Feared – Synder

feared_2015

Six albums in with the release of Synder and Swedish metallers Feared have uncaged a fury and voracity which not only confirms the band as one of the relatively unsung greats but has the listener smiling broadly as their soul is desecrated. Feared’s new album is a rousing, destructive beast of a proposition. It is an encounter which is not exactly menacing new boundaries within a thrash/death metal landscape but taking its already established template to dark and creatively ravenous depths which are as fresh as they are rabid. The band’s name describes exactly how their music should be contemplated with the ‘sins’ of Synder greedily devoured.

The story of Feared goes back to 2007, the project the creation of guitarist and producer Ola Englund (ex-Six Feet Under). Despite a potent start and a first demo in 2008, the band disbanded until two years later when things stirred again. Englund and vocalist Mario Ramos (Demonoid) released a self-titled debut album which swiftly earned support and acclaim from fans and media alike, a success built on the following year through second album Rejects. The 2011 encounter lit further focus upon the band which once more escalated as Furor Incarnatus in 2013 came out, though in turn a greater hungry appetite outside the band and striking creative energy within came with fifth album Vinter. The album followed a period which saw Englund also become the new guitarist of The Haunted and the addition of drummer Kevin Talley (Suffocation, ex-Dying Fetus, ex-Black Dahlia Murder) and ex-Clawfinger bassist Jocke Skog to Feared. The release revealed a new intensity and inventive tempest within the band’s songwriting and sound, a gateway to darker ferocious climates which has now been driven on and overshadowed by Synder. Produced by Englund and Skog it is the finest Feared assault yet, from the striking artwork of Sylvain Razorimages wrapping its hellacious roar to the furiously flavoured and diversely coloured adventure, it is an intensive examination and explosive incitement for ears and imagination.

feared_synder_cover  The album’s title track opens things up, the brief instrumental an initial melodic caress of guitar courted by an ominous air which brews and expands as the track comes to rigorous life with thick rhythms and evocative sonic endeavour. It is not a startling start but a potent atmosphere setter, warming up ears and thoughts for the immediate ferocity of Your Demise. Riffs fling their spite at ears with rage and virulent animosity, their thrash breeding an instant gripping lure enhanced by the spicy grooving and thick throat shredding vocals of Ramos. Framing and igniting it all further, the growling grouchiness of Skog’s bass and the precise rabidity of Talley’s beats drive an anthemic urgency and contagion within the track, it all colluding for a breath-taking and thrilling full start to the album.

The impressive and riveting tempting continues in Of Iron And Ashes, the song equally uncompromising and carnivorous but quickly adding floating melodic clouds of keys to its turbulent canvas. Their presence and touch is minimal in the otherwise violent climate but cast an intrigue and unpredictability which eventually is realised in a calm, melodic eye of the storm moment. The volcanic heart and nature of the song is soon ravishing ears though as squirming grooves and tenacious riffery leads ears through a rhythmic jungle into the resourceful venomous grasp of Caligula. Again this song shows as those before it, that there is plenty involved in the thrash/death sound of Feared, here a groove/alternative metal weaving adding to an inventive theatre for a potent Bloodsimple like essence.

My Grief, My Sorrow follows suit in its own individual way, its heavier prowl and imposing intensity a predatory insistence on the senses. It’s stalking takes on even greater malevolence as rhythms make venomous jabs and stabs though the acidic grooving is a constant temper reining in the fury enough to allow mouth-watering melodies and sonic imagination to have their say. As its predecessor, the song takes the imagination on an enthralling ride whilst bruising and battering the body, a respite found straight after though in the classical elegance of the melancholic Dygder, another short and descriptive instrumental.

It leads thoughts and emotions in to the waiting ravenous jaws of By Silent Screaming, an immediately caustic and bracing tsunami of vitriolic energy and creative tenacity. Though never quite matching up to those around it, hail their torrents of riffs and beats, the song is the most exploratory on the album with changeable scenery of melodic endeavour and an almost psychotic air to its rhythmic and unpredictable imagination. It is a fascinating encounter revealing more about the intent of the band’s latest creative explorations with every listen.

The invigorating Wolf At The End Of The World has ears back in a bracing barrage of sonic and rhythmic raging next before My Own Redemption plunders even heavier, darker exploits. From the gut spilling tones of Ramos to the spidery grooves of Englund, the track bewitches as it chews up the senses. It is another stalking incitement but one with the raw heart of a predator and the inventive emprise of a troubadour, the vocals alone a union of bestial pestilence and melodic crooning. One excellent song is replaced by another as Dying Day explodes in ears with incendiary effect, grooves and hooks whipping up the imagination and vicious rhythms taking care of the body as Ramos spills rancor with every syllable.

War Feeding War keeps appetite and emotions inflamed next with its corrosive lures and fearsome persuasion whilst The Narcissist, with a disturbed and vehement web of sound and hostility, is an instantly enjoyable onslaught with plenty that escapes first attention but goes towards increasingly richer return listens. Both tracks involve the whole of the listener, though a point to offer for the whole of Synder to be fair in varying degrees. Some songs, like the first of these two, are more unbridled physical enticements whilst the latter, as also the closing Godless Devotion, provide dramatically deeper and longer to explore proposals.

All tracks though combine to provide the listener with a blistering protagonist to get excited about in Synder and confirm Feared as one of those bands many may have heard about but really should now be making the effort to dive deeply into.

Synder is available now via most online stores and @ http://www.fearedband.com/store-feared-synder

http://www.fearedband.com   http://www.facebook.com/fearedband

RingMaster 28/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

[STÖMB] – The Grey

Band

   “Can you hear the sound of the world? This ephemeral echo that slowly burns through the void…

Can you see beyond the veil? This overwhelming presence that enhances the truthfulness of any reality…

And then…When everything has faded away and the world is silent…

All there will be left is resonance…And the grey.”

 

Bred from the prose above, the epic, imposing landscape of The Grey, the debut album from French progressive metallers [STÖMB], is a ten track exploration of desolation and the nothingness consuming life before, during, and after its journey. Certainly that is where it took our imaginations, but the encounter will be the conjuring of diverse thoughts and emotions across all immersing within its potent and compelling adventure. As much as it is for ears, The Grey is an exploration for the imagination too, sculpting instrumental dramas and imposing soundscapes which easily ignite the senses and mind.

With a progressive metal sound entwining rich essences of diversely found flavours, the listing of the Paris quartet’s inspirations probably giving a clearer picture of their invention. Guitarists Tom B and Aurélien DF, bassist Alexandre G, and drummer Olivier R cite bands such as Meshuggah, Tesseract, Klone, Tool, and Animals As Leader as influences to their own striking compositions, and fair to say whatever your imagination is coming up with as you read that spicing is probably close to the mark in regard to album and sound yet a fraction of what The Grey provides as it leads ears and emotions into fresh adventures.

Digi    At around seventy minutes in length, the album is an epic journey and challenges from start to finish whilst rewarding with tracks which transport the listener into the realms they have been inspired to contemplate by its sonic narrative. Maybe combined it all makes for a proposal pushing limits of endurance, yet there is rarely a moment within songs and release where thoughts and attention wanders. From opener The Complex the album simply fascinates; every slither of melodic seduction and roar of primal antagonism a bewitching incitement. The first track alone has it all, its initial caress of beauty evolving into a volatile stroll of ravenous riffs and menacing rhythms within a caustic yet inviting ambience. The only voices across the album come in occasional suggestive samples, an early one helping shape or at least hint to the descriptive intensity and background of the first track.

The portentous feel of the song is replaced by the ferocious and hostile majesty of Rise from Nothing, a ravenous consumption of the senses but composed with a sonic and melodic beauty which ebbs and flows across the rugged rhythmic scenery. It’s consistently tempestuous air and theatre becomes even more volatile and inflammatory as the track proceeds, but like a travelogue it equally enthrals as it slips into new aural lands of mystique and creative colour before making way for Veins of Asphalt. The new detour to explore equally has a wealth of fearsome and endearing enterprise to offer and evolve; jagged riffs and scything beats entangled with a sonic web of mouth-watering craft and virulent temptation. With most tracks within The Grey ranging between six and nine minutes, only two courting slimmer lengths, there is a continually changeable aspect to the dark, immersive flights which is impossible to portray here but take as read very easy to get lost within in person.

Corrosion Juncture is a blend of savage intimidation and melodic ingenuity within a spatial atmosphere, the music a tenaciously magnetic flight through turbulence and calm within a shadowed drenched unknown. The senses are buffeted throughout and ears lit by the masterful endeavour of each aspect of sound as the track drives towards the lighter peace and beauty of The Crossing. It is a brief floatation of warm melodises and transfixing creative charm, a lull in the tempest which is soon consuming ears and thoughts again through the dystopian heat and intensity of Under the Grey. Its busy persuasion has thoughts lost in Orwellian theatre, again evidence of tracks and the band freeing the imagination to explore its own dark corners to their soundtrack. The song is a gripping proposal equalled by the just as potent Terminal City, a bustling rigorous prowl across an intensive, unrelenting daily provocation of life we can all feel akin to.

The track is glorious, the pinnacle of the album alongside its predecessor, though things continue to enthuse appetite and enjoyment as the broader terrain of The New Coming and the mercurial Genome Decline follow. The first of the pair embraces a calmer if still ferociously unstable climate with a smothering tapestry of unpredictable sound whilst its successor is an undulating, rabidly twisted spiral of enterprise and imagination embracing the listener in a thick sonic hug breeding fiery melodies and spicy textures.

The album closes with Only an Echo, a song with its melancholic air and reflective ambience which feels like an epilogue or more an epitaph to the dark premises explored before it. It is a fine and suggestive end to an increasingly gripping encounter. Admittedly at times The Grey is now taken in halves here, yet each time it leaves a lingering pleasure and incitement in emotions and thoughts…Fair to say that progressive metal has another impressive protagonist to contemplate.

The Grey is available now @ https://stomb.bandcamp.com/album/the-grey

http://www.facebook.com/stombofficial

RingMaster 28/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Evil Conspiracy – Prime Evil

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It might not be an encounter with even an inkling of tearing up the metal ‘rule book’ in its makeup but Prime Evil from Swedish heavy metallers Evil Conspiracy is one seriously enjoyable proposition to revitalise weary ears. A feisty mix of flavours from classic and power metal to thrash and melodic escapades, the band’s sound makes for a magnetic and inventive incitement in a debut album which hits all the right notes in its thoroughly rewarding stomp.

Hailing from the Kumla/Örebro areas of Sweden, Evil Conspiracy emerged in 2002, evolving from a band called Legions which had just lost some of its members. A quartet of demos were released between 2003 and 2006 to strong responses, whilst live the band were soon earning a good reputation for their performances. Their first show saw the band support Lost Horizon but in no time they were drawing strong and eager crowds and support, resulting in Evil Conspiracy being one of the headline acts at the Wretstock festival whilst in early 2004 they supported Dionysus at the release party for Anima Mundi in Örebro. A few personnel changes have come with the years, especially vocally, but with the line-up of vocalist Fredrik Eriksson, guitarist/keyboardist/vocalist Andreas Mäkelä, guitarist Patrik Mäkelä, bassist Martin Giaever, and drummer Veikko Heikkinen, Evil Conspiracy set about creating their first album with its release recently coming through Sliptrick Records to whom the band signed last year.

Prime Evil is an immediate incitement for ears and appetite, the opening Intro a short but atmospherically engaging proposal. The guitars spread suggestive melodies as around them brooding ambience brews, this in turn inviting dramatic rhythms and intensity to step forth until it all winds down leaving the listener ready for the fiery contagion of Rule the Ruins. Thrash seeded riffs rigorously roam as gripping hooks leave their mark whilst along the lure the excellent and grouchy tones of Eriksson entice and impress. Group harmonies add to a mellower but no less anthemic chorus whilst the spicy enterprise of the guitars are courted by the ever presence temptation of addictive hooks and spiky grooves. The track is an excellent proper start to the album and quickly backed up by its title track with its own unique collection of tangy grooving and virulent persuasion. A rich essence of Bay Area thrash lines the rampancy and snarl of the track but equally its sonic endeavour and imagination has a power/heavy metal adventure as the track twists and lurches from landmark to landmark with a creative infectiousness which is Anthrax like.

There is no letting up in energy and enjoyment as the prowling predator that is Scars with Pride takes over. The vocals simply draw full attention as does the roaming throaty bass enterprise of Giaever, whilst the guitars spin an evolving web of voracious and in turn seductive invention as the song explores a mellower landscape, though its walls still snarl and grab at the senses from time to time. It is a captivating encounter setting up the broader metal tapestry of Fallen From the Sky, another song with a growling, inhospitable nature at its core but engaged in an exploration of melodic beauty and eighties harmonic resourcefulness. It does not quite find the same levels of persuasion as its predecessors but still makes a compelling and rewarding proposition before being outshone by The Plague. Jagged, carnivorous riffs saw away at ears initially, their intimidation matched by the menace of the rhythms before it relaxes a touch for a melodic saunter. All the time though glimpses of the predation it opened with flirt with the passions before emerging in a raucously addictive and anthemic chorus. Simply it is a lithe beast of a song with raptorial imagination and a malevolent heart.

7-2 provides a slab of enticing power balladry with rugged exploits next whilst The Beast of Flesh and Blood and Tools of Evil uncage their individual contagions of multi-flavoured and skilfully crafted old school infused metal. All three, without igniting the fires as the first half of Prime Evil achieved with personal tastes, have easy control of body and satisfaction with their individual catchy anthems. The third especially has the knack of deceptively involving the listener at certain points, if not quite maintaining that potency for its whole length, but enjoyment is only topped up by each and the following Father of Lies.

The penultimate song is the most diverse on the album in many ways, its melodic and progressive enterprise a fascinating enticement which if anything does not go far enough in its boldness, ultimately preferring to embrace a more classic heavy metal croon. Nevertheless again you can only say that satisfaction is thick as the final encounter takes to ears. Earth and Flames is similar in make-up if not presence to the previous song, aggressive and seductive in simultaneous persuasion and a thrilling end to a thoroughly enjoyable offering from a band you can expect to be talked about in much broader circles from hereon in.

Evil Conspiracy might not want to re-invent the metal wheel but they certainly have the intent to give it a colourful coat of voracious rock ‘n’ roll paint, a success found in the heartily recommended Prime Evil.

Prime Evil is available now via Sliptrick Records @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/prime-evil/id974680961

https://www.facebook.com/evilconspiracy

RingMaster 28/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

The Decoy – Parasites EP

The Decoy (7 of 20)

It seems like South Wales is truly ablaze with exciting emerging talent right now, not that the area has ever been slow in producing striking and very often impressive propositions. The past months, indeed couple of years though has seemingly seen a new flood of adventurous bands and sounds to wake-up and capture the imagination. Few bands and releases have whipped up ears and passions as potently and excitingly as The Decoy with the Parasites EP though. The Cwmbran trio’s new four-track incitement is a raucous fire of sound and flavouring, a fiery storm of alternative rock ‘n’ roll which fills in the gap still there since the demise of Reuben whilst creating its own agitated pop infused creative brawl. There are certain times it is impossible not to get a little excited and the release of Parasites is one of those moments.

Consisting of guitarist/vocalist Lewis “Biffy” Barber, bassist/vocalist Joel Williams, and drummer/vocalist Luke Blake, The Decoy since forming in 2009 has been steadily brewing up a loyal fan base and increasing attention. Shows with the likes of Attack! Attack! [UK] and Press To Meco confirmed the band as an aggressively alluring live presence whilst a self-titled EP and a second called Mirrors, established the band’s sound as one to watch and simultaneously get fully engaged with. Parasites is another level to what has come before though, a coming of age for the sound and songwriting of the band whilst still retaining the mischievous and volatile adventure to both aspects which has already helped the threesome stand out.

CoverArtThe swift jab to the ribs of opener Moustache Cash Dash reveals the new plateau breached. From the initial roar of vocals across the whole band, the song has ears and attention gripped, that first flame of voices the trigger to a rowdy stomp of unpredictable hooks and twists aligned to a flirtatious swagger and pop seeded contagion. With the two minute mark a distant glimpse, band and song are as lyrically and vocally bright as they are technically and inventively resourceful, creating a busy proposal which just captivates from start to finish.

The following Vultures is equally as magnetic, its rhythmic shuffle a highly persuasive introduction leading to a web of bass and guitar enticement as jagged as it is fluid. There is funkiness to the agitated stroll of the song too, especially in the bass swing, whilst its core sound comes over as agitated and irritable as the centre of the lyrical relationship explored. Again the creative magnetism cast is irresistible as the band shows the variety in their ingenuity as another already established essence finding new heights, and proven again by Parasite. The third track caresses ears and hugs thoughts with a great vocal and melody rich ambience initially; it’s almost haunted nature a gentle coaxing which suddenly expels a roar of angst and volatile energy. There is a certain creative theatre to the song, a dramatic ingenuity which makes every twist from a gentle vocal kiss to a fierce spilling of rage musically and lyrically, a breath-taking and unique endeavour. The track is superb, as all of the tracks, and quite outstanding in its very distinct and individual presence within the EP.

The release is concluded by ANDYOUISM, the rawest, fuzziest slice of voracious pop rock you will have the treat of coming across this year outside of Parasites. Rhythms pound from the off, the senses virtually shuddering at their potency, whilst effect clad vocals sizzle in ears as the guitar slips its own fierce simmer of sonic tenacity around it all. There is a touch of Engerica to the encounter; a dark intrigue like the now demised band used to express, a striking hue to the infectious furnace of imagination stoking drama. Simply it is an ingeniously imposing and scintillating end to an equally masterful release.

Parasites is from first note to last, an outstanding proposition, something to stir up the passions and bring a fresh and invigorating adventure to the British rock scene. A new signpost has been set down in the rise of The Decoy but there is still the feeling that we have not heard anything yet.

The Parasites EP is available now via Ghoulish Records @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/parasites-ep/id991452997

https://www.facebook.com/TheDecoyUK   https://twitter.com/TheDecoyUK

RingMaster 28/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Unmothered – U M B R A

Unmothered_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

U M B R A is a predator soaked in doom and sludge but equally draped with essences of black metal, noise, stoner rock, and most likely any other voracious flavour you can imagine. It is also one of the most primal and inventively addictive things heard so far in 2015. The new carnivorous proposition from US band Unmothered, the three track EP proposition brawls through ears, violates the senses, and scars the psyche from start to finish, all the time igniting the passions with its fierce turbulence. There is no escape once it takes hold but no desire to flee its uncompromising trespass either.

Starting their raucous prowl of the senses in 2010, the Austin hailing Unmothered unleashed their self-titled debut EP vinyl in 2012 to acclaiming responses across the underground scene. It brought seven atmospherically ravenous and physically cavernous landscapes to feast on the senses, laying the seeds for the even darker and in many ways more intimate intrusions to be found within the insidious temptation of U M B R A.

cover_ Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review    As its predecessor, the EP is wrapped in the artwork of UK artist Andrew Sloan, its dark toning and organic imagery a first glimpse of the creative tapestry and sonic exploration set to seduce ears and beyond. Opener Magnetar rubs ears with a lone riff to begin within but swiftly revolves and broadens into a predatory canter of imposing rhythms from drummer Matt Moulis and dark throaty bait courtesy of Joseph Barnes’ bass, both entwined in the just as gripping sonic tenacity of guitarist Matt Walker. Alone each sculpts pure drama but together they make aural pestilence whilst additionally conjuring a groove which no matter where it leads or what it twists itself into, is an unrelenting seducing within the carnal ambience and textures around it. The pestilential tones of Walker’s vocals crawl into the psyche too as they hitch a ride on the increasingly contagious grooving and tsunami like hostility swinging its way to the same destination.

If the swagger of the first song is incendiary and contagious, it is light weight compared to that of Scarp and before it Huntress. The second song scythes through ears on a sonic lure before thickening its bait within a musty swamp of noise. It is only building towards the point of greater addictive enterprise though, another flaming acidic groove with a waspish nature flirting within ears as guitars and drums spin a magnetic enslaving web. Equipped with gnarly bass tones which simply inflame the senses, the song offers whispers of bands like Ministry and Morkobot, though equally you would suggest Unsane or a Today is the Day, as many do, as a hint to the ravaging being enjoyed. The track is irresistible, a disembowelling of the senses with riveting rewards in return but quickly over shadowed by the final song.

Scarp from its first breath is a torrent of sonic nagging, Walker’s guitar a primal bee in the psyche which is rapidly matched in primeval temptation by the roguish swipes of Moulis and the throaty dissent of bass. A rhythmic and sonic virulence does not let up even as the raw tones of Walker spill their new narrative of aggression and his guitar skirts over the Killing Joke like rhythmic spine with its caustic and corrosive enterprise. A post rock like calm embraces ears midway through to wrong-foot and bewitch, the drums continuing to roll out a mouth-watering and unrelenting niggle of anthemic beats throughout. It is a mesmeric and meditative passage yet in its air, lurking in the shadows there is an intimidation and menace which bides its time before exploding in one hellacious climax of one outstanding incitement.

The track is a brilliant; a gripping end to a glorious slab of noise fuelled contagion posing as U M B R A. Letting greed have its say there is no doubting that the EP is over too soon but with the adage ‘leave them wanting more’ surely in its thoughts, U M B R A and Unmothered have opened up a vat of anticipation for something bigger and you suspect even more threateningly bolder.

U M B R A is available from May 26th via Crowquill Records. For details see http://crowquillrecords.limitedrun.com/artists/unmothered

http://unmothered.com/   https://www.facebook.com/Unmothered

RingMaster 26/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Masamune -Tension & Resolution

Masamune Promo Shot

Tension & Resolution is the devilish encounter introducing UK alternative rockers Masamune to their broadest audience yet, five tracks which just get under the skin in an attention grabbing debut on first hearing to become even more dramatically compelling over time. The release also shows there is still plenty of scope for the band to evolve and build even more virulent persuasions, and that alone just breeds healthy anticipation.

Hailing from Sunderland, Masamune began in the autumn of 2009 when guitarist Steven Kane, bassist James Wallace, and drummer Jack Johnson came together musically for the first time. Crossing each other’s path via the internet, the band’s founders were soon creating their own songs and performing across the North East of England before in 2012, the trio decided to push things to another level and recruited vocalist Neil Anthony in the year’s closing weeks to complete the line-up. The years have seen the band play alongside the likes of Fearless Vampire Killers, Fort Hope, and Ashestoangels as well as taking part in a Channel 4 television show with comedian Al Murray as their roadie. Musically they have drawn references to the likes of Muse, Red Hot Chili Peppers, and Queens of The Stone Age, all understandable suggestions especially the first of the three, but as the EP’s first song shows there is much more fresh body and flavouring to the Masamune sound.

Masamune Cover Artwork     Tension & Resolution opens with The Bloodlines and a tangy guitar melody. Its lure is soon backed by a rolling persuasion of drums and in turn an instantly captivating bass groove amidst richer guitar enterprise. Things relax for the entrance of Anthony, his expressive tones courted by a dark bassline and crispy beats whilst a flirtatious almost smiling tease of guitar contrasts the darker emotion of the moment. It is a beguiling passage slowly increasing in drama and intensity and eventually erupting in a feistier blaze of riffs aligned to potent harmonies from Anthony and Wallace. More tantalising temptations, like hooks and grooves from across the band, continue to play with the imagination and feed a growing appetite as the song provides a strong start to the release.

The following Silhouettes opens with just as rich bait as its predecessor began with; a single seduction of guitar cast in a familiar yet indefinable suggestiveness the lead into an increasingly busy and fuzzy web of enterprise. That Muse essence is an open breeze across the song, colouring nicely the original and flowing ideation of Masamune. It is another offering which ebbs and flows in energy, though it provides a livelier and more infectious bounty for ears and thoughts to eagerly embrace. The catchy beats of Johnson are deceptively anthemic and matched by the alluring bass coaxing sculpted by Wallace whilst around both, the guitar of Kane and the increasingly impressing vocals of Anthony sparkle and entice.

     Run & Hide saunters in next on a thick bassline and a welcoming shuffle of beats before opening up into a harmony loaded stroll of melodic rock with evocative expression around an infectious swing. Steely bursts of riffs add to the captivation, as do the spidery strands of guitar endeavour, it all aligning for another gripping and enjoyable persuasion before making way for the melancholic charm of The Song About Ghosts. Though it carries imposing shadows in its body there is also plenty of radiance through melodies and harmonies, an inventive rhythmic tempting, and in the chorus a Brit pop hue to twist things up. The track maybe does not quite match up to the last couple of songs yet it too is an unpredictable and resourcefully engaging encounter which persistently draws ears back.

The EP is concluded by House Of Mirrors, a highly enjoyable finish with its snarling riffs and magnetic sonic tenacity. Once again rich inescapable hooks snare ears and the imagination whilst the ever enslaving basslines of Wallace add their addictive qualities to the mix. The song is enthralling and an invigorating close to a fine first encounter with Masamune.

Though some songs within Tension & Resolution just fall short of finding the spark to elevate them to even higher stature, the band seemingly holding back at times rather than taking a step into the creative ‘unknown’, there is no denying that the EP is one seriously satisfying debut and that the future of Masamune is looking very exciting.

The Tension & Resolution EP is available now through all stores and via http://masamune.bigcartel.com/product/masamune-tension-resolution-ep

https://www.facebook.com/masamunemu         http://www.masamunemusic.com/

RingMaster 26/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Calling Apollo – Hunter |Gatherer

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Though not a slow burner, the five track encounter making a potent impression first time around, it is fair to say that Hunter |Gatherer from UK quintet Calling Apollo just gets bigger and more impressive over each and every listen. It is a proposition which suggests that its creators is still a band evolving and discovering their ultimate sound but powerfully hinting that when they do it will be something to get very excited over. To be honest Hunter |Gatherer is already an attention grabbing proposal which whips up a keen appetite and anticipation in return for its mix of familiarity and fresh invention; the EP a potent step in the full emergence of one very promising band.

Rising from Cardiff towards the end of 2012 as a quartet, the band spent time creating and honing their sound inspire by artists such as Deftones, The Cure, Funeral For A Friend, Thrice, The Doors to Kings Of Leon, Nine Inch Nails, and Muse amongst many. Vocalist Christian James Neale was recruited early the following year before the five-piece hit the live scene, starting with a show in Newport which earned rave reviews. This was followed by the release of the band’s debut EP Vessels; an encounter self-recorded in a tiny box bedroom in Barry and released as a free download to great responses. In 2014, Calling Apollo ventured into the studio for the first time, recording the Clone City/1945 single. It was a greedily received offering by fans and underground media alike, a success easy to see repeated and more by Hunter |Gatherer.

Picture 133   The release opens with the meaty tones of Hunter, riffs and rhythms a pungent proposal from the off entwined with inviting melodic strands of guitar. Though there is a recognisable air to the song quite early, its busy enterprise and imagination means there is a strong unpredictability to the encounter. The vocals of Neale instantly hold attention, his presence with a melodic embrace around him bringing a Placebo essence to wrap the robust rhythms of drummer Zak Woolf and bassist Luke Walters. The pair in turn provide an anthemic but also tempestuous canvas for the guitars of Kevin Williams and Dan Hughes to colour and spiral from whilst rawer backing vocals compliment Neale to good effect. The song does not leap out at the imagination and emotions as maybe it should have given its creative endeavour, but it certainly awakens keen interest which is more heavily inspired as each subsequent song comes forward.

The following In This City makes a gentle guitar caress on ears initially, its melodic romance swiftly reinforced by the mellow tones of Neale. As it entices, the pairing breeds a rising intensity which erupts in a controlled but tempestuous stroll of agitated rhythms and sonic tenacity. Once in full swing the track is a captivating contagion of emotive expression, revealing the one reference which dominates all when describing the band’s sound. Though there is a great variety to the music, it is Billy Talent which this and following songs most remind of, Calling Apollo sculpting the same impassioned, hook loaded adventure the Canadian band is so adept at

The outstanding encounter makes way for Chemical Breaker, a song which also makes a restrained entrance equipped with radiant melodies and stirring rhythms before boiling up into a more turbulent and engrossing proposal. Though it does not constantly have the same dramatic spark as its predecessor, it is a track which becomes more volatile and fascinating minute by minute and over time, setting up emotions and a now hungrier appetite nicely for the closing pair of richly enticing songs.

Monsters has moments where its potency is more diluted than in other instances within its body but when bounding along with boisterous and dynamically striking enterprise it is a mouth-watering exploit. Even its less fiery essences provide an enthralling incitement to be held firmly by. Melodies and vocals never lack emotive energy whilst the more controlled aspects of the song where the band for personal tastes could have pushed themselves into darker more unpredictable waters, do not hang around long enough to defuse the aggression and voracity of sound and song.

Enjoyable as it is though, Gatherer quickly outshines its predecessor, its opening breeze of melodic coaxing around a shadow kissed bassline tantalising. The lure only thickens as floating harmonies and the voice of Neale open up the narrative, bringing one irresistible hook in voice alone to the chorus. The absorbing song continues to hug the web of guitar intrigue and craft wrapping ears, its reflective elegance a warm breeze eventually heading into a more rugged wind of energy and intensity to bring even greater pleasure. The track is a fine end to a thoroughly engaging release.

Produced by Romesh Dodangoda (Kids In Glass Houses/Funeral For A Friend), Hunter |Gatherer is a highly satisfying next step for Calling Apollo. It comes loaded with potential and a hope that the band really kicks on and boldly explores their already quite individual sound. Those hints of uniqueness within the release, combined with more familiar yet potent influences, makes EP and band a must check out recommendation.

Hunter |Gatherer is available now via Signal and the Noise Records via https://callingapollo.bandcamp.com/album/hunter-gatherer

https://www.facebook.com/CallingApollo

RingMaster 26/05/2015

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