Quella – Donor Fatigue

Though not their first offering, we will admit that Donor Fatigue is our introduction to UK outfit Quella and the beginning of close attention such its striking persuasion on ears. Offering four slices of the band’s progressive punk/metal which truly embraces much more than that tag suggests, the EP provides a gripping landscape of imagination and noise which demands and devours attention.

Coming out of London and Brighton, Quella have built a potent fan base through their previous releases including the Fantastischen! EP of last year and a live presence which has seen them share stages with the likes of Sumer, Core of iO, In Search of Sun, Black Orchid Empire, Gold Key, and Dirty Sound Magnet. Produced, recorded, mixed and mastered by Lewis Johns (Conjurer, Rolo Tomassi, Gnarwolves, Employed to Serve), Donor Fatigue would spark no surprise if it drew even greater attention and a new horde of ears the way of the band, indeed such its riveting adventure we expect it.

The EP opens with Crown Of Flies and immediately lured intrigue with its cinematic sample and sparked eager attention with the tempest of sound which swiftly follows. It in turn breeds a punchy and lyrically pungent canter as infectious as it is barbarous. The striking tones and imaginative words of vocalist Stefano Sebastianelli stand at the core of the captivation, the voracious rhythms of drummer Adam Parker and bassist Lee Davidson predacious temptation alongside breeding the drama as the guitar of Bean sonically shapes he song’s adventure. A fusion of punk, noise rock, and metallic dexterity, the song is simply superb and more compelling by the rock induced twist and imagination flooded turn.

Though it remained our favourite moment within the EP, it is regularly challenged if not dethroned within Donor Fatigue, with Smalltown Eiderdown the first to stake its suggestive claim. Instantly accosting ears with a dirty tide of riffs and senses swiping beats, the song just as quickly reveals spiky hooks and melodic taunting within its contagious and volatile body. Southern tinged grooves only add to the appetite nagging stoner lined lure of the song, its persuasion multi-faceted and all-consuming in voice and sound.

Loyal To The Lie teases with hard rock stranded enticement initially but no surprise as a thickly and varied flavoured web of sound and imagination grows from it, the band’s progressive instincts  entangling punk and anthemic rock dexterity before its brief but potent presence makes way for the groove punk riot of Them Apples. Entering with a similar melodic involvement to that its predecessor left in, the track keenly uncages its rapacious rock ‘n’ roll wolfishness amidst a feral but composed breath. It is a galvanic mix which is likely to arouse the spirit of punk and hard rocker alike.

That last suggestion applies to Donor Fatigue as a whole, a release which has brought a new and already eagerly devoured pleasure in the shape of Quella to us at The RR

Donor Fatigue is released 22nd November with pre-ordering available now @ https://quella.bandcamp.com/album/donor-fatigue

https://www.facebook.com/quellaband/     https://twitter.com/quellaofficial

Pete RingMaster 19/11/2019

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

Youth Illusion – Terms of Submission

Terms of Submission is the debut EP from UK outfit Youth Illusion and an encounter quickly showing why the quartet has earned potent praise and attention since emerging.

London based, the band consists of members born and raised in the States, UK, South Africa, and Italy. Their creative coming together last year has spawn a sound bred in the instincts of pop punk and alternative rock but as the four tracks within their first EP show it is already brewing its own varied identity. Already the band has notably shared the stage with plaudit luring success alongside I Set My Friends On Fire and impressed at the Camden Rocks Festival and should expect a fresh flood of ears and attention their way with the release of Terms of Submission.

Though maybe uniqueness is not yet as prevalent as familiarity within their EP, Youth Illusion openly sow and water the seeds of such future originality across its offerings, that familiarity more of the overall flavouring of their genre inspirations than of certain protagonists within them. Terms of Submission opens up with Better Off, the song rising on a sonic thread into a dextrous mass of riffs and rhythms before hitting its immediately infectious stride. The guitars of Matt Ungaro and Zach Almond proceed to weave a web of enticement loaded with keen hooks whilst the latter’s vocals add matching temptation with melodic prowess. There is a great steeliness and trespass to the guitars too which proves just as magnetic as the striking beats of drummer Tim Storey and the brooding hues of Rory Deans’ bass.

It is a great start to the EP and maybe it’s most potent moment though persistently challenged by its companions led by next up Cover Up And Die. If not as dramatic and punchy as its predecessor in its entrance, the song soon reveals its own contagious exploits and imagination in pop punk fuelled rock ‘n’ roll. Its bounce and snarl is unapologetically infectious and body an accomplished persuasion with Deans’ backing vocals a strong addition to Almond’s potent lead.

The increasingly impressive Enemy launches at ears from an almost tempestuous start with a rousing rally of rhythms at its core, they the lead to the track’s continually evolving adventure as melodic and vocal contemplation blends reflective calm with pop infused catchiness. Dean’s bass is again an ear grabbing ingredient in the mix but all four members of the band prove their dexterity and imagination in its creatively raucous body before Rebellion brings things to a close. Though in some ways it is the least surprising song within the release, with its A Day To Remember/All Time Low like character, it is nonetheless a bouncing pleasure inciting the same eager energy in those paying attention.

Terms Of Submission is an infectious introduction to a band easy to see a potent future for if their sound evolves its true individuality from this impressive start. On the evidence of the EP, they will provide plenty to enjoy however it turns out.

Terms Of Submission is out now.

https://www.youthillusion.co.uk   https://www.facebook.com/YouthIllusionband/

Pete RingMaster 19/11/2019

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

Mr Ted – El Dirty Sex

Amongst the mischievous and devilry loaded protagonists which help make rock ‘n’ roll so fun there is one certain rascal which is beginning to stand out more than most and that is UK outfit Mr Ted. We had a hint of their devilish manner, intent, and enterprise through a split release with Bisch Nader earlier this year on Society Of Losers and it is in full rebellious mood with debut album El Dirty Sex, again unleashed by the Liverpool label.

Consisting of Merseyside bred Peter Williamson, Mark Hughes, Phillie Collier, and Mark Charles Manning, Mr Ted create a sound embracing the best diablerie of punk and noise rock and the similarly roguish hues of grunge, alt rock, and other rapacious flavours. It emerges within El Dirty Sex as one captivatingly disobedient incitement as ridiculous in its antics as it is irresistible in its character and exploits with unbridled fun fuelling all.

Though hard to pin down with comparisons there is definitely something akin to Aussie band I Am Duckeye to the Mr Ted sound but as the album shows it develops new aspects in noise and misconduct song to song. The album opens up with Rage Quittin’, and immediately gets its bounce going as rhythms jump about with funk instincts. In no time riffs and hooks are adding their enticement with vocals matching their boisterousness yet all the while a darker, heavier edge infests the lining of the song; its doomier hue bringing thicker body to the instinctive predation of the quickly compelling encounter and its Houdini meets the previously mentioned Australians natured stomp.

It is an outstanding start to the album quickly matched by the alt rock shenanigans of The Bean Song with its animated moves and virulent hookery. Darkly hued rhythms incite and entice from the first second, guitars and vocals casting a web of temptation which effortlessly worms itself into ears and body with the inevitable involvement achieved by its monkey tricks including exploiting the equally infectious lure of The Kinks with a big grin.

The outstanding Shame is next up and similarly thrusts its inescapable hooks forward from the first breath; grooves which swing with knowing relish of their subsequent success in getting hips and lust to do their bidding. As crispy favourites fall as part of its lyrical observation, the song buried itself deep in the passions and psyche adding layers of voracious rock ‘n’ roll by each irresistible minute to seal such slavery before Sea Of Platelets shares an indie pop breeding and psyche rock shaping with matching eagerness; a touch of Television Personalities only aiding its thick persuasion.

Originally their part in that earlier mentions split release, Muscle Milk steps up next. Its lean but easily coaxing beginnings lead ears into the awaiting thick mass of dextrous sound; again grooves and rhythms inherently tempting in its rapacious but mercurial doom/sludge mixed body of contagious trespass. Still as irresistible as it was earlier this year, the track epitomises the core of a Mr Ted song and all the mischief and creative perversity found.

Through the punk ‘n’ roll ferocity of One 2 Panda, a predominantly instrumental track just as devious in its intrigue wired suggestiveness as it is predatory in its noise punk menace, and the feral contagion of the Happy Song, the album’s claws just dug deeper while Sexy Legs displayed its own funk and pop rock enterprise to take body and imagination on another energetic ride with unpredictability and misbehaviour for company.

El Dirty Sex goes out on the magnetic antics of firstly Andrew WK Party In Ireland, its title unsurprisingly giving clue to the major spice in its punk rock riot which also has a bit of Stiff Little Fingers to it with a Flogging Molly spicing breaking upon the folkish hues that emerge in the fun. Pickled Eggs and Snakes concludes the release, providing eight minutes of inimitable temptation taking essences of The Beatles, The Scaffold, Mischief Brew, and Half Man Half Biscuit in its increasingly volatile shanty. As everywhere though, it soon spreads its own unique voice and character of sound to leave us so hungry for much more.

Released in September we are a little late to the party but El Dirty Sexy has an open invitation which will never go out of date and should definitely be accepted.

El Dirty Sexy is out now via Society Of Losers Records; available @ https://mr-ted.bandcamp.com/album/el-dirty-sexy

https://www.facebook.com/MrTedLives/   https://www.instagram.com/mrtedlives/   https://twitter.com/mrtedlives

Pete RingMaster 19/11/2019

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

Tarah Who? – 64 Women

Released last month but a release which should escape the attention of no one is the imagination soaked five track punk furores that is 64 Women. The new EP from Tarah Who?, the compelling encounter is an incendiary rock ‘n’ roll device which explodes on ears and senses with ravening appetite.

Consisting of Paris born guitarist/vocalist Tarah Carpenter and drummer/backing vocalist Coralie Hervé, LA based Tarah Who? has regularly tantalised and incited the senses through their releases but there is something about 64 Women which hungrily eclipses all before it. Each song is an individual adventure and trespass of imagination and enterprise united in a punk breeding and grunge/alt/noise rock nurturing. They have a bite and snarl which forces a step back and virulent contagiousness which had us jumping headlong into their devouring no bounds feared exploits.

Fair to say given our enjoyment with previous encounters including acclaimed last EP, Half Middle Child Syndrome, anticipation was certainly alive with maybe unfair expectations of something certain to spark our appetites but it took little time for opener Linger to set the first breach of a whole new ardour for the band’s  voracious assault and bold adventure. Within a breath, the guitar is winding its acidic lure around ears whilst invading them with clamorous thrusts, Hervé’s lurking beats just as invasive before the song explodes in a body jerking, attitude fuelled roar of noise and temptation. Vocals are equally as confrontational and magnetic, swinging from the threads of the continuing infectious clamour with matching voracity. Unpredictable twists and ear gripping enterprise simply add to the ingenuity and rabid flirtation of the track as a whole new level of Tarah Who? incitement unfurls.

Copycat follows, hitting its creative stride instantly with rhythms a swiftly catchy lead to the skirmish of guitar and emotion. Like a rapacious mix of Spinnerette and in some ways 4 Non Blondes, the song reveals rock ‘n’ roll instincts and punk rock belligerence. Again the duo slips into calmer but no less striking moments within the sonic urgency before Hurt shares its own mellow breath as it rises up in a radiant melodic dew with Carpenter’s tones again providing an equally enticing persuasion soaked in emotion and reflective observation. It is a gorgeous moment in the release, a haunting seduction of craft, sound, and heart with inherent dissonance in all.

In contrast but with matching captivation Umbilicus strides from its first breath with punk antagonism and devilment, but another song unafraid to tease with unexpected momentary detours within ravenous goading which only add to its might and irreverence while Numb Killer brings the EP to a close with its own wonderfully nagging virulence and enterprise. Riffs tease and arouse as hooks ignite song and pleasure alike, all the while rhythms prowling and invading with equal contagion. Add the vocal tenacity and catchy intrusiveness of its creators and you have another song within 64 Women which leaves only a desperate hunger for more.

And as a whole the EP has us greedy for the next moment with Tarah Who?, something which has a real task on its hands to outdo the band’s latest riot but easy to suspect will relish and provide a thrilling adventure in trying.

64 Women is out now via Kurukulla Records.

http://www.tarahwho.com/   http://www.facebook.com/Tarahwho   https://twitter.com/Tarahwho

Pete RingMaster 19/11/2019

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

Fertile Reptile – EP

Life’s trials and tribulations can be said to be character building and certainly it is easy to feel that about the Fertile Reptile sound. An acoustic parade of craft, passion, and energy, it is a rousing affair with a definite emotive edge as eagerly shown by the trio’s new EP, cryptically named, EP.

The band is based in Co Cavan Ireland, a place already tattooed on our eager senses through another threesome, The Radioactive Grandma. Large in space, small in populace, the county has a music heart which cannot be ignored, for us that band and now Fertile Reptile stand right at the centre. Both bands have an acoustic rock bred sound and there is no escaping thinking of the sadly demised Radioactive Grandma when listening to the Fertile Reptile EP, that band’s Johno Leader indeed mixed and mastered the quartet of tracks, but it swiftly and firmly proved the latter has its own distinct sound. It is a proposition which also teased with essences sparking thoughts of The Wonderstuff and The Woodentops in varying degrees which equally only added to its rich captivation.

As mentioned the band’s journey to date has not been plain sailing. Formed early 2009, the trio of vocalist/guitarist Peter Denton, bassist Jamie Byrne, and drummer Dwayne Kiernan leapt into the local live scene taking punk, metal, and ska influences into their intimately themed songs. “Due to mental and physical health difficulties” though the outfit disbanded towards the close of the following year but their friendship endured and saw them coming together to jam from time to time and work on other projects. In 2015, Kiernan underwent surgery for a rare spinal disorder but complications left him with brain injury and mobility issues leading him to have to give up playing drums. Music will have its day though and he turned to the bodhrán and in 2018 the three came together with a couple of acoustic tracks in Denton’s pocket and emerged as Fertile Reptile; his electric guitar swapped for an acoustic incitement to join the electric enticement of bass and that, as within their first EP, quickly addictive intimately manipulative bodhrán.

To be honest everything about the band’s EP got under the skin and quickly, its first track, Can’t Feel Anything, invading with a swing no hip or foot could ignore. Denton’s guitar is a smiling enticement, the darker hues of Byrne’s bass the perfect companion as Kiernan’s rhythm on goatskin, or whatever his bodhrán wears, dances. Denton’s vocals equally had ears and thoughts keenly involved as the song eagerly strolled all the time inviting and receiving enthused participation.

Virulently infectious it is a tremendous start to the release and quickly matched in catchiness and enterprise by Forget About It. It was with this magnet of a song that The wonder Stuff spicing more firmly revealed itself and similarly there is a tint of XTC to its gleeful canter. Like a spirited embrace of summer around reflective words, enlivened even more by the violin of Christophe Capewell, the track had body and appetite bouncing before making way for the equally irresistible Abusement Park. The rawer rock heart of the band’s sound fuels and shapes the character and imagination of the song, its emotive dispute and physical boisterousness together rather than at odds in its galvanic shuffle; Kiernan’s zestful backing vocals another alluring texture in the contagion.

There is a calmer pose to closing track, Tubby Lad, though there is no avoiding its instinctive catchiness and inherent spirit. Again lyrics tap into intimate thoughts as melody and harmonies caressed an already greedy appetite for the band’s sound, the song a powerhouse of incitement and vibrancy even in its reposeful gait.

We have had the pleasure to check out some truly enjoyable and thrilling treats this past year and the Fertile Reptile EP stands tall among them.

The EP is out now; available @ https://fertilereptile.bandcamp.com/album/ep

 

https://www.facebook.com/fertilereptile/    https://twitter.com/ReptileFertile    https://www.instagram.com/fertilereptile/

Pete RingMaster 07/11/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Aren Drift Interview

For those who may not know who you are, introduce yourselves quickly.

Radka Nemcova – Vocals, Rhythm Guitar

Matt Plumley – Lead Guitar

Dominic Cahillane – Drums

Theo Corcoran – Bass

Describe your sound in as few words as possible.

RN: Progressive rock, international vibes, heavy melodic riffs, contralto vocals, cinematic sound.

DC: Vibrations

MP: Female fronted prog rock

TC: I’d say our sound is best described as heavy progressive rock with international influences, I’ve heard the word melodic chucked around a bit as well.

Who are your three biggest influences as a band?

RN: It’s hard to name just three bands as there are many bands we love but I would definitely mention Perfect Circle, In This Moment, Queen of the Damned soundtracks. (The first choice I would choose for the technical side and second two choices I love for the production side.)

What’s the meaning behind your band name?

RN: AREN is made of my initials (‘RN’ = phonetically ‘aren’) I used Aren D. as my artistic / musical pseudonym as no one was able to remember or pronounce my name haha. I chose the second word ‘drift’ because I like to drift and our music should make you drift too.

We came up with lots of different names but everyone liked Aren Drift so we kept it as a band name.

How did you approach our latest release in terms of writing and recording?

RN: Writing is my favourite part so it was just a fun bit for me. I love it. Recording was good but mixing was the difficult part of the whole process.

I am very creative person and I have very strong visions in music and art and I imagine things how they look and sound before they are actually written or filmed. Mixing itself is very creative process and we struggled to get the sound we wanted. However, it was a great learning curve and I’m already excited to apply everything we learnt into our next recordings.

MP: In terms of the recording, we were on a budget, four days in total for five songs, some unreleased at this moment in time. We pretty much had the parts written before we recorded, but somehow ended up re-recording most of the guitar parts at my home studio. When you are on the clock you don’t have time to mull that sound over and try different amps, settings, different guitars, you literally stick a mic in front of your amp and off you go. So that meant we weren’t quite happy with the sound we had. It was a big learning curve for us; we have plans to do things differently next time.

Do you have any personal favourite songs on the release?

RN: Snow Queen. I think the song determines Aren Drift’s unique style.

DC: Light Hole

MP: Sun Goes Down for me.

TC: I’d say my favourite song of the new EP is light hole, it’s one of my favourites to play live as well, but I do also really like “snow queen”.

Explain the meaning behind the album title.

RN: ‘Beneath The Surface’ – We want the listener to go deeper at all the levels while listening our music. Some of the reviews we received say that you need to listen the songs a few times until it fully reveals their potential. I was actually very glad to read that because that’s what I love about music.

The artwork represents what’s beneath your skin, inside of the Earth’s core, inside of you.

Tell us about the video for Snow Queen and its concept.

RN: Snow Queen music video was partly filmed in Czech mountains and partly in England. I wanted to produce something powerful and arty. A music video which captures a story as well as the feelings.

Sun Goes Down music video is solely my arty outlet.

I don’t want to say anything else. Just watch it J

Do they tie in with the themes around the song? If yes, why? If not, why not?

RN: It does. I don’t want to reveal everything. Let’s say you need to listen to the lyrics and watch the video.

Were they fun to shoot or proved to be quite a challenge?

RN: When we were shooting Snow Queen, I was two days in the mountains in -20°C wearing a dress. It was snowing and I thought my hands and nose will fall off so yeah… it was fun haha.

I believe everyone enjoys shooting the music videos. But post production is proper hard work. I believe the devil is in the details and I have very strong visions so I usually spend long time working on the post productions. I produced both videos myself in co-production with Ollie Dolling. It was great working with him. I’m already excited to work on our future videos.

MP: Definitely one of my bands highlights and the results were way beyond what I expected.

Do you have any live shows lined up at present?

RN: Follow us on Facebook. We are planning 2020 UK tour! All the dates will be there.

We were also booked at Concorde 2 in Brighton in June 2020 which will be an epic show.

In regards to the closer dates I would recommend you a gig at Black Heart in Camden, London on 20th September. We are supporting Esoterica. But if you want a ticket, be quick as the show might be sold out soon 😉

What are your favourite songs to perform live?

MP: Our new song Sirens, I love it and the response we had to it at the EP launch which was the first time we played it live, was very moving, loved it.

RN: I really enjoy playing Sirens. It is our new song and by my opinion it is musically the best piece which I’m very proud of. At the moment I’m playing with a thought to write trilogy for Sirens. I have whole concept in my head + the ideas for the video so let’s see if we can do something about that.

DC: Porcelain Dolls has a nice few changes where I can bring a few different styles in the song. For all out energy, Passion Kills is always the track I’m scanning the set list for.

TC: As I said, light hole is one of my favourite songs to play live, as well as one of our new songs called Delirious.

What are the best and worst shows you’ve played to date?

DC: I think it varies for each of us; I’ll leave it down to the fans

TC: I’d say the worst show I’ve played with Aren Drift was my first one with the band, I was slightly nervous, which is odd for me, and I just didn’t quite gel with the music! But our best show in my opinion was our EP release, the sound was great, the crowd was amazing and we were all playing at the top of our game!

If you could open for anyone, who would it be?

DC: Tool would be immense

RN: Deftones, Korn, Marilyn Manson, Perfect Circle, Alice in Chains, In This Moment

MP: Wolf Alice, lead singer is a girl and they rock, great live band from what I can tell on YouTube, I’d then get a chance to watch them in the flesh every night J

Oh yeah and Faith No More, they are still rocking, check out SuperHero from the Radio 1 sessions on YouTube.

Any comical stories from your time as a band you can share with us?

DC: Now that would be telling, shame on you. 🙂

Any closing comments?

Thank you for your support. We appreciate every single person who goes to the live gigs and support the local music in general. Thank you.

Check Aren Drift out further @…

https://www.arendrift.com/    https://www.facebook.com/arendrift/    https://www.instagram.com/aren_drift/

RingMaster Review 06/11/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Model Depose – Damage Control

Bred from the seeds of eighties post punk and synth pop, the Model Depose sound has only nurtured and forged its own identity since the Netherland band’s first release back in 2013 and within new album, Damage Control, has cast its richest individuality and temptation yet.

The Groningen hailing outfit openly bear their inspirations on their creative sleeves with maybe a Depeche Mode influence the strongest yet they have increasingly been woven into the commanding imagination of the band. Damage Control though is most unique offering from the quartet yet. Certainly across its tapestry of flavours embracing dark and new wave, indie pop and post rock among many to that post punk/electro pop core certain shadow wrapped moments and electronic breaths sparked thoughts of the likes of Marc Almond, Editors, Modern English, Dead Register and the original Human League alongside Dave Gahan and co, yet every track rose to share its own rare presence of familiarity and uniqueness.

Damage Control opens up with Wights and quickly had attention secured as the rich vocals of Roeland van der Velde stepped forward within an electronic shimmering. An emotive lining to his tones are echoed in the synth shared melodies of Mariët Gast and the almost nagging jingle of Jobbe Holtes’ guitar, the song in no time an eager captivation. Their warm lures though are courted by dark shadows, bassist David Bos prowling their intimation as thicker and increasing drama marries every note and syllable. It is an enthralling almost haunting beginning to the album, its grip on the imagination already in place and only tightened thereon in.

Stranger follows and equally has melancholy for company as van der Velde again immediately impresses. There is a fire in the song’s dark belly though which without truly igniting gives it energy and intensity, the former ensnaring hips and the latter an emotive engagement. By its finale, its Depeche Mode-esque catchiness is in full swing yet without defusing its darkened breath.

The album’s title track follows and immediately had the body bouncing with its eager bold rhythms and the scything strikes of guitar behind again the rich invitation of vocals. The song is pure esurient contagion getting under the skin in no time and using body and spirit like a puppet as electronic and indie rock textures collude and roar in defiance. A definite favourite song contender it is quickly matched by the darkly lit virulence of Red Alert. There is a Muse like tint to the song, its evocative almost dissonant thoughts and breath united with instinctive rock ‘n’ roll catchiness which itself has something of She Wants Revenge to it.

Through the crepuscular but inflamed serenade of Blackstar and the light of magnetism that is Cold War, there was no loosening of the album’s hold on ear and pleasure. The second of the two features the guest vocals of Groningen-based singer/songwriter FENN and her duet with van der Velde is worth the admission fee alone while their successor, Drawing the Line, brings an electro rock incitement which again had body and imagination doing its contagious bidding. It is another which makes a firm claim for favourite album moment, the track sheer temptation from first to last second.

 #Dancelikenooneiswatching has an electro punk sneer to its synth pop calling, the track predominately a slice of rock dexterity smouldering with a host of other spices and quite addictive while the riveting Yesterday’s Gloom is a tenebrific croon with tempestuousness in its heart and intensity. Both tracks epitomise the diversity of sound within Damage Control but equally the unity of the Model Depose breath and craft to ear catching enterprise.

The album concludes with the pair of 03:00Am and bonus track Bombs Are Falling, the first an atmospherically evocative seduction within a sunless yet beguiling landscape and the second a gripping post-traumatic stress themed expression of power, intensity and magnetic craft.

Together they provide a potent end to a striking release, one which with its influences fits in with the eighties scene many of those inspirations come from but is firmly as fresh and adventurous as anything within the electronic /indie rock landscape Damage Control now lights up.

Damage Control is out now through Trisol Music Group across most stores.

http://www.modeldepose.com   https://www.facebook.com/modeldepose   https://www.instagram.com/modeldepose  https://www.darkmerch.com

Pete RingMaster 22/10/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright