David Alpha – Rockin’ Roulette EP

As he prepares and works on his new album, US singer songwriter David Alpha recently unveiled the Rockin’ Roulette EP, a retrospective compilation bringing together two of the most potent cuts of previous full-length Sacrilege 2.0. They are songs that highlight the punk and rock richness in his music whilst providing a strong tempting for what comes next from the Florida hailing artist.

Former lead singer and songwriter of The Fons, Alpha resumed his solo career in 2014 after time off studying and a short-lived part in a new band he formed. With tracks rattling around in his imagination, he soon released Sacrilege 2.0 which drew strong attention and praise.

As the EP opener, Scarilege casts its roar it is not hard to understand why. Seeing Alpha linking up with Dead Kennedys guitarist East Bay Ray, the song instantly bounces along on a lively riff. It is a lure which soon catches flame as Alpha’s vocals alongside scheming rhythms rise from a relative calm to fevered irritability. Instinctively catchy as it bites and hollers, the song is a slice of prime punk rock which maybe does not boldly surprise but is openly fresh and infectious around a taunting bassline which just as eagerly captivates.

The following Jeans grabbed ears here even more swiftly with punk ‘n’ roll carrying a broader flavouring than within its companion though if not providing the same snarling bite. That is replaced by richer imagination catching twists and turns as Alpha vocally and musically teases and taunts ears and the world. It is that adventurous trait though which elevates it from a strong to great song, its unpredictable moments ensuring it really stands out from the throng..

Together both songs make for a highly enjoyable outing and for newcomers introduction to David Alpha, each sharing potential which will surely flourish in his forthcoming releases.

The Rockin’ Roulette EP is available now @ https://davidalpha.bandcamp.com/album/rockin-roulette

https://www.davidalpha.net

Pete RingMaster 30/01/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

She Made Me Do It – Drenched

pic by @dcmusicvideos

There is nothing better than an encounter which immediately enthrals attention and appetite but is only scratching at the depths of temptation and adventure within. The Drenched EP from She Made Me Do It is one such offering; a release which instantly had ears pricked and the body bouncing but was just revealing the seeds to blossoming levels of imagination and seduction.

The four track release is another in a long line of rich enticement from the duo of Shaheena Dax (Rachel Stamp) and Will Crewdson (Rachel Stamp, Adam Ant, Scant Regard, The Selecter, Bow Wow Wow, Flesh For Lulu) and one of the pairs’ most deviously tempting offerings. From start to finish it is a magnetic almost teasing fusion of dark shadows and elegant radiance bound in an equally rich mix of punk, new wave, post punk and alternative rock adventure. The successor to their 2017 album, The Frantic Legion, the compelling exploits of Drenched sees the band’s sound even more defined yet bolder in its adventure and tapestry of flavours. Through the captivation and intimation of Dax’s golden yet often almost portentously lined vocals and the descriptive yet rousingly tenacious antics of Crewdson’s guitar to the suggestive caresses and intriguing shimmers of their keys, She Made Me Do It create a captivating web to immerse in and dance with.

Produced by Crewdson and with Joe Holweger providing drums, Drenched opens up with the swiftly irresistible Bones. Straightaway post punk tendrils escape Crewdson’s guitar, their clinging hues something akin to the claws cast in the past by the likes of Leitmotiv and Sex Gang Children. Escalating these lures by the second, the track builds into a lumbering but lively stroll where Dax soon springs her own potent temptation as bass and drums steer the dark throes of the song’s canter; the punk hues of guitar only adding to its anthemic and equally predacious swing. Inescapably infectious but with that great edge of danger and intimidation, the song, as indeed the EP, needed a mere play to get under the skin and only burrowing, deeper and deeper thereon in.

The following Broken Morning is a just as skilful manipulator of ears and appetite even as it instantly reveals a much warmer and calmer nature. That is no chain to an instinctive catchiness and creative eagerness though, the song devilishly impossible to resist joining in with especially when faced with one contagion laded chorus and again a swinging energy which enlivens the body and spirit of song and listener alike. There is something, if right now indefinably, familiar to the track but a hue which only adds to its compelling design and persuasion.

Ashes is next up, electronic pulses gently but firmly resonating before the dirtier breath of the bass joins up quickly followed by the similarly beckoning strains of guitar and voice. A song which relishes its electro pop instincts as fully as its rock ‘n’ roll heart, it offers a tapestry of flavours and creative twists, all as unpredictable as the track is unsurprising in its voracious zeal and stirring enterprise.

The release ends with the melodically celestial beauty of Time, a song of intimate and spatial elegance over an earthbound spine that just as easily ignites the imagination as the siren-esque flight above.  It is a hauntingly mesmeric conclusion to a release which as we said just grows more impressive and tantalisingly by the listen. It is a heavier, more guitar driven rocker than predecessors but equally richer in its melodic and broad weave of flavours and adventure; a must in anyone’s book.

The Drenched EP is out February 1st on Catranstic Records with pre-ordering available @ https://shemademedoit.bandcamp.com/album/drenched-e-p and https://shemmdi.com/store

 

https://www.shemmdi.com/   https://www.facebook.com/shemademedoitpage   https://twitter.com/SheMMDI

Pete RingMaster 30/01/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

State Of Ember – Broken Horizons

With a sound woven from a combination of metal, punk and prog rock, UK outfit State of Ember have already courted proper attention with a debut EP but are now demanding it with the release of its successor, Broken Horizons. Offering six power fuelled, boldly tenacious tracks, the release is an ear grabbing, spirit rousing slab of anthemic rock ‘n’ roll and one fiercely enjoyable trespass.

Formed 2016, Worcestershire bred State Of Ember have been referenced to the likes of Alter Bridge, Shinedown, and INME but as Broken Horizons shows they have an individuality which is really beginning to mark them out from the crowd. True originality might still be awaiting their sound but it is hard to say there is nothing fresh or little which does not stand out about it either. From opener Time & Time, the EP sets out its rich stock of metal infused punk ‘n’ roll, flavouring just as welcoming to the spices of heavy and melodic rock. That first track swiftly springs wiry grooves which keenly wrapped ears, the guitar temptation laid out by Chris Tamburro an equal to his vocal prowess while the tenacious swings of drummer Chelsea McCammon alongside the infectious growl of Mike Landreth’s bass make for a matching lure.

It is a great, senses rousing start quickly matched by the eager exploits of its successor, Fear of Falling. Admittedly its opening wave of grooves and riffs is barely removed from those of the first song but it soon evolves its own character of imagination and attack which ebbs and flows in ferocity and invasive catchiness; growing all the more compelling by the turn.

Both next up Made Up My Mind and the following Reasons hit the spot, the first a fiery strong-willed roar with feral instincts and the second a cyclone of irritable punk metal inspired vigour and enterprise with a definite Therapy?-esque lining to it. Both are a cauldron of raucous adventure, the latter especially stirring before the blues rock scented Wrong Turn shares its infectious holler. Because of the thick triumph of the previous song it paled a touch in comparison but still easily coaxed ears and appetite to want more; a need final track, Beneath Our Dreams, feeds with zeal and resourcefulness as State Of Ember share another creative strand to writing and sound with its melodic rock laced metal insurgence on the senses.

Broken Horizons is as much about potential as current strengths and enterprise and as it is rich in all, it is not that hard to suspect a potent future for State Of Ember and a whole lot of pleasure for the rest of us.

Broken Horizons is released January 11th.

http://www.stateofember.co.uk    http://www.facebook.com/stateofember   http://www.twitter.com/stateofember

Pete RingMaster 8/01/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Downcast – Self Titled EP

Finding a band which stands out with a truly individual sound within the melodic punk landscape has not proven to be so easy these past years. There have been many outfits which have still impressed but finding that specific individuality is less frequent but now we have British outfit Downcast and the release of their self-titled debut EP. It is n introduction which more than suggests that the band with their emo spiced pop punk has the potential to be something different and such the memorable moments within this their introduction we could say they are already well on the way to realising that promise.

Taking inspirations from the likes of The Wonder Years, Alkaline Trio, ROAM, and Neck Deep, Downcast emerged last year, initially concentrating on writing this debut and honing the sound which flourishes within it. Recorded with producer Ian Sadler (Anavae, ROAM), it would be fair to say that the release made a good if not immediately sizeable impact on ears and thoughts. Yet there was something which easily lured us back more than once or twice and with every play has blossomed into a very enjoyable and impressively potent, potential loaded proposition.

It has moments which simply got under the skin and aroused the passions alongside other instances where expectations were fed even if enjoyment still courted those times. The EP opens with Anthurium and potent guitar bait which lures attention into a waiting tide of pop punk tenacity which takes little time to erupt. Settling down into a robust and busily infectious stroll, the track springs melodic hooks and vocal prowess with ease. Surprises are maybe less open yet the song has a tenacious catchiness and open enterprise which takes charge. With firm often heady rhythms bearing down on the senses, it is a strong and magnetic start to the release swiftly backed by the following Sombre.

The acoustic heart of the second track quickly casts a different breath within the EP, guitar melody and vocal unity reinforced as a potent part of the band’s sound. Short but a full captivation, it offers plenty of reasons for expectations of that real originality emerging ahead as too its successor, Window Seat. It is another song which took and needed time to fully persuade but once hitting its stride after a relatively gentle entrance, it blossoms into a rousing roar nurtured through a strong undercurrent of imagination and boisterousness.

The EP is completed by the pair of 2013 and I’m Sorry. The first is the biggest highlight of the release; its instinctive hooks, spicy melodies, and vocal dexterity an infectious blend blending the familiar with the individual. The final track in turn provides another appetising offering if without finding the heights of its predecessors. From its solid if slightly underwhelming start the song builds crescendos of emotion and drama, flourishing with each before settling back down into that initial mercurial calm. In saying that, there is a captivation to the song which never stops nagging and we can only say enjoyment came with it.

Overall, the EP is a powerful foundation to spring from with potential and pleasure at its heart; Downcast a band it could be impossible to ignore ahead.

The Downcast EP is released January 11th.

https://www.facebook.com/downcastUK/   https://twitter.com/downcastuk

Pete RingMaster 8/01/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

 

Gumshoe – The Governor’s Brother

Condemned by love, life, and the leaden disparities which hungrily frequent the secret backwaters of everyday existence, the heart of the tales shared by Gumshoe are rich fascinations which simply seduce ears and imagination. Proof comes with the new album from the Athens in Georgia hailing US outfit, The Governor’s Brother a collection of dark intimation someone like David Lynch would relish giving a visual face to.

With the imagination teasing lyrical prowess of vocalist/guitarist Andy Dixon, his magnetic narration and the creative evocation of sound cast by bassist Jef Whatley and drummer John Norris, The Governor’s Brother simply dragged ears and appetite into its rich crepuscular landscape. Musically, Gumshoe conjures with a blend of shadow embracing folk, country, and blues; their sound matching and echoing the tenebrific stories explored.

The Governor’s Brother opens up with Barking At Shadows and its unrushed amble is an instantly captivating proposal. It is a lure only accentuated as Dixon shares the intimate breath of the song and the band spring its dawdling swing. Pure seduction as it draws the listener into its ill-lit heart the track is a compelling introduction and potent sign of things to come as confirmed by the following Call Me Mr. Rubber Belly.

The second song immediately shows a firmer hand but equally saunters along with a heavy, bordering on lumbering gait. Wiry blues nurtured tendrils of guitar illuminate word and voice as rhythms impose their thickly enticing bait; hues of punk and country rock colouring the brooding virulence which infested ears and imagination before Amorosa steals its own fair share of the album’s limelight with its unworldly   cryptid bred romance.

Next up, the irresistible I Am The Sun provides another instantaneous fixation as richly enticing flames of brass spring eagerly across another reserved yet eager stroll of sound and voice as firmly catchy as it is suggestive while Bye Bye Baby emulates its pleasure binding exploits with its own individually dancing jangle and vocal enterprise. Maybe taking a touch longer to warm up than its predecessor, the song soon has body and attention swinging to its pop ‘n’ folk rock exploits carrying a great warped Talking Heads meets Roy Orbison flavouring.

The album rounds its manipulation of storytelling and imagination with firstly C.L.A.U.S., a tenacious blues/surf tempting which sometimes is overrun with less collected lust as it serenades the focus of its inspiration, and finally the melancholy engulfed desolation bred croon of Never Enough. A track which haunts long past its departure, it is a riveting and delicious end to a release which is easily drawing us back time and time again.

An encounter which seems to further blossom as it reveals more of its portentous intrigue loaded  depths listen by listen, The Governor’s Brother is a bewitching anthology of word and sound; its dark poetry tantalising and accompanying but just as potent music a masterful insinuation in an album which just commands keen attention.

The Governor’s Brother is available now across most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/gumshoetunes/

Pete RingMaster 8/01/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Hauméa – Unborn

Emerging earlier this year, Hauméa is a quartet from Alençon in France making a rather potent impression with their debut EP, Unborn. Offering four tracks bristling with a host of rock and metal nurtured flavours, the release makes for a captivating introduction to a band easy to see enticing strong attention with their temptation loaded sound.

Formed by bassist Léa Zima and guitarist Andy, the Hauméa was soon completed by the addition of vocalist Niko Lorelei drummer and Sébastien Chauvin. Their individual musical backgrounds and experiences has bred a sound which embraces an array of styles and flavours; a proposition as melodically seductive as it is imposingly aggressive and as imaginatively delivered as it is emotionally raw.

The Unborn EP opens up with its title track, the song quickly laying down its persuasive rhythmic and sonic bait. In full bloom, the track is a mix of the controlled and fevered, especially potent when its shackles are off. It is a strong start revealing the enterprise within the band’s sound and songwriting as well as individual craft. Equally the varied blend of metal and rock the band merges shows itself a magnetic proposal though really captivated the imagination across its following companions starting with Not Usual.

The second track instantly had attention gripped with its opening rally of beats, a tempting soon fully ablaze as guitars and bass unleashed their lustful exploits. Similarly there is a hungry edge to the vocals which just adds to the captivation. As its grows, the track fuses instinctive ferocity with a Nine Inch Nails-esque tempting, easily twisting from a rousing trespass to a melodic seduction and back as it easily eclipses its predecessor.

Dad is Fool makes its entrance on a deceptively calm beckoning but soon is unleashing a tide of creative trespass which in turn springs a contagious stroll of rhythmic and sonic enticement. Still a volatile edge remains though; a psychosis which ignites with predatory intent across the track’s bold and unpredictable landscape. As the previous track, it is an impressively stirring encounter marking out Hauméa as a highly potent and compelling proposition.

Instantly a sonic spiral around invasively swing rhythms marks the final track of Unborn, the mercurial Here I Am a cauldron of sound and intimation carrying threat and temptation. Both essences proceed to fuel each twist and turn within a track fluidly slipping from predation to seduction time and time again.

At its most striking in its middle but bookended by songs which also easily stirred the appetite, Unborn is a strongly convincing and exciting first meeting with Hauméa suggesting the potential of rather striking times ahead. Our anticipation is already rising.

The Unborn EP is available @ https://haumeaband136108.bandcamp.com/releases

https://www.facebook.com/Haumea136108/

Pete RingMaster 18/12/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Zedi Forder – I Don’t Want To Set The World On Fire/Ditties 1 EP

For us one of music’s best adventures over the past decade has been the creative emprise of songwriter/vocalist/drummer Chris Kerley; an escapade taking in acclaimed releases from bands such as Tricore, An Entire Legion, Rind Skank, Kid Golhum and now Zedi Forder. It has been a journey Kerley has for the main taken with guitarist Mark Carstairs but is now just the songwriter with new creative mischiefs on board for the latest encounters from the latter of that long line of great projects.

Ahead of a new single released this December, Zedi Forder recently unveiled the Ditties 1 EP, a collection of tracks which did not quite fit the alt metal/rock palette of the band but more than deserved a full airing. It is fair to say that each has the inimitable touch and character of a Kerley song, his distinctive tones and melodic prowess unmistakable as too the devilish humour which always lurks around his compositions and often takes over the driving seat, but just fall outside the palette of the band’s previous offerings.

With guitarist April Cox and bassist Rich Tomsett alongside Kerley and more of an indie pop/rock sound to its contents, Ditties 1 opens up with Fine Wine. It is a song which as soon as its initial bass lure is joined by a similarly enticing guitar hook has the body swaying, a bolder bounced incited by its lively and increasingly bold, defiant and tongue in cheek stroll. With a Queen-esque hue to its captivation and imagination, the track needed barely a play to get under the skin and have mutual participation involved.

Teasing hooks and sultry shimmers accompany the entrance of Forget about me next, one of a couple of songs which would not have glaringly been out of place within the bands outstanding debut album of last year we would suggest but certainly have their own particular flavour. It too swiftly and easily had attention and involvement hooked, Kerley just as adept at breeding pop songs as more predacious encounters.

I Am with its piano elegance and intimation as well as Cox’s great harmonic backing tones simply beguiled especially as its opening arms brought a virulent rock ‘n’ roll saunter while Sit and Wait provides an relatable intimate croon which again had body and thoughts swaying in pleasure and recognition before Something Else shines with its crystalline balladry and emotive charm.

The EP also features two bonus tracks in Football in the park and Spookums though the latter is not listed, songs which share the same reggae/folk devilment and indeed tune as too Reeves and Mortimer like humour and released previously during the World Cup and Halloween periods respectively; tracks which dare you not to join in with the biggest knowing grin.

As mentioned the EP was released ahead of a single; that track being a cover of The Inkspots classic I don’t want to set the world on fire. Embracing the forties nostalgia of the original with their own particular misbehaviour, the track bewitched ears and vocal chords, again rather quickly and enjoyably. It is a track which makes the perfect Christmas song if you have no appetite for the infernal creative clichés and bells most have to come with.

With a highly anticipated new album slated for next year, both Ditties 1 and I don’t want to set the world on fire make for a great appetite pleasing slice of Zedi Forder; a one of a kind treat few can emulate.

The Ditties 1 EP is out now as a pay what you want purchase via https://tricore.bandcamp.com/album/zedi-forder-ditties-1-indie-rock-punk-ep with I don’t want to set the world on fire released December 7th.

https://www.facebook.com/zediforder

Pete RingMaster 01/12/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright