Astral Cloud Ashes – Too Close to the Noise Floor

Album Art_RingMasterReview

With three attention grabbing and imagination sparking singles under the belt, Astral Cloud Ashes unveil debut album Too Close to the Noise Floor. It is a collection of songs which arouse and serenade the senses, often simultaneously as the project’s mesmeric songwriting and emotive melodic elegance seduces.

Astral Cloud Ashes is the new project of Jersey bred songwriter/musician Antony Walker, previously better known as one half of the Channel Islands hailing Select All Delete Save As. Having already created music under the name ALPA, amongst other monikers, Walker quickly sparked attention to his latest project last year with first single Too Close To The Noise Floor, the now title track to the new album. Primarily a solo project but with backing vocalist Jason Neil a permanent fixture in the band, Astral Cloud Ashes draws on inspirations ranging from The Cure, Bloc Party, Interpol, At the Drive In, Mars Volta, and Say Anything as well as flavours bred in indie and alternative rock/pop. Equally though, the album shows bold ventures into more progressive and post rock pastures without losing the instinctive catchiness and melodic romancing found in those earlier propositions.

Mixed across its tracks by Gareth [The Fold], Edd HartwellPaul Miles, Daniel Szanto,  and Walker himself, with the mastering undertaken by Tim Turan, Too Close to the Noise Floor opens with The Man I Had To Become. Instantly a temptation of bubbling guitar captures ears, the coaxing quickly joined by a wave of rhythmic jabbing and a thicker weave of melodic guitar and harmonious vocals. It is a gentle yet boisterous affair easily whipping up the imagination and spirit with Walker’s distinctive tones the mellow flame within a more combustible web of enterprise. It is a great mix which marked those early singles but already seems to have blossomed within the album into a more adventurous and confident entangling of the listener.

The great start is followed by the album’s title track, Too Close to the Noise Floor showing a rawer, more imposing energy as it takes the imagination into the intimacy and adventure of cosmonautics but equally involves “family values and unwanted first-world paranoia” in its energetically hugged theme. Punching its rhythmic and contagious essences home, it also carries a hazy climate to its atmosphere with the bass a deliciously throaty lure amongst nothing but virulent temptation. Embracing a XTC feel and Melvins like revelry, the track has body and appetite eagerly involved in swift time.

Grateful for the Ghost In Our House steps forward next and as the last track showed a more formidable presence to its predecessor, this song reveals a fiercer predation to its opening and subsequent invention within another wash of suggestive melodies and smouldering dynamics. Though not in the actual sound, it is easy to see where an influence of The Cure comes into play, Walker creating an emotional and musical drama which has the senses riding a roller coaster.

Recent single Get Real follows, strolling along with the ever present catchiness which Walker conjures with seeming ease across every track. Guitars pop and bubble throughout the song as rhythmic tenacity creating an anthemic frame to the vocal and melodic ingenuity before Flashback takes over. A calmer and mellower engagement but even more emotively forceful, the song caresses ears with a lone guitar melody before being joined by a heavily shadowed bassline aligned to a broader floating melodic enterprise. Vocally, Walker provides an introspective narrative as provocative as the poetic almost volcanic fuzziness of his guitar. Adding another individual shade and hue to the album, the track shows the broader landscape of Walker’s songwriting and an intimacy, whether personal or observational, which fuels his words.

With drummer Max Saidi guesting, Avant Blah! strolls boldly in next, its lo-fi pop ‘n’ roll blending Weezer infection with Pavement-esque invention while its successor Lites almost lumbers into view in comparison with the brooding bass and irritable riffs to the fore. In all songs there is a great repetitious quality brewed by Walker, here almost coming over drone like to great effect around the solemn melody and the similarly melancholic vocals. As it expands though, a wave of rich textures and rousing energies flood the song, returning throughout the low-key yet thickly enjoyable, almost imposing encounter.

The excellent This Once Great Place has an air of The Cure again with its atmospheric landscape, reminding of the A Forest/Pornography era of the trio across its own captivating journey before the equally impressive Housing in a Bubble makes a grab for best track with its more punkish/grungy roar of sound. Everything about it has a snarl not heard on the album previously; revealing more of the diversity the release carries whilst stirring up a fresh greed in ears and pleasure.

Our Holiday brings Too Close to the Noise Floor to a sombre and enthralling close, the track initially a dark sigh but soon building its own catchy canter loaded with spiky hooks and spicy melodies around another slightly foreboding and compelling bassline. Once more thoughts of Robert Smith and co are sparked but again as a flavour in something individual to Astral Cloud Ashes. It is a riveting end to a striking and increasingly impressive first album from Walker.

The clues to the project’s potential were there in its first trio of singles, and now confirmed and partly realised by Too Close to the Noise Floor. The feeling is that there is plenty more to come and to be explored within that promise, and going by the strength of this thoroughly enjoyable offering, we are all in for many treats ahead.

Too Close to the Noise Floor is released July 11th @ http://apple.co/1RFvoL8

https://www.facebook.com/astralcloudashes   https://astralcloudashes.bandcamp.com/   https://twitter.com/AstralCloudAsh

Pete RingMaster 08/07/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Uncaging the emotional beast: an interview with Owleye

Owleye_RingMasterReview

Formed in the late half of 2013, Owleye is a snarling post hardcore roar from Denver. After a potent couple of years across their local scene, last year saw a line-up change and short hiatus with the departure of their previous vocalist. The release of their new EP this past April announced and confirmed the welcome return of the quintet and we seized on the opportunity to talk with the band and find out what makes them tick…

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Thanks for having us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started?

We are Owleye, a post hardcore band from Denver, Colorado. The band started in 2013 with a group of friends DJ (guitar) Brad (bass) and Frank (drums) getting together and wanting to make something new and unique while keeping true to their roots. Myself (Tim vocals) and Dave (guitar) came into the band mid-2015.

Is Owleye your first musical venture and if not have previous experiences had any impact on what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

We’ve all be involved with other bands with different experiences. Having different paths always is super cool cause we can throw so many different elements and styles and blend it into what Owleye really is.

Tell us about the band name.

The band was originally I Will Lie but Owleye was always in the back of our heads so it quickly changed to that.

owleye2_RingMasterReviewWas there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

I mean really we just wanted to play music that is relevant and also very unique at the same time. I mean listening to our new EP No Wounds, the listener will notice every different tone and feel to each song ‘cause they are all similar but different at the same time, it’s really cool.

Do the same things still drive the band when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

I mean my vocal style was a lot different than the previous vocalist, so I mean we are pretty fresh still but the overall outlook of the band has evolved tenfold over the past year and with this EP.

Equally since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

I know it is very cliché but we’ve all just matured as musicians and it really shows in our new sound and new music. Even writing now our songs we are working on are growing bigger and more mature.

That change has been more of an organic movement or you guys deliberately setting out to try new things?

Well again with me coming in, I wanted a different sound and wanted to write music that is very comfortable for my vocal style so it was basically starting all from scratch again and trying new things until we were all on the same page.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

We are all inspired by different genres and things but we kinda just write how we are feeling at that moment in time. This last EP was me getting a lot of things off my chest that I’ve been holding in for years. So who knows what is to come in the future ha ha.

Is there a regular process to the songwriting?

We kinda just pre pro little ideas and grow off said idea. Being able to hear an idea over and over again in earphones is so beneficial and every band should do it to help them get the best product.

owleye3_RingMasterReviewWhere do lyrical inspirations more often than not come from?

I wrote a lot of past experiences that have been held over my head for a long time and just trying to find the positive. Sometimes life sucks and I’m just trying to make light of things in my lyrics and find the true beauty that comes with hardships.

You mentioned it earlier, so can you give some background to your latest release?

Our latest release No Wounds is really all about finding ourselves with this new line-up and touches a lot on my past insecurities at least lyrically. It’s struggling with different things in life and trying to find the light of stupid fucking situations.

Every song is pretty different themed with tones and the overall feeling it gives. I mean there are parts where you wanna punch your best friend in the face to the next song that really tugs at your heart strings and makes you want to cry. Cycles especially is really emotional and talks on losing a loved one and trying to grasp that one thing that will stay with you long after they are gone. It’s a very interesting EP for a debut release with so many different sounds, which is real cool.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much ain their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

I mean we like to do pre-production a lot but really change the song at least 10-15 times before even going into a studio to work with a producer to get the best product we can get from it. I think having the ability to hear things back is the most beneficial thing a musician can ask for.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably the favourite aspect of the band?owleye Photo credit_Channel Nightmore

I think what sets us apart from some other bands is our live performance because we go hard in the paint every single time. You can feel the energy during our set where even if you don’t like our music you are going to want to move around just cause we put so much of our souls into every performance.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods?

We are still currently starting to branch out from our local scene to a more national scale and really the only thing we can do or any band for that matter is just work your ass off to get what you want from your art.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date? Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as the band grows and hopefully gets increasing success or is it more that bands struggling with it are lacking the knowledge and desire to keep it working to their advantage?

I don’t think it really brings anything negative for us personally but that’s the fun thing with social media people really only care about the negative. We are so quick to jump on anyone’s mistake ‘cause you know everyone is perfect but I think if society could easily cut through the bullshit then social media sites could be a positive outlook on everything.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Thank you so much for having us guys, and to the readers we love you so much and thank you for making our lives liveable by allowing us to play music.

Check us out if you haven’t yet and expect to see us coming to your city in the near future!!

https://www.facebook.com/owleyebandco    http://www.owleyeofficial.com/   https://twitter.com/owleyeofficial/

Pete RingMaster

The Ringmaster Review 08/07/2016

HANKKS – Love Shy

Hankks pic 1_RingMasterReview

Offering another flavoursome romp to the summer’s soundtrack, British alternative indie rockers HANKKS release new single Love Shy. With the raw clang of a melodic Birdland and a flame of infectious pop n’ roll lying somewhere between Asylums and The Libertines, the track quickly establishes its own character of sound and temptation to alone reveal why the buzz brewing up around the Birmingham quartet.

Formed in the April of 2015, with a name apparently chosen through an admiration of actor Tom Hanks, the band quickly earned a potent reputation for their live presence around their home city. Consisting of Ben James, Jacob Evitts, and brothers James and Harry Davison, the foursome released their well-received debut EP, Wilson, this past March. Backing it up with another surge of live shows, acclaim and radio support courted both shows and release, with stronger recognition of the band’s magnetic sound openly rising; success sure to blossom again with the release of Love Shy.

Taken from their first EP, the single has ears tingling with an initial flame of guitar jangle quickly courted by jabbing beats. As its body swiftly expands, harmonic calls surround the excellent dual vocal attack, their tempting matched in persuasion and adventure by the web of melodic enterprise escaping the guitars and the moodier bassline prowling the contagious stomp.

There is an eighties meets nineties indie pop scenting to the track but equally a fiery and excellently unpolished anarchic edge boiled in modern invention. Together, with the open craft and imagination of the band, it makes for a rebellious feel good slice of pop ‘n’ roll which simply rouses ears and spirit alike.

Love Shy is accompanied by an excellent video @ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h21X4kfwfhA

https://www.facebook.com/HANKKSM8/   https://twitter.com/hankksm8

Pete Ringmaster 08/07/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Billy Bibby and The Wry Smiles – Are You Ready?

Billy Bibby_RingMasterReview

Reinforcing the attraction and quality found in the band’s recently released debut EP, Bide Your Time, British quartet Billy Bibby & The Wry Smiles unveil new single Are You Ready?, a song which infests ears and imagination with its earthily melodic rock ‘n’ roll laced with an inviting tinge of Americana.

The band is the new venture of former and founding lead guitarist of Catfish and the Bottlemen, Billy Bibby. Uniting his string and lead vocal prowess with that of lead guitarist Rob Jones, bassist Matt Thomas, and drummer Mike Pearce, Billy Bibby & The Wry Smiles came together in the Autumn of 2015. Within their first six months, the band went on a 26-date UK tour and recorded the well-received Bide Your Time EP. Its tracks and especially its singles, Waitin’ for You and Don’t Fall, found potent radio play across the likes of BBC Wales, BBC Jersey, Radio X, and Virgin Radio UK alongside numerous national and global indie stations.

It is a success sure to be matched and potentially surpassed by Are You Ready? , a track which Bibby recently talked of, saying “This song was the last one to be practiced and finished as a band before our first UK tour together,” continuing to add “but as soon as we’d finished it with our own input into our own individual parts it seemed to stand out as a major contender for the next single.

The song opens with the ear luring tones of Biddy being cradled in gentle strokes of guitar, a union quickly joined by crisp rhythms and the magnetic jangle of Jones’ melodic enterprise. As the vibrant passage of the verse leads to a boisterous chorus, there is an undefined familiarity to the proposition, but an essence which simply adds to the infectious character and imaginative nature of the encounter.

As swift as it is an ear pleaser, the sense that the song will be a live crowd pleaser emerges and in many ways it has that live air to its rousing presence.

The Bide Your Time EP was an impressive introduction to Billy Bibby & The Wry Smiles which Are You Ready? takes to an even more potent level while providing the summer of 2016 with an instinctive anthem to embrace.

Upcoming UK gig and festival dates:

JULY

14 Rawtenstall | The Artisan

15 Perth | The Green Room

16 Dundee | Buskers 17 Glasgow | Broadcast

23 Stockport | Blackthorn Festival

29 Banbury | Also Known As

30 Haverfordwest Castle | Pembs Fest

31 Lake District | Kendal Calling | House Party Stage

AUGUST

06 Whitby | Coastline Festival

20 Doncaster | Blackfest

26 Manchester | Night & Day Café

SEPTEMBER

02 Lode, Cambridgeshire | Lodestar Festival

03 Merthyr Tydfil | Bowstrong Festival

17 Tickhill | TFest

https://www.facebook.com/billybibs20   https://soundcloud.com/billybibs20   https://www.instagram.com/billybibs20/

Pete RingMaster 08/07/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

 

Los Chicos – Rockpile of Shit

Los Chicos_RingMasterReview

There are few rock ‘n’ roll parties as thrilling and irresistible as those provided by Spanish rockers Los Chicos, an experience they offer once again with new album Rockpile of Shit. Offering fourteen tracks which embrace everything from garage to pub rock, punk to funkily soulful shenanigans and plenty more, the release is a feast of boisterously rousing rock ‘n’ roll and a delicious echo of the Madrid quintets’ inimitable live show.

Formed in 2000, Los Chicos have released a quartet of increasing acclaim grabbing albums before Rockpile of Shit, the previous trio of Launching Rockets (2007), We Sound Amazing But We Look Like Shit (2009), and In the Age of Stupidity (2013) released, as the band’s new encounter this time in conjunction with Folc Records, on the always impressing Dirty Water Records. Live the band has ignited stages alongside the likes of Mudhoney, Southern Culture on the Skids, King Khan, The Sonics, Johnny Casino, Soundtrack of our Lives, Redd Kross, Cosmic Psychos, Spencer P Jones, The New Christs, The Young Fresh Fellows, The Meanies, Barrence Whitfield, Hi-Risers, Eddie And The Hot Rods, Roy Loney, and many others and toured across the globe, hitting Australian four times. Now they are ready to set a new stomp in motion across the world with Rockpile of Shit, a one hard to resist slab of fiercely flavoursome rock ‘n’ roll.

Feet and hips are soon as on board with band and album as ears when opener A Kingdom Of Coolness starts things off. Choppy beats and riffs soon tempt as grooves and vocals steer the course of the punk infused encounter. With its seeds seemingly in sixties garage rock and seventies punk, the track carries a great feel of old UK band The Cortinas to it as it emerges an undemanding yet seriously inescapable incitement to body and appetite as virulently infectious as it is commandingly rousing.

The same qualities fuel the following Rockanrolla, its own raw rock qualities making a potent temptation around the inviting tones of vocalist Rafa Suñén. Again the guitars of Gerardo Urchaga and Antonio Urchaga nag and jangle with remorseless enterprise and persuasion, bringing an Eddie And The Hot Rods hue to its boisterous catchiness before the even more virulent charms of I Don’t Wanna Learn Anymore steps forward. The swinging bassline of Guillermo Casanova makes for a powerful lure as the crisp beats of Ral García back up its invitation; they in turn matched in old school revelry by the guitars but with a modern spice which is inimitably Los Chicos.

FDW003_RingMasterReviewThe funky R&B of Older And Better has feet taking to the floor from its first rhythmic beckon, backed perfectly by the sizzling flames of sax which grace the outstanding encounter. With a hint of King Salami and the Cumberland Three to it, the song is mouth-watering devilry laying an early claim to best track on the album but soon rivalled by its Department S spiced title track. It too infests body and soul, bringing each alive and indeed eager vocal participation with its and the bands creative festivity.

Last Day Here offers a fiercer snarl while feasting on a fifties rockabilly inspiration. Equally though, it has a power pop vibrancy which lights up another impossible to escape chorus, voice and hips puppets to its manipulative magnetism. With discord flirting with the guitars and a Devo-esque quaintness emerging, the track epitomises the album; a seemingly simply flavoured proposition soon showing itself bursting with bold adventure and diversity.

The country/cow punk romp of Responsibility Ville hits the spot with ease next whilst More Beer is a melodic jangle sparking thoughts of countrymen The Pulsebeats as it too grips an already greedy appetite for release and sound. The wonderful relentless beats of García, as throughout the album, enslave ears and spirit alone, guitars and vocals playing with its conquest in an array of styles and devilish ways, Miami Beach soon employing its own surf hued punk ‘n’ roll web ensuring there is no respite for the listener’s  body and enjoyment.

Through The Ramones meets The Members like Mommy’s On MDMA and the country punk of Little Man, there is no lessening in bouncing songs and bodies while Night Ride adds its own individual twist on the country rock scent. All three leave a big smile on the face, though each is eclipsed by the scuzzier funk ‘n’ roll of I Know I Don’t Know and finally the hypnotic shuffle of closing track Toga Land. The pair ensures that physical and emotional involvement is at its most eager as the album comes to a mighty conclusion, an event leading only to a hard deny urge to press play and start all over again.

A great many already know of the rock ‘n’ roll majesty spun by Los Chicos, and with Rockpile Of Shit we can be safe in suggesting so will a great many more. This is one party everyone should gate crash.

Rockpile Of Shit is out now via Dirty Water Records/ Folc Records @ http://www.dirtywaterrecords.co.uk/shop/#!/~/category/id=2801529&offset=0&sort=addedTimeDesc and http://folcrecords.tictail.com/product/fdw003-los-chicos-rockpile-of-shit-preventa-disponible-en-mayo

https://www.facebook.com/LOS-CHICOS-42339317978

Pete RingMaster 30/06/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Infectious roars: talking Rosedale with founder Mike Liorti.

Rosedale_RingMasterReview

The brainchild of Torontonian Mike Liorti, Rosedale is an aggressive pop band which commands attention. Formed in 1989, the band has moved and evolved through numerous personnel and situations, all the time Mike honing the sound and imagination which has lured potent praise to EPs and albums. With thanks to Mike we recently explored deeper into the world and body of Rosedale…

Hello Mike and thanks for talking with us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started?

Thanks for having me. Rosedale is currently just me. I have different members all over the place but I’ve been solo for almost 5 years.

Have you been involved in other bands before? If so has that had any impact on what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

I’ve produced, managed, and played keys/lead guitar for my friend Alex Baker. We recorded his album January Blues in 14 hours and toured it for a couple months. He’s an incredible artist and has definitely influenced me to keep it simple. I also filled in on guitar/guest vocals for a couple bands that played as my band such as Time and Distance (Charleston, WV) and Your Favorite Coastline (Virginia Beach). Both were very fun experiences. I programmed some FX and lights into their back tracks for fun. And they both taught me a lot about writing even before I played for them and I was just a fan. I also sang vocals on a Disney musical called Radio Rebel. I sing all the vocals for the GGGG’s character, Atticus Mitchell.

What inspired the band name?

The band name came from a street that was on our way to the local music store, L&M. We would walk to that music store almost every day and write songs on their awesome gear. We ended up becoming friends with all the employees and recorded with some of them. So that store and the walks to it represent our roots and where we came from. Still, to this day, I’ve met some of my musicians while checking out music stores, taught parts and sold gear to people in music stores, and we often get people saying “I feel like I walked into the lighting room at Guitar Center” as we’re about to start our set. So it’s safe to say I’ve always been the store rat. And it’s taught me more than a college degree would have.

rosedale2Was there a specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

Initially we were very influenced by our local heroes, Moneen. The Used and Boxcar Racer/Blink 182 were also up there on our direction list, but every time we hit the clean channel, it was for Moneen. We were about growing pains and dreams to leave our home town (very original…) As everyone sort of fizzled out into real life and new bands, I migrated the message of Rosedale to more of a motivational message to stay focused on your dreams, show the world what you’re made of, be grateful for what you have, and never give up.

Do the same things still drive the project when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

They’ve definitely evolved over time, especially with new members coming in for tours. I try to take titbits of their influences into the parts/intros/endings so they have a little more fun every night and it keeps things fresh for me. And I definitely still enjoy playing old songs and putting a twist on them. Right now we’re doing an 8 minute “anniversary version” of our 2006 single you’ll count to Ten (for whatever ten people care) which I just now realized has some serious irony in the title.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved? Has it seen more of an organic movement of sound or more deliberate intent to try new things?

Rosedale’s sound has definitely matured into more of a listenable aggressive pop. We no longer put our amps on 11 and sing/yell from our throats the whole set. But there’s definitely a lot more raw passion and expression on stage and in the recordings so it’s overall much more authentic. There’s also a lot more orchestration and traditional symphony/big band instruments in the tracks now- big choir vocals too. That evolution just sort of came naturally through my classical upbringing and appreciation for classic movie score composers like John Williams and Hans Zimmer. I just figured ‘hey nobody has really mixed that with punk rock’ and it’s made some cool songs. It takes a lot of time to score them out and program them to sound realistic but it’s a really rewarding process to hear them back.

Are there any in particular inspirations which have added colour to not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

There are definitely influences all over the place in my music and approach on life (Some more surprising than others). You might not think Lil’ Wayne has a strong influence on the decisions I make, but he does. I don’t smoke or drink syrup, but I often think “what would Weezy do?” whenever I feel like closing up shop early after a long day in the studio. I watched a documentary on how Michael Jordan switched from basketball to baseball and I was just as inspired to work on my show from it as I was from seeing an Angels & Airwaves concert. So influences are drawn from everywhere for me. If it sounds good to me, I’ll roll with it, if it has meaning to my life, I’ll write about it.

Is there a general process to your songwriting?

My process is No Process. I like to change it up every time I write a song and challenge myself. If I started writing on piano last song, the next one I might write on guitar, or uke, or acoustic, or just a pad. If I was using pro-tools to demo it out, I’ll try Logic or ableton or Reason for the next demo. If I just finished a sad song, next one is gunna be happy; slow song, fast song etc. The last thing I would ever want Rosedale to be is a recipe that has every song on the album sounding the same…as much as that works for bands these days.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

I just write. Personal life memories, something that is on my mind a lot, whatever the chords/song reminds me of. I try not to decide what I’m gunna write about before writing a song. I usually just dive into it, even if there’s no music yet, and realize what I’m writing about once there are a few lines down.

Give us some background to your latest release.

Rosedale was released February 2016 and is a self-titled release because it’s basically all about Rosedale; where it all started, my personal story, why I am who I am, and the struggles I currently face. I recorded it at the studio that mentored me into the recording world, Drive Studios in Woodbridge Ontario. I’ve been good friends with Steve Rizun for the past few years and knew that studio inside-out so it made perfect sense to do the album there. It’s every control freak’s dream to have the key to the studio and I was like a kid in a candy store. 14 hour days flew by in that place.

Give us some insight to the themes and premise behind its songs.rosedale_RingMasterReview

The on-going theme, naturally, is to do what you love and never give up. Sacrifice everything else for the one thing you truly wanna do with your life.

Do you go into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

A little bit of both. I do like going into a studio with all the ideas mapped out and just replacing the tracks with better tones/takes. But sometimes I’ll just have a couple tracks and a tempo laid out and say “I’m saving this one for the studio…I wanna get crazy with this one”.

Tell us about the live side to the band.

We have a programmed light show and a bunch of automation on our mics to make it sound like (and sometimes bigger than) the record. We also bring our own fog machine. It helps make every show epic and works well with our music. Whenever I think “man, I set all this stuff up for nothing” I’ll see someone taking a picture or video and lose all regret.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods? Are there the opportunities to make a mark if the drive is there?

Toronto is very tough to have as your home base. I rarely play it because it’s always such a let-down seeing everyone bail last minute. [With] most Canada shows that seems to be the case for some reason; like you have to create a big buzz elsewhere before your hometown cares about you again. I wish all it took was good music. The best place for music is Germany/Austria. Anywhere where German is the main language, good music prospers. I hear the same thing about Japan too but I’ve never been there myself.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date? Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as the band grows and hopefully gets increasing success or is it more that bands struggling with it are lacking the knowledge and desire to keep it working to their advantage?

The internet and social media should be much more useful than it actually is. Contemporary social media has ruined music, straight up. It’s the independent musician’s worst enemy. It was great in the MySpace days but now, thanks to the corporate sharks taking over, it’s just one big useless distraction polluting everyone’s common sense. Will it ever be useful/free again? One can only hope. Don’t get me wrong, there’s a lot of positive things that social media is to thank for, like connecting with new fans personally has never been easier! But overall it’s just become one big cess pool of gimmicks, memes, vented personal matters, and ads.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Keep your stick on the ice.

https://www.facebook.com/ROSEDALEmusic   http://www.rosedalemusic.net/

Pete RingMaster

The Ringmaster Review 01/07/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Shot Of Hornets – Make Out A Picture

Shot Of Hornets Promo Shot_RingMasterReview

A release to make a lingering impression, Make Out A Picture is the debut EP from British alternative rock band Shot Of Hornets. Consisting of four tracks which snarl and rousingly seduce with equal measure, the encounter is a beast of an introduction to the Welsh trio. There is a predacious edge to every element making up its gripping drama and forceful enterprise just as a virulent contagion fuels the anthemic unpredictability shaping its ear pleasing character. Together it provides a creative and impassioned theatre of sound and imagination as compelling as it is so often breath-taking.

Hailing from Mold in North Wales, Shot Of Hornets consists of brothers Daniel (guitar/vocals) and Conor Cahalane (drums/lead vocals) alongside Charlie Farnham (bass/vocals). Emerging last year with inspirations from the likes of early Biffy Clyro, At The Drive-In, Hundred Reasons, and Fightstar in their creative arsenal, the threesome soon began making potent impressions with their fierce live presence and shows. Now it is Make Out A Picture set to rattle national awareness of Shot Of Hornets, with success surely an inevitable return for the EP’s galvanic might.

Shot Of Hornets Cover Artwork_RingMasterReviewThe band lays a tight grip on ears and appetite straight way with opener Corrosive, needing little time to tempt both as swinging beats and an instantly grumbling bassline starts things off. Angular strikes of guitar and group snarls behind the inviting tones of Conor swiftly join the affair and increase the infectiousness already sparking the senses. Smooth slips into mellower moments and discord kissed twists leads to a seriously rousing chorus, all the time an intensity and volatility seemingly lying in wait, eager to erupt but instead simply adding great depth to the song and enterprise persuading ears; when it does escape a great Reuben-esque feel flows through the track, ending in a scintillating finale which in tone continues into the song’s successor.

Don’t Go Chasing Shadows, Arthur is exceptional, from its initial lively stalking of the senses and barbarous tempest through to its quirky and deranged character one of the best tracks heard here this year. Vocally and musically the band prowls and leaps upon the imagination with their unique ideation and adventure, keeping things as enthrallingly off-kilter and seriously infectious. At times the song reminds of the now demised UK band Engerica, in other moments courting something lying between System Of A Down and Hundred Reasons, and relentlessly leaving ears and pleasure greedy for more.

The brief instrumental interlude of Firm Handshake provides a tantalising atmospheric hug though truthfully instincts after the first listen is to dive straight into closing track Everything With Nothing. The closer is another track which emerges as one kind of creature and slowly evolves into something different as one inventive minute follows another. The song’s initial abrasive growl is soon replaced by a melodic and emotive reflection though certainly vocally that raw edge still lurks. Subsequently, inescapably catchy lures and fiery flames add to the track’s theatre, spiky rhythms and riffs joining scything grooves and grisly punk infused predation as the song twists and turns and in turn bewitches with every unpredictable moment.

If Make Out A Picture is a sign of things to come, expect to hear plenty more of Shot Of Hornets in sound and acclaim. The EP is a debut which demands attention, rewarding with songs which bring the imagination and spirit through a band with very healthy horizons ahead of them.

The Make Out A Picture EP is released July 1st through all stores.

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Pete RingMaster 30/06/2016

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