Sju Svåra År – Ingen Tog Det Som Ett Skämt


Ingen Tog Det Som Ett Skämt is the new EP from Swedish punks Sju Svåra År, a band said to be “a precursor to the wave of Swedish-language punk swept across Sweden in the early 2000’s.” With their name translated as Seven Hard Years, and latest outing as Nobody Took It Like a Joke, the Stockholm quintet is still possibly a proposition yet to be encountered by many outside their homeland but one which now rewards their investigation with one storming slab of politically charged punk ‘n’ roll.

Emerging from the ashes of Burning Kitchen in 2001, Sju Svåra År consists of Sara Hedberg (Burning Kitchen, Hellregn), Josefin Finer (Burning Kitchen), Linus Segerstedt (True Moon), Emma Söderberg (Satirnine), and Erik Gärdegård (Icos). Returning after a break between 2003 and 2007, the band released their acclaimed debut album Storma hver hjärta in 2012. Its presence teased broader and keener attention which Ingen Tog Det Som Ett Skämt should easily match if not eclipse.

The EP opens with Skicka Några Rader, beats instantly rapping the senses as hooks and riffs gather to launch their own equally inviting assault. Just as potent are Josefin’s vocals, melodic yet forceful and backed with matching command by Sara within a web of hooks and punk grooves. The bass is rich captivation, guitars an imposing lure as rhythms bite with an instinctive snarl. Together it is a riveting enticement with a great Au-Pairs like hue to its brooding enterprise.

The following Maskeradbalen trespasses the senses from its first breath but again with a melodic infectiousness which enhances rather than tempers the song’s natural irritability. As with its predecessor, there is a seventies punk spicing at play but more Vice Squad meets Dolly Mixtures adding to the individual adventure cast by Sju Svåra År. Brief and snappy, the track is a viral growl which hits the spot within seconds, relentlessly teasing it for the next two minutes plus.

Fyra Sista Siffror is a more reserved slab of punk ‘n’ roll but just as bold in its imposing contagion and confrontational weave of melody and riff bound in suggestive grooves. Vocals drive the persuasion with continued magnetism whilst nagging beats are at the virulent heart of the song’s instinctive catchiness. Captivation at its harrying punk best with a hint of Sex Pistols inspiration at times, the track is superb and swiftly matched by the EP closing Oroliga avdelningen, a stirring incursion of rock ‘n roll as caustic as it is melodically seductive.

Having only now coming across Sju Svåra År though the excellent Ingen Tog Det Som Ett Skämt there is no escaping the feeling of having missed out the past decade, something an overdue courting of Storma hver hjärta will partly remedy. The best punk rock is instinctive, from the heart and there is no escaping that natural pulse behind one treat of a release.

Ingen Tog Det Som Ett Skämt is available now via Gaphals @

Pete RingMaster 27/02/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Scaners – Self Titled

Create a sonic kaleidoscope made up of particles from The Ramones, Devo, The Dickies, and The Screamers with essences of others such as Brainiac, Useless Eaters, and Acid Baby Jesus and you get the glorious garage synth punk sound fuelling a release which surely will be announced one of the year’s best moments come its annual awards. The cause of such thoughts is the self-titled debut album from French punksters The Scaners which despite those references at the beginning, or because of them, is one unique and quickly addictive incitement of sound and mischief.

Hailing from Lyon, The Scaners proudly and openly embrace their inspirations in their music; influences which from their label, Dirty Water Records, to reviewers and fans are universally recognised within something as individual as you could wish for. A four track 7” hinted at and teased ears with its inimitable antics last year, lures and revelry now in full roar and enterprise within the band’s first full-length.

Recorded with Lo Spider at Swampland in Toulouse, the album sets off on its sci-fi fuelled flight of fun with opener Abduction. Like a dance party in Area 51, the song swings its rhythmic hips to its own sonic infestation of devilry, vocalist Pav Scaner vocally hot-footing across the strands of temptation like a dervish as the keys of his organ dance. Hooks fly as beats bounce, seventies punk flirting with its synth punk/garage rock tenacity as ears and appetite are instantly baited and trapped.

The cosmos wraps the imagination next as Spacecraft lifts off with a punk rumble; bassist Tama Scaner and drummer BX Scaner rousingly fuelling its brief but irresistible surge before I Don’t Want To Go swaggers in on addictive beats and vocal dissonance. Pav’s keys again entice like sonic liquor as his voice wonderfully trespasses the shuffle; a riveting incitement matched and escalated by the spatial theremin gas and raw guitar prowess of Dédé Scaner. As the first, both tracks simply infest the imagination, getting under the skin like an infernal but exciting itch which you want to scratch but never lose.

Checkpoint Planet is a slightly calmer waltz which just as easily has the hips swinging and appetite devouring with its virulent infectiousness. As throughout the album, Pav’s lead vocal explorations are just as magnetically supported by the rest of the band’s throats, though it is the animated throb of Tama’s bass which steals the biggest portion of the passions before The Dries bursts in on a The Dickies bred lure to uncage its own voracious stomp. A fusion of sixties, seventies and current punk ‘n’ roll, the song is simply irresistible; manna to the devil in us all.

Darker and heavier textures line the B52’s hued aeronautics of Enjoy Your Flight; a trespassing bounce of a track which masters limbs and spirit like a cosmic puppeteer while No Place In Space steals best track honours with its post punk/garage punk saunter with a healthy essence of The Horrors to its reined but open diablerie. The first single from the album, the band apparently has two versions of the song; this the “slow” shadow accompanied drift through space; we cannot wait to hear the fast flight.

The pop virulence of the following We Want To Talk To Your Leader has the body romping within a breath or two, its new wave flaunt of sound and enterprise pure addiction which teases with nods to The Ramones; flavouring simply grabbed full-on by Video Tape next with again simply contagious results. Both tracks, though to be honest as all songs, leave the body breathless and greedy for more, a hunger quickly fed with great relish by the irritable sonic escapade of Flying Fuck and the flirtatious parade of Modern Fissure. The first is a furious surge of boisterous sound and brazen seduction and its successor a calmer but no less instinctively raw and rapacious slice of synth pop and both quite delicious to the ears.

The album ends with Levitation Train 2077, a swirling maelstrom of electronic punk as controlled as it is feral creating one glorious finale. All bands should have a theme tune to our thoughts, something recognisable and addictive announcing their arrival, like all the best TV shows, and this is undoubtedly the one for The Scaners.

Everything about the album was liquor to our intoxication and as the introduction of The Scaners to our ears, the spark to a lusty following hereon in; there is the feeling we will not be alone.

The Scaners album is out now via Dirty Water Records, Dirty Water Records USA, Adrenalin Fix Music, Casbah Records, Dangerhouse Skylab, Teenage Hate Records, Strycknine Recordz, and Trokson Records and available at!/The-Scaners/c/27034946/offset=0&sort=normal and

 Pete RingMaster 27/02/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Who Killed Nancy Johnson? – Flat Earth Theory

Having recently checked out their latest single, Dark Horse, and been definitely taken by it, it was a really welcomed treat to be sent over by the band itself the release the song came from. Its creators are UK outfit Who Killed Nancy Johnson?, a​ ​​​Reading-based quartet creating an eventful fusion of punk and rock with post punk imagination. It is a tenacious sound fuelling a new EP in the shape of Flat Earth Theory, four tracks of raw and devilish rock ‘n’ roll which just got under our skin.

Formed in 2015, Who Killed Nancy Johnson? has grown into one increasingly praised and devoured live presence across the south of England. Their debut EP, Cops and Robbers, released early last year only added to their rising reputation, one sure to be energised again by Flat Earth Theory. Musically the band embraces inspirations from the likes of The Stooges, The Ruts, Wire, Magazine, Black Flag, Buzzcocks, The Rezillos, Fugazi, Ash, Killing Joke, Lit, Rival Schools, The Drills, and 3 Colours Red; an array of flavours which if not openly echoed in the band’s individual enterprise certainly adds to its substance.

Flat Earth Theory is an eventful encounter, an affair coincidently echoed in its making with former bassist Paul Anthony leaving the band just before the EP’s mixing stage and preventing the basslines already laid down being used. A mystery bassist saved the day though, Who Killed Nancy Johnson? leaving the studio with four slices of ear grabbing rock ‘n’ roll.

The EP opens with Strip, a song which opens the band’s live show and to rousing success one imagines such its potent impact on Flat Earth Theory. From a dulled clang of guitar, spirit sparking beats launch their bait, Mark Wren whipping up song and appetite alike as Pete Moulton’s guitar continues to linger casting raw strokes. Quickly though the song surges through ears, its rapacious energy and disruptive intent manna to the imagination and capped by the distinctive tones of vocalist Stefan Ball. Old school punk meets post punk devilry, kind of like The Adicts in league with a Fugazi fuelled Gang Of Four, the track is irresistible and for us a must single. It is easy to see why their shows get off to a flyer with the song, its two minutes instinctive punk ‘n’ roll incitement.

The following Alien has a broader rock landscape, alternative and punk merging for a tenacious stroll which teases and lures the listener to one irresistible call of a chorus demanding eager participation. As in the first song, the band casts wicked hooks and anthemic persuasions which manipulate by the second, a great throbbing bassline accentuating their dexterity as the track matches its predecessor in hitting the spot dead centre.

Mouth and Trousers is next up, a more controlled song which almost prowls ears initially even as a rush of riffs crowd them. It calms down further as vocals join the shuffle, rhythms keeping their restraint in place too. There is a whiff of pub rock to the song, a Dr Feelgood breath to its punk ‘n’ roll which brings another potent shade to the EP’s sound and though the track did not ignite the passions as richly as its companions, it had the body bouncing and vocal chords indulging especially through another potent chorus.

The EP is completed by that latest single, Dark Horse. The song is a muscular affair of alternative rock which straight away springs a lure of firm beats and juicy hooks, building on their prowess with appetising grooves and a brooding bassline aligned to almost predacious beats. Recalling bands such as The Motors and Mind Museum, the track dances in the imagination whilst arousing the spirit.

With new recruit Julien Bruinaud completing their line-up on bass, Who Killed Nancy Johnson? are ready to build on their previous success with a real nudge on national attention, the thoroughly enjoyable Flat Earth Theory irrepressibly leading the persuasion so watch this space.

Flat Earth Theory is out now @

Pete RingMaster 20/02/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Valensole – Make Pace EP

Just under a year ago, British punks Valensole sparked intrigue and pleasure with their debut EP, Where We Should Be. It was a potential loaded, ear grabbing introduction to the Southampton trio suggesting a band with all the right attributes and imagination to make potent strides within the UK rock scene. Now that suggestion has been reinforced and given greater strength by Make Pace, a second EP of raw and rousing punk ‘n’ roll very easy to devour.

Embracing inspirations from the likes of Nirvana, Green Day, Sum 41, and early Foo Fighters, Valensole was formed in 2016. The threesome of vocalist/guitarist Elliott Jones, guitarist Nick Jones, and bassist Dave Parker certainly had ears and praise attentive with that first EP and such the fresh character and tone to its successor, we can only expect them to find much even greater attention upon the release of Make Pace.

With Kurt Philips providing drums throughout, the EP kicks off with Giving Up, its jumbled start instantly spawning a tasty guitar hook which soon leads into a tenacious stroll through ears. Simultaneously a new richer flavouring to the band’s punk sound begins tempting, the track merging its raw traits with infectious enterprise as it increasingly stomps around. Dave’s bass has a gorgeous dark steely tone, Elliot’s vocals matching its lure in earnest attitude as his and Nick’s guitars throw their sonic wares around. As with the first EP, we found flavouring more akin to the likes of Psychedelic Furs and The Vibrators than those earlier mentioned influences but more so the band’s own voice in sound and invention emerges this time around.

The potent start is soon matched by the following M.A.D, the track immediately getting under the skin with its opening spicy hook. Both guitars tease and tempt, uniting in a fiery lure backed by the stirring swings of drums and the grumbling stroll of the bass. There is a great vintage punk lining to the Valensole sound, one especially vocal in the rousing antics of the second song even as it slips into calmer, provocative waters. It all erupts again for a tenacious finale as physically bracing as it is catchy before So Bored moves in with its ear nagging endeavour. Carrying a whiff of Buzzcocks to its melodically scored trespass of a hook, the track soon revels in its caustic rock ‘n’ roll breeding but as its predecessor is a proposition which is unafraid to explore unpredictable twists and turns before lighting its riotous touch paper once again.

The EP ends with Don’t Let Go, a song again drawing those Richard Butler and co references while uncaging its own individuality. Equally there is a garage punk meets Generation X scent to the song, a thickly flavoursome hue adding to the unrelenting pleasure the track and indeed Make Pace overall sparks.

Valensole’s sound is on a journey, one still evolving and growing. The band’s first EP hinted at its promise, the second reveals new depth and adventure to add to that potential. When it will all come to full maturity time will tell but the ride on the way is undoubtedly going to be great fun with the anticipation of many more easily devoured treats like Make Pace.

Make Pace is released February 9th.

Pete RingMaster 06/02/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Reverse Family: 365 days of songwriting

Last August we gave you a first look and insight into the epic new project from Reverse Family. Starting the following October, the plan with 365 was to release 52 EPs as one a week for a whole year, each of their songs representing a single day in the inspiring life of its creator.

Reverse Family is the solo project of Dermot Illogical, though you may know him as Andreas Vanderbraindrain, the frontman of British outfit The Tuesday Club. With its brainchild embracing the various talents of others, Reverse Family first grabbed keen attention with debut album My Songs About Life Mid Crisis in 2016. In so many ways 365 is a whole new ball game for the band, a project taking the listener into the heart and thoughts, not forgetting darkness, Dermot personally experienced as he came to terms with personal despair through the death of a great friend and band mate, going through divorce, dealing with the serious illness of both parents and other traumas taking Dermot to the edge.

Since that first collection of songs sent our way to announce the release of 365, the project has been in full swing with some more teasers sent for our ears to explore. So time to give you more insight into a collection of songs which we can say to date has grabbed the imagination and pleasured ears in varying persistently enjoyable ways by focusing on a few more which have recently been unveiled.

Day 20 provides The Suns rays are just like birthdays, an inviting stroll built around a great post punk bassline as crispy beats align to the distinctive tones of Dermot. Reflecting on the radiance of the weather as emotions rise and fall, the track is a thickly infectious affair nagging away at ears like a pleasurable itch.

There is great diversity to the sound and personas of songs with 365 too, Was I a good man (day 15) swinging along with a sixties garage pop hues as guitars offer their psych kissed jangle while No Reason to run (day 6) has the rhythmic shuffle of a King Trigger aligned to an off kilter twee/ indie pop croon. Hugging a melody which enthrals in its nagging simplicity, the track is simply mesmeric, almost shamanic in its virulent enterprise.

Equally irresistible is the bricks and mortar snarl of Sunshade City (day 21). It has a gnarly tone around the pulsating shadowy lure of the bass, both at the heart of its post punk/industrial examination while with matching success We Got It (day26) sees Reverse Family embrace early Adam and The Ants textures in its resourceful punk dance. With so many tracks unveiled already it is hard to pick a favourite but this always figures in any contemplation as too does  the twang lilted Keep Being the Good Guy (day 25). Its country punk tinge and another irresistible bass line and tone court the ever virulent vocal delivery of Dermot, it all uniting in one seriously catchy persuasion.

Seductive acoustic discord flirts from within Dark pop (day 7) and insatiable askew pop punk is bred through the rousing antics of Pay the price (day 3) while School gate politics (day 64) is a prowling harassment with menacing shadows and post punk intimation, kind of like a Bowie meets Artery contemplation. All three are additional pinnacles in the lofty landscape of tracks released to date and definite favourites with us among so many more.

It has to be said though that Movin’ forward (day 74) is the cream of the crop, its repetitious swing and hook lined lure simply irresistible; a real ear worm as dark as it is vibrant. There are numerous potent ways to get into 365, such as the delicious lithe tenebrific pop ‘n’ roll of Your wandering hands (day 82) but Movin’ forward is addiction in the waiting.

There is so much more to discover already with 365, aside from our glimpses, with EPs released currently standing at 19 as you read, and all there for your exploration, @  with plenty more adventure to come which you can keep up with through the Perfect Pop Co-Op magazine. 365 is DIY majesty with drama to be found at every turn and so much pleasure too.

Read our introduction to Reverse Family and 365 @

Pete RingMaster 06/02/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Incendiary beginnings: introducing Blast Bomb

This past December saw the release of the debut single from German rockers Blast Bomb, a band with friend of The RingMaster Review and owner of the great independent label Undead Artists, Johnny Rose as its vocalist. The whole of the band though has a pedigree which matches their passion and craft, all in potent evidence within Born To Lose. With thanks to the whole band we grabbed the chance to find out more about Bomb Blast and their first single…


Hello guys and big thanks for taking time to chat with us.

Kein Problem, Danke fur dein helfen!

Can you first introduce the band?

Johnny: Singer

Torben: Guitar

Klaus: Guitar

Kai: Bass

Tobi: Drums

When did the band come together and what are your individual musical histories before Blast Bomb?

Torben – The Band comes together in the beginning of 2017 (January). I make music together with Tobi since school. Must be since 1995 or something like that, a long time. Klaus always says we know each other so well if someone does a fart the other reacts from the music view. Our first real band was High Gain District. A few years ago I played together with Klaus at Skull Harvest, so there comes the connection.

Kai: Skull Harvest 1999 – 2005 / Spezialangriff 2010 – 2012 / This One Goes To Eleven 2006 – 2016

Johnny – Torben and Tobi played together in bands for many years! Torben and Klaus played together in bands for many years….. Kai, Torben and Klaus played in bands together for many years…. are you sensing a pattern????

We already know Johnny from his exploits with Thirteen Shots and his label Undead Artists, how did you Johnny meet the rest of the band and what sparked your addition to its line-up?

Torben – the band posted an advertisement on a local band platform that they are searching a singer. At the same time Johnny makes a post that he searches for a band. So he receives the handy recordings from the last practice and in the next weeks some rehearsals was arranged. The rest is history…

Johnny – The guys have all been friends and playing music together for many years, ok in different bands but that chemistry was very obvious for me from hearing the live demo’s, so I was delighted when I got the chance to audition…..

Was there a deliberate direction you wanted to take Blast Bomb or has that and your sound just organically come together?

Torben – The sound comes automatically together from the single members. So we formed our own sound, every member of the band has his influences. Tobi has a Jazz and Alternative background, Kai has a stoner source, Klaus comes from Metal, Torben is more Rock orientated and Johnny …

Johnny – My music taste is superb! Who doesn’t love Chris De Burgh???

Torben – But all members are very open to ALL kinds of music, they have the same opinion about music … If it is good, it is good!!!

How would you describe the band’s sound to newcomers?

Torben – The band sound is something between Punk Rock, Rock, Metal, Stoner and Alternative… The term Crossover is a bit dusted but could maybe fit in another context than in the 90’s.

Johnny – I think the sound is more Punk ‘N’ Roll, we are certainly a crossover but we have this raw energy that runs through every song…..that to me is Punk ‘N’ Roll. But we need you guys to help us?? Who are we? What are we? haha

Can you give a flavour of some of the inspirations which may have made an impact on the band but certainly on your personal tastes and approach to making music?

Johnny -Well for me The Beatles, Black Sabbath and Pink Floyd are my biggest influences! But the older Crossover punk bands are the reason I make the music I do…Misfits, Amen, Snot, Turbonegro. I am fascinated by concept bands too, something I would love day love to try, I like the attention to detail in the concepts.

Torben- Guns N Roses (Appetite For Destruction and Lies, when the Illusions came out I throw everything in the garbage), Pantera , Rage against the Machine, Suicidal Tendencies, Faith No More, Mr Bungle, Red Hot Chilli Peppers.

Klaus- My First contact with Rock was Led Zeppelin and Black Sabbath; I found the records from my stepfather. But later I found love for grunge Alice In Chains, Pearl Jam, Soundgarden… I am also a big fan of Elvis, Little Richard and Jerry Lee Lewis

Torben – Klaus ALSO LOVES Judas Priest and Iron Maiden…

Kai – Don’t forget Adriano Celentano Klaus

Klaus-oh and Jimi Hendrix….

Kai- For me its 80s Metal and Bay-Area Thrash to Stoner bands and the explosive Scandinavian Rock scene in the 90s; there’s too many to mention…

Tobi -NO MEANS NO, Primus, NO MEANS NO and of course NO MEANS NO

You have just released your debut single, Born To Lose; a three track feral punk ‘n’ roll attack showing creative irritability, ferocity, and attitude. It also reveals the variety of flavours in your sound. Is the single a full echo of your music or a teaser to an even broader tapestry?

Torben – It’s more a teaser, the band just in the forming process of their own style. The band creates a dozen songs since January; all have the same direction but are very different. The direction is forward …

Johnny – Absolutely, we are still finding our direction, The songs we are writing have so much power and purpose.  Born To Lose felt like the correct single to record as it was the first song I heard and realised I wanted to join this band; I actually wrote the lyrics on the train to my audition, not much has changed from my original lyric idea!

We all work together to encourage us to achieve our best.  Wait till you hear the full length

Can you give us a look into its themes?

Torben – Just wait for the Long Player… Till then we fix our sound…

Johnny – We keep working, Writing, Fine tuning, maybe we won’t rush the full length, better to focus on quality. We only want to put out the best, we are not kids anymore!

I assume you have a host of other songs in your arsenal. What was it about that trio which you felt made the best introduction to the band to the world?

Torben – We thought that it was a good idea to give a wide selection of our sound and don’t pick the most equal sounds.

Johnny – Yes we always knew that Maiden Hero and Born To Lose [would be on it] but we was unsure on the third option, we had another song in mind, But we played a show two days before we recorded and the feedback from friends and people at the gig made us re-think the third option…. that’s why we chose You’re Going Down… it was chosen kinda by fans.

The single is released through Italian label Archetype Records; how did that link up come about?

Torben – It just a friendship, so we help them and they help us. So it was a good opportunity for all of us.

Johnny – Yes these guys are trying to build something unique, we are trying the same, felt like a good agreement

On the live side of the band, you have already been successful supports to the likes of Honeymoon Disease, Conan, and Monolord, earning plaudits at the same time. When starting out did you suspect your sound would make a potent fit with bands and audiences of different genres?

Torben – No not really but we hope regarding our different sources and it seems that the idea works out well.

Johnny – To be honest I was incredibly nervous playing the show with Conan and Monolord. We are in NO WAY doomy but the crowd was more open than I expected, we got a really positive reception. We didn’t change our approach for the show so to see these doom fans getting down to some punk rock was quite amusing for me….

From the outside, The Hamburg music scene seems to be boiling up, how is it on the inside?

Torben – Curse and blessing at the same time. In Hamburg the scene is really big, so you can catch up a lot of influences. Furthermore you have the option to see a lot of bands, local and international, in the small and big clubs.

But regarding that it is hard to get a good gig and bring the people to the concerts. In Hamburg you can go to minimum 5 concerts every day. So it’s hard to get notified by the people but that makes us proud that we get that attention only after the first shows.

Johnny – Yes we just played our first headline show and the venue was pretty much sold out, it was certainly cosy. The Conan and Monolord show was just outside Hamburg, a Tuesday night and SOLD OUT… that to me was crazy.

I lose a lot of money a month in going to gigs, Some fantastic local bands too, in so many different styles.

What is next for Blast Bomb?

Torben – To rule the world 😉 …We are planning our first Italian tour, during the summer we want to play a few festivals and still searching for a good support slot. Furthermore we are looking to Johnny’s homeland to get a few shows there.

During the next year we want to do some more recordings, we think about a few small releases, nowadays we have no need to bring out a whole record… We bomb the world with a lot of, lot of small releases.

Johnny – haha Blast Bomb the world… will be explosive

Again many thanks for sharing your time; any last words you would like to add?

Torben – Better be aware the next bomb could be next to you …

Check out our review of Born To Lose @

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 10/01/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Easter Teeth – Truckstop Fear

Within numerous instinctively magnetic musical lures for us is the temptation of rock ‘n’ roll duos. The past few years has unearthed a host of exciting and stirring propositions across an array of styles and adding to that seemingly ever expanding list is California’s Easter Teeth. Comprising of the Eymann brothers, Josh on vocals/drums and Tim on vocals/bass/keys, the band creates a predacious mix of punk infused post punk and noise rock and as proven by latest album Truckstop Fear, a blend which is quite irresistible.

Growing up listening to their mother’s array of cassette tapes including James Brown, Sam & Dave, and The Rascals while riding in back of the family station wagon, the siblings bring those spices with their subsequent discovery and love of punk, hardcore, and math rock into their own sound. It is as funky as it is irritable, as soulful as it is agitated and with its slim but rich body of rhythmic trespass and vocal energy a real fresh DIY breath in the world of noise.

Truckstop Fear is the successor to 2013 debut album Being Alone With Your Thoughts is for Inmates, the two full-lengths surrounding a split 7” EP with Moral Monsters in 2015 and two track single Shake Hands with Danger released early 2017. Within mere seconds the latest album grips ears and attention as opener Honey from the Carcass whips ears with Josh’s crispy beats, the bass a waiting hum as shouts and hits break into a hectic shuffle. Swiftly hips swing to the track’s funkiness, the senses cowering before its raw edge and scything beats; it all a corrosive temptation coloured by the electrified fuzz of keys. As the music, the vocal union of the siblings is bold and instinctive, a direct incitement hard to turn down.

The following Baby’s Got Cold Feet casts a minefield of shuddering beats as a groove woven bassline strolls with grumbling dexterity within the melodic flourish of keys. Like a scowling tango built on the attributes of Pigbag and Swell Maps, the song hits the spot with increasing addictiveness though it is soon eclipsed by the caustic Art Attacks meets mclusky tango of Play the Harp, Throw the Spear. It is a rabid trespass but with a restraint which only escalates its impact before the album’s title track raises the ante yet again. It too has the scent of numerous decades of rock ‘n’ roll in its uncompromising proposal shaped by the imposing skeletal steel frame set by Josh. Hooks and catchy enterprise erupt across its barbarous stroll, a blend of contrasts just as potent within the pair’s infectious vocal insurgency.

As the previous songs, each in turn built upon and outshone by the next, Good Intentions Paving Co. soon steals the limelight, its kinetic saunter an irresistible collusion between bass and drums enhanced by the ever rousing union of voice and Tim’s squirts of mania lined keys. The track is noise at its most majestic, and demonic, a virulent tirade of manipulative rock ‘n’ roll with a chorus only the deaf could resist joining.

Sit Down Party has its own breed of addictiveness, a fevered but again skilfully controlled incursion of sound and enterprise bearing hues of bands such as Pere Ubu, The Mae Shi, and Big Black in its design. What grabs ears though is something unique to Easter Teeth, an individual character of sound confirmed once again within the rhythmically viral, sonically lusty Inspiration Indiana and the senses stalking Just Curves, a track with something of The Mekons to it.

The album ends with Pick a Puppy, a piece of poppy noise punk with volatility in its heart and virulent dance. It is a superb end to a release which sparked a lustful appetite and hunger here for the band’s sound. At times the best rock ‘n’ roll comes raw, undiluted, and with a tart almost acrimonious flavouring; the evidence there within the wonderful wickedness that is Truck Stop Fear.

Truck Stop Fear is available on ZAP! Records @

Pete RingMaster 09/01/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright