Kinasis – Pariah

Though formed in 2010, UK metallers Kinasis maybe a proposition, like for us, which has escaped your close attention up till now. That is surely going to change with the release of their new EP, a ferociously striking and aggressive incitement loaded with hungry unpredictability and a technical prowess which simply inflames the fascination and pleasure. The four track insurgency is Pariah, a proposition which embraces an array of metal bred flavours in a cauldron of ravenous imagination and rabid dexterity.

Since emerging seven years ago and drawing strongly favourable responses with a debut demo the same year, Kinasis has grown into the British metal scene with increasing individuality and potency. Recent years their reputation earning live presence has seen the Bridgwater quintet shares stages with the likes of Sepultura, Malefice, Flayed Disciple, Sworn Amongst, Abadden, and Tacoma Narrows Bridge Disaster among many as well as venture into Italy alongside S.H.I.N.E. The release of Pariah feels like and should be the moment when Kinasis step from the shadows and stamps their creative authority and individual sound upon the extreme metal landscape.

Produced by Justin Hill (ex-Sikth) and wrapped in the artwork of Andy Pilkington of Very Metal Art, Pariah instantly goes for the jugular with opener Red Earth. Riffs surge through ears with a rapacious nagging whilst rhythms purge their animosity straight onto the senses. With every passing second the intensity rises but with a virulence and infectiousness which has the body bouncing to the ferociousness. A Korn-esque essence emerges as clean vocals invite nu-metal nuances, an industrial dexterity reminding of Static-X joining in as the track fluidly twists and turns through its inventive drama further embracing melodic and atmospheric suggestiveness. It is sheer magnetism, the track a mighty persuasion and alone the declaration of the coming of age of a new force to take notice of.

The following Black Dog creeps up and prowls the listener with predacious riffs and stabbing beats, then once sizing things up vocally and musically plundering the imagination with vocal tenacity embracing both raw and clean throated enterprise as death and technical metal tendencies dance which each other in barbarous intent.  As nu and groove metal elements get involved, things only become more precise rather than muddled, Kinasis showing their adeptness at weaving diverse and seriously enticing trespasses. For personal tastes the track never quite lives up to its three companions but certainly leaves no element of dissatisfaction in its wake.

Kindred similarly stalks ears if with a less obvious enmity as melodic strands entwine its initial proposal. Even stronger Korn like essences emerge to pleasing effect across the song and around a death/grindcore merging which has hints of Cryptopsy in its own infectious savagery. Clean vocals interchange with barbarous expulsions to further enhance the adventure, the band musically as bold and expert in switching through a kaleidoscope of styles and flavours without disturbing the song’s carnal nature and heart.

The release concludes with Incipient, an instant maelstrom of voice and sound colliding nu-and industrial metal psychosis with the harsher antagonism of variety woven extreme metal  before luring in just as appetising melodic and groove metal imagination. It is seriously arousing stuff, the type of sonic manna addiction is spawned from right here. As throughout Pariah, every twist brings a fresh incitement to chew over but mere seconds to consume before the next steals attention and increasing ardour.

It is the final throe of a quite simply stunning encounter from a band which will surely now get the attention their craft and imagination deserves. There have been a few bands coming to the fore as the British metal scene heads into new horizons and Kinasis have just made it known their intent to be there on the frontline.

Pariah is released September 29th and will be digitally available at most online stores with physical copies sold through http://kinasis.bigcartel.com/ and at shows.

https://www.facebook.com/Kinasis

Pete RingMaster 26/09/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Furyborn – Dawn Of Leviathan

Since emerging in 2010, UK outfit Furyborn seem to make a potent statement with every move they make within the British metal scene. From their live debut in 2011, they have earned support and a reputation which has only gathered momentum and is sure to again with the release of their debut album, Dawn Of Leviathan. It is a ferociously imposing and compelling affair that arouses the same senses it trespasses with the band’s increasingly distinct and adventurous style of melodic death metal.

That live side of the Poole hailing quintet has seen them become one of the most potent forces across the South of England, win the regional Metal 2 The Masses competition and play Bloodstock Open Air for only their seventh live outing. Since then they have shared stages with the likes of Napalm Death, Threat Signal, Mors Principium Est, Sylosis, The Agonist, Malefice, The Defiled, Evile, (Hed) P.E. and Ted Maul as well as release their first acclaimed EP, The Reaping Of Our Days released in 2012 through Bored Stiff Records. Fair to say the band has been nagging at national and broader attention since day one, increasingly growing both which the highly anticipated Dawn Of Leviathan can only escalate.

The album quickly shows a new strength in intensity, craft, and imagination within Furyborn; a growth in all aspects infused into a maturity which is maybe unexpected within a first full-length, even from a band in its seventh year. Dawn of Leviathan opens with the atmospheric trespass of Second Sun, a brief harass of raw sonic dissonance which leads into the album’s title track where instantly a barrage of intrusive beats from drummer Tim Coulson and ravenous riffs from rhythm guitarist Rob Walker devour ears. Just as forceful are the raw throated roars of vocalist Jut Tabor who quickly seizes attention with his grudging tones, their causticity leading to a great flame of clean endeavour; the frontman, as the sounds around him showing a new dexterity and range which only impresses. It takes little time for band and song to reveal a new lofty plateau to that of the first EP, the melodic suggestiveness of lead guitarist Nick Richardson alone a striking new adventure equipped with the broader imagination and uniqueness that flows through the veins of the track.

The Reckoning follows with the same striking creative tenacity and character, the track a tirade of biting rhythms and corrosive riffs leading the listener into a web of melodic and cleanly delivered temptation. Within the burly, ravenous tempest of bitter sonic and vocal inhospitality, it makes for a compelling mix which only intensifies its lures as the song evolves and broadens its inventive landscape before Exult in Extinction uncages its own rabid assault again led by the uncompromising swings of Coulson. Stalking the senses, the bass of Timmy Hodgson is predatory if sometimes overwhelmed by the storm of riffs and beats while again Richardson veins the cauldron of sound with tendrils of skilful melodic lava. Contrasts flare and meet within the encounter, each colluding with and countering the other in a twisting tempest matched by vocal resourcefulness across the band.

The industrial opening of A Fault in Our Design brings a bold hint of Fear Factory like hues before the track turns to stalking and intimidating the senses. There is a swing to its core presence with breeds the infectiousness soon seeping into every element, the result a blistering yet controlled incitement as predatory as it is melodically tenacious while Life Begins uncages its own mercurial invasion of sound and emotion. Though swiftly persuasive and increasingly compelling, the song does not quite reach the inventive and  gripping heights of its predecessors for these ears though individual flair is as open as the track’s animosity and melodic assurance.

The raw rabidity of I Am Heresy has the imagination and appetite magnetically hooked again straight after with its ravenous and invitingly inhospitable assault of the senses while Deep Rising provides an enthralling lure of Tabor’s striking clean side courted by a laid back but fully suggestive climate of electronically led sound. With the irresistible carnivorous tone of Hodgson’s bass to the fore, the track is superb, another stirring magnet within the release adding further aspects to the bold adventure and evolving imagination of Furyborn.

The album concludes with firstly the varied metal symphony of Wraith, an array of flavours swarming with each other before a writhing death metal causticity bursts from within their midst, and finally with the symphonically laced As We Burn. The closer revels in all the new attributes of the band’s sound and writing, its proposal as invasively seductive as it is rancorous and transfixing. Again Fear Factory-esque hues entice as more Sepultura/Gojira like elements challenge, each woven into the individual character of Furyborn’s own sound. One of its major highlights, the song ensures that Dawn of Leviathan ends on a fascinating high.

Throughout, the album tightly holds attention and fiercely pleases, increasingly so with every subsequent listen. The fact that you still feel we are listening in on one step in a journey still to unfold only adds to the impressive nature of a release which is as much about potential as it is ear exciting craft and adventure.

Dawn of Leviathan is out now through most online stores and @ http://furyborn.bigcartel.com/

https://www.facebook.com/furyborn/

Pete RingMaster 11/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Codex Alimentarius – The Infinite Growth Paradigm vs Finite Resources (Mk II)

June 1st sees the re-release of The Infinite Growth Paradigm vs Finite Resources, the debut EP from British metallers Codex Alimentarius. Going a big way, alongside their imposingly potent live presence, in earning them an immediately loyal fan base, the band’s introduction has been “re-fired and re-forged” in such a way that it not only commands but simply demands fresh attention. Like a great many we are sure, Codex Alimentarius evaded our radar first time around and indeed with its successor The Hand Of Apophis. Listening to the MK II version of The Infinite Growth Paradigm vs Finite Resources though, it feels more like destiny than annoyance that the Exeter outfit has taken to now to grab ears and an immediate appetite for their melodic death metal nurtured roar, the EP a searing wake-up call to the world of one fiercely exiting proposition.

Formed in 2009 by the quartet of vocalist Stephen Bending, guitarists Stan Kemble and Tim Wright, and bassist Andrew Dicker, Codex Alimentarius were soon making a strong imprint on the local live scene in their first year before expanding the line-up with the addition of third guitarist Elliott Alderman-Broom and drummer Frank Dennis in 2011. The Infinite Growth Paradigm Vs Finite Resources in 2010 only added to their growing reputation and appeal, its release followed by the band going on to tour with the likes of Vader, Krisiun, and Furyborn as well as share stages with bands such as Sonic Syndicate, Malefice, Evile, Revolker, Ted Maul, Demonic Ressurection and many more over the next handful of years. The well-received release of The Hand Of Apophis in 2014 followed the recruitment of Ray Arrell as the band’s new vocalist and the From Hell To Oblivion UK Tour with Enemy Reign the previous year. Despite all that, Codex Alimentarius was still a passing name for many but it is hard to see that remaining the situation as the revamped The Infinite Growth Paradigm vs Finite Resources resets and re-energises the inevitable emergence of the sextet to the fore of the European metal scene.

Mixed and mastered by Alderman-Broom and wrapped in the artwork of Dicker. Mk II opens up with Baptised and swiftly gets down to catching the imagination with nagging riffs and suggestive melodies within an electronic mist. It is an enticing start which does not force attention but teases and seduces it, coaxing intrigue into the venomously lined tones of Arrell and richly toned grooves just waiting to make their impact. Becoming bolder and in many ways even more toxically attractive, the song blossoms in presence and adventure with Arrell the source of animosity and rhythms the seed of imposing trespass; all bound in the simultaneously seductive and predatory adventure of the guitars.

It is a potent and quickly enjoyable start but one soon eclipsed by the mighty proposal of Collapse. It too harries the senses with riffs and flying beats, their rapacious intent matched by the brooding antipathy of bass. Yet there is a swing and hunger to it all driven by almost rabid grooves and gutturally celebratory vocals which simply enslave ears and imagination. With tinges of thrash and folk metal in its dynamic assault, the track is glorious; only growing to greater heights with reserved passages of melodic endeavour and craft woven into a web of senses entangling temptation.

Good Slaves swaps the boisterousness of its predecessor with a more controlled state but still with a heady drama of energy and portentous suggestion. Sweeping melodies add to its dark edge and cinematic climate, grooves and riffs colluding to provide a heart as rousing as it is invasive as the song ignites body and thoughts with ease before passing its success over to the infectious almost envenomed charm of No Return. It feels calmer and physically kinder than those before it yet makes up for it with a tonal animus which infests vocals, melody, and imagination alike. If missing the extra spark of the previous pair of songs, it is a compelling journey through impressing craft and aural discontent; a merger of light and dark, melody and antagonism which heightens an already keen appetite for band and sound.

There is a bait of real catchiness within the quickly persuasive Symbiosis which follows, a devilish grooving which has swift control of body and attitude as the track grows in virulent contagion and emotional jaundice. It is a beast of a tension strapped, malignant stomp providing another major moment within Mk II, a peak matched by the closing mystique cloaked Arise. With Middle Eastern hues flirting with ears and thoughts from within its feudal proposal, the song breeds and widens its tapestry of creative and physical dexterity; guitars weaving a net of emotional and expressive suggestion around plundering rhythms and vocal causticity. It is a gripping affair which though a slow burner compared to earlier tracks leaves the listener provoked in thought and greed to hear and explore more.

With hindsight now available, Codex Alimentarius have not only given their first EP a new lease of life but released and developed its true character as indeed that of their keenly adventurous and eventful sound. Infinite Growth Paradigm vs Finite Resources (Mk II) feels like the moment that the band will truly step out from the shadows or certainly stoke a fire of awareness and attention; the former most likely such the striking presence and also potential found within the release.

Infinite Growth Paradigm vs Finite Resources (Mk II) is released June 1st.

http://www.codexthemasses.co.uk/    https://www.facebook.com/codexalimentariusband/    https://twitter.com/codexthemasses

Pete RingMaster 23/05/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

This Dying Hour – Resting Where No Shadows Fall

this-dying-hour-promo-shot_RingMasterReview

In many ways you could say that Resting Where No Shadows Fall, the eagerly anticipated debut album from British metallers This Dying Hour has been ten years in the making. Formed at the beginning of 2006 and swiftly impressing with their debut EP, the High Wycombe outfit has endured a decade littered with setbacks “that were just too great to overcome; everything from death and marriage to money came between the band and its members.” Now they are back and with a release which feels like it carries all the emotions and frustrations felt over that time; an album which ignites ears and imaginations with invention and passion.

That first year of the band produced the Longest Memory From The Shortest Life EP, a well-received and often praised introduction. It was accompanied by tours throughout the UK and Europe as well as shows with the likes of Young Guns, Sylosis, Bury Tomorrow, Malefice, and Exit Ten. The years since, as mentioned, brought This Dying Hour to a standstill until this year when vocalist Dave Pickup and guitarist Ash Whitelock decided to spark the band into life again with the help of “rotating members to fill the void.” Now they have made the wait for the next instalment of This Dying Hour adventure a forgotten moment as Resting Where No Shadows Fall seriously impresses ears and thoughts.

The album opens with its brief title track, an atmospheric instrumental which draws the imagination, leading it into the waiting jaws of War Drums. The second track instantly makes its point with scything riffs and beats, their imposing swipes aligned to a nagging raw melody before things all comes together in a predacious stalking of the senses. The snarling tones of Pickup are soaked in raw emotion and ire, a potency matched by Whitelock’s irritable guitar and the rhythmic antagonism of the track. It not may be the most unique proposal, references to the likes of Lamb Of God and Killswitch Engage valid, yet the song has a freshness which roars in ears and only blossoms further as a cleaner touch invades the vocal incitement.

The impressive start continues as Asleep springs its wiry grooves and vocal hostility next. Swiftly the song shows its distinct and individual character to be a diversity of intensity and energy, all soaked in venom as it seizes attention and a growing appetite for the release. Clean vocals and great dirty harmonies bring stronger drama and quality, as too the enterprising craft of Whitelock as the song bellows and challenges in equal enjoyable measure.

this-dying-hour-cover-artwork_RingMasterReviewPath Of Unknown opens with a melodic atmosphere similar to the opening intro, sunken vocals courting the initial lure before the song opens up into a striking and thrilling encounter. The mellower tones of Pickup predominantly stir the song this time around, luring with the listener alongside spicy melodies into one ridiculously infectious chorus and subsequently a great passage of calm reflection with a touch of Palms to it. One of the biggest highlights among many, the outstanding proposal is followed by the far more hostile climate and sound of Time To Die, though it too is unafraid to cast warm melodies and catchy clean vocals. A rival for best track to match its predecessor, the song completes a first half of Resting Where No Shadows Fall which simply blows most other emerging melodic/groove metallers away.

There is little loosening of attention and pleasure either as first the darker sinister realm of Underworld encloses and encroaches on the senses. Certainly the track is a touch hit and miss, moments which stir the blood and others which lie a touch flat on thoughts but arguably it is the most inventive proposition on the album as it ensnares the imagination while Alive is as accomplished as anything within Resting Where No Shadows Fall at blending the calmer and fiercer emotional and physical exploits of band and songwriting. Though both are lacking the spark of earlier songs, each leaves a real want for more which Priapism feeds with its melody rich charm and fiery temperament.

The album closes on the same kind of explosive sound and impact as it started, Room 108 a volatile and often corrosive encounter with sparkling moments of vocal invention and melodic imagination seemingly inspired by a mix of System Of A Down, Deftones, and In Flames.

It is a great end to an excellent first album from a band making up for lost time in passion and invention. With the potential of bigger and bolder to come, it is very easy to push Resting Where No Shadows Fall as something all should make an acquaintance with.

Resting Where No Shadows Fall is out in stores from Friday 30th September.

https://www.facebook.com/thisdyinghouruk/

Pete RingMaster 28/09/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Koshiro – Crown Of Venom

Koshiro Promo Picture_RingMaster Review

Starting off well and just getting creatively bigger and bolder over its six tempestuous tracks, the Crown Of Venom EP from metalcore quintet Koshiro, pretty much reflects the emergence of the British band. Making a good and potent impression with the first release, the band has continued to grow into a formidable proposition on the underground metal scene. Whether their new EP is enough to push them into the thicker glare of the broader metal scene time will tell, as it still suggests there is plenty more from the band to come in greater originality and ingenuity, but it will forcibly remind that the Bristol fury is around and getting stronger and more sonically vocal.

Formed in 2010, Koshiro quickly drew attention and loyal local support with their fierce yet melodically fiery sound. Their self-titled EP of 2012 and a handful of singles around and since it have nudged wider attention with plaudits increasing in turn, whilst live the band’s reputation has similarly only grown, shows with the likes of Feed the Rhino, TRC, Lower Than Atlantis, The Safety Fire, Blessthefall, Malefice, I, The Breather, and LIFERUINER part of their emergence over the years. Crown Of Venom though, is a new big step for the band; in songwriting and imagination it easily outshines all before and musically reveals the band as mentioned earlier, bigger, bolder, and creatively busier. In the words of vocalist Ben Errington, “These new songs are both the most chaotic and the most heartfelt we’ve ever put together. There are tracks on this record that I never thought we’d be capable of; we really wanted these songs to capture our live sound perfectly but take it to the next level, really expand upon our grand ideas which have progressed from our past singles ‘Malevolent’ and ‘Guts Guilt Greed”.

Koshiro Cover Artwork_RingMaster Review     The EP was recorded with long-time collaborator Kevin Peters and opens with the thickly atmospheric, slightly portentous air of Green and Gold. Strings seep elegance and melancholy in equal measure whilst the ever strong tones of Errington share the emotive heart of the track as haunting keys cup his expressive voice with cinematic resonance. It is a potent coaxing into the release and the following King Of Snakes, if a start which does not light any particular fires outside of intrigue despite the prowess of all. Its successor quickly provides a bigger temptation, its initial breath Tricore like with again Errington providing rich bait as around him the guitars of Ben Bone and Thomas Clark begin sculpting a provocative and spiky weave of riffs, grooves, and sonic confrontation. The expected storm does not materialise despite ire and aggression lining all aspects, with the swiping beats of Craig Rudman especially intimidating and again the song does not hold the spark to get the blood raging through veins but with inventive enterprise and fine fluidity to its subtle and bigger twists of gait and ferocity, the song keeps ears and appetite easily on side, especially with its rousing anthemic calls, before being eclipsed by Necromancer.

As suggested, the EP improves and gets more fascinating with each subsequent track, and so as the first pair pleased, Necromancer stirs the senses like a landslide. From a dying heartbeat, the song erupts in barbarous rhythms and crushing riffs but amongst them a delicious scythe of violin ignites air and imagination, its wonderful touch just the first of ingenious hues and ideation within the carnivorous beast posing as a song. It would be hard to say it brings major originality but remembering others mixing up recognisable flavours as cleverly and tenaciously as Koshiro do is hard. The track continues to snarl and brawl with creative zeal but equally aligns the hostility with a striking melodic and vocal croon. In a way Crown Of Venom and indeed Koshiro seem to come of age at this point, a maturity continuing to impress hereon in.

Sleeper Cell steps up next with a rhythmic shuffle from Rudman which resonates through bone as it bewitches with infectiousness whilst bassist Rich Miller lures the darkest predacious tone from his strings as the guitars cast a tapestry of rancor and sonic romance. The ever riveting strings continue to spark adventure too whilst vocally Errington is as compelling, whether with raw squalls or clean persuasion, as the volatile furnace of sound and the musically driven bellow of emotion. The track is a climatic storm of temptation, and as its predecessor also ripe with the shoots of real originality which are definitely blooming within the band’s sound now, Creation Theory swift confirmation as between two vocal samples, which sound like they are voiced by Michael Caine, it sculpts a hellacious emprise of sound as physically carnal as it is evocatively suggestive. Like a war cry in many ways, the track has body and thoughts enflamed and ready to unleash their emotive strengths, a powerful success from a gladiatorial merger of devouring intensity and incendiary invention.

It is the pinnacle of the release, only relenting in its animosity as it departs for closing track Catharsis to begin spreading its melodic warmth with a slightly mercurial and antagonistic underbelly. It was up against it to match the previous trio of songs but still leaves the EP on a high whilst relishing the chance to reveal more of the depth and new diversity in the band’s sound and composing.

Actually there is one more offering upon Crown Of Venom, the bonus of a cover of Sia’s Chandelier. Though Koshiro easily improve the song it does nothing for the EP and quickly found itself ignored in our numerous listens of one increasingly impressive and enjoyable release.

Koshiro are again proving themselves to have the potential to make a big impact on the UK and European metal frontline, even more so this time around. They are probably still a couple of rungs short but with more progress as shown here, watch out world here they come.

The Crown Of Venom is available from September 25th through all stores.

Pete Ringmaster 24/09/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Unforseen Prophecy – Burn The Skies

promo_1

Opening up the 2015 with a reboot of their second EP Burn The Skies, UK metallers Unforseen Prophecy are seemingly poised to awaken a greedy spotlight on their rather flavoursome sound. The three track encounter, without quite managing to find a striking uniqueness, leaves ears hungry and satisfaction full as it brews up a raw and potent blend of inspirations from the likes of Devildriver, Lamb Of God, and Malefice with a Lacuna Coil like melody and harmony rich temptation. Burn The Skies does not quite set the heart racing it is fair to say but certainly it sparks an increasingly eager appetite to thoroughly explore the Kent quintet and their accomplished invention.

Formed in 2010, Unforseen Prophecy has earned a strong live reputation, taking in shows with the likes of Malefice, Exit Ten, Silent Descent, Beholder, Bull Riff Stampede, Evil Scarecrow, and Seven Deadly along the way. Equally their five track debut EP Without Consequence stirred up keen support and attention from its release in 2012 whilst last year saw the band win the Kent Metal 2 the Masses competition which led to a successful appearance at Bloodstock. Burn The Skies revealed upon its initial release a potent step forward in the band’s imaginative songwriting and resourceful sound and its nationwide unveiling this month has the potential to open the strongest awareness of the exciting band yet.

New single and the EPs title track opens up the encounter and instantly has ears ringing and anticipation aflame as a vocal roar from Paul Wells is matched in intensity and appeal by a cover_240stamping stride of angry riffs and threatening rhythms. Bound in an equally addictive grooving it is an empowering and thrilling entrance to Burn The Skies which dips slightly when it relaxes for the entrance of the alluring melodic voice of rhythm guitarist Charis Pattison, though Wells is still there challenging with his great abrasing tones. The song is soon back in control of senses and imagination as the excellent creative swings of drummer Russ Edwards are courted by thick enticements from the guitar of Aaron Jones and bass shadows provided by Paul Gills. The song continues to flirt and intimidate with anthemic persuasion and enthralling enterprise. As the EP, arguably the song is not offering anything strikingly new but for technical craft and untainted enjoyment it leaves no doubts.

The following groove laden stroll of The Placebo Effect keeps things on a high, though it takes a little longer to grip compared to the more instant success of its predecessor. Wells is soon raging across its stirring canvas of aggressive sound and resourcefulness, the guitars a busy harrying of ears whilst rhythms are as predacious as the grooves are virulent. Unrelenting in its examination and stalking of senses and thoughts, the track emerges as our favourite confrontation upon Burn The Skies though the opening melodic charm of Oblivion soon makes a seductive argument. With the vocals of Pattison ebbing in potency at times though, and the fury of the track missing the spark of the other two incitements upon the EP, the song pleases without raising the same excitement and ardour. Technically the song is as riveting and impressive as ever though, revealing more of the band’s tenacious and imaginative enterprise ensuring the release ends on a strong if not dramatic high.

Whether Burn The Skies will open up the doorway to the major awareness it is easy to feel the band is destined to walk through of course only time will tell but it does mark Unforeseen Prophecy down as a band UK metal will be eagerly embracing sooner rather than later.

The Burn The Skies EP is released nationwide on January 5th through all digital platforms.

https://www.facebook.com/unforeseenprophecy

RingMaster 03/01/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Malefice – Gravitas EP

Malefice 2014 Promo

There is always a twinge of excitement when news of a new Malefice release breaks, having been hooked on them via debut album Entities back in 2007, and so it was with the announcement of new EP Gravitas. It was an appetite and anticipation more than forcibly fed by the brutal fury of a release. The EP sees the UK metallers at their most fearsome and uncompromising best. It is a beast of an adventure and assault; hard to say the band’s best rage yet but definitely there on the frontline of their finest moments.

The successor to last year’s V EP and third album Awaken the Tides two years before it, Gravitas finds Malefice going back to the sounds which they feel ignites and is the core of the band. Vocalist Dale Butler talked about the album recently saying, “After taking some time out from the band to do our own things and focus on our own lives we came back together not feeling as we had given all we have to give to Malefice… We spent a long booze-fuelled evening talking about what we want to do and what came out of that discussion is that we want to write music we like…We are going to back to what makes us Malefice and we’re gonna write some fucking heavy music to headbang to.“ There is no doubting their success in that, the release a merciless and inventive brute force but unafraid to vein and spear it with the melodic fire and imaginative tenacity which the band has equally become renowned for in British metal.

There is no escaping the primal fury and angry weight of the EP as opener Forsaken descends on ears with predatory riffs and rhythms, both aspects converging in one intrigue soaked stalking. It is a seriously intimidating proposal with effects teasing the skirting vocals, Butler eventually escaping their restraints to snarl venomously as the song moves into a new aspect of its hunt of the psyche. From that initial harrowing prowl, the track slips into a torrential charge of spicy grooves across cantankerous riffs and murderous rhythms. It is a gripping and savage violation, the guitars of Ben Symons and Andrew Wilson pure spite and invention in their rabid riffery and designs whilst the heavy handed swings of drummer James Pearly Cook are judge, jury, and executioner in their attack on the senses. Completed with the almost carnal tones of Tom Hynes’ bass, the track is a furnace of malice and unfussy yet pungent imagination.Cover

The cauldron of vocal ire and variety from Butler and band is just as feverishly addictive as the sounds brawling around them, second track Heroes providing more of their exploits in its own unique violation. A more merciful start fuelled by fiery melodic enterprise makes a ‘gentler’ welcome though the track is soon barging through ears with nagging riffs and unforgiving rhythms. It tempers and scythes across this tempest though with an outstanding haze of superb clean vocals and just as thick sonic expression, before exploring a mesmeric calm of evocative radiance and melodic charm. It is just the eye of the storm of course, the track soon back in vicious mood and ferocity. There is a feel of Fear Factory to it in some of its parts but ultimately this is a unique and thrilling exploration all of Malefice’s own making

Within a breath Escape is bawling over and brawling with ears, providing another distinct twist to the blaze of the release. Grooves seduce from the first second, scorching the raw and turbulent landscape of the song whilst another array of differing and complimenting vocal diversity grips the imagination giving more potency and depth to the track’s narrative. Swirling and savaging within its towering rhythmic walls, the track is a glorious trespass of senses and emotions.

Gravitas comes to a close with My Design, riffs hunting down the listener with pack like mentality as grooves sear air and flesh with their pestilential temptation and resourcefulness. As it expands and immerses the listener in its lyrical sufferance, the track is a riveting and skilled provocation but lacks the creative spark which ignites the other three tracks on the EP so magnificently. Nevertheless it is an assault drenched in what Malefice is all about, creatively threatening, destructively intense, and driven by pure passion, not forgetting irresistibly thrilling.

Gravitas is a scintillating slab of barbarous majesty reinforcing Malefice as one of the UK’s and Europe’s leading inventive metallers. Earlier we suggested a debate on whether this is the band’s best moment yet; another listen as we write though suggests it just might be and if not, anticipation that the forthcoming new album from Malefice will be is hard to shake off.

The Gravitas EP is available now via Transcend Music @  https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/gravitas-ep/id922130758

https://www.facebook.com/maleficeofficial

RingMaster 04/11/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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