URNE – The Mountain Of Gold

From the ashes of one great thing rises another; certainly it looks that way listening to the new EP from UK metallers URNE. The Mountain Of Gold is the debut release from a band featuring ex- Hang The Bastard members in vocalist/bassist Joe Nally and guitarist Angus Neyra. From the demise of their previous acclaimed outfit, the pair formed URNE, pulling in the rhythmic prowess of drummer Rich Wiltshire to join them. Distinctly different in sound but with the same level of craft and imagination which made their previous band so potent, URNE across four fierce yet melodically magnetic tracks suggest they have the wares to be just as rich a proposition.

Produced by Architects and Sylosis guitarist Josh Middleton, The Mountain Of Gold allows new single Dust Atlas to kick things off. As the first beats of Wiltshire firmly rap the senses, a slow drawling groove emerges to entangle ears. Its sludgy air is soon courted by a livelier rhythmic taunting which in turn drives the subsequent heavy/groove metal trespass of the already compelling encounter. Neyra’s guitar dances on the imagination whilst carrying a more imposing threat in its breath, a trespass which in turn festers in the opening throes of Nally’s vocals. As the song, he soon shows diversity as mellower and harmonic hues emerge in his tones, a move bringing an even greater blend of flavours and increasing invention.

It is a thickly impressive start with a touch of bands such as Mastodon, Exodus, and The Sword to it though hues in something far more individual to URNE; a trait just as potent within the following creative drama of The Lady And The Devil. Essences of doom and occult metal join the more classic swing of the track as it gets its instinctive groove going alongside the enticing clean tones of Nally, the dark brooding in his bassline a great tempering to the fiery air of again a track which masterfully and imaginatively evolves.

The EP’s title track as good as stalks ears next with its rapacious riffs and rhythmic grumble speared by a groove which instantly inspires the body’s movements. There is punk-esque irritability to things at first, one dismissed by melodic and harmonic radiance but only to the wings to return as the enthralling cycle repeats. Neyra shares his prowess with as much dexterity as the song has in captivating ears and attention; a potency all three share with their individual and united enterprise.

The March Towards The Sun concludes the release, the song featuring Middleton within its tenacious and untimed but deviously designed rock ‘n’ roll. The track is breath raw and antagonistic but equally precisely sculpted and seductive as another mercurial landscape of varying and animated metal consumes ears.

The Mountain Of Gold is a striking and more importantly rousing introduction to URNE yet you cannot help thinking from its power and potential we have heard nothing yet which is soon clear as being just as exciting.

The Mountain Of Gold is out now available across most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/urneband/   https://twitter.com/urneband

Pete RingMaster 15/08/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Furyborn – Dawn Of Leviathan

Since emerging in 2010, UK outfit Furyborn seem to make a potent statement with every move they make within the British metal scene. From their live debut in 2011, they have earned support and a reputation which has only gathered momentum and is sure to again with the release of their debut album, Dawn Of Leviathan. It is a ferociously imposing and compelling affair that arouses the same senses it trespasses with the band’s increasingly distinct and adventurous style of melodic death metal.

That live side of the Poole hailing quintet has seen them become one of the most potent forces across the South of England, win the regional Metal 2 The Masses competition and play Bloodstock Open Air for only their seventh live outing. Since then they have shared stages with the likes of Napalm Death, Threat Signal, Mors Principium Est, Sylosis, The Agonist, Malefice, The Defiled, Evile, (Hed) P.E. and Ted Maul as well as release their first acclaimed EP, The Reaping Of Our Days released in 2012 through Bored Stiff Records. Fair to say the band has been nagging at national and broader attention since day one, increasingly growing both which the highly anticipated Dawn Of Leviathan can only escalate.

The album quickly shows a new strength in intensity, craft, and imagination within Furyborn; a growth in all aspects infused into a maturity which is maybe unexpected within a first full-length, even from a band in its seventh year. Dawn of Leviathan opens with the atmospheric trespass of Second Sun, a brief harass of raw sonic dissonance which leads into the album’s title track where instantly a barrage of intrusive beats from drummer Tim Coulson and ravenous riffs from rhythm guitarist Rob Walker devour ears. Just as forceful are the raw throated roars of vocalist Jut Tabor who quickly seizes attention with his grudging tones, their causticity leading to a great flame of clean endeavour; the frontman, as the sounds around him showing a new dexterity and range which only impresses. It takes little time for band and song to reveal a new lofty plateau to that of the first EP, the melodic suggestiveness of lead guitarist Nick Richardson alone a striking new adventure equipped with the broader imagination and uniqueness that flows through the veins of the track.

The Reckoning follows with the same striking creative tenacity and character, the track a tirade of biting rhythms and corrosive riffs leading the listener into a web of melodic and cleanly delivered temptation. Within the burly, ravenous tempest of bitter sonic and vocal inhospitality, it makes for a compelling mix which only intensifies its lures as the song evolves and broadens its inventive landscape before Exult in Extinction uncages its own rabid assault again led by the uncompromising swings of Coulson. Stalking the senses, the bass of Timmy Hodgson is predatory if sometimes overwhelmed by the storm of riffs and beats while again Richardson veins the cauldron of sound with tendrils of skilful melodic lava. Contrasts flare and meet within the encounter, each colluding with and countering the other in a twisting tempest matched by vocal resourcefulness across the band.

The industrial opening of A Fault in Our Design brings a bold hint of Fear Factory like hues before the track turns to stalking and intimidating the senses. There is a swing to its core presence with breeds the infectiousness soon seeping into every element, the result a blistering yet controlled incitement as predatory as it is melodically tenacious while Life Begins uncages its own mercurial invasion of sound and emotion. Though swiftly persuasive and increasingly compelling, the song does not quite reach the inventive and  gripping heights of its predecessors for these ears though individual flair is as open as the track’s animosity and melodic assurance.

The raw rabidity of I Am Heresy has the imagination and appetite magnetically hooked again straight after with its ravenous and invitingly inhospitable assault of the senses while Deep Rising provides an enthralling lure of Tabor’s striking clean side courted by a laid back but fully suggestive climate of electronically led sound. With the irresistible carnivorous tone of Hodgson’s bass to the fore, the track is superb, another stirring magnet within the release adding further aspects to the bold adventure and evolving imagination of Furyborn.

The album concludes with firstly the varied metal symphony of Wraith, an array of flavours swarming with each other before a writhing death metal causticity bursts from within their midst, and finally with the symphonically laced As We Burn. The closer revels in all the new attributes of the band’s sound and writing, its proposal as invasively seductive as it is rancorous and transfixing. Again Fear Factory-esque hues entice as more Sepultura/Gojira like elements challenge, each woven into the individual character of Furyborn’s own sound. One of its major highlights, the song ensures that Dawn of Leviathan ends on a fascinating high.

Throughout, the album tightly holds attention and fiercely pleases, increasingly so with every subsequent listen. The fact that you still feel we are listening in on one step in a journey still to unfold only adds to the impressive nature of a release which is as much about potential as it is ear exciting craft and adventure.

Dawn of Leviathan is out now through most online stores and @ http://furyborn.bigcartel.com/

https://www.facebook.com/furyborn/

Pete RingMaster 11/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Harbinger – Human Dust

You may have caught on to the buzz brewing forcibly around UK metallers Harbinger, an increasing clamour which their new EP, Human Dust, alone provides a forceful host of reasons for. Forging technical and death metal in one ferocious tempest unafraid to stretch its adventurous instincts, the release offers six slices of raptorial sound ken to prey on the senses. It is a striking next step from the London based quintet displaying thick potential aligned with their already realised qualities in one attention grabbing exploit.

The follow-up to their well-received debut EP, Paroxysm, the ravenous Human Dust takes little time in stirring ears and appetite with ravenous riffery, swinging rhythms, and sonic dexterity; all colluding with melodic imagination and a blossoming unpredictability which was not so potent in the first release. Everything from songwriting to individual adventure, the dual vocal attack of frontman Tom Gardner to simply the band’s imagination is a bolder step up from Paroxysm.

Human Dust opens up with the instantly invigorating roar of The End of Time. The guitars of Ben Sutherland and Charlie Griffiths barely use a breath to weave a web of intrigue and rabid riffing, their lure matched by the more primal swings of drummer Joel Scott and Kris Aarre’s mutually heavy bassline. It is a fierce and swiftly infectious affair, hooks and sonic dexterity a flirtatious trespass as Gardner roars and brawls with the senses, combining throat raw growls with more harmonic bellows to fine effect. The track swings and savages as it twists and turns through technical and hostile textures, pleasuring and punishing in equal highly agreeable measure.

Just as magnetic and impressing is Humanity’s Limit, the second track seeing Gardner add even cleaner warmer tones to his increasingly captivating attack. The robustly flickering beats of Scott from the start take no prisoners, neither too the rapacious riffs and technical teased grooves and flames which sear and seduce the senses from within a storm at times as primal as it is imaginative. Indicative of all songs, every listen reveals something fresh in the song’s cauldron, next up Psychosomatic similarly sharing richer rewards with every venture into its barbarous yet exotic squall.

Two or three seconds of deceitful calm draws ears into the all-consuming roar of The Darkness of June straight after, the track sharing closely related melodic temptation and arpeggio tenacity to its predecessor within its caustic surge. There is a touch of similarity across some tracks, certainly on a less than intense listen but nothing to particularly defuse the EP’s potency with purposeful attention revealing all the individual qualities of each song.

Human Dust literally burns the senses next, tempering its hostility with melodic caresses and inciting it again with spicy almost toxic grooves and the ever resourceful vocal challenge of Gardner. The guitars provide a carousel of craft and enterprise, rhythms the bullish heart whilst instinctive imagination shapes the song’s compelling character and the wonderful melodic bridge between the track and its EP closing successor II. Captive/Hated. Again time allows the track to share its full richness but straight away it has ears hooked and pleasure sparked with its tenacious exploits and adventurous mercurial twists.

Human Dust as well as proving a thoroughly enjoyable engagement is a bigger step in Harbinger finding true uniqueness in their sound. They are no quite there yet but definitely moving in the right direction whilst providing gripping music certainly fans of bands like Decapitated and Sylosis will find strongly intriguing.

The Human Dust EP is out now through Basick Records; physically @ https://basick.supplies/collections/harbinger  and digitally @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/human-dust-ep/id1218457845?app=itunes&ign-mpt=uo%3D4

http://www.facebook.com/harbingerriffs/

Pete RingMaster 21/06/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

This Dying Hour – Resting Where No Shadows Fall

this-dying-hour-promo-shot_RingMasterReview

In many ways you could say that Resting Where No Shadows Fall, the eagerly anticipated debut album from British metallers This Dying Hour has been ten years in the making. Formed at the beginning of 2006 and swiftly impressing with their debut EP, the High Wycombe outfit has endured a decade littered with setbacks “that were just too great to overcome; everything from death and marriage to money came between the band and its members.” Now they are back and with a release which feels like it carries all the emotions and frustrations felt over that time; an album which ignites ears and imaginations with invention and passion.

That first year of the band produced the Longest Memory From The Shortest Life EP, a well-received and often praised introduction. It was accompanied by tours throughout the UK and Europe as well as shows with the likes of Young Guns, Sylosis, Bury Tomorrow, Malefice, and Exit Ten. The years since, as mentioned, brought This Dying Hour to a standstill until this year when vocalist Dave Pickup and guitarist Ash Whitelock decided to spark the band into life again with the help of “rotating members to fill the void.” Now they have made the wait for the next instalment of This Dying Hour adventure a forgotten moment as Resting Where No Shadows Fall seriously impresses ears and thoughts.

The album opens with its brief title track, an atmospheric instrumental which draws the imagination, leading it into the waiting jaws of War Drums. The second track instantly makes its point with scything riffs and beats, their imposing swipes aligned to a nagging raw melody before things all comes together in a predacious stalking of the senses. The snarling tones of Pickup are soaked in raw emotion and ire, a potency matched by Whitelock’s irritable guitar and the rhythmic antagonism of the track. It not may be the most unique proposal, references to the likes of Lamb Of God and Killswitch Engage valid, yet the song has a freshness which roars in ears and only blossoms further as a cleaner touch invades the vocal incitement.

The impressive start continues as Asleep springs its wiry grooves and vocal hostility next. Swiftly the song shows its distinct and individual character to be a diversity of intensity and energy, all soaked in venom as it seizes attention and a growing appetite for the release. Clean vocals and great dirty harmonies bring stronger drama and quality, as too the enterprising craft of Whitelock as the song bellows and challenges in equal enjoyable measure.

this-dying-hour-cover-artwork_RingMasterReviewPath Of Unknown opens with a melodic atmosphere similar to the opening intro, sunken vocals courting the initial lure before the song opens up into a striking and thrilling encounter. The mellower tones of Pickup predominantly stir the song this time around, luring with the listener alongside spicy melodies into one ridiculously infectious chorus and subsequently a great passage of calm reflection with a touch of Palms to it. One of the biggest highlights among many, the outstanding proposal is followed by the far more hostile climate and sound of Time To Die, though it too is unafraid to cast warm melodies and catchy clean vocals. A rival for best track to match its predecessor, the song completes a first half of Resting Where No Shadows Fall which simply blows most other emerging melodic/groove metallers away.

There is little loosening of attention and pleasure either as first the darker sinister realm of Underworld encloses and encroaches on the senses. Certainly the track is a touch hit and miss, moments which stir the blood and others which lie a touch flat on thoughts but arguably it is the most inventive proposition on the album as it ensnares the imagination while Alive is as accomplished as anything within Resting Where No Shadows Fall at blending the calmer and fiercer emotional and physical exploits of band and songwriting. Though both are lacking the spark of earlier songs, each leaves a real want for more which Priapism feeds with its melody rich charm and fiery temperament.

The album closes on the same kind of explosive sound and impact as it started, Room 108 a volatile and often corrosive encounter with sparkling moments of vocal invention and melodic imagination seemingly inspired by a mix of System Of A Down, Deftones, and In Flames.

It is a great end to an excellent first album from a band making up for lost time in passion and invention. With the potential of bigger and bolder to come, it is very easy to push Resting Where No Shadows Fall as something all should make an acquaintance with.

Resting Where No Shadows Fall is out in stores from Friday 30th September.

https://www.facebook.com/thisdyinghouruk/

Pete RingMaster 28/09/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Enemo J – Miley Virus

promo picture - enemo j_RingMaster Review

Listening to Enemo J is like being submerged in a swarm of African honeybees running amok, their sound a nagging and ferocious irritant that never desists in aggression and rage once provoked into creation by the band’s inspirations and imagination. As proven by new album Miley Virus, it also produces raw sonic nectar that ignites the appetite and through an unpredictable tempest, leaves the senses wrung out but with a real greed for more. The UK metaller’s fifth album is arguably their most adventurous and diverse yet, as again the band weaves an agitated expanse of styles and flavours into their storms, equally though it is possibly their most testing, but as that only results in being amongst their most fiercely enjoyable, it is a definite asset.

Hailing from Burton On Trent and emerging at the beginning of the new millennium, Enemo J has gone on to unleash a quartet of successful and increasingly acclaimed full-lengths and earned a potent stature for a live presence which has seen the band play with the likes of Napalm Death, (Hed) PE, Sylosis, Black Light Burns, and Korn, create a stir with performances at Download in 2010 and more recently 2014, and play with similar reactions fests such as Bloodstock. Now the core line-up of vocalist Craig Hartwell, guitarist Haydn Edwards, and bassist Mikey Wyke are ready to nudge and punch the broadest spotlights with Miley Virus, expectations after many listens to the beast leaning towards a highly positive outcome in that intent.

Miley Virus Artwork_RingMaster Review     After the vocal led Intro, band and album explode into tempestuous life with This Is Not A Toy, immediately spinning web of steely grooves and predatory rhythms led by the distinctive and as always swiftly engaging roars of Hartwell. His attack though comes with great variety from his throat and within the band, an adventure matching the winding lures of guitar and more controlled but no less imposing prowl of bass. Aligning ferocious metalcore influences with a groove metal tantalising, and subsequently cleaner textures in sound and voice, the track is a gripping and dynamic incitement to set things off and highly addictive, especially the more it evolves its rapacious body.

The album’s title track steps forward next, Miley Virus from an electronic coaxing flexing rhythmic muscles and cantankerous grooves from the already impressing prowess of Edwards. Spilling rap metal tenacity and enterprise in vocals and thick initial temptation, the track creates a kaleidoscope of uncompromising intensity and melodic tempting which at different times hints at the like of Skindred, Stone Sour, and American Head Charge across a thoroughly magnetic persuasion. Unfortunately our promo did not come with any details of guests and full personnel on the album but amongst many things, female vocals add a great siren-esque lure to the track’s robust adventure.

Five Percent slips in next, Hartwell’s voice offering its hip hop prowess as the track begins its growth into a fiery protagonist stalking ears and inciting with lyrical and physical confrontation. As bestial as it is harmoniously alluring within a volatile and climactic ambience, the outstanding track is a gripping proposal matched by This Stops Today. Carnivorous riffs court a sonic imagination straight away, vocals leaning towards a rancorous toning as they provoke and excite with the track perpetually twisting and embracing a wealth of attacks and formidable flavouring. As its predecessor, it too marks another lofty peak within the album with its Slipknot meets Stuck Mojo like voracity, a pinnacle almost emulated by the death/metalcore lined savaging of Ides Of March. The song is a predator of ears and emotions, virtually everything about it an insidious prowl led by the great malevolence fuelling Wyke’s bass but then tempered by the acidic strands spewed by Edward’s guitar and again impressive vocals.

The boldest adventure within Miley Virus starts emerging from Majora, the song a roar of rap lined metalcore which suddenly turns, with more impressive female vocals at its centre, into a melodically honed gothic proposal. This is Enemo J, so things never stay in one direction for long though; a swarming tenacity of riffs blossomed from the savaging fury and in turn swinging back into the gothic coated seducing. To be honest the track caught our ears by surprise and took a while to totally convince but overtime it wins out, as too Throughout which takes a similarly longer route in succeeding with its convincing. A thick tapestry of flavours extreme and melodic which at times flirts with post hardcore tendencies too, the song casts more great female vocals alongside the caustic squalls of Hartwell as melodies from keys and guitar provide an evocative drama. Admittedly, it fails to spark the same richest of reactions as earlier tracks but in fascination and invention, the song is absorbing and easy to repeatedly explore.

Both the volcanically intensive Sufferance and the drama fuelled radiance of Time sear the senses and light the imagination respectively, the first with its blackened wind over a swirling sonic canvas of endeavour. Its successor spins a low-key but potent acidic hook repetition within a sonically and emotionally turbulent post hardcore landscape, vocals as expected as strong as the music in revealing the depth of diversity and invention within their grasp.

Miley Virus is concluded by Drunk Lions At The Wolf Party, a ravenous ferocity of sound and presence veined by melodic and harmonic ingenuity. The song truly comes alive once all the extreme contrasts within it collude to create an engrossing flight of ire and emotive elegance, in turn providing a fine and big close to a riveting and thoroughly enjoyable encounter. Enemo J just goes from strength to strength with each release, and though for personal tastes it is a little bit a proposition of two halves, each song thrills and enthrals in their own inventive way to make Miley Virus an easy recommendation to make.

Miley Virus is out from November 1st through Digital Media Records across most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/enemoj

Pete RingMaster 31/10/2105

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Nemaind – Eclipsi EP

cover_RingMaster Review

There is not a great deal we can tell you about Spanish melodic death metallers Nemaind though the most important bit of information you need anyway is that their debut EP, Eclipsi, is one heavily flavoursome and magnetically alluring incitement. Its three tracks do not break down boundaries or re-invent existing landscapes within the death metal scene, but it undoubtedly provides one potential fuelled, richly enjoyable sonic tempest to eagerly immerse within.

Formed early 2014, Nemaind hails from Barcelona inspired by bands such as Moonspell, Opeth, Death, Gojira, Insomnium, Caladan Brood, Sylosis, Emperor, and Amon Amarth. Created by vocalist/bassist Ferran C, previously of thrashers Rotten, the band’s line-up was soon enriched by guitarists David C and Gerard B, subsequently followed by drummer Martí F. Recorded in February this year, Eclipsi gives the first introduction to a broader expanse of ears of Nemaind, in turn offering a strong persuasion of their craft and potential.

Eclipsi opens with its title track and instantly has attention and appetite wide awake with a swarm of waspish riffery and fierce rhythmic intimidation. It is a masterfully magnetic start which continues to tempt and work on the psyche as the track breaks into and begins exploring a malevolent landscape of portentous grooves and sonic rapacity. The vocals are varied causticity, their diversity never merging major differences between tones and delivery but enough to ensure more fresh textures in the tempest of sound and the increasing adventure emerging within the outstanding and increasingly impressive encounter. The guitars especially spin an evolving web of intrigue and imagination within the volatile atmosphere and confrontation of the song, adding captivating hues and ideation in the face of barbarous intent.

The following Pareidoniria is similarly sculpted within its own individual character and ravenous air, addiction loaded riffs stalking with unrelenting persistence alongside rapier beats and a throaty bass groove. Musically the track conjures a soundscape Gojira like in rousing dexterity and technical imagination, Insomnium seeded in hostile and ravishing emotional trespassing whilst its melodic ferocity is Corbeaux like. It does not quite match up to its predecessor’s heights yet only leaves a want for more and helps build the intent to keep the band on the personal radar.

The EP is brought to an end with Les últimes llums de tardor, another predatory protagonist this time emerging from a primal sonic mist bristling with thickly flavoursome flavours and ear pleasing enterprise. Initially there is an almost eighties like gothic spicing colluding with broadening winds of sonic and extreme metal drama rippling with creative expression and highly provocative aural colour. It is the least physically corrosive of the three songs, though still showing no emotional mercy, weaving a fascinating design of warm and barren scenery which is always emotively lively and boldly adventurous as it scars the senses.

As the final song’s cold climate dissipates, Nemaind leaves only richly positive thoughts and full pleasure behind. As suggested, it is not the most original release yet every listen brings something fresh and individual against other encounters you may come across with a similar canvas of sound. We suggest taking note of the name and enjoying their debut with the promise of increasingly impressive explorations with the band another lingering aftermath.

The Eclipsi EP is available digitally now on Nemaind’s bandcamp profile.

Pete RingMaster 31/08/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent check out http://www.zykotika.com/

All To Ruin – Among Us

All To Ruin Promo Picture

Back in 2013, Welsh melodic metallers All To Ruin made their introduction with the Parables EP, a striking collection of songs whose only real issue was a sound which lay comfortably within that of the crowd. The suggestion and potential though was that the band would evolve into something much more distinct in time. Now the Port Talbot band return with its successor Among Us with the first question in anticipation of its release being had All To Ruin found that unique identity. Certainly in adventure, craft, and maturity, the band’s sound has openly leapt on, but in originality it is a bit of yes and no. A familiarity to bands such as Funeral For A Friend, Protest The Hero, and at times August Burns persists but it is now coloured with a freshness and creative tenacity which makes the band’s sound linger and take on a more individual character. All To Ruin is still searching for that real originality it is fair to say but as you get caught up in their powerful anthemic choruses and the fiery passion of vocals and sound, that moment in time belongs solely to them.

Formed in 2011 and with a demo under their belts by the end of that first year, All To Ruin swiftly lured attention from fans and media alike. It was Parables which lit an even stronger awareness and following, backed as potently by live performances which has taken the band to play over the past four years with the likes of The Gallows, Young Guns, Deaf Havana, This Is Hell, Lower Than Atlantis, The Blackout, Funeral For A Friend, Heart Of A Coward, Heights, Exit Ten, Textures, Continents, Sylosis, The Chariot, Revoker, The Casino Brawl…well the list goes on and on. Entering the studio, as with their last EP, with Martyn ‘Ginge’ Ford and Matt Bond (Slipknot, Trivium and Bullet For My Valentine), All To Ruin reveal a bigger, bolder, and more flavoursome sound in Among Us with, as earned by the earlier release, similar if not greater responses expected in return.

All To Ruin Cover Art     The EP opens with Take The Reins and instantly encases ears in spicy grooves, hungry riffs, and punchy rhythms. Vocalist Aaron Roberts just as quickly brings his impressive voice to the affair whilst the guitar of Rhodri Williams provides a spiral of sonic enterprise and temptation. That new strength in songwriting and sound needs little prompting to show itself, as too a bolder imagination as the song slips into a gentle melodic embrace of voice and guitar. The thick swipes and rolls of drummer Tom Richardson keep an aggression bubbling though, eventually becoming the spark for a return of the opening impassioned roar of the encounter.

It is heavily enticing start to Among Us taken up another level by its title track straight after. Jabbing beats and a dark throaty bassline from Dan George provide the initial bait, their intimidation swiftly wrapped in the sonic tendrils of guitar. It all evens out as a warmer but no less imposing weave of increasingly gripping melodic adventure unites with the tempestuous and intensive rhythmic side of the proposition. There is also a drama to the song, emotionally and physically, which reveals more of the inventive and mature edge to the band’s creativity. An orchestral seducing in the background of the song helps that theatre arise as it flirts throughout, and once given its clarity, simply captivates in the finale of the excellent song.

Certainly there are plenty of recognisable elements on the two songs so far, but in reality that kind of applies to most releases these days, and as mentioned when songs like Among Us and the following Disconnect bellow with passion and imagination, it is predominantly a flavouring which only adds to the enjoyment. The third song brings a similar canvas to the previous track, an emotive orchestral colouring immersing the imagination as rhythms plunder the senses and vocals unleash the heart of the proposal. Aggressive and reflective simultaneously, the track spins another intriguing web of sparkling endeavour soaked in familiarity though it reveals itself to be even stronger in enterprise and emotion.

Aggression fuels History next, the best song on the EP driven by a creative snarl and provocative energy spawned by carnivorous riffs and uncompromising rhythms. Rather than being tempered this is complimented by the blistering sonic exploits cast by the guitars and the inventive twists further stirring up an already explosive song. On the last EP there was one song which stood out and pushed the envelope on the release and on Among Us it is History.

The EP comes to an end through Beneath The Steel Sky, a blaze of melodic rock which like a friend wraps enjoyably around ears and feeds the appetite. As shown here, technically the band has grown impressively as they have in songwriting and sound, but it is the imagination which lines every song which most stands out even if uniqueness is taking longer to come through. As with Parables though, Among Us suggests it is looming and closer still, but again the reality is that as songs consume ears and imagination only thorough enjoyment is the outcome.

The Among Us EP is available from April 27th via http://www.alltoruin.bigcartel.com/ and through all stores.

https://www.facebook.com/alltoruinmetal   https://twitter.com/alltoruinuk

RingMaster 27/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net