Weaves and carousels with Demi The Daredevil

demi-the-daredevil_RingMasterReview

It is fair to say that bands which bring a diversity of imagination and sound together stand out from the thick music crowd more than most and that is exactly what is happening with Demi The Daredevil. Since forming in 2006, the Texan outfit has explored their art rock natured sound without allowing it boundaries, persistently luring attention from fans and media alike to now knock on global awareness. We recently had the chance to do our own exploration of the band with one of its founders Jeff Azar to look at the beginnings of Demi The Daredevil, that journey through sound and imagination, their latest release and much more…

Hello, many thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to the bands beginnings?

My name is Jeff Azar from an Art Rock/Dark Theater band called Demi the Daredevil. It all started in our hometown El Paso; El Chuco as some like to say. Jovan (RIP) and Marc started playing guitar together, and I was introduced to them by a mutual friend. I started off on the drums in this band.

Were you involved in other bands before Demi the Daredevil? If so what influence did those experiences have on what you are doing now?

Marc is in a few other bands. I jammed with some people sometimes. I guess they helped me realize what direction I did NOT want to go in.

What inspired the band name?

Demi is short for demigod, which is a half man half god. Kinda like a Hercules type.

Not sure about Daredevil. Marc and Jovan chose Demi the Daredevil over The Rootbeer KamiKazis.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

No, at least it was more intuitive rather than a logical idea behind what we were doing. When we first started, Jovan was inspiring from random things like film scores or TV show theme songs or video game music and we punk rocked those out. We didn’t have too much of an audience in mind, we just wanted to make loud fast melodic music.

When my brother came into the mix later down the road, I thought we’d have two ideas: classical music merged with the pop world and the world of movie acting/very obvious themed songs. Currently, the main goal is to have 1) good chord progressions 2) good melodies 3) and killer grooves. Besides that, there is no one idea musically, and as far as the lyrics go, I’m speaking to those who struggle with mental health.

Do the same things still drive the band when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

That’s a good question. At first it was the pure fun of playing and analyzing music, with no thought of an audience. Then the drive became to be a critical success. Now, the drive seems to be connecting with kindreds, with like minds. Wanting a sense of community is the drive.

dtd_RingMasterReviewSince your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

This band has had a lot of style changes. There have been phases, which might have made it hard to pinpoint an audience. But it was a necessary exploration…. Anyway, at first it was balls out punk rock or power pop. Then during a Beatles phase it became more reserved and softer. When my brother Thomas came into the mix, it became very Broadwayesque, because he’s a classically trained pianist and likes Broadway styled melodies.  Now, there don’t seem to be rules. As long as the songs are accessible, emotional, and will stand the test of time at least for a little while, we can inspire from soft rock, power pop, classical, funk, dark cabaret, etc…

It has been more of an organic movement of sound rather than you deliberately trying new things?

It’s always been an organic movement of sound. At every point in the history of this band we’ve just dished out what we were taking in at the time. For me it’s intuitive writing in that I take in a bunch of impressions, and then somehow something is synthesized from all those impressions.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

Yes. You’re right about there being such a wide range of influencers. I’ve obsessed over bands during each stage…And can’t list them all. But, even though I’m ashamed to keep bringing up this contemporary band that only in the last year has been the biggest personal influence, Twenty One Pilots has had a major impact on my personal approach. I had similar subject matter to Tyler lyrically; he just said it better with zero pretence. He got me to get more sober, gave me faith in making songs that don’t have to be master crafted mega hits, just as long as they are good and accessible. They made me go the distance with grooves, and incorporate all these intricate rudiments I learned in drum line. And they created online community of a certain type of fan with a very particular identity which I’d like to reach too. The live show energy; I could go on. Please stop me.

Is there a regular process to the songwriting within the band?

For me, I need to start with a timeless and emotional chord progression…Or at least a variation of one.  That is most important to me. I try out syncopated rhythms with the core instruments. Melody then is experimented with. Previously written poetry is put more into lyric and song form. Recording programs help with happy accidents. There is a long phase of punching the song up after the main idea is there…So many bases to cover.

Where do the biggest inspirations to your lyrical side come from?

Lyric inspiration starts from what I think is a big realization or feeling.

I then take months to get a more bird’s eye view on it and to say it better than when I tried to describe it initially.

Can you give us some background to your latest release?

A lot of the lyrics for it were written in strange places, like an attic on the UT campus during my last summer of school there, a couple psych hospitals(a lot of time to reflect there), and in a tee pee (which I needed to live in to save money for marketing). The band was in flux, and our producer lived in New York. So it took a long time to coordinate with our producer long distance, which left me a lot of time to treat the songs like Frankenstein until they were the best they could be.

Give us some insight to the themes and premise behind it and its songs.dtd-art_RingMasterReview

The EP is called Secret Schizoid. The schizoid, defined by a psychologist Rollo May, is someone unable to feel, or to have close connection with others. They are out of touch with themselves. So these tracks are tracking that recovering the self process and piecing it back together.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to leave plenty of room for development as you record?

Definitely a band that goes into the studio with songs more in their finished state. Unless a group of musicians are dedicating enough time with each other to make magic happen going into the studio without set ideas seems like a nightmare. Plus we really just need to record live drums in the studio. The rest can be tracked at home.

 Tell us about the live side to the band?

We’re starting to prep for the live shows and trying to make them theatrical, in the sense that we we’re creating little inner dialogue scenes with voices on the back tracks, or I should say monologue scenes because they are like schizophrenic voices, in between songs…And making it engaging with the audience. We want people to feel like they are part of the inner turmoil.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it? Are there still the opportunities to make a mark?

Yes, there are opportunities to break through; the key is knowing what kind of person your fan is and send them personal messages. Build relationships. Also learning how to using social media to reach them. Facebook offers a really useful audience insights tool to learn more about your fans, and a power tool editor to advertise correctly.  In terms of playing live shows to regional fans when you don’t have money or resources to book nation or worldwide tours, promoting your shows to potential fans in whatever area will make it more worth your while. No industry ppl who can take you to the next level will mess with you without fans, and you can’t leverage anyone in the industry without fans.

You touched on social media there, how has it impacted impacted on the band to date? Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as the band grows and hopefully gets increasing success or is it more that bands struggling with it are lacking the knowledge and desire to keep it working to their advantage?

At first, the social media made us feel insecure because we just got crickets. After understanding how to use it (to spread your music to people who are care about that kind of music), it’s a free marketing tool. You have to learn how to use it and adapt. If you want to get signed to a company, you need to prove you have engagement from a Fan-base because that is in our control now. If you don’t care about getting signed you still need to use social media to have a Fan-base. You can play a show to ten people, two whom really likes you, or you can reach 8,000 people by $20 to market a live performance online for example.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add for the readers?

Thank you for asking good questions! Yes, admit insanity, embrace your humanity.

If you are plagued with self-doubt, are conflict ridden, and someone who asks existential questions listen to our Secret Schizoid EP 🙂

http://www.demithedaredevil.com/    https://www.facebook.com/demithedaredevil/   https://twitter.com/demidaredevil

The RingMaster Review 13/01/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Big South Market – Muzak EP

the-big-south-market_RingMasterReview

Weaving strands of hard and blues rock with grunge and stoner essences for a sound equally familiar and enterprisingly fresh, The Big South Market is an Italian band making a powerful introduction to themselves with their debut EP Muzak. Five tracks of rousing rock ‘n’ roll the encounter is an impressive offering from yet another duo showing that you do not need multiple bodies to make a mighty roar.

From Barletta, The Big South Market was formed in 2015 by vocalist/guitarist Giuseppe Chiumeo, founder of the crossover band The Rest Side, and drummer Ruggiero Ricco from thrash metallers Cancrena. Quickly they made a potent impression playing all across their homeland, broader attention now being tempted by Muzak and its fiery contents.

Opener Big Deal immediately threatens welcoming ears with thumping beats as wiry grooves wrap around. It is an intoxicating start which only blossoms in strength and sound as Chiumeo and Ricco unite their imposing enterprise. Like a blend of Gruntruck and Crobot, the song growls and seduces, getting under the skin in no time as it vocally snarls and musically sears the senses.

tbsm_cover_RingMasterReviewIt is a stunning start swiftly matched by the similarly fiery lures of Before (You Make It Deeper), itself a fine blend of stoner and blues endeavour as raw as it is imaginatively woven. As with its predecessor there is plenty which seems familiar yet more than enough to create a proposition which stands apart from the crowd, riffs and grooves a web of instinctive adventure in an imposingly big yet uncluttered roar of sound.

A southern air lines the blues rock of next up Moodrink, its grooves and rampant rhythms a spirit sparking enticement as soulful vocals roar. Hinting at the likes of bands such as Pantera, Kyuss, and Royal Blood, the track robustly croons and writhes in ears while the following Red Carpet involves its predecessor’s creative liquor in an even richer slice of virulent blues infused rock ‘n’ roll.

As it strikingly began, Muzak ends on a major highlight with Desert Motel, a slab of desert blues built on enjoyably intrusive rhythms and boozy blues tenacity around the ever potent vocals of Chiumeo. A less energetic proposal compared to earlier tracks, it replaces a full throttle charge with emotively suggestive grooves within melodic fire as an underlying intensity soaked in attitude and ferocity murmurs.

It is a fine end to a thoroughly enjoyable first look at The Big South Market, a pair showing the potential of eventually matching the stature of other great rock n’ roll duos.

Muzak is out now across most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/thebigsouthmarket   https://twitter.com/tbsmofficial

Pete RingMaster 11/01/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Oh! Gunquit – Nomads Of The Lost

ogqpic-shufflelive1_RingMasterReview

If you did not receive it as a gift for Christmas, it’s time to go treat yourself with the latest offering from British ‘trash-bop-freak-a-billies’ Oh! Gunquit. Following closely behind their dynamic cassette only Hot Cross Fun EP, Nomads Of The Lost is a two track lime green vinyl 7″ single which has the body throwing itself around like a puppet hooked to the creative strings of the London quintet.

Formed by vocalist/trumpeter Tina Swasey and guitarist/vocalist Simon Wild in 2011, Oh! Gunquit weave a contagious web of sound from strands taken from everything from of primitive surf, garage-punk, raw rhythm ’n’ blues, exotica, and various strains of rock ‘n’ roll. Previous singles and compilation placed tracks have backed a stage show and presence which has made Oh! Gunquit an essential live proposition, with their Dirty Water Records released debut album Eat Yuppies & Dance in 2015 sparking a broad flood of new attention and greedy appetites for the band’s fiercely eclectic and unique sound.

recordsleeveartwork_RingMasterReviewHot Cross Fun only confirmed and pushed their rising stature which Nomads Of The Lost, recorded with producer Jim Diamond, undoubtedly gives another potent nudge to. Opener Nomads Of The Lost strolls in with brass aflame amidst swaggering rhythms, teasing and flirting with ears before Tina’s infectious vocal stroll grabs its fair share of attention. Continuing to swerve around the senses in sound and energy as grooves entice and rhythms urge bodily participation, the song sizzles and insatiably dances like a warped The Revillos on heat.

Second track Walking The Streets ventures down a more garage punk vein compared to the broader rock ‘n’ roll of its companion with a Cramps like groove lighting Orson Family like shadows as Tina conducts a devilish harmonic chorus like a sinister Imelda May. The track is as irresistible as Nomads Of The Lost; at times even more so as wonderfully toxic guitars entangle ears as danger flirts from every suggestive groove.

Oh! Gunquit has a sound which once it hooks on just never relinquishes its grip; a slavery which Nomads Of The Lost proves is most welcome.

Nomads Of The Lost is out now on Dirty Water Records and @ https://ohgunquit.bandcamp.com/track/nomads-of-the-lost

https://www.facebook.com/ohgunquit/

Pete RingMaster 11/01/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Calling All Astronauts – Life As We Know It

lawki_RingMasterReview

With their second album still drawing wide acclaim, British electro punks Calling All Astronauts ensured 2016 left in fine style with Life As We Know It. Their ninth single and taken from Anti-Social Network, the song is more enticing evidence to the variety in the band’s sound and their ability to get the body grooving as eagerly as the spirit devours their rousing sounds.

Backed by three remixes of the single, the proposition is more an EP than single and a fine end to another increasingly successful year for the London based trio of vocalist/keyboardist/programmer David B, guitarist JJ Browning, and bassist Paul McCrudden. Earlier single Empire reached the No.2 spot on the Official European Indie Chart while the band twice hit top spot in the Hype Machine Twitter Chart, success capped by CAA headlining the Bandstand Stage on the final night of Beautiful Days Festival.

Released on Supersonic Media, Life As We Know It is an encounter hard for hips and the imagination to resist. It is a warmer, mellower affair compared to the band’s usually eclectic but attitude loaded sound; irresistibly catchy with a nostalgic air bringing thoughts of bands like The The and B-Movie whilst being distinctly CAA. Few bands create a sound truly unique to themselves but the threesome persistently achieves that while still pushing their creative boundaries. With suggestive melodies colluding with punchy beats and David B’s uniquely captivating tones, the song is an offensive of melodic charm and funk spiced basslines wrapped in tempting guitar and caressing keys, all fuelled by a contagion which as suggested has feet and bodies at its mercy; manna for any dance-floor.

The remixes bring bold new shades to the song with the Daak Sun Remix especially striking. Darker bordering on sinister as it rumbles in sound and atmosphere, the track is a far more physical proposal which if anything has the body and imagination even more frenetically involved.

Surrounding it the Naked Highway Remix is a fuzzy stroll under a spatial sky, its bassline earthily scuzzy as keys radiate a cosmic revelry while the Malandrino Remix is a seductive sunset, intimately exotic as keys dance evocatively through ears to the bouncy beat of the rhythms like a tropical Thompson Twins.

Together they all add up to another richly enjoyable outing with Calling All Astronauts with the original slice of Life As We Know It further evidence of a band deserving the keenest attention.

Life As We Know It is out now through Supersonic Media across most online stores.

http://www.callingallastronauts.com    https://www.facebook.com/CallingAllAstronauts/     https://twitter.com/CAA_Official    https://callingallastronauts1.bandcamp.com/

Pete RingMaster 11/01/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Survival Code – One

the-survival-code-pic-2_RingMasterReview

Sure to cement the attention and praise generated by recent EP Broken Strings and a title track acting as its first single, UK alternative rockers The Survival Code release new track One mid-January. Also from the three-track EP, the song is another imagination sparking, ear pleasing proposal sharing just a little more of the variety making up the band’s infectious rock ‘n’ roll.

London based, The Survival Code is fronted by Dubliner Gary McGuinness on vocals and guitar and driven by the rhythmic prowess of bassist Michael Eden and drummer Tom Cook. Formed in 2011 and inspired by the likes of Johnny Cash, Deftones, Foo Fighters, Alkaline Trio, The Cure, The Beatles, and Biffy Clyro, the band released the Everything But Today EP in 2013. Well-received it was easily surpassed in sound and success as well as acclaim by debut album MMXV two years later, a step forward replicated again by Broken Strings.

the-survival-code-one-artwork_RingMasterReviewLast year was a big and eventful year for the band, seeing them play over 40 gigs across the capital and beyond ending with a UK tour around their latest EP. It also saw The Survival Code settling down to write a new album, go through a change of bassists, and endure “a manager that ran off with months of work.” One ensures that 2017 is kicked off in fine style for the band, a year already threatening to exceed its predecessor in success and adventure.

From its first breath One uncages a tide of jabbing beats and imposing riffs but with a creative restraint which allows all aspects within to express and tempt around the potent vocals of McGuinness. Raw in air yet finely woven, the track also casts harmonic roars and melodic sighs within its rousing body, essences of bands like Feeder and Skyscraper hinted at as the song blossoms in imagination and infectious energy.

From start to finish, it is a relentless persuasion which has body and spirit involved. It might not prove to be the most unique encounter found this year but few will be more enjoyable so if you are looking for new meaty rock ‘n’ roll to feed a hungry appetite The Survival Code might just be the One.

One is released January 20th through Independent Records Limited (IRL).

January 14 – Proud Camden – Camden Rocks all day festival

March 16 – Brighton – The Hope and Run

http://www.thesurvivalcode.co.uk/    https://www.facebook.com/thesurvivalcode    https://twitter.com/thesurvivalcode

Pete RingMaster 11/01/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Beware! Monsters – Friend or Faux

beware-monsters-friend-or-faux-cover_RingMasterReview

An invigorating kaleidoscope of sound amid rousing creative dramatics, Friend or Faux is the debut album from British outfit Beware! Monsters. It is an encounter bred on a fusion of electro infused rock ‘n’ roll, rap, drum ‘n’ bass, and dubstep; like a fusion of Hadouken!, G.R.I.M, and Abandon All Ships but swiftly finding its own character in an provocatively fun album with a snarl in its heart and lyrical suggestiveness.

There is also a more than light touch of Semitt Falls to the Manchester band’s proposal which is no surprise as Beware! Monsters features former members of that band in guitarist Paul Kendrick and bassist Sidge Rushton. In fact vocalist Jay Kane was also one of the founders of the unpredictably inventive Semitt Falls, linking up once more with former band mates and newcomer in drummer Corentin Neyran for a new adventure in 2016. Beware! Monsters swiftly found eager appetites devouring their boisterous sound live and subsequently with Friend or Faux and its enjoyably intrusive and bold sixteen track proposal.

Book ended and broken up with ‘skits’ of evocative aural suggestion, the album starts proper with Make Wubz Not War and a deliciously heavy bassline with funk in its heart. As electronic and guitar cast essences attach themselves, the irresistible coaxing leads ears into a lively stroll abound with rock bred devilment and electro enterprise. With Kane’s rapping an equally persuasive motion in the thrilling scheme of things, the song sparks thoughts of previously mentioned Londoners Hadouken! and fellow Mancunians G.R.I.M but as also suggested earlier shows plenty to forge its own identity.

A mightily anthemic trespass on body and imagination, the great start continues with Truth, a milder mannered encounter sound wise but with a bite to its words and an underlying defiance to its intent as melodies seduce and rhythms bounce. Rushton’s bass again is an imposing treat more than matched by the frantic urges of the electronic antics around it and Neyran’s tenacious beats.

A wonderful nagging quality is shared by Kendrick’s guitar in the following Higher, its riffs and grooves a magnetic persistence supported by funk fuelled rhythms and an instinctive catchiness brewed in quick time by the aligning of individual revelry. With a touch of Axis Mundi to its body, the fiercely enjoyable track is followed and eclipsed by Beware of the Monsters, a pop rock scented affair with classical strains in its melodic endeavour and rapacity to its captivation loaded rock ‘n’ roll; it ultimately a resourceful carnival with the snappy raps of Kane as its side show barker.

The brief Project Dystopia is a similarly alluring affair at ease either snarling or roaming through ears in a reggae graced haze before making way for the punchy dynamics of A Long Way From Home, a track epitomising the album in the diversity of styles and textures employed in its imaginative carousel. Though it lacks the same spark as its predecessors for personal ears, the song is a compelling and skilfully woven proposition before the short almost gothic lure of In Ravens We Trust pulls intrigue into the waiting drama of We Are The 48. The track is another rock heavy slice of goodness with a predatory edge to its rhythms and vocals amidst the entwining of fiery grooves and smouldering melodies.

The Messengers of Deception rumbles and grumbles next without skimping on veins of seductive melodic enticement and its own distinct web of rousing creative espionage while No False Idol smoulders around another earthy bassline as an Enter Shikari meets Electric Six escapade blossoms into something fiercely unique and explosive to Beware! Monsters.

The cosmic toned A Revolution in Progress stirs the senses and emotions next, its intimate yet worldly challenge a tempestuous blend of rock and metal as at ease gently caressing involvement as forcibly stirring it up, all with a craft and invention which sets another certain highlight within Friend or Faux.

Closing with The Haunting is Over, a short evocative instrumental, Friend or Faux is one of those striking debuts which lingers in ears and thoughts long pass its presence. Certainly some tracks surpass others but from its first eventful second through to its suggestive last, the album is an impressive introduction to a band already outshining its member’s previous successes.

Friend or Faux is out now @ https://bewaremonsters.bandcamp.com/releases

https://www.facebook.com/bewaremonstersuk/

Pete RingMaster 11/01/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Ventenner – Invidia

Ensuring 2017 gets off to a powerful start, UK’s Ventenner are poised to release their new album; an encounter which from start to finish rapaciously devours ears and imagination. Increasingly irresistible with every passing slice of alternative metal, rock, and industrially infused electronic involvement, Invidia is the natural yet inventively bold offspring of the band’s previous successes across. When giving us the heads up last year about the forthcoming encounter, band founder Charlie Dawe (vocals/synth) suggested that “This one is set to be a lot heavier, more powerful and a superior record!” It needs little time and barely one listen to confirm his hopes and assessment are right on the money.

Variety and imagination has never been lacking in the Ventenner sound as evidenced by previous albums This Is The Reason of 2012 and the acclaimed Distorture two years later. Power and forceful enterprise has never been absent in the band’s music either since emerging initially as a solo project for Dawe in 2007. Ventenner’s last album alone was an encounter leaving “the senses beleaguered and imagination ablaze from start to finish”, its emotionally raw dystopian soundscapes seductive and compelling but indeed Invidia while embracing similar qualities taps into an almost primal yet involved intensity and abrasive energy which consumes the listener.

Produced by Esoteric vocalist/guitarist Greg Chandler, Invidia also unveils the most intricate tapestries of sound from the London based outfit yet starting with opener The Start Is The End. A synth resonates in ears first, it’s coaxing swiftly joined by the prowling tones of Dawe with restrained but striking rhythms alongside. As riffs and hooks bring their invention to the mix, the song breeds a Nine Inch Nails scented predation; exotic hues lining an emerging melodic suggestiveness within a controlled yet tempestuous proposal. Throughout, the song’s character is intrusive and raw yet magnetically infectious, traits blossoming throughout the album.

cover-art_RingMasterReviewBreak In Two reinforces the release’s impressive start, its resourceful entrance calmer yet just as instinctively invasive as its predecessor’s as a Gravity Kills meets Celldweller air grows and colludes with Ventenner’s openly distinct imagination. A gorgeous melodic hook caps off a mighty temptation, its prowess and potency matched by the sinister charm and emotive fire of next up Saligia. Almost devious in its weave of flirtatious melodies and sonic causticity, the song is pure addiction as industrial metal and electro punk merge for a hauntingly irritable raid on the senses.

A superb and masterfully woven conflict of textures makes up Enemy next, an outpouring of beauty and the beast sound and creativity lined not for the first or last time within Invidia by a Pitchshifter like essence while next up Be Still brings fresh crabbiness to ears as Ventenner again confirm their expertise at aligning melodic elegance and bordering on hostile emotional and musical tetchiness.

The former of the essences is embraced primarily by the bewitching Only The Empty Remain, though it too has a disgruntled undercurrent which erupts throughout before Circle while carrying a touch of Society One to itself, roars commandingly, making its mere two minutes another of the most powerful and essential moments within Invidia.

Dividing Seed just as enjoyably hits the spot, its web of guitar and synth intrusiveness as disarmingly seductive as it is cholerically bracing; essences further inventively twisted by successor Bruxism. A bear of a song with bone shuddering beats and senses binding vines of sonic invention around the emotional challenge of Dawe’s vocals and words, the track is sheer power but tempered by the disarming flow of melodic grace and harmonic beauty which breaks through the October File spiced tempest.

A predatory air is cast by Anamnesis, a trespass captivatingly countered by the reflective melodies and warm textures blossoming in voice and sound. Like two souls in dispute yet eager union, the track adds to the pinnacles of the release before being instantly matched by the imagination gripping landscape of closing track Omega. Its melancholic beauty immerses ears and thoughts in a haunting almost spatial flight accentuated by Dawe’s transfixing tones in a temptation which alone urges a swift return to the roar of the album.

Distorture impressed two years ago but has been easily eclipsed by Invidia, already one of this year’s important highlights. In many ways the Ventenner sound has come of age yet it is easy to still feel there is plenty more for they and us to discover.

Invidia is released via Hibernacula Records 20th January on CD and also digitally and on vinyl through http://www.ventenner.com/store

http://www.ventenner.com/

https://twitter.com/ventenner   https://www.facebook.com/Ventenner/

Pete RingMaster 10/01/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright