MoRkObOt – GoRgO

Photo credit: Muur Studio

Photo credit: Muur Studio

For us there are few bands which produce grooves and unpredictable twists as carnivorous as they are relentlessly addictive and inventive than MoRkObOt, and the creators of rhythmic and grooved entanglements have done it again with fifth album GoRgO, woven a web of psyche twisting trespasses through their twin bass and psychotic drum instrumental alchemy.

The Italian trio of bassists Lin and Lan, and drummer Lon have excavated their most primal yet dynamically and imaginatively inventive maelstrom of sound yet with GoRgO, almost as if their twelve years and previous quartet of releases have been building up to this momentous moment. Recorded by Giulio Ragno Favero (Zu, Teatro degli Orrori, OvO, One Dimensional Man) at Lignum Studio in Italy, the album manages to stir an intimate as well as broadly ravenous incitement across seven slices of aural psychosis. The press release for GoRgO describes the album as “low-end noise rock origami” and from its first crunching breath a folding and twisting of texture and convention is exactly what involves the listener.

Opener Kogromot instantly grabs body and imagination as the opening lure of beats play like a side show barker, inviting attention as the waiting dexterity and rapacity of the bass slung duo stands poised to join in the ensnaring of ears and dismantling of expectations. Quickly the virulence of the track consumes ears; swinging beats and hungry grooves creating a raw festival of cantankerous sound and revelry that preys on the senses as much as it ignites them.

gorgo_RingMasterReviewThe mouth-watering start continues through the darker excitable throes of Kologora, Lon’s jungle of twisted rhythms alone ear and appetite gripping. As ever there is a predatory side to the heavy and the creatively dissentient nature of the MoRkObOt sound, the shadow lingering tone of the first track a growling antagonist in the second and subsequently an invasive almost cancerous infestation in the third. Gorokta takes a less direct approach to stirring up the emotions than its predecessors, their more forceful intrusiveness replaced by a ‘mellower’ and expansive adventure weaving more textural and sonic hues in its head spinning proposal. At times Lon is a blur of sticks and beats whilst Lin and Lan sculpt a calmer but emotionally dangerous landscape of enterprise.

There is no other band like MoRkObOt, their technical craft and distinct imagination blending forms of simplicity with seriously involved imagination, every note as revealed again within the outstanding Ogrog, skilfully and instinctively inventive to send the listener spinning into fresh adventures each and every time shared. Another track which prowls, virtually stalks the senses with rhythmic dexterity to lust over, it makes way for the harmonic discord and heterodoxic Kromot. The track glorious invades and seduces body and spirit, nurturing a creative and renegade instinct within itself and its targets. For some reason steampunk like imagery comes to mind during the track, aural technology and aesthetic designs coming together like a puppeteer which in many ways is what MoRkObOt are; puppeteers of rhythms, riffs, and grooves, not forgetting the psyche.

The album completes the rousing and seducing of the passions with firstly the dark, sinister, and slightly vaudevillian exploits of Krogor and lastly the epic Gorog which takes and accentuates all those elements and more into an otherworldly and deeply cavernous soundscape. Forcibly mesmeric and bewitchingly off-kilter within its shadowy beauty, the track is stunning; a sublime and transfixing exploration growing from its noir almost jazzy emergence into one deceptively raptorial encounter.

There is no denying we have a real soft spot for MoRkObOt but fans or not there is no escaping that GoRgO is the finest entanglement with the band yet and one of the year’s most irresistible offerings.

GoRgO is out now via Supernatural Cat on CD, Vinyl, and digitally.

http://www.morkobot.org   http://www.facebook.com/morkobot   http://morkobot.bandcamp.com

Pete RingMaster 28/09/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Kobadelta – The Metaphysical

photography-by-adam-kennedy

photography-by-adam-kennedy

It is fair to say that their quartet of previous EPs have established Kobadelta as one of the most intriguing and captivating prospects to emerge on the British music scene in recent years and also that listening to the evolution of their seriously tantalising sound has captivated almost as much as the noise itself. October sees the release of the Newcastle bred outfit’s new encounter and another growth in songwriting, music, and temptation.

Their five-track EP, The Metaphysical, sees the band’s psych rock spiced sound reveal its richest and most adventurous landscape yet with an even greater weave of textures and flavours. Melodies are imposing, harmonies bewitching yet both offering magnetic warmth which shimmers and radiates against the instinctive dark tones and emotive shadows which breed the band’s songs. It is a tapestry which lays the Kobadelta sound somewhere between Echo and The Bunnymen and The Doors with an almost gothic Nick Cave essence for extra flavouring.

Formed in 2010, the quintet soon built a potent live reputation locally, nudging on wider recognition with the release of debut EP Ritual (Time Flies) three years later. 2014 saw the band make bigger strides towards national awareness and in sound through both the Hidden Door and Remain Distracted EPs, their success subsequently eclipsed by the Open Visions EP last year. It was a dark and compelling encounter pushing the band’s sound to another level which now The Metaphysical cements and takes on again while still showing the potential of even more adventures to be discovered and explored within the band. With shows alongside the likes of Temples, Allusondrugs, We Were Promised Jetpacks, Demob Happy, Splashh, The Temperance Movement, The Weeks, Lola Colt, and The Voyeurs among many more, and those aforementioned releases, sparking a real appetite for the band’s sound, The Metaphysical might just be the moment Kobadelta hits the broadest spotlights.

The EP swiftly captures ears and imagination with opener Hold Yr’self, the track seducing initially with the caress of suggested pipes before the song tumbles into view with tangy grooves and swinging rhythms. There is no escaping The Doors scenting to any of the band’s song, though Ian McCulloch and co are probably a stronger spicing to what soon shows itself to be distinctly Kobadelta. With the synths of Jordan Robson dancing around the magnetic melodic weave cast by guitarist Alex Malliris, the imagination is soon hooked, gripped tighter as the potent vocals of Dom Noble bring a darker edge in collusion with the rapier swings of drummer Jon Marley and Chris Malliris’ brooding basslines.

It is a compelling start matched by the infectious stroll of the similarly shadow rich and sonically fiery Ride By The Light. Mixing mellower seducing with those dynamic flames of sound and energy, the song is a whirlpool of adventure and drama. There are moments which remind of early   but again as keys wrap the predacious tone of the bass in just one of the track’s major attractions, Kobadelta unveil something unique to themselves.

Bathsheba raises the energy and sultriness of the band’s sound next; its raw mystique and fuzzy climate a feisty wrapping to the tenacious rhythms driving yet another irresistible proposal from the EP. As lyrics and vocals tell a story so does the music, both colluding in a spirit rousing incitement which seems to become darker and more volatile with every enjoyable listen; a potency emulated in the following Is This The Start Of Something Beautiful? and its ferine adventure. So easy to get physically and mentally sucked into its suggestive kaleidoscope of sound, the song trespasses and transfixes the senses as each band member unleashes their fiery enterprise.

Bringing the EP to a magnificent close is You Don’t Need To Ask…, a slow prowl of a headily dark song which borders on demonic even with its theatre of catchy charm, spellbinding melodies, and predacious rhythms. There is a definite occult rock air to the track and its dark romance with the minimal but powerful presence of piano icing on another mighty and increasingly tempestuous highlight of the release.

There are a few bands which have emerged in recent years for which it is hard not to find a touch of real excitement to go along with anticipation upon word of a new proposition from them. The Metaphysical is the perfect example as to why Kobadelta is firmly one of them.

The Metaphysical EP is released in October with its launch show on Friday 4th November in Newcastle at Think Tank – Underground with support from local bands Hazels and FOTO.

https://www.facebook.com/Kobadelta

Pete RingMaster 28/09/2016

This Dying Hour – Resting Where No Shadows Fall

this-dying-hour-promo-shot_RingMasterReview

In many ways you could say that Resting Where No Shadows Fall, the eagerly anticipated debut album from British metallers This Dying Hour has been ten years in the making. Formed at the beginning of 2006 and swiftly impressing with their debut EP, the High Wycombe outfit has endured a decade littered with setbacks “that were just too great to overcome; everything from death and marriage to money came between the band and its members.” Now they are back and with a release which feels like it carries all the emotions and frustrations felt over that time; an album which ignites ears and imaginations with invention and passion.

That first year of the band produced the Longest Memory From The Shortest Life EP, a well-received and often praised introduction. It was accompanied by tours throughout the UK and Europe as well as shows with the likes of Young Guns, Sylosis, Bury Tomorrow, Malefice, and Exit Ten. The years since, as mentioned, brought This Dying Hour to a standstill until this year when vocalist Dave Pickup and guitarist Ash Whitelock decided to spark the band into life again with the help of “rotating members to fill the void.” Now they have made the wait for the next instalment of This Dying Hour adventure a forgotten moment as Resting Where No Shadows Fall seriously impresses ears and thoughts.

The album opens with its brief title track, an atmospheric instrumental which draws the imagination, leading it into the waiting jaws of War Drums. The second track instantly makes its point with scything riffs and beats, their imposing swipes aligned to a nagging raw melody before things all comes together in a predacious stalking of the senses. The snarling tones of Pickup are soaked in raw emotion and ire, a potency matched by Whitelock’s irritable guitar and the rhythmic antagonism of the track. It not may be the most unique proposal, references to the likes of Lamb Of God and Killswitch Engage valid, yet the song has a freshness which roars in ears and only blossoms further as a cleaner touch invades the vocal incitement.

The impressive start continues as Asleep springs its wiry grooves and vocal hostility next. Swiftly the song shows its distinct and individual character to be a diversity of intensity and energy, all soaked in venom as it seizes attention and a growing appetite for the release. Clean vocals and great dirty harmonies bring stronger drama and quality, as too the enterprising craft of Whitelock as the song bellows and challenges in equal enjoyable measure.

this-dying-hour-cover-artwork_RingMasterReviewPath Of Unknown opens with a melodic atmosphere similar to the opening intro, sunken vocals courting the initial lure before the song opens up into a striking and thrilling encounter. The mellower tones of Pickup predominantly stir the song this time around, luring with the listener alongside spicy melodies into one ridiculously infectious chorus and subsequently a great passage of calm reflection with a touch of Palms to it. One of the biggest highlights among many, the outstanding proposal is followed by the far more hostile climate and sound of Time To Die, though it too is unafraid to cast warm melodies and catchy clean vocals. A rival for best track to match its predecessor, the song completes a first half of Resting Where No Shadows Fall which simply blows most other emerging melodic/groove metallers away.

There is little loosening of attention and pleasure either as first the darker sinister realm of Underworld encloses and encroaches on the senses. Certainly the track is a touch hit and miss, moments which stir the blood and others which lie a touch flat on thoughts but arguably it is the most inventive proposition on the album as it ensnares the imagination while Alive is as accomplished as anything within Resting Where No Shadows Fall at blending the calmer and fiercer emotional and physical exploits of band and songwriting. Though both are lacking the spark of earlier songs, each leaves a real want for more which Priapism feeds with its melody rich charm and fiery temperament.

The album closes on the same kind of explosive sound and impact as it started, Room 108 a volatile and often corrosive encounter with sparkling moments of vocal invention and melodic imagination seemingly inspired by a mix of System Of A Down, Deftones, and In Flames.

It is a great end to an excellent first album from a band making up for lost time in passion and invention. With the potential of bigger and bolder to come, it is very easy to push Resting Where No Shadows Fall as something all should make an acquaintance with.

Resting Where No Shadows Fall is out in stores from Friday 30th September.

https://www.facebook.com/thisdyinghouruk/

Pete RingMaster 28/09/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Rousing one and all: getting to know The World Over

the-world-over_RingMasterReview

With a new album starting to stir up real attention, it is fair to say that LA based rockers The World Over have grown in sound and stature with increasing attention on their ear gripping music in close quarter. Shows with the likes of Attila, As Blood Runs Black, Meytal Cohen, The Browning, and many more have only added to their nudge on new ears and support; so with big thanks to front-woman Tiaday Ball, granddaughter of Ernie Ball (world renowned creator of Music Man guitars and Slinky Strings), we got down with The World Over to see what is at the heart of the band and their increasing impact on the music scene…

Hello and thanks for sparing time to talk with us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started?

Hi! I’m the vocalist, Tiaday. On guitar we have Ryan Knecht and Donovan Allen on bass.

The World Over was created in 2013 by founders Xavier Moreux, Ryan Knecht, Anthony Dellaripa, Eric Gledhil, and myself who had all moved to Los Angeles from around the world with the mutual goal to make music. We conceptualized a band which could represent many different cultures and promote messages of hope and empowerment!

the-world-over_RingMasterReviewHave you been in other bands before? If so has that had any impact on what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

We’ve all been in bands before coming together as The World Over and we all can agree that we’ve learned from our mistakes. Even our last album as The World Over we’ve taken as a growing experience to finding our sound that is in our new album, MOUNTAINS that we just released. You can check it out here: https://itunes.apple.com/album/id1146557304

What inspired the band name?

Our original line-up had consisted of band members from around the world so we really wanted to have a name that could represent our diverse cultures and continuity. The World Over just felt right and even though our most diverse members couldn’t remain in the band, it still holds true to us in other ways. We will take The World Over one fan at a time! Haha.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

Not really. Xavier just really wanted to start a band and got all of us together to make it a reality. But our new sound was definitely created to break the boundaries of the Rock world reaching a much broader spectrum of listeners.

Has that idea and intent evolved and broadened over time?

I think it’s definitely evolved because of the line-up change and us three particularly wanting to make The World Over as big as it can possibly become. In the beginning, we didn’t really know what we wanted and had not much guidance or direction for where we saw ourselves in the upcoming years.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

The big difference between our last record, Rampart District, and our new record, Mountains (available on iTunes, Spotify, etc.), is significantly more under the blanket term of “rock”. We stay true to our roots of post-hardcore but we have definitely diverged into a new category.

Has that expansion been more of an organic movement of sound or the band deliberately wanting to go there?

It was both! We knew we needed to branch out and explore other ideas but we didn’t know how at first. Over time it became more apparent of what we wanted and we made it happen.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating the-world-over2_RingMasterReviewand playing music?

The new Bring Me The Horizon has influenced all of us because of how they forced themselves out of their comfort zone to create something that everyone can enjoy and executed it well…Also Deftones biiig time. We just took the same approach and it’s been working for us. We’re just having fun at this point and whatever is created is created haha.

Is there a regular process to the band’s songwriting?

For Mountains specifically, we spent a lot of the time recording demos at Ryan’s studio, either jamming ideas acoustically, writing over vocal melodies or going off of other recordings we did on our own. After we collected the demos we knew we definitely wanted on the album, we flew to Canada to work with Siegfried Meier (Kitty, DMX) at Beach Road Studios which was an amazing experience to have as a band. He has an amazing studio and is a great producer to work with!

Where do the lyrical inspirations to side of your songs predominantly come from?

Sometimes I’ve pulled from lyric piles that I’ve had for years that never fit in other songs and just so happened to work in these. But a lot of inspiration for my lyrics is from my perspective on life and my experiences like Liberosis and Swervewolf. But then there are some songs like Invisible and Traitor that are just storytelling.

You mentioned Mountains earlier; can you give us some background to it.

We named our new album, Mountains because it references to our hardships and obstacles we’ve had to overcome through the period of time between this release and our last album, Rampart the-world-over-art_RingMasterReviewDistrict as well as how we plan to move mountains with this record.

Would you give us a closer insight to its themes and the premises songs?

There usually isn’t much of a reoccurring theme to our songs, but I always end my lyrics with a message of hope and empowerment instead of constant complaining like some songs out there and I plan to keep it that way.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

A little bit of both. Structurally, we have it done. But there are little nuances that we change on the fly in the studio.

Tell us about the live side to the band?

It’s a very high energy and in-your-face performance! You should come see it for yourself some time! We have shows listed on our website at: http://www.theworldoverofficial.com/

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods? Are there the opportunities to make a mark if the drive is there for new bands?

There definitely is, but you have to line yourself up with the right people and a good team. You have to put in the work and not expect things to fall in your lap. Especially in Los Angeles as there is a lot of competition. You have to hustle to survive.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date?

We think it’s helped us reach a greater international audience as we have fans all over the world. You can never gain too many fans. Personally we think you need to utilize all of your social media platforms in order to get yourself established as a band. Also post nudes. Jk don’t do that.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Thanks for having us! Lastly, we’d just like to add that our album is out on all music platforms: iTunes, Spotify, Amazon, Google Play, iHeartRadio and more so give it a listen! We also have merchandise available on our website: http://www.theworldoverofficial.com/ or on our bandcamp where you can stream our album for free at: http://theworldover.bandcamp.com/

You can subscribe to our channel at: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheWorldOver

https://www.facebook.com/theworldoverofficial/   https://twitter.com/TWO_band

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 28/09/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Seeds in a wasteland: engaging with Remnants of Hope

remnants-of-hope_RingMasterReview

Forging a potent reputation with a sound going against the general trend of their local music scene, Remnants of Hope is an Atlanta bred band on the rise. Their Industrial/punk rock sound has seen the band have their most potent year yet since forming in 2014, the sharing of stages with the likes of Eyes Set To Kill, Famous Last Words, Wednesday 13, Allegaeon, Byzantine, and Not Tonight Josephine among numerous all adding to the reputation of Remnants of Hope. With thanks to vocalist Alexander Death, and guitarists Nykii Nightmare and Paul Graveyard, we grabbed the opportunity to find out more about this growing force…

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Hello and thank you for having us!

Can you tell us about the band and how it all started?

We’re a band called Remnants of Hope from Atlanta, Georgia. We started out covering songs from bands we liked then making our own music videos and putting them up on YouTube. After we became more passionate we started writing our own material, not long after that we came up with the name “Remnants of Hope” and started performing.

Is Remnants of Hope your first foray into music or have you been involved in previous outfits?

Group: We’ve not been in any bands before this one.

What inspired the band name?

Group: We’re an industrial band and most of our songs take place in a post-apocalyptic setting. We wanted a name that would describe fighters for the greater good in that setting.

roh_RingMasterReviewWas there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

Group: We wanted to be an industrial rock/metal band. We wanted to have flaming guitar solos as well as screaming and singing. We wanted to put on a very theatrical live show, when we’re afforded the time to set-up and we’re allowed to bring extra stage items we take fog and lights with us, as well as stage props.

Do the same things still drive the band when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

Group: Our passion for music. That will never change.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

Group: Heavier with much more complexity.

Has it been more of an organic movement of sound or do you deliberately push yourselves into trying new things?

Group: Both, as artists we want to progress and do new things, that plus the natural maturity of our song writing progressing makes our sound change.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

Zander: Danny Worsnop. His vocal style on Death to Destiny was very intriguing and encouraged me to change up my own style.

Nykii: Bullet for my Valentine. The way their songs are composed is inspiring to me in creating my own compositions.

Is there a process to the songwriting which generally guides the writing of songs?roh3_RingMasterReview

Nykii: I compose all the music then Zander and I get together for the lyrical content of the songs. After that we go down the list of what vocal style the song needs to sound the best. Once the vocal style has been selected me and Paul write the guitar solos. That’s the process and steps we usually go through each time we write a song.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

Group: Real life experiences, video games we’re playing…Possibly horror movies for some songs (Afterbite).

Please give us some background to your latest release and some insight to the themes and premise behind it.

Group: Mirroring My Pain. We put it out last April. The EP is about dealing with and defeating your demons.

Mirroring my Pain [the intro] is the start of the story line, the realization that the character of the story can change certain aspects of his life. See Me Fall is about the character confronting his demons, saying how they only want to see him bleed. Every time he looks into the mirror his demon self is threatening to slit his wrists. At the end he confronts and defeats his inner demons. Digging Graves is the part of the story where he buries the worse half of himself, once and for all letting go of his pain. The character has inner turmoil as he fights against his darker emotions to move on. Worth Fighting For is the final song on the EP. The character has taken care of all of his inner demons, but his emotions that lash out are still plaguing him. He fights and kills “Anger” and “Pain” in a symbolic measure that he now has them both under control.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

Group:  Yes, we do a lot of pre-production to make sure we get things right once we start recording them.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably the favourite aspect of the band?roh2

Group: Whether we play for fifteen minutes or forty minutes, we give it our all the whole time. To us it’s what we live, breathe and train for. The live show is everything to us.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it?

Group:  Sometimes, we’ve been really really lucky this year with opportunities to open for bigger bands. Last year we were not nearly as fortunate, so we were basically just trying to push out as much online promotion and campaigns as possible.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date? Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as the band grows and hopefully gets increasing success?

Nykii: Where we’re from bands are either death-core or pop-punk. This has put us in both a fantastic and a terrible place at the same time. Thanks to social media other band members from different bands can quickly go to one of our sites and comment on the fact in a negative manner that we’re not exactly the same as them, making the exact same music as them. On the other hand, we’re different and we fit better on some shows than others would. I think social media for the most part is already becoming a negative thing at our current place. Keeping it working to your advantage is just a massive game of X’s and O’s. Every time you get three in a row the game appears to restart and you need to find a new corner to try and occupy with your work.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Group: Once again, thank you for having us. Our music video for A Warriors Heart is out now! (or will be by the time this interview is posted). You can watch it here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=94ZNBLFhA8c

https://www.facebook.com/RemnantsOfHopeBand/   https://twitter.com/RemofHope

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 26/09/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Hands Off Gretel – Burn the Beauty Queen

HOG_RingMasterReview

Checking out the ear exciting single One Eyed Girl a few short weeks back, our closing line was “Roll on Burn The Beauty Queen”. That is the title of the debut album from UK grrl punksters Hands Off Gretel, and just a handful of days ago it was unveiled to quench hopes and anticipation for its potential riding on the back of its lead single. Burn the Beauty Queen is glorious, a feast of grunge fuelled punk ‘n’ roll snarling and barracking like a fusion of Die So Fluid, Spinnerette, and The Raincoats. It is an infestation of ears and psyche skilfully weaving recognisable flavours into its own distinctively imaginative exploits and more than fulfilling the promise offered by its first single.

Emerging from an early musical partnership between vocalist/guitarist Lauren Tate and guitarist Sean McAvinue and following the demise of the former’s Lauren Tate Band, Hands Off Gretel quickly started to draw attention with Tate’s ‘frustration songs’ as creative fuel. Late 2015 saw Sam Hobbins invited to play bass and drums on the South Yorkshire band’s album, subsequently become the permanent Hands Off Gretel drummer to join Tate and McAvinue, newest member bassist Joe Scotcher completing the current line-up.

In a year already seeing Hands Off Gretel release the single My Size as well as One Eyed Girl and play Whitby Goth Weekend, Camden Rocks Festival, Rebellion, Kaya Festival, and Isle of Wight Festival, Burn the Beauty Queen is the pinnacle and needs barely two minutes of opener Queen Universe to confirm the fact. Teasing, almost taunting with a lone riff initially, bait swiftly accompanied by the potent tones of Tate, the song is soon a cauldron of imposing rhythms, cantankerous riffs, and spiky hooks with bitchy harmonies adding their great snarl. It is a stunning start quickly reminding of those earlier references yet just as powerfully showing its own character of sound and invention as it stomps over senses and into the passions.

There is no chance of such a powerful bordering on psychotic beginning being followed by an antic-climax either as One Eyed Girl follows to confirm its position of one of the best songs heard this year. Grumbling in ears from its opening bassline, the track is soon aggressively challenging and seducing as Tate’s catchy yet confrontational tones align to the nagging and addictive exploits of McAvinue’s hooks and riffs as rhythms swing with venom. Again there is no escaping a Brody Dalle essence to vocals and indeed the sound but the song bounces around on its own unique terms to feed an already keen appetite for what is on offer.

art_RingMasterReviewBad Egg is next, coaxing ears with a singular hook wearing an early Adam and The Ants scent before things open up with wiry melodies and predacious beats as McAvinue’s guitar spins a web of tangy melodic intrigue. Less ferocious and imposing than its predecessors, the track is dangerously bewitching, leaving a lingering imprint before Teethin’ strolls in like a gunslinger, one hiding its bite behind catchy endeavours but perpetually gnawing away with post and old school punk invention. Its exceptional persuasion is followed by that of Little Man, a haunting ballad-esque canter seemingly as much inspired by the darker explorations of Siouxsie and The Banshees as bands like Hole and 4 Non Blondes, and quite irresistible.

From its dark shadows, Hands Off Gretel go for the jugular with the punk infested and simply brilliant Always Right. It is a rousingly irritable assault, like Bikini Kill meets Au Pairs and also fiercely addictive as its virulent enterprise and piecing hooks take hold before Under The Bed bares its cranky attitude and nature with creative zeal.

Through the barbarous Oh Shit with its predatory bassline and scything riffs and the raging fire of World Against She, Hands Off Gretel prove that even their least unique offerings simply ring true with ears and emotions and set the band well apart from the field whilst tracks like Eating Simon with its Three Imaginary Boys like Cure hooks and enslaving rhythmic rumbling offer evidence that the quartet just might be one of the bands helping steer British rock to new glories ahead.

Then we have Plasters, a superb and slightly deranged piece of imagination which drawls discord, musically and emotionally, whilst casting another highly addictive web of beats and sonic hooks. The song brings seventies punk, eighties new wave, and nineties grunge into the raw and twenty first century invention of Hands Off Gretel for something quite striking.

The dark amble and warning of Push The Girl and the climactic theatre of Awfully Miserable bring Burn the Beauty Queen to a powerful close; the first sublime creative drama in the ear and its successor, from an engrossing low key unleashing, a tempest of scything beats and grumpy basslines littered with electric grooves and spiky hooks as crescendos rise and fall.

It is a great end to one of the year’s most impressive and seriously pleasurable releases of 2016. Hands Off Gretel bring a fresh excitement to music, Burn the Beauty Queen the biggest thrill.

Burn the Beauty Queen is out now and available @ http://www.handsoffgretel.co.uk/_p/prd15/4533789831/product/burn-the-beauty-queen-album

http://www.handsoffgretel.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/handsoffgretel/

Pete RingMaster 21/09/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Dog ‘N’ Style – Pub’s Calling

dognstyle-promo-pubc-3_RingMasterReview

Unleashing a flavoursome dose of rebel and spirit rousing rock ‘n’ roll within its muscular walls, French heavy rockers Dog ‘N’ Style have just released debut album Pub’s Calling. A hungry and virulent roar from start to finish, the ten track encounter revels in the band’s stoner and hard rock shaded rock ‘n’ roll which in turn inspires ears to greedily devour what is maybe not the most unique incitement but certainly one which leaves thick satisfaction.

Formed in 2013, Epinal hailing Dog ‘N’ Style quickly hit their stride live, the following three years seeing the Spinalien quartet play over a hundred shows across France and further afield including tours in Russia, Spain, and Luxemburg. Sharing stages with the likes of No One is Innocent, The Casualties, Tagada Jones, Ultra Vomit, and Burning Heads along the way the band’s melody infused heavy rocking has been increasingly praised while their self-titled debut EP of 2015 introduced the band to a broader attention which Pub’s Calling can only further ignite.

An earthy revving of an engine opens up the album, its growl welcoming the meaty body and sound of The Best of Me. Straight away the song sets the character and intent of sound and release, riffs and rhythms heavy and imposing as fiery flames of guitar and rich melodies collude with an infectious boisterousness. As most songs within Pub’s Calling, there is something familiar about the opener but a recognisable air which wraps the band’s commanding and enterprising songwriting to fine effect.

art_RingMasterReviewThe great start to the album continues with I Did Something Bad, the growl lined vocals of Greg Hal a magnetic essence as swinging riffs and rhythms unite while the guitars of Yan Pierrat and Hal spin a web of sonic and melodic adventure. Like its predecessor, there is an instinctive catchiness to the song which is irresistible even when the bass of Robin Rob’s grooves along on its own. The band lists inspirations as the likes of Black Stone Cherry, Steel Panthers, Red Fang, and Nashville Pussy, and it is those kinds of influences which especially leap around within the album’s second track.

Pretty Fly reveals a grouchier intent in its nature and sound from the off yet again grooves and the inviting tones of Hal are quickly seducing ears as the mighty rhythmic swings of drummer Boub Tchak resonate. A cantankerously toned bassline entangles the warmer but no less intrusive riffs and grooves of the guitars, it all contrasting and mixing masterfully with the melodic and fiery imagination which blossoms across the track before One Day springs its Gruntruck spiced proposal and in turn Bad Motorcycle swaggers in with its hard/classic rock fuelled stomp. Neither track quite live up to the heights of the first trio of songs yet spicy grooves and infectious roars as well as the sonic dexterity offered ensures both leave enjoyment high.

The release hits top gear again with Night Losers, its funk infested basslines alone sparking an already eager appetite as the tendrils of tangy guitar entangle ears. Again vocals and rhythms involve the listener with ease and though originality is maybe limited the imagination is swiftly hooked by the songs inventive twists, turns, and snarling enterprise.

With its southern rock hued melodies, the same applies to the excellent Running Out which swiftly seduces as sultry sonic sighs amidst calmer vocals and energies immerse ears in its smouldering but rhythmically imposing climate. Carrying a fierce snarl in its mellower stroll, the track is outstanding, best track contender which though closely rivalled within the album leaves the moment which lingers longest even as the bruising and thickly catchy rumble of Never Trust An Asshole mightily consumes ears and pleasure next.

The album’s title track is heavy rock ‘n’ roll at it most compelling and rousing, rhythms and riffs enslaving instincts as grooves and almost toxic melodies infest the imagination. It too is a battleground of attitude loaded aggression and energy infused with a tapestry of warm melodic invention and dustily charming harmonies.

Ensuring the album ends on a high similar to how it started, it calls time on the boozy rabble-rousing with the final Couple Of Beers, a track again weaving all the traits and contrasting shades of the Dog ‘N’ Style sound and invention in one exhilarating escapade. It is a fine end to Pub’s Calling, an album which may not be about to change the direction of muscle driven rock ‘n’ roll but certainly gives it something to get lively about.

Pub’s Calling is out now across most online stores.

 

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Pete RingMaster 21/09/2016

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