Watertank – Destination Unknown

SLF019 - hi-res cover_RingMaster Review

After ten years of existence, French rockers Watertank released debut album Sleepwalk in 2013 to heavy and deserved acclaim. Like for so many, it took our ears and appetites to hungry heights; in the words of our review the release was “an instigator of the purest temptation.” Now the band unleashes its successor Destination Unknown and lures even lustier responses with its irresistible concoction of sludge, stoner, and various other compelling styles. Taking the essential essences with made the first album so potent; Destination Unknown emerges as a fuller, more gripping proposal of sound and invention which in turn shows that its predecessor was just the appetiser to greater Watertank alchemy.

The Nantes band began in 2013, swiftly forging a strong fan base and reputation for their sound and stage presence with increasing success over the years. A couple of well-received EPs earned strong attention and praise before the release of Sleepwalk, whilst on stage the band proceeded to play with the likes of Torche, Kylesa, Baroness, Capricorns, Lair Of The Minotaur, and The Ocean amongst a great many. The band’s first album certainly sparked new spotlights upon Watertank though not to the level now expected to be aroused by Destination Unknown.

The album opens with Automatic Reset and straight away transfixes ears with its opening mist of guitar; the sonic shimmer quickly followed by a bulging blast of heavy riffs and rhythms. With them a groove also joins the tempting, its lure relaxing as the song settles into its stroll and welcomes the dusty tones of vocalist Thomas Boutet before returning with even spicier toning to its sultry tendril. Just as quickly a contagious air floods the encounter, a persuasion which never loses its potency as the song shuffles up its gait and intensity across the rest of the magnetic offering. The guitars of Rémy Bellin and Bojan Anicic continue to wrap ears and song in resourceful and gripping enterprise, greater colour added to the excellent start to the album all the time.

Straight away it and the following Fever reveal a more rounded and deeper depth to the band’s music, a less raw and caustic sound which still retains the growl and intensive weighty hues which fuelled the previous release. The second song is a far more aggressive offering than the first, punkish in its attitude and energy with wiry hooks to match. The bass of Maxime Coste is a grumbling potency whilst drummer Jocelyn Liorzou lashes skin and senses with adventurous and antagonistic scythes. It is a glorious riot bringing a mix of Torche, eighties band Skyscraper, and a touch of Motorgrator to entice before making way for the gentler smouldering charm of Contrails. It is still a heavyweight proposal though which seems to grow and loom over the senses with every passing second. Once more hooks and grooves grace a dynamic web of imagination and primal temptation, the latter at times as intimidating as the swings of Liorzou and the predatory riffs.

The song closes with similar reflection soaked calm to how it started, drifting away so the heavy resonance of Coste’s bass can lure attention ready for an intensive crawl of riffs and grooves. DCVR is another swift inescapable persuasion equipped with a sonic tang and commanding stature, not forgetting an addictive swagger even with it is on the prowl. It is also another track showing the greater expanse and imagination in the band’s songwriting and sound, and their ability to perfectly entangle rugged terrains with highly provocative ambiences of sound and emotion.

   The bubbling electronic start to Last/Lost Hope instantly catches expectations unawares and by surprise, though they are barely given a nibble to feast on within Destination Unknown anyway. Its enslaving coaxing soon evolves into a thrilling and lively shuffle of sonic and melodic festivity guided by the ever appealing tones of Boutet. At times elements of post punk and new wave, as well as noise rock, seem to add their spice to the infectious tapestry of the rock popper, a strong catchiness emulated again in the dirtier but just as contagious Surrender. As much as you can find hints in varying degrees of bands such as Torche and Queens Of The Stone Age to the song, there is an older hue to the outstanding stomp, elements across its kinetic two minutes recalling eighties and nineties seeded ingenuity.

Doomed Drifters explores the darkest shadows and corners of the band’s sound but again tempers it with a sonic and melodic resourcefulness which energetically and brightly smoulders as it masterfully fuse contrasts and flavours. Seducing with greater and more experimental suggestiveness for an emotionally provocative and atmospheric climax, the song leaves ears enthralled and primed for the bewitchment of the similarly expansive landscape of Scheme. Growing bigger and bolder with every passing harmonious whisper and melodic enticement, the song dances and flirts with ears and imagination, recalling a strong if coincidental feel of Comsat Angels to its exceptional and thrilling adventure.

The album ends with its just and adventurous title track, Destination Unknown a thick provocative embrace which evolves and then revolves through a soundscape of sonic and emotional intensity. It is a fine finish to an exhilarating proposition. Watertank certainly thrilled with their first album but leave it looking a touch pale against the creative vivacity and explosive drama of Destination Unknown, one of the most exciting encounters this year so far.

Destination Unknown is out now via Solar Flare Records @ http://shop.solarflarerds.com/categories/pre-orders and http://music.solarflarerds.com/album/destination-unknown

https://www.facebook.com/wtrtnk

Ringmaster 30/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

 

 

William English – Basic Human Error

w.english_RingMaster Review

The most intimidating and thrilling cauldrons of hostility are those which spit and burn even before you get dirty and scorched within their blistering ferocity, and so it is with Basic Human Error, the debut album from UK noise violators William English. It is a release which singes flesh from ears and boils the senses from its first breath alone, only impacting and thrilling with harsher and richer intensity once you actually delve into the depths of the seven ravishments. The Norfolk quintet lit a fuse in the passions with their first single from the album Bud Vessel a couple of months ago, but hindsight shows its triumph barely scratched the surface of the wonderfully hellacious Basic Human Error

The William English sound is a prowling rabidity of doom enriched, tar thick sludge which is just as open and voracious with heavy strains of hardcore, noise, and dark metal. It makes for a menacing and uncompromising proposition yet one with an array of virulent toxic grooves and rapier like rhythms aligned to slithers of invention embroiled in anything from punk to noise to post punk. It is an invigorating and punishingly exhausting consumption of body and psyche, which only gets fiercer and more scintillating with every listen.

Cover_RingMaster Review   It is Bud Vessel which lights the touch paper to the album, its two minutes plus of vicious addictiveness an instant onslaught of barbed hooks and spicy grooves encased in fuzz soaked, snarling causticity. With mercilessly stabbing beats from drummer Joe Woodbury in the driver’s seat, the track careers through ears with the squalling hardcore tones of vocalist Shane Miller an acidic burn in the hostile and contagious smog of the song. Stoner seeded grooves spring their bait throughout too, everything colluding to ignite ears and emotions in a blaze of cancerous temptation.

The opener is as much a punk roar as anything else and quickly contrasted yet emulated in many ways by Life Of A Fisherman. The song is a slowly invading protagonist, a crawling and persistently expanding threat initially which once settled kicks up a gear and unveils a masterful swagger rich with ravenous and inviting grooves around a volatile nest of barbarous rhythms. Spilling sonic ire and addictive lures with every passing minute of the track’s weighty length, guitarists Ryan Carter and Dave Vickers sear and ignite the senses and imagination respectively, their hostile invention, as across the whole band, forceful and riveting whether slowly trespassing through or raging with tsunami effect at the listener.

The epic assault finally makes way for a just as intensive examination from Seaweed, a track venomously lapping ears with steady persistence, and as the last, creating moments of sheer violence. The bass of Callum Gibb is a predatory stalker within the crushing weight and intensity of the song whilst vocally Miller uncages his full punk spite and expression, especially devouring the air with an effect covered might when the song slips into a cavernous, post punk spiced, doom soaked passage of insidious calm. The torrent of rugged riffs and rhythms provide a constantly evolving and nagging proposal but as other aspects around them are regularly unafraid to switch gait and hostility as the ever gripping drama of the grooves persist in their addictive tenacity.

     Captain Tugboat unleashes its own distinct violation next, bringing extra tang and ingenious unpredictability to a fury of hooks and toxic grooves in a presence which embroils torment and rage in one corrosive and once again irresistible animus of sound and emotion. As the album, at times the track sparks thoughts of bands like Eyehategod and Buzzov*en but equally of others like Coilguns, KEN mode, and Neurosis; raw whiffs just as suggestive in the following Grandpa Sorrow Pt. 1, another taking such elements and sculpting them into something solitary and predacious to William English. The track stalks the senses with a laboured but hungry intent from start to finish, eventually dissipating for A Monger to cast its individual sonic coaxing and bracing creative hostility. There is no escaping its slow encroachment and the subsequent raptorial explosions breeding mouth-watering savagery, nor the spellbinding effect of its unbridled barbarity in tone and sonic enterprise. Bass and the song’s truculent atmosphere provide a bestial embrace, the vocals an ever shifting in delivery and belligerence throughout whilst the guitars emerge carnivorous in invention and enthralling in craft for another viscous treat.

The album closes with the eleven minute sonic opus of Grandpa Sorrow Pt. 2, a full journey in its own right exploring every flavour and inventive corner within the William English invention, ability, and sound. It is as dramatically appealing and darkly ruinous as the world we live in, every passing second and twist a creative cacophony of raw seduction and jaundiced attitude shaped by fearsome tapestries of viscid sludge spawned ingenuity.

The track is a tremendous end to a thrilling first album from William English. Basic Human Error is sure to be an encounter seeing many fleeing for the hills in fear but similarly one to breed plenty of lustful hunger and stalker like attention for its creators. We are the latter and suspect we will be heftily joined in that club over the coming weeks.

Basic Human Error is available now via Grandad Records @ https://williamenglishband.bandcamp.com/

and http://grandadrecords.bigcartel.com/product/basic-human-error-william-english

https://www.facebook.com/WilliamEnglishBand/

RingMaster 01/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Straight Line Stitch – Transparency

Photo credit- Benjamin and Beverly Ross

Photo credit- Benjamin and Beverly Ross

Whether Straight Line Stitch is a band you ultimately take to or not, there is no escaping the fact that their sound demands attention. Their evolving mix of metal and rock is a dramatic and inventive proposition which explodes with fresh and rigorous tenacity in the band’s new EP Transparency. Consisting of six tracks which can uncompromisingly snarl and masterfully seduce, creatively savage and forcibly charm across their individual bodies, the EP is a rousing and fiercely enjoyable encounter from a band which never compromises their sound and invention but still manages to shape it into one easily devoured adventure.

Released via Pavement Entertainment, Transparency sees the Knoxville, TN trio reinforcing their core fusion of metal and hard rock with new transfixing twists and detours whilst retaining its recognisable and potent substance. The threesome of vocalist Alexis Brown, bassist Darren McClelland, and guitarist Jason White have not sculpted a major departure to the impressive offerings within their previous acclaimed album The Fight of Our Lives of 2011, yet the tapestry of ravenous and melodic invention is loaded with greater predacious and captivating temptation than ever before. It might just be a handful of songs but the EP suggests Straight Line Stitch have tapped into a new vat of inspiration and resourcefulness which can only further unfold ahead.

SLSCOV_RingMaster Review     Transparency opens with Out of the Shadows, a brief instrumental intro which entices well enough with its evocative air and elegance but fair to say the release properly gets going once Dark Matter suddenly roars from within the parting kiss of its predecessor. Brown’s aggressive raw tones rage first, swiftly joined by hungry riffs and rhythms bound in a tight vine of alluring grooving. In a matter of a few additional moments, Brown unveils the other side to her vocal prowess, her melodic persuasion casting new colour to the sonic tempting fermenting within the song and providing another step in the ever impressive and seamless diversity in her delivery. A carousel of predatory hostility and alluring pop rock around a carnivorous spine, the song itself is a persistently captivating engagement which is quickly matched by Out of Body.

The third track opens with warm enticing, guitar melodies caressing ears as the gentle tones of Brown flirt with the senses. As bass and drums harden their character, a stronger growl begins lining the song though it relaxes when keys spark harmony rich calmer passages within the song. Like a mix of In Flames and Lacuna Coil yet with an intimacy which gives the encounter its own distinction, the song heftily pleases before making way for Face of God, a track with volatile shadows to its depths and virulent contagion to its anthemic tempting. It is a stirring mix of textures with riffs and bass almost bestial in their intimidation and rancorous sound whilst vocals and melodies cast blazing rays of evocative beauty. Things continue to shift and twist in the body of the outstanding encounter, the EP’s best moment a kaleidoscope of unpredictable and easily digestible enterprise.

Wilderness is a savage provocation from its first breath, riffs and rhythms preying on ears with antagonistic imagination and fury which is soon matched by guitars and vocals and their own aggressive ingenuity. The fierce theatre subsequently slips into oases of melodic beauty, sparking new potent bait for appetite and imagination to feed from even though the blistering track’s dark side is never far from the surface. It is a template taken to its own imposing success by Human Bondage, though the closing song does lack the spark of uniqueness found in its predecessor. Nevertheless it is a maelstrom of rabid almost carnal riffs, grouchy basslines, and almost fell vocal ire entwined with warm and soaring radiance spread sonically and through the dynamic tones of Brown.

The song is a thick pleasure bringing another thoroughly enjoyable and enthralling incitement from Straight Line Stitch to a pleasing end. The new adventures within Transparency may not make it the best offering from the band to date, though it is right up there in many ways, but they suggest something major might just be in the pipeline and brewing very nicely for the band’s next album or proposal.

Transparency is available from June 30th via Pavement Entertainment.

https://www.facebook.com/straightlinestitch

RingMaster 30/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Heyrocco – Teenage Movie Soundtrack

Screen-Shot-2015-06-04-_RingMaster Review

With the release of recent single Elsewhere a sparkling lure to its impending arrival, Teenage Movie Soundtrack has answered the suggestiveness of its lead song and shows itself as an even greater enticement of the promise soaking that lone song of a few weeks back. The debut album from US angst poppers Heyrocco, the ten track encounter is a diverse and magnetic party for ears which weaves the teen angst sounds and emotions of the nineties, the guitar jangle of early Cure, and the dirtier tones of grunge into something unique from the imagination of the band. This still only scratches the surface really but the ultimate result is a release which sounds familiar, nostalgic, and thoroughly fresh, not forgetting highly enjoyable.

Hailing from Charleston, N. Carolina, Heyrocco consists of vocalist/guitarist Nate Merli, bassist Chris Cool, and drummer Tanner Cooper, a trio who has been constantly and increasingly stirring up attention on both sides of the pond since forming around five years ago. Teenage Movie Soundtrack is the band’s largest and strongest nudge on ears and appetites since forming and it starts with a bang through opener Loser Denial.

Guitar and vocals immediately pour their rich expression on ears, the pairing already hinting at the hues of a Weezer which only gets intensified as the song slips into a ripe stroll of rumbling bass, eager beats, and a spicy guitar clang. It is also instantly wrapped in pure infectiousness, a trait invading the whole of the album from hereon in. Virulently increasing in energy and captivating endeavour as it heads towards its riotous finale, the track is an exhilarating start to the release, leaving the listener in an agitated state eager for more, which comes courtesy of the heavier but no less compelling Melt. The air and presence of the song is thicker in emotional intensity but still retains the alluring catchiness of its predecessor, and indeed that same seeding of alternative rock/power pop for its own tempestuously inventive and at times perfectly imposing presence.

Heyroccocover_RingMaster Review     The grunge fuelled Virgin comes next, its opening minimalistic croon leading to thick and voracious Nirvana-esque explosions. It is an alluring cycle which is on repeat across a track which dramatically seduces and enslaves ears and emotions. There is no escaping the decade and bands inspiring the invention of Heyrocco or the ability of the threesome to twist them into ravenous incitements of raw and incendiary pop, as proven again by the lighter revelry of Elsewhere. Its opening jangle of hooks and invitational vocals is irresistible bait especially with its whisper of discord, a success eclipsed once the dark tones of bass and subsequent scythes of guitar court the potent variety of vocals across the band. Spiralling melodies and welcoming harmonies continue to exploit the submission given to the song’s charms, even as the outstanding encounter stirs up its creative intensity and volatile shadows to grow into an even bolder and muscular proposal.

A calm of sorts arrives next with the warm caress and enterprise of Mom Jeans, its rhythmic tempting and swinging pop gait a reserved but energetic festival of smouldering reflection and vivacious light locking ears and thoughts into eager attention. The almost sultry embrace of the song is replicated in many ways by First Song, though its tenacious balladry made up with livelier energy and melodies has more of a Costello/Petty-esque feel to it. Compared to previous tracks it takes longer to tempt and never quite manages to spark the same thrills whilst casting its pleasurable persuasion, but it certainly reveals more to the potential soaked depth and diversity in songwriting and sound within Heyrocco.

Alison brings a fiery blaze to ears next; its fuzzy textures and sizzling air colouring a cauldron of angst laden expression and melodic infectiousness bound in searing psych pop enterprise which in turn is equipped with pleasure gripping hooks. The track sizzles on the senses but is soon outshine by the even greater temptation of Jake Miller’s House Party. From its initial blast of spicy grooves and anthemic rhythms aligned to a thick lure of a bassline, imagination casts images of being bound in the throes of heaving bodies bouncing to the song’s puppeteer like tempting. You can picture a video for it straight away, energies and limbs moving in tandem even as the song relaxes a touch from its kinetic start for the great tones of Merli. A stomp of grunge hued rock ‘n’ roll, the song’s seamless flow through controlled and frantic crescendos is as magnetic as the web of invention and flavoursome hooks running incessantly through what proves to be the best track on the album.

The skilful Cure like hug of Santa Fe (Stupid Lovesong) is another which takes it’s time to convince, but eventually its laid back melody cast serenade simply leaves ears smiling whilst closing track Happy with its heavier rock croon ensures the release closes as potently as it began.

As so many, the band’s last single was our introduction to Heyrocco and there is no doubting they thrilled. Now Teenage Movie Soundtrack shows that it was no a flash in the pan but even more that it was just one strong essence in the band’s full sound and inventive presence. The additional excitement bred by the album is that you get the feeling this it only the beginning in their creative journey, just a scratching of the surface.

Teenage Movie Soundtrack is released on July 10th via Vital Music Group

https://www.facebook.com/Heyrocco    http://www.heyrocco.co.uk/

RingMaster 01/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Inacoma – Isn’t That True

Inacoma - Single artwork_RingMaster Review

Following the release of their self-titled debut EP, Swedish rockers Inacoma back its success up with the uncaging of new single Isn’t That True, a heavy stomp of a track which gets ears, attention, and an appetite for more easily excited. Taken from their first release, the song croons and rumbles, flirts and roars with anthemic persuasion to confirm Inacoma as a band with a very healthy future ahead of them.

Inacoma began in 2013 in Stockholm, formed by multi-instrumentalist Adam “O” Olsson who had previously played guitar in pop/rock band called No Definite Time. He subsequently linked up with vocalist Cristo Hage, a former lead guitarist in metal band The Last Providers, with the band line-up completed by drummer Jonathan Olsson. The trio soon had honed a mix of hard and alternative rock which, as evidenced by their EP and now the new single, brings feisty hooks and fiery grooves in line with whipping rhythms and ravenous riffs. It is a stirring proposal carrying something familiar yet in a presence as fresh as it is energetically creative and tenacious.

Isn’t That True is the perfect gateway onto the band’s sound, its vivacious and muscular presence virulently infectious but with a bruising intensity which is just as easy to devour. From a distance with a groove already working away, the song looms in to fill ears with flavoursome melodic and sonic tempting veined by more intimidating but no less magnetic rhythms. Like a mix of Foo Fighters and Soundgarden merged with a healthy slice of Johnny Wore Black and Creed, the track is a snarling consumption of body and appetite. It offers a design of guitar enterprise entangling riffs and hooks which are only there to seduce but with inventive unpredictability across the song and great vocal variety, it all unites in something fresh and spicy.

Isn’t That True is three minutes of prime rock ‘n’ roll from a band which you know will only get bolder, hungrier, and more compelling. Inacoma is the name, so go check out now.

Isn’t That True is released on July 6th

https://www.facebook.com/weareinacoma

RingMaster 01/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Pacific – Those Nights

Pacific_RingMaster Review

After the success of previous single Time to Forget, which along with widespread praise went on to earn potent radio play over 80 stations across the country including the Huw Stephens show on BBC Radio 1, UK band now Pacific release another single taken from their forthcoming EP. Fair to say Those Nights is another song marking out the band as a highly enjoyable and seriously promising proposition, and one surely destined to the same acclaim and exposure as its predecessor.

Emerging in 2011, Pacific consists of vocalist/pianist Anthony Orzel, bassist Daniel Orzel, guitarist Dave Bithell, and drummer Drew Burns, a quartet no strangers to earning strong support for their sound live and through singles released before Time to Forget was unveiled earlier this year. That song and now Those Nights have pushed the band to a new plateau of not only attention but also creativity, a step certainly making their forthcoming EP a highly anticipated proposal.

Pacific cover_RingMaster Review     Those Nights opens in a hug of piano and vocals, Anthony Orzel providing a magnetic coaxing which is soon joined by a vivacious mix of key enterprise and rhythmic shadows. Their company also brings a livelier air and energy to the emerging song, its core melodic charm and warm radiance a kinetically shimmering tempting contrasted and accompanied perfectly by the earthier tones of bass. It is a potently contagious mix though there are moments where the song resists exploding into a hinted bolder blaze of sound and emotion. Hindsight suggests the band is right to rein it in, the fluid and beautifully rounded body of the song a persistent persuasion never leaving a moment bare of virulent persuasion.

The very enjoyable teaser of the band’s two singles this year ensures their EP will be an eagerly devoured proposition, and though Those Nights might not end up as your favourite single of the year or even this summer, but it also might, we suggest it could be the one you return to most often.

Those Nights is out now

http://www.facebook.com/pacificofficial     http://www.pacificofficial.com

RingMaster 01/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

STUNNING NEW VIDEO SINGLE FROM IMMENSION RELEASED

Immension Online Press Shot

Steel City metallers ‘Immension’ continue their climb with the brand new video single for ‘In Vain’ which is taken from their debut album of the same name and out in stores now.

Watch ‘In Vain’ right here – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9poeYC-qeXY

By pulling from a host of sources, but namely the layered webbing of ‘In Flames’ and the accessibility of ‘Trivium’ and ‘Arch Enemy’, Immension have carefully crafted a sound that cunningly blends the fundamentals of contemporary and metal; the end result is absolutely exhilarating.

Immension were originally formed in 2008 in Sheffield by founding members Jake Kearsley and Tim Dolan. Drummer Jonni Sowter entered the fray in 2011, and the aspiring riff beasts soon set to work on honing their sound. It wasn’t long before the Steel City crew hit the road and toured throughout the whole of the UK. The band then went on to record and self-release two EPs. Both records sparked extensive praise and support from Kerrang!, Rock Sound, Total Rock Radio, Terrorizer and Powerplay Magazine, all helping to catapult the band to a national level.

Immension’s debut album, ‘In Vain’, has just been nationally released and it sets a clear marker, drawing a definitive line in the sand for the trio. The riff slingers now lift the album’s namesake as a new video single and are set to charge forward. The single is an energetic assault on the senses that will undoubtedly pull you in, while highlighting the band’s maturity and careful texturing through perfectly woven guitar work and thoughtful arrangements. The Yorkshire metallers are here and are poised to reach new heights.

– IMMENSION’S VIDEO FOR ‘IN VAIN’–

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9poeYC-qeXY

https://www.facebook.com/immension https://twitter.com/immension