry. Dark Century comes with a potent buzz behind them and their new album easily reveals why as it ignites ears, imagination, and a greedy appetite for their fusion of death, thrash, grind with a viciously healthy course of hardcore. It is a release which has plenty in it to feed expectations but also comes with a just as rich soak of originality to thrust The Canadian quintet into a spotlight of its own.

Formed in 2001 by guitarist Martin Gendreau, Dark Century has built an impressive reputation and presence over the years around Montreal and beyond. It is a time sign-posted by their excellent and well-received debut album Days of the Mosh as well as a live presence which has seen them alongside the likes of Aborted, Misery Index, Quo Vadis, Rose Funeral, Exhumed, Fleshgod Apocalypse, Goatwhore, Origin, The Faceless, Battlecross, Fuck the Facts and many more as well as light up numerous festivals. With a new line-up Dark Century return with their monstrously towering new incitement, an album which puts the band on a new plateau. Produced by Chris Donaldson (Cryptopsy, Mythosis, Erimha, The Agonist, Derelict, Neuraxis) with Gendreau, Murder Motel is a storming onslaught from start to finish, a ravenous bestial proposition veined by incessantly riveting imagination and unpredictable twists.

     In Our Veins starts things off and is soon careering through the same network of the listener with riffs grazing every surface they can find and rhythms voraciously pummelling the senses. It is a ferocious start which aided by the raw thrust of the vocals and that rhythmic tsunami, only intensifies its assault the further into its destructive arms you sink. Drummer Steve Burns is exceptional from the off but also is the stringed ravishment from Gendreau whilst the slightly varied and excellent caustic tones of vocalist Leather King and the predatory bass incitement of Francis Lafrenière equally steal their share of attention and acclaim.

The fine start hits another gear with the following title track where again a mere breath is taken before a disorientating rhythmic assault and bass grilling consumes the senses. Little time passes neither before a swagger and violent swing to the track wraps its irresistible temptation around a by now rampant appetite, the track lurching over and provoking the emotions with mischievous designs and violent intent. Here as with a few songs there is something familiar to the proposal offered but it only eases the accessibility of the track for the eagerly offered passions. The solo from Erik Fernet-Evans is a plume of intrigue and drama to colour further the potent canvas of the song as it drifts away at its end for Torticolis to seize its portion of attention. Rabid and intensively imposing, the track grips with carnal intent and flesh savaging sounds, its breath toxic and riffery a torrential assault driven harder by the severity of the Burns’ rhythmic spite.

Knees might already be buckling at this point and senses cowering in fear but hunger for more is insatiable and fed healthily by the brief but intensive predation of Ice Breaker and the fearsome rage of new single Kill The Crowd. The latter’s touch is as violent and scarring as anything heard before on the album but is aligned to a masterful persuasion of heavy metal coaxing and hardcore ravaging. Add the irresistible swinish grind twists and vocals plus the teasing cowbell, as well as the horde chants and you have another irrepressible capture of thoughts and emotions, but one exceeded even more by the brilliant Dead Birds. It is one of those addictions impossible to shrug off with the track from its anthemic rhythmic entrance stamping its authority over ears and excitement, crowding and preying on the senses with primal riffs and vocal voracity. It is just one of the structures ready to subjugate the passions, a heavy intensity laden consumption taking its sizeable portion of the adventure under its control just as firmly as the underlying but easily detectable excitable grooves have their appealing say.

   The four second Trio du Bûcheron comes next and there really is little to say about it. Neither working as an intro nor making any impact being so short, it is just there before both Cholestérol and Chloroforme cast their severity over ears. The first is another merciless gorging of the senses with piggish vocals, hellish rhythms, and a sonic weave of skilled enterprise igniting the otherwise pleasing if underwhelming song, in comparison to previous maelstroms. Its successor is similar in its presence, formidable and undeniably impressively crafted but failing to spark the same rapture. Nevertheless both keep band and album in solid control before the closing pair of firstly Mosh Test Dummies and the closing Gore On My Snare ensnare ears to inflame responses all over again. The first of the final two initially stalks and stares venomously at its recipient, its approach reserved but only for a deceptive moment as the song soon uncages its sinews and rigorous ingenuity to smother and savage all before its predatory strides. Its companion is pure blistering barbarity, everything from riffs to rhythms and vocals to creativity a masterclass of bloodlusting malevolence. It is demanding physically and emotionally making a scintillating conclusion to a tremendous provocation.

The album comes with recommendations that fans of bands such as Dying Fetus, Cannibal Corpse, Six Feet Under, Hatebreed, and Annihilator will get a hot flush from Murder Motel, but we suggest anyone with a lust for inventive and revelling extreme metal will find Dark Century a new best friend.

The self–released Murder Motel is available now @ http://darkcentury.bandcamp.com/album/murder-motel

www.DarkCentury.ca

9/10

RingMaster 19/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Boy – Darkest Visions

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Imagine a mix of The Angelic Upstarts and UK Subs with an equally potent blend of Rocket From The Crypt and Turbonegro, and you have a sense of Czech punks Boy and the body of their outstanding debut album Darkest Visions. Fusing old school British punk with a touch of glam and raw rock ‘n’ roll, band and release make a dramatic entrance to a worldwide market with their Rebel Sound/Voltage Records released rampage. It is an encounter which has a welcome familiarity to its brawl but just as strongly a unique breath and substance which marks out Boy as a band with a potentially mighty future within the world of punk rock. The band name suggests wishy-washy media friendly teen pleasing blandness, what you get is raw antagonistic punk rock of the finest order.

There is little we can reveal about the background of the band with any available bio offered in Czechoslovakian, but they are a quintet from Brno who have previously released a three track 7” EP via Voltage Records last year and before that had a track on the 2012 compilation Brno stále v plamenech (Brno Still In Flames). Their new full-length is produced by Turbonegro’s Tommy Akerholdt and features numerous guests including Ronnie King (who has worked with NOFX, Rancid, Offspring, Snoop Dog) on piano, Shawn Smash (Total Chaos) on guitar, Daniel Marusack (Chancers) on flute, Theresa Kovalová (Calm Season) on cello, and Martin Maleček (ex – Centaury ,SRK) on conga. That piece of info alone tells you the flavoursome design and sounds bursting from within the punk bred tempest, though the album starts off with a more straight forward belligerent sound.

The title track opens things up with a fiery welcome, hooks blazing vociferously within the ears whilst vocal samples bred from 9/11 place front coverthe drama of the release. It is a heavy weight welcome with sinews building up their intent and intensity ready for the following I Need Your Hate. The second track is immediately snarling and gnawing at the senses, riffs bordering on carnivorous and rhythms an imposing barracking. The excellent rough vocals roar and confront with a voracity which matches the passion of the sounds around them, the song further flaming with seductive melodies from within its rapacious onslaught. There is nothing dramatically ground breaking about the song but with impressive individual skills, a scorching solo, and anthemic band vocals it is an irresistible proposition.

Never Break Us Down binds the imagination next with an instant addictive groove, a lure aligned to numerous sharp hooks and that again virulent anthem seeded suasion which already the band proves they are expert at sculpting. The resourceful romp offers that earlier mentioned RFTC comparison as well as holding a touch of The Mighty Mighty Bosstones to its catchy temptation, both elements re-occurring across the album and adding extra spice to the outstanding raucous charge of punk ’n’ roll. It is a mix which lights up Back For More to a different degree, the band grazing the senses with greater causticity and ravenous breath. Again there is a compelling contagion to the track which has attention and appetite impatient for more which Stay Free more than happily provides. Abrasing ears with acidic sonic swipes from the first second along with an evocatively brewing wash of keys, the track broadens its riveting narrative with a wonderful dark cello croon and atmospheric shadows. It is like a mix of UK band The Duel and Russian punks Biting Elbows, an invasive seduction which subsequently stretches further into a NOFX like imposing. The track is quite glorious, pushing the invention and songwriting of the band whilst still entrenched in their epidemically appealing seventies seeded punk.

Stop Talking To Me stalks and riles up the imagination next, riffs on a chunky prowl speared by predatory rhythms. The vocals are vitriolic in delivery and malevolent in intent, a seemingly different voice leading the intrusive belligerence as the track squares up to the senses and emotions. It is a great strike but one which ends far too soon, only one minute forty seconds in length, and closes on a frustrating and actually very annoying fade-out. These grievances are soon forgotten though as Drop The Bomb scores ears with an acrid flame of guitar punctuated by keys and wisps of melodic guitar invention. The song strides purposefully with a slow predation, absorbing imagination and the by now constantly submissive passions. It is another total captivation revealing yet more of the depths of sound and invention within Boy, the unveiling continued with the heavy rock exploits of It was the Alcohol. The track is prime punk and hard rock with glam devilry and metal toned hunger, and impossibly addictive especially its infectious chorus which is bait only the deaf or the six feet under could resist joining in with.

The album comes to a close with firstly the thrilling quarrelsome bluster and catchiness of Fashion Police then the incendiary glory of Just A Number. The last track is an aggressive scrap of spellbinding hooks, fierce riffs, and punchy rhythms all merged into a rabid contagious punk spat, a last lingering triumph to sear the sound and name of Boy in to the memory and passions.

Darkest Visions is one of the punk glories of recent years and a potent suggestion that Boy has all the armoury and invention to be a real force in punk and rock rioting across numerous horizons to come.

Darkest Visions is available through Rebel Sound and Voltage Records now as a black vinyl release with a 12 -page booklet and in a deluxe version clad in silver foiled artwork.

https://www.facebook.com/PUNKROCKHOOLIGANS

http://www.boy-punk.com/

9/10

RingMaster 19/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Pink Tatami – Chapter and Verse

Pink Tatami

It is with great thanks to the vocalist of Pink Tatami, Mike Marques that we can bask in one of the most invigorating and downright thrilling releases of the year so far. The frontman of the French band introduced himself and colleagues with the hope that a review of their debut album Chapter & Verse might be possible. One blast of just its opening song and a review was not only possible but essential. Consisting of twelve exhaustingly imaginative fusions of alternative rock and metal, with plenty more besides lurking and seducing from within, the album is a breath-taking tantalisation. Bulging with virulent hooks, deceptive shadows, and an irresistible invention which hooks its claws in from the first second to the magnetic last, this is a debut of not only an outstanding band but of a potentially major force.

More than merely flirting with experimental tendencies, the sound of Pink Tatami feeds off the richest essences within metal and rock, every song a distinctive individual combining for an enthralling and mouthwatering proposition. Toying with and igniting the imagination and passions like a mix of Faith No More meets Kontrust with the devilry of Dog Fashion Disco and Destrage adding to the constantly evolving recipe with an extra spice of 6:33, sound and album roars and teases with all the charm of a bestial predator, the seduction of a sultry temptress, and the psychotic lures of a deranged puppeteer, though not always in that order or combination.

Recorded over a two year period, Chapter & Verse leap at ears and imagination right away, the Paris quartet simultaneously stroking coverand threatening the senses with dark riffs and rhythms with the entrance of opener Twisted Lip. The track soon settles into a feisty keen stride, the bass of Alex Ghilardi growling imposingly whilst the guitar of Florent Beaucousin coaxes and fires up thoughts in league with the richly impressive tones of Marques. It is an immediately flaming temptation which elevates its psyche metal seeded bait with the pop rock twist of the chorus. That Faith No More comparison is a swift suggestion though song and Pink Tatami only use it as flavouring to their ripe feast of sound. Across its saunter the song fuses in some funk twists with a Red Hot Chili Peppers lilt and a strong melodic rock grunge like enticement, an ingenuity which only adds to the potency.

The very strong start is soon shaded by the following Sinistra, which opens up its lure with an electro resonance, its stimulating wash surrounding the welcoming vocals and subsequent blaze of guitar steered by the punchy beats of drummer Bamby Alfonço. Again there is a definite Patton-esque flavour to the teasing which only accentuates the rich tones of the song. Flowing into slower romancing avenues and rapaciously toned energetic ventures, the track keeps thoughts and appetite on their toes and greedy for more which False Rebounds is more than happy to offer. Sinister whispers lurk as a singular guitar brings the song into view, the dark ambience standing over the emergence of the song until pushed aside by funky enterprise and bouncy vocals which step in to steal attention. It is a constant balance though, the shadows never far from making their narrative heard alongside evocative melodies and the livelier urgency of the track ever eager to have its say. It results in a riveting and thrilling proposition though in many ways just the appetiser to its quite magnificent successor.

The title track to the album is simply glorious, from its opening scrub of riffs and pulsating hypnotic beats a ridiculously virulent and anthemic suasion. The start has a Buzzcocks feel to its tempting and is soon courted by surf rock like croons and floating harmonies. Capture of heart and soul is done within those opening seconds, leaving the rest of the track to wrap tighter bonds around their submission. Into its stride the track enlists the contagion of rap metal with hip hop seeded vocals chopping across the ears whilst a sonic mystique dances provocatively in the background before erupting into a blazing sun of impressive vocal soars and searing melodies. It is easily the best song on the album, and the others are mighty, and one of the best to grace the year to date, much like the album.

Fears that there might be an anti-climax in store after such a triumph are soon chased off by both The Employee and “A” is for…, the first stalking ears at through dark vocals upon a stirring ridge of riffs before expanding into an intrigue noir kissed adventure with a sultry melodic breath. A track which manages to smooch with and haunt the senses at the same time it is another striking slice of invention; corrosive floods of aggression and predacious riffs having as much of a say in the painting of the song’s mysterious canvas as the mesmeric vocals and entrancing melodies, not forgetting the arcane tempting watching on. Its successor brings a ska toned walk to its delicious pop rock dance, crooning and embracing the listener in another RHCP spiced escapade which entrances and mischievously plays.

   The caustic touch of Dumas & Dos Santos brings another flood of ardour upon the album, the carnivorous bass tones and rapier like aggression of the guitars and rhythms irresistible as they thrust a violent furnace of intensity through the ears. It is tempered though by an infectious side to its provocation which increases the epidemic invasiveness of the explosive treat. It is a pleasure taken on further by the dark suggestiveness of We Can Help You, a track veined by exploratory sonic adventure and intrusively appealing twists, and the intensively shadowed Dorothea Tanning, its tale and invasive sounds an enveloping cloak of danger and creative spite. The song roars and thrashes about as its theme unveils every black twist and intimidating turn whilst merging passages of intimidating seduction into the turmoil.

Adhesive spits and romances with its diverse wares next, the song a gentle caress in certain moments and a voracious assault in others reminding of Russian punk rock band Biting Elbows at times. The song is surpassed by the following Evokes, a spiral of sonic addiction from its first seconds before careering into the passions on a torrent of punk/metal rabidity. Grooves and riffs squall irresistibly across the bow of the rhythmically challenging song, vocals adding irrepressibly to the raucous tempest. It is a stunning and quite brutal peak to the mountainous range of the album, a Breed 77 toxicity only adding to the inescapable trap.

Closing on the mild in comparison Eye Bank, a song where thoughts of Poets Of The Fall come to mind but just another tone in something unique to Pink Tatami, Chapter & Verse is one of those gifts you cannot turn away from without assistance, an enslaving incitement with far reaching snares. Though long in the making, the album is only the debut of Pink Tatami, a quite magnificent and accomplished one admittedly, but just the start of their journey. It is scary to think how good they have the potential to become and extremely exciting.

The self-released Chapter & Verse is available now!

https://www.facebook.com/pinktatami

http://pinktatamiband.bandcamp.com/album/chapter-verse

10/10

RingMaster 17/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Mind Museum – One Blood

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The potent ascent of UK alternative rock band Mind Museum continues unabated as they release their riveting new encounter, the One Blood EP. Since unleashing their attention grabbing debut EP Rat Race in 2011, the Bristol trio has continued to impress and outweigh other emerging bands with their weave of heart bred passion, riveting sounds, and gripping enterprise. Each release the band unveils takes their presence and reputation up another level and One Blood is no exception, the maturity in songwriting, sound, and simply presence mouthwatering.

Formed in 2010 from the ashes of several bands including most notably I AM THE DOOR and Full Scream Ahead, Mind Museum has persistently presented a proposition impossible to ignore or not find a deep rooted attraction for. Since forming the band has made as big an impact live as they have with their releases, sharing stages with the likes of Young Guns, Twin Atlantic, The King Blues, and The Royal Republic as well as lighting up their own headlining shows. Taking inspiration from bands such as Biffy Clyro, Coheed and Cambria, The Cure, and Placebo, the trio of vocalist/bassist Justin E Percival, guitarist Will Slater, and drummer Chas Bacon have honed a sound which holds a vague familiarity which makes it instantly accessible before taking the imagination and emotions on an incendiary ride of raw angst dripping vocals, rich sonic colour, and melodic passion. Their 2011 Rat Race EP made a potent entrance for the band, one just as powerfully backed up by The Power Of Three EP the following year but the George Lever produced new exploit immediately shows a big leap the band has taken from those earlier releases, confirming and expanding the promise and adventure hinted at by the 2012 single Lie To Me.

The release opens with The Get Go and immediately has a resonating bass note and a tart guitar wash soaking the ears whilst the already OneBlood-EP_ScreenResemotion drenched squalls of Percival wail in the back ground. As expected from the band on past experiences, it is a dramatic entrance but one which regroups into a restrained and melody kissed persuasion which still retains its raw edge but seduces rather than demands attention. It is a riveting enticement, the dark throat of the bass almost prowling the senses, though without menace, whilst guitars and rhythms keep imagination and appetite busy. Intensity and energy all the time are building their intent though, biding their time until the fiery chorus where everything is ablaze with passion and emotive colour. It is a thrilling encounter which finds a band never short on invention anyway, exploring and interlocking stronger varied textures and washes of sound than ever before. The song is thoroughly infectious and evocatively poetical, Percival’s vocals providing potent and at times emotionally desperate feeling hues to further light up the whole narrative.

The title track strides in next, bass and drums again casting a sinew built frame for the guitar and vocals to drape their emotive designs upon. The punchy touch of Bacon transfixes throughout, commanding the course of song and thoughts whilst the heavier rock bred veining from Percival sparks another level of greed for the extensive tapestry of the song. With its predecessor the song shows the full scope of the band, the first a more heads down rock attack and the second a pungent and intense emotional incitement; both soaked in a provocative passion and dramatic intimacy which inflames the thoughts and emotions of the listener.

   Wake Up steps up next, throwing a towering heavy rock weight upon the senses before again flirting with reining in its assault. This is short lived though as the song erupts into an exhausting and scintillating fire of energy and sonic provocation, rhythms and riffs sculpting a tempest of blistering voracity and aggressive entanglement within, whilst all is flushed with the passion and emotive flames which marks out Mind Museum from the pack as much as their sound. It is an exhilarating song setting senses on edge for the next up Lie To Me to sooth and then inflame further. The song smoulders and nestles closely whilst digging in masterful sonic claws from Slater and rhythmic barbs from Bacon, and once entrenched exploding in a climactic fire. The song is one of those which lingers and returns long after it has made its last sear on the ears, a masterful puppeteer of memory and passions, much like most of songs to be fair.

Both Answers and All The Kings Men keep the temptations and impressiveness of the release foaming at the mouth, the first an initially mellow song but one which soon has its nostrils flaring as it aggressively croons and uncages another furnace of emotional and impacting sonic flames aligned to inciting vocals, and its successor a bewitching weave of choppy riffs and anxiety soaked vocals honed and fused to a virulently contagious blaze of imaginative and skilfully explored melodic causticity. It is a sensational conclusion to what is easily the most emotionally imposing and creatively explosive thing from Mind Museum, and the finest.

Actually it is not quite the finish of the EP as the band treat us to very engaging acoustic versions of Wake Up and Lie To Me, and a couple of remixes of The Get Go and One Blood by Icon Roller which are decent enough. Whether the four tracks are something you would return to time and again like the main body of the release commands is debatable but they make an enjoyable extra all the same.

As declared One Blood is Mind Museum at its most powerful and inventive yet plus their most insatiably imaginative, and you still feel there is so much more to come.

The One Blood EP is available via Secret Chord Records now!

http://www.mindmuseum.co.uk/

9/10

RingMaster 17/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Holy Mountain – Ancient Astronauts

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Binding the senses in grooves which show no restrain or mercy in their insatiable temptation and plying that slavery with riffs which voraciously gnaw and smother all before them, Ancient Astronauts the new album from Scottish metallers Holy Mountain, is an unstoppable juggernaut of sound and intensity. It is a heavyweight antagonist merging stoner and doom metal into a suffocating tsunami of intense and exhaustive sounds, but one which veins and sears it all with at times corrosive but always incendiary magnetic grooves and melodic causticity. It is quite simply an encounter which lovers of the riff will devour with greed.

Holy Mountain, its name taken from the Alejandro Jodorowsky’s 1973 movie La Montana Sagrada, was formed in 2009 as an improvisational duo by guitarist/vocalist Andy McGlone and drummer Pete Flett. Two years after emerging, the Glasgow band enlisted bassist Allan Stewart and went almost straight into the creation of debut release Earth Measures. The mini album found its release in the May of 2012 welcomed by strong responses and acclaim, a reaction sure to be replicated and taken to greater levels by its impressive successor. Recorded with producer Paul Savage (Mogwai, Franz Ferdinand), Ancient Astronauts is a giant leap if not for mankind certainly for Holy Mountain as they explore all the qualities unveiled on their previous release far more intensively and inventively whilst casting new wild and expansive endeavours.

LV-42666 brings the journey into view, cruising in on a sonic breeze before stroking the imagination rigorously with thrashing rhythms, Holy-Mountain-Ancient-Astronauts-300x288rapacious riffs, and addictive grooves; rogue vocals adding to the celestial mystery and adventure. As urgent as it is heavy, the track strides boldly as sinews bare their muscular appetite and melodies seduce ears with the guile and irresistible lures of a wanton temptress. There is also an unmistakable psychedelic pop romp to the encounter which only accelerates its submission of the senses and passions.

The following Luftwizard instantly brings a darker and heavier suasion but again it is lit by scorching melodies and also this time vocal harmonies which flirt and tempt the imagination as potently as the sounds. The voice of McGlone is fed through a Roland Space Chorus across the album bringing a spatial quality to his tones and the general air of songs, something equally inspired by the majestic pungency of accompanying keys. The thick imposing riffs of the song provide a deep texture to the affair which almost groans in its intensity and rapacious wrapping of the sonic maelstrom within. It is a masterful adventure guiding the listener through a union of dark and light, a mutual rather than combative merger but one with plenty of imposing shadows to its exultant fire.

The title track comes up next exploring cavernous sceneries with doom bred prowling riffery and rhythmic provocation whilst short but virulent grooves lance the thick smothering air, their strikes beacons through the appealing murkiness as the song heads into an explosive contagion which bursts out with urgency and sonic radiance. The track touches the darkest depths and brightest highs in tone leaving the senses exhausted and rewarded by the riveting ascent, their recovery given no respite as Star Kings from a rhythmic draw swiftly courted by a highly tempting bass stroll, feeds another strenuous passage of ravenous riffs and fuzz surfaced enterprise. The vocals are a little further forward and carry stronger clarity within the tempest of sound, though they still feel pleasingly immersed in the overall flood of the experience rather than being an overlying presence riding the waves. It is an aspect which is as potent and important as the riffs and rhythms in making the album the immense proposition it is, they and the ridiculously contagious toxins which the band also casts into the creative rabidity.

Not necessarily the best track, so hard to choose one, but a definite favourite here is Tokyo which comes next. A bestial vicious voice and growl to the riffs drives the track initially whilst the bass with its throaty appeal makes the good guy in the confrontation, its smiling grooves the temper to the predacious guitar grizzle and the trigger to the flirtatious sonic temptation and boisterous vocals which revel in the overwhelming devilry of the track. It is a siren of a song which is matched by Gift Giver, the danger which usually accompanies such a tempting and arguably missing in its predecessor, an open stalking at the start of the song. Its slow pacing is soon ignited as riffs escape their shackles, a punkish urgency taking over whilst the drums hold a little restraint in attack if not power. It continues to switch between extremes bringing a scintillating and unpredictable soundscape to play with and explore, a post punk severity adding its taunts from time to time in the lulls between unbridled sonic blazes. The instrumental is riff heaven and groove manna thrown into an aural alchemy and corruption to bask in.

The album is completed by firstly the seventies seeded psychedelically enhanced 100 Years A Day and lastly the smouldering expanse of Hollow Hill which alone encapsulates all you need to know about Holy Mountain in sound, skill, and imagination, as well as influences with a range of twists and enterprise which pull up references to Black Sabbath, Deep Purple, and Electric Wizard, ones you can apply to the whole of the album even with its distinct presence. Ancient Astronauts is a magisterial slab of psychedelic rock/metal and Holy Mountain a band poised to stake their claim for a seat on the top table of the genre we suggest.

Ancient Astronauts is available now through Chemikal Underground digitally and on limited edition vinyl.

http://www.holymountainband.co.uk/

9/10

RingMaster 17/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Reverted – Sputter the Worms

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Though you come out of it feeling there is plenty left for its creators to discover and find to develop a wholly unique voice, it is hard not to be impressed and eagerly captivated by Sputter the Worms the debut album from UK band Reverted. With the release of the band’s new single Die My Saint, taken from the album, a look at the full-length seemed in order. Consisting of thirteen tracks which roar at ears with a ferocious multi-flavoured brew of sound and aggression, the release is a fiery brawl merging thrash, hard rock, and varied essences of metal. The album rampages with imagination and voracity, crawling rigorously over the senses and passions with raw adventure. There is much within it which is arguably familiar but plenty which is vigorously individual as the album riots with thrilling effect.

Reverted began in 2010 and it is fair to say they have made a more than attention grabbing impression. They have backed up the promise showed by live performances with Sputter the Worms, a release which pulls feet and emotions into active submission early on and refuses to let them relax until it has finished its creative charge. The title track thrusts its muscular weight and body through ears first, though its entrance is relatively reserved with thick riffs and pumped beats making a less than forceful coaxing. It is a magnetic start all the same which increases its bait with a great whining acidic flame of guitar which triggers a hungry rampancy in the gait of the track. The bass of Luis L Valle and guitar of Daniel Ruiz stomp with a prowling menace and rasping riffery respectively with the song in full stride whilst the drums of Ozzy Preciado thump with intimidating skill. It is a richly engaging proposition completed by the excellent vocal tones of Tony Vega, his gruff but clean tones ably backed by those of Preciado. Like a mix of Metallica and Fuckshovel, thrash and punk pleasing additives to the heavyweight rocking going on, the song is a masterful opening persuasion.

The potent start is soon backed up by the similarly impressive Magledonia (Harvest of Sin), another brew brought on a thrash bred Sputter The Worms Artworkappetite. The track swaggers and ripples with antagonistic confidence and sonic bait, guitars and drums enslaving attention so the bass can stalk the senses as vocals sprawl with their menacing narrative. With a vein of classic and hard rock virulence to its encounter, the song romps with a straightforward but appetite sparking success before making way for Don´t Try to Steal Me from the Inside. Valle instantly steals early control of thoughts and song with his throaty lines before the rhythms of Preciado explode in highly agitated invention and the track crowds the ears with a predatory intensity. Groove and thrash metal collide perfectly within the song but also scorching flames of melodic and alternative rock add their spice to the exciting mix, with the vocals as the sound unafraid to vary and play with their delivery.

Both the outstanding Dispose of Heartaches and the new single Die My Saint ignite imagination and pleasure further, the first bursting with a devilish intent forging punk and thrash into a psyche rock and nu-metal mesh. The track exhausts and exhilarates the passions, stealing early best song honours though it is soon rivalled by its successor, an urgent aggressor with absorbing twists of sonic endeavour amidst another richly packed flavoursome design. Psyche and nu-metal colours the sinew driven encounter whilst the rhythmic frame is an unrelenting insistence with anthemic persuasion. The pair provides the first major pinnacle of the album, probably the highest peak though plenty of tracks like the following Pulse stand tall alongside their might. A growl erupts in the vocals and sound of the song, intensity driving forward with bestial rabidity to match the barbarous rhythms and the ever predacious bass provocation. There is a grunge flame to the cleaner stretches of the song though proving again the diverse ground and textures the band explores across the album. Admittedly there are familiar sounds at work too, that Metallica feel never far away, but Reverted mix and come up with an overall sound which holds its own in freshness.

The acidic entrance of Tolerance makes a dramatic lure before a mix of progressive rock and groove metal merges to enthral thoughts, the track littering its pleasing bulk with punchy energy, rising crescendos, and abrasive expulsions. It is another potent enticement which as its predecessors welcomingly lingers. It also in many ways closes the most immediate part of the album with the following Stained Soul andonwards, the album places its most adventurous and involved songs though it certainly does not relinquish its grip on appetite and passions. Stained Soul holds a slower gait than previous tracks but with intensity still high fills the vacancy with a focused melodic rock craft, though that is still courted by the rapacious intent the band revels in which ensures the song is no less a threat and aggressor than others.

The gentle caress of Insanity takes longer to persuade than most but with its emotive strings, warm melodic rock centre, and passionate grumble the track easily secures a greedy appreciation whilst the more power ballad like Forsaken with a definite Hetfield and co feel pleases firmly without lighting fires, the same which can be said about Stairs of Guilt. Neither song grips as tightly as others but shows the expansive power of the band in sound and songwriting which certainly excites.

   Sputter the Worms closes with firstly Time, a track which glides through a weave of styles and. As the previous two it fails to spark a full ardour but furthers the impressive skills and imaginative adventure of the band which are to enthuse over and anticipate creating greater triumphs ahead. Final song Bummer is a muscle driven slab of heavy rock with metal roots, a very easy to devour and enjoy straightforward protagonist.

Reverted is a band on a sure and striking rise in presence and creativity, with the potential to be something very special. They have a drama to their songs and an invention which defuses the recognisable elements also carried; the result one thoroughly thrilling ride.

The self-released Sputter the Worms is available now!

http://www.reverted.co.uk

8/10

RingMaster 17/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Discharger / The Uprisers Split EP

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If you ask us there really are not enough split releases around these days, not enough bands/labels really exploiting their potential in spreading the word and sounds of emerging and established but maybe still to be discovered bands. Rebel Sound Music has stepped up to the plate though with the outstanding link up of Dutch Oi! punks Discharger and US punk ‘n’ rollers The Uprisers. Consisting of four diverse contagions, the 7” single is an irresistible riot of uncompromising rock ‘n’ roll, one gleefully leaving an exhausted and impossibly contented glow over ears and passions.

Hailing from Amersfoort, Discharger has never been slow in unleashing anthemic and compelling encounters to ignite punk appetites starting with debut album Born Immortal in 2004. Our Hate Is Justified two years later and the following The Sword of Our Ancestors in 2008 reinforced the band as a truly provocative proposition whilst the 2012 album Desecrated Ground recruited another wealth of engaged attention and fans, with the band re-embracing their Oi! background they started with than the more metal rooted influences which marked its predecessor. The quartet with their new songs stay rooted firmly in their punk roots on the single though that is not to say that the band has neglected any of its adventurous intent in sound.

Everytime We Drink opens on a relaxed chord and melodic coaxing before lifting its sinews and knees to burst into a muscular stomp, enthralling grooves lacing the aggressive urgency of the band. Seemingly already a firm favourite with fans and newcomers to the band since its appearance on YouTube a few weeks back, the track roars and recruits with open anthemic revelry around a thumping rhythmic punctuation. A fiery rampage with more contagion in its walls than many bands breed in a whole album, the track ignites an instant greed in ears and appetite for the following No Place For Our Kind. Opening on an acoustic invitation, the song erupts into a rampant confrontation with infectiousness again dripping from every note and digging hook. The great gruff vocals and almost brawling stride of the song has a thick texture which is part metallic and part rockabilly, the combination reminding of Danish motorbillys, The Grumpynators at times. It is a thoroughly incendiary and riveting anthem, quite irresistible and quite brilliant.

Discharger gives a high benchmark for New Hampshire’s The Uprisers to match, but it is no challenge as they rival their companions in Printsound and contagion. Emerging from the ashes of The Radicts, the band sees the reunion of Todd Radict and Rodger Shosa of The Bruisers, the pair having played together in punk band Five Balls of Power in the eighties. The band opens up their contribution to the release with a reworking of an old song of The Radicts. Led by the captivating vocals of Britney Noyes which have more than an essence of Poly Styrene meets Wendy Wu to them, Everybody’s Got A Reason takes a mere breath in time to draw a firmly attentive reaction with its opening thump of beats and classic rock flavoured guitar tempting. Keeping to a controlled stride with strikes of rhythms and guitar around catchy hooks, the song makes a tasty infectious appetiser for the band’s main course, the outstanding Ghetto Blaster. A brand new song from the band, it captures thoughts and emotions right away with its old school/modern punk bait, the track within seconds reminding of bands such as Penetration, 4 Nin Blondes, and Juliette And The Licks. Riffs and rhythms surge through the ears as devilishly as the vocals; every stride leaving a coating of anthemic toxicity which builds into a virulent seduction speared by sonic endeavour and melodically crafted hooks for the strongest bait. The song is punk rock at its purest insatiable best and takes tops honours amongst four quite magnificent beasts.

Whether the bands are intriguingly new to you or you just want punk rock in its strongest guises then the split between Discharger and The Uprisers is essential listening and owning.

The Discharger/ Uprisers split 7” is available now through Rebel Sound Music now coming in 200 Black vinyl, 200 Red vinyl, and 100 White vinyl options.

https://www.facebook.com/dischargerholland

https://www.facebook.com/theuprisersnh

http://www.rebelsoundrecords.com/

9/10

RingMaster 16/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Concrete – Subculture Street Troopers

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Hailing out of Austin, Texas, caustic punks Concrete unleashed one of the prize joints of Oi! punk last year with their debut release, the 12″ EP We Are All Reapers Here. Its acclaimed provocation is now backed by the release of the 7” single Subculture Street Troopers via Rebellion Records and Rebel Sound Records. Consisting of two confrontational contagious brawls to get your teeth deeply into, the single reinforces the emergence of a new roar and force in modern punk with more than a healthy seeding in old school voracity.

     Subculture Street Trooper is pure aural addictiveness from its opening anthemic whine of guitar onwards, riffs and bass adding their rich bait alongside the crisp drum pokes.  It is one of those instantly virulent songs which enslave imagination, passions, and memory with impossible ease, a potency only increased by the gruff vocal growls and united band chants around them. The song swaggers and strolls with a consummate persuasion before lighting a fire and exploding into a voracious charge of abrasive riffs and barbed hooks.  Bringing an essence of Angelic Upstarts to its grazing enticement, the track closes as it started with the rapacious stroll and an insatiably contagious grip Concrete-singleon the heart.

Second song Born To Never Lose does not have the same dramatic and intensive temptation as its companion but still bruises with a primal expulsion of hardcore aligned punk rock which allows no escape from its raw incitement. The production on the song is a little cloudy but it does little to prevent the thorough enslavement of the listener, in fact it only enhances the raw and uncompromising onslaught which embraces led by the great equally aggressive and unpolished vocals.

If their previous EP escaped your attention, Subculture Street Troopers is the perfect way to discover Concrete, a band with a sound which lives up to its name and a storm punk rock will be hearing a lot more of.

Subculture Street Trooper is available through Rebel Sound and Rebellion Records now on 100 Black Vinyl, 100 Gold Vinyl, and 100 Transparent Red Vinyl with heavy gold splatter.

https://www.facebook.com/CONCRETENATION

http://rebelsoundrecords.com

http://www.rebellionrecords.nl/

8.5/10

RingMaster 16/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com

Imbroglio – The Struggle in Pursuit

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There is an overpowering beauty in something which is intensively tormented and destructively passionate, equally a compelling attraction in the most vicious inner struggles of man and their corrosive shadows, and that beauteous temptation does not come any more irresistible than the new album from US metallers Imbroglio. Returning from an obviously potent hiatus, the band has unleashed the ravenous The Struggle in Pursuit, a breath-taking slab of creative savagery which will leave newcomers to the band reeling and bring existing fans their most richly absorbing and imaginatively consuming presence yet.

It was a surprise when the Ohio band announced it was going on a hiatus on the eve of the release of their previous acclaimed full-length Declared Self Hatred. It was something which was desperately needed as band founder and  guitarist /vocalist D.J. Gilbert revealed in an interview with Exclaim!, where he stated “I no longer felt a fire burning inside because with Declared Self Hatred I felt like I finally wrote my final piece, my suicide note. I knew I was on my way to the easy way out. I literally expelled every ounce of hate for myself on that record. So it was either put it on an indefinite hiatus for a while or just allows myself to self-destruct.

Initially with the intent of starting a new band when ready to return to creating music, Gilbert was persuaded by new band member Bret Newland (drums/vocals) that the project had to stay as Imbroglio; that whatever Gilbert wrote and performed it would sound like the band anyway. Original band member Josh Deeter (bass/vocals) returned to complete the line-up with the trio setting about making returning EP which they recorded with Bobby Leonard. Featuring the contribution of keys and synths on a couple of tracks by Devon Robillard, who had played bass in the band at the time of the Sleep Deprivation album, The Struggle in Pursuit takes little time in smothering the senses and imagination in aural causticity and lyrical ravages incited by the struggle in the pursuit of happiness in today’s social climate. The songs rage and stand defiant against the wrongs and obstacles in life but with a triumphant and provocative stance promoting a broad and personal freedom.

The inventive tempest of grind, sludge, and doom metal from the band is veined by their most exhilarating and rigorous experimental TSIP_Album_Coverexploration to date; exhaustive and captivating invention immediately paraded on opener Full Speed. As its title implies, the song races through ears from its first breath, rhythms thundering down upon the senses and riffs immediately abrasing and flailing everything before them. Vocals need little coaxing to sear the air with vitriolic suasion as the bass darkens the imposing and strenuous maelstrom further. It is a disorientating treat, sonic spirals of invention and searing toxicity enflaming the imagination and an already drooling appetite for song and release. The track continues to lurch over and rip through the senses with sabre flung sonic twists of sound and a rhythmic predation which intimidates and commands full submission to its inciting call simultaneously.

The outstanding start is matched by the thick intensity and equally rapacious antagonism of Approaching, the track soaked in a passionate rabidity and driven by an anthemic enticement within a maelstrom of noise and intrigue. The track roars and rages as it engages and recruits the passions, every second a ferocious protagonist and every twist a mouthwatering intrusion of cutting sonic endeavour and enterprise. There is little time to concentrate on a single moment, the voracious attack and invention of songs a turbulence which needs numerous exploits to  explore fully which this and the following Gravity are perfect thrilling examples of. The third song of the release barracks and engages thoughts and emotions from its first touch, riffs and rhythms tenderising the senses as the guitar spurts potent sonic toxicity throughout the provocative landscape. It is a riveting furnace of emotion and sound which reaches a new height when solemn darkly toned clean vocals duet with the coarse squalls of voice and sound beneath them.  It is a tremendous sprawling and suffocating embrace of harsh and invigorating endeavour leaving the body a broadly smiling wasted mess.

Day Break gives no time for a breather or respite as it leaps straight at the listener, drums puncturing every inch of the psyche into which the guitars and vocal lay their vicious irresistible bait whilst the bass looks on with a dark hearted yet seductive lure. There is a hardcore violence to the track also which only accentuates its almost visceral predation leaving emotions smouldering and senses bruised. Its primal insistence makes way for Desolation, another track where the title reveals all before any sniff of the suffocating ambience and emotional suffering can soak the ears. It is a glorious cloud of despair and intent; one speared and split apart by unpredictable sonic imagination and skilled melody inspired shafts of scorched light. A towering conclusion to a quite brilliant encounter, the return of Imbroglio has given metal a new proposition to wax lyrical over, The Struggle in Pursuit deserving all the acclaim destined to come its way.

The Struggle in Pursuit is out via The Path Less Traveled Records now!

10/10

RingMaster Review 16/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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