Fights And Fires – Future Plans And The Things That Ruin Them

Though we have been aware and kept an ear on the exploits of UK outfit Fights And Fires since they emerged on 2008 and for the main enjoyed their trio of albums as well as a host of EPs and singles, none have gripped us as their new offering, the Future Plans And The Things That Ruin Them EP. It is a collection of tracks which leap around with voracious enterprise and matching physical agility whilst hooking the imagination with a canvas of craft and imagination, a mix that increasingly compelled attention.

The Worcester melodic punksters has been drawing plaudits and support with increasing success since they uncaged their first album, their reputation for incisive song-writing and growth in a sound as confrontational as it is contagious seeing an escalation of acclaim within the underground and above. Now they are ready to challenge the established with Future Plans And The Things That Ruin Them, a record written throughout 2020 and the pandemic lockdowns which sees the band focus on hope and a bright future despite being birthed in dark times.

Though as individual as you would wish, the Fights And Fires sound does have something of a Max Raptor meets Baddies meets Rocket From The Crypt hue to it, an essence which only escalates its potency and impact as proven by EP opener Disposable Dogs. Vocalist Philip Cox immediately held ears with his tones as the song opens up, choppy guitar urging keen focus alongside his emotively powered reflection. Soon after the beats of drummer Lee Jackson break the restless calm, jabbing the senses with an eventful swing as the guitars of Ryan Price and Philip Cook cast their sonic web. Already there is an inherent catchiness to the song which is echoed in the character of vocals and their own infectious presentation. With the angst exposed matched in the darker hue of Luke Tasker’s bassline, the track had us hooked and hollering and not for the only time within the release.

The following Shitty Year reflects on obvious times but could apply to any tempestuous passage experienced, it another dextrous and spirited proposal with manipulation in its arsenal and involvement rousing prowess. Snarling in defiance and fiery in its virulence, it continues the impressive start to the EP which Bed For Bones only cements with its galvanic and slightly pugilistic incitement. Like a protagonist grabbing you by the scruff of your collar and hollering in knowing understanding as it stirs the fight within, the track had us bouncing and lustfully punching out its words.

Up, Down, Labour, Conservative, A, B, Start is a hardcore infused slab of the band’s voracious song-writing, a track raging with discontent yet casting another galvanic contagion of enterprise which hungrily got under the skin before Pocket Full Of Flowers brought the release to a ferociously infectious close. A pop punk hosting fire of rhythmic assail and sonic flaming with equally irritable but composed lyrical contemplation, the track is drama and craft in full strength epitomising the traits shaping one ear gripping, imagination stoking encounter.

Fights And Fires have grabbed a return of freedom and their own creative prowess with a striking creative hand, in Future Plans And The Things That Ruin Them casting a proposition eager to set the year alight.

Future Plans And The Things That Ruin Them is out now via Lockjaw Records; available @ https://fightsandfires.bandcamp.com/

 

https://www.facebook.com/fightsandfires   https://twitter.com/fightsandfires   https://www.instagram.com/fightsandfires/  

Pete RingMaster 01/03/2022

Copyright RingMaster Review



Categories: Music

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: