Making Monsters – Bad Blood

2015 promo_RingMasterReview

We heard the buzz and now we know it is pretty much on the mark, UK band Making Monsters is one striking and seriously exciting proposition. Our evidence comes with the band’s new EP, Bad Blood. It is six tracks of highly irritable and even more contagious rock ‘n’ roll equipped with the snarl of punk and bold diversity of alternative rock; a proposal which stirs the instincts and spirit from start to finish; oh the fact that the band’s sound has a touch of Animal Alpha to it does it no harm either.

Emerging in 2011, the Derry based Making Monsters soon poked at keen attention with their self-titled debut EP the following year, that potently back by successor, Attention, two years later. Alongside that success, the quartet has developed and honed their sound and live presence, impressing and luring new flocks of fans while sharing stages with the likes of Young Guns, Silverstein, We Came As Romans, Max Raptor, and Skindred amongst many. A clutch of singles have increasingly stirred the blood and ears these past couple of years while a full UK tour with Fightstar and Arcane Roots last October cemented the band’s growing reputation. With Bad Blood though, it is easy to expect the band stepping into new spotlights and strength of acclaim, the EP holding all the creative cards to be a game changer in the ascent of the band as it is in their sound.

Straight away the EP suggests there is a new maturity and even bolder adventure to the Making Monsters sound, a thought confirmed song by song across Bad Blood. It opens up with its mighty title track, a slab of punk ‘n’ roll straight away teasing with spicy hooks as the instantly impressing roar of Emma Gallagher takes on all challengers in attitude and quality. Guitars and boisterous rhythms continue to entice and intimidate across the excellent encounter, Gallagher’s emotive fire backed by male scowls as Brian Doherty’s drum sticks beat out an addictive pattern.

MM - Better _RingMasterReviewIt is a glorious start with, as suggested at the start, a great Animal Alpha hue to its tempest; an imagination and appetite inciting beginning to the release quickly and potently backed up by Call Me Out. A kinder affair on the senses for the main but with an imposing volatility, the dark stroll of Gary Todd’s throaty bass at first holds court with the provocative tones of Gallagher, who is already showing much more of her versatility; the pair soon colluding with the fiery enterprise of guitarist Paul Monk and heftily swung beats to stir up an already keen appetite.

Latest single Better comes in next; its entrance also less intrusive but taking a quickly unshakeable firm grip on ears as shimmering melodies and senses piercing hooks lay their bait into the rhythmically virulent swing of the song. There are moments throughout it where thoughts wonder if Distillers were fused with Stolen Babies, would they sound like and as riveting as this. They are essences which continue to flavour a song which has the energies breathless and hunger greedier by its end, so luckily We Aren’t Living is next to eagerly share its melodic pop ‘n’ roll with a growl and a tenacious will. Like those around it, the track offers plenty of unpredictable twists and moments of fascinating imagination, neither ever disrupting the flow and impact.

Rose seduces next, Gallagher caressing ears with her warm yet snarly tones as sultry tendrils of guitar sway. It is a mesmeric coaxing soon over run by a torrent of spiky riffs and busy rhythms providing a just as enticing invitation. As now expected things are soon turning down new avenues and offering a variety of twists woven into a blaze of a song as raucous as it is emotively inflamed and intimate.

Bad Blood ends on our favourite track, a rampaging beast of attitude and invention going by the name of Noodle Sync. Noise and garage rock meets punk metal infused rock ‘n’ roll, the track is a blistering assault and trespass on ears and the senses. It is a cauldron of raw riffs and invasive hooks driven by the diverse drama and emotion of Gallagher’s explosive voice and presence, her ability and invention more than matched in sound and imagination by the rest of the band.

It is a stunning end to a quite exhilarating release; an EP which just might be the making of Making Monsters and certainly another step towards major things for the band one suspects.

The Bad Blood EP is out now digitally @ http://makingmonsters.bandcamp.com/ with physical copies available @ http://makingmonsters.bigcartel.com/product/bad-blood-ep

http://www.makingmonsters.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/makingmonsters   https://twitter.com/makingmonsters1

Pete RingMaster 16/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Pulsebeats – Fiction Non-Fiction

The Pulsebeats_RingMasterReview

Every two years or so we seem to get a new stomping encounter with The Pulsebeats; a regular occurrence, certainly over the past four years, providing so far highly memorable and rousing adventures. Nothing has changed with new album Fiction Non-Fiction either, a riotous ten track affair which has the body and spirit leaping with the band’s distinct fusion of garage and punk rock with power pop contagion.

Formed in 2010 by a quartet of musicians from Manchester and Santander in Spain, The Pulsebeats soon had an increasing flock of fans bouncing live and with their self-titled debut album of 2011. A raw but captivating romp, it awoke a new wave of attention and media interest which was further stirred up by the band’s three track 7” single Don’t Turn Your Fucking Back On Me two years later. That release immediately revealed a new imagination and diversity in the band’s songwriting and sound which has now been taken to yet another plateau with Fiction Non-Fiction. Released a couple of weeks ago by FOLC Records and Action Weekend Records, the recording of The Pulsebeats’ new roar of energetic fun saw the band return to Santander’s Drive Division Studio with Alex Pis handling production. What emerged was a collection of songs eager to reveal the band at its most musically adventurous and indeed creatively tenacious yet.

What Can I Do? is the first slice of engaging incitement on the album; a welcome instantly wrapping ears in jangly guitar and crisp beats. The distinctive British tones of Nathan are soon adding to the already potent lure of the song, his and fellow guitarist, Luis’ riffs and hooks surrounding his tones with matching zeal and expression The track is a tidy slice of power pop mixed with sixties spiced R&B, a warm an catchy start soon eclipsed by Dead School Marching Band. New wave like guitar insurgency rubs the senses first; their almost duelling bait soon accompanied by the swinging rhythms of drummer Ral and the almost haughty bassline of Alex. In no time, the outstanding song has feet and hips bound in its virulence whilst a Who/early Jam hue blossoms to ignite the imagination. It is also an inventively busy proposal, vocal growls and writhing harmonies colluding with spiky hooks and tangy grooves to add to its ear gripping devilry.

Cover_RingMasterReviewThe punk ‘n’ roll of Eyes On You leaps straight from the closing breath of its predecessor, the track a glorious old school incitement with a touch of early Buzzcocks meets The Freshies to it; indeed Nathan adding a Howard Devoto like toning to his raw vocal persuasion. Like the previous track, it quickly and easily has body and passions involved while showing more of the variety in sound shaping Fiction Non-Fiction.

The following All I Give also has some of that nostalgic spicing to certainly its acidic hooks and uncluttered body, bringing a lighter infection of pop ‘n’ roll for its magnetic chorus, while Carrie-Anne is a less forceful proposal creating a flirtatious smoulder with sultry surf like melodies within a power pop/new wave hug with just a touch of The Only Ones to it. Both songs easily command undiluted interest and an increasingly greedier appetite for the album, if without quite matching up to the major heights of those before them and the thumping garage rock ‘n’ roll of Baby Girl. The anthemic punches of beats alone have limbs involved, vocals and riffs taking care of the rest of quickly seduced attention.

The mischievous nature of the band in word and sound is never far from the surface of the album and especially dynamic and irresistible in The Man Without A Head. The stomping slice of rock ‘n’ roll is an epidemic of sonic contagion with a host of additional strands drawn from blues, vintage R&B, and pop punk. Many tracks have a claim for best track honours within Fiction Non-Fiction, this one of the most vocal though so too is its successor, the resourcefully infectious and melodically lusty September Calendar Girl.

To be honest most tracks create an unforgettable peak within the lofty stature of the album, the glorious Everybody Wants Some intoxicating punk rock revelry almost aflame with raw energy and attitude to match earlier heights. It offers an uncomplicated two and a half minutes of breath-taking and seriously addictive rock ‘n roll which just ignites body and soul.

Completed by the even briefer punk riot of The Ballad Of Medicine Stu, again a track impossible not to get fully involved in, Fiction Non-Fiction is the kind of release you turn to for pure fun, knowing it will not disappoint in sound, adventure, or attitude. As for The Pulsebeats, they just get better and better, which means so do their records which Fiction Non-Fiction can testify.

Fiction Non-Fiction is available now on CD and download through Folc Records/Action Weekend Records and @ https://thepulsebeats.bandcamp.com/album/fiction-non-fiction

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Pete Ringmaster 11/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Tijuana Death Shot – Generation Y

TDS_RingMasterReview

Formed last year, there is not a lot of info to share about UK rockers Tijuana Death Shot but on the evidence of their first demo and now new video/single Generation Y, the Manchester trio is heading the right way to ensure the British rock scene is well and broadly aware of them.

We mentioned that Tijuana Death Shot emerged in 2015, though their bio also suggests the band stepped into the light a year earlier, formed by lead vocalist/bassist Jo Quincy and drummer Tom Harris. With guitarist/vocalist James Binnie completing the line-up, the trio were soon creating raw and contagious heavy rock roars cast from a pool of blues and punk rock alongside glam and a more varied ferocity of sound. A three track demo last year awoke a wider expanse of attention, including ours, with the ear grabbing proposals of Disco Killer, This is the Rainbow Blackout, and Smoke & Liquor, whilst live, the band hit a hungry stride across 2015 continuing into this, adding the sharing of stages with a host of emerging and more established bands, including recently Novacrow, Stone Angels, Keto, Dischord, and The Stupids.

Now it is Generation Y stirring up a new tide of eager ears and support, primarily through a great video bringing the song’s salacious qualities to visual light in the Quincy and Sarah Brady directed film.

Stabbing beats and guitar make first contact, they triggering a slim but catchy stroll as the distinctive tones of Quincy entice within the web of Binnie’s grooves. A more forceful edge is carried by Harris’ anthemic swings, inciting a bigger roar from all in the chorus which is given extra punk ‘n’ roll ferocity by the enjoyable confrontational surrounding shouts of Binnie before the track bounces across its range of energies and sonic enterprise.

As shown on their previous demo, Tijuana Death Shot have a great range of unpredictable and imaginative, often off-kilter, twists to their songs; here the listener subsequently facing a rhythmic shuffle wrapped in blues flames or a sultry croon of melodic rock seduction within what is overall a rousing canter. Every element of the song also carries a mischievous devilment which will see Tijuana Death Shot, with their creative boldness, going a long way in making a potent impact on the diversity of British rock ‘n’ roll.

The Generation Y video can be seen @ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wbpNktZ_uXA or https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/video-selector/ with the song a teaser to a new EP to be released later this year.

https://www.facebook.com/TJDeathShot   https://twitter.com/TJDeathShot   https://soundcloud.com/TJDeathShot

Pete Ringmaster 10/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Cavemen – Self Titled

The Cavemen_RingMasterReview

With a name like The Cavemen, you instantly give a suggestion of sound and character before a note is flung at ears. Thoughts imagine something raw and primal; a sound stripped to the bone with no concern for niceties and that is exactly what you get in the New Zealander’s self-titled debut album. The Cavemen creates attitude driven garage punk ‘n’ roll which simply stirs up the punk inside and twists it into songs which are as addictively contagious as they are belligerently mischievous.

Formed by a quartet of high school teens, The Cavemen emerged in 2012 after spending “several years of under aged drinking and loitering around the various basements, graveyards and parking lots of their home city.” With their dirty and intrusive sound honed to the virulently imposing height found on the new release, the quartet of vocalist Paul Caveman, guitarist Jack Caveman, bassist Nick Caveman, and drummer Jake Caveman soon began stirring up their homeland’s live scene. That success though was soon facing obstacles which led to the band to looking at moving over to the UK, Paul explaining with the thought, “No bar will have us, no station will play us… We might as well bugger off to the other side of the world.” So now London based, The Cavemen has linked up with Dirty Water Records for the global release of their debut full-length, an album having already ignited eager appetites with its previous limited vinyl release via 1:12 Records.

Think The Cramps and The Stooges meets The Damned, in their early days, and The Ramones and you get a clue to the incitement leaping out from the album’s opener alone. Mentally Ill swiftly has ears and appetite gripped with its brawling lo-fi devilment; guitars and bass creating a swiftly gripping tempting as beats trespass the senses with their antagonistic swing and vocals deliver every syllable in a rabid squall of tone and attitude. Garage rock meets ’77 punk rock, the track is an attention grabbing start to the album instantly backed and eclipsed by the irritable confrontation of Fuck For Hate. Hook and grooves entangle as the song stirs up ear and spirit; vocals egging on the track’s rebellion and discontent as it worms under the skin.

cavemen front sleeve_RingMasterReviewIt too is then over shadowed a touch by the outstanding Stand By Your Ghoul. Straight away the collusion of guitar and bass hooks has lips being licked, then smiling broadly as Hamond-esque keys dance devilishly on the imagination within another handful of tempting seconds. The prime bait reminds of seventies band The Piranhas, or more specifically their single Jilly whilst the bare boned roar of the track manages to come over as something between The Dirtbombs and The Horrors in their early days.

The album’s punk driven rock ‘n’ roll continues to seriously involve and excite body and spirit as the fifty scowling seconds of Scumbag leads to the minute and a half invasive seduction of Rides With The Reich. Barely a track goes by without escaping the two minute mark, a short sharp riot approach which does not stop songs like this also uncaging the most contagious of hooks and swaggers within senses bracing tempests of multi-faceted punk rock.

Rock ‘n’ Roll Retard bristles and romps next; wearing its old school punk nature as sonic belligerence before At The Pub barges in with its gang mentality punk ‘n’ roll. Again there is little resistance from feet and vocal chords as participation to yet another song from The Cavemen is inescapable; a submission given time and time again to its persuasion and to brawls like Fucked In The Head and Drink Driving. Again that garage rock flavouring creates great flames of eventful contrasts in the creative truculence stirring up ears, the second of this pair managing to find an oi! like challenge to get even greedier over too.

The limb throwing swagger of School Sucks offers a fractious anthem next whilst Crimes Tonight squeezes some power pop revelry into its sixties/seventies infested rock ‘n’ roll; a fusion of flavours casting something that is The Sonics meets The Saints like. Both tracks, it goes without saying by this point in the album, has the body bouncing and emotions defiant, the latter aspect even more so with the dirty Motorhead tinged rock ‘n’ roll of Glass Breakfast.

The album closes with the irresistible furnace of Trash Talkin’ Paint Huffin’ Girl, a final fevered stomp of incendiary punk and rock devilry as raw and primitive as it is ferociously galvanic. It is a rigorously boiling end to a thrilling blaze of rapacious rock ‘n’ roll from a band which sparks a new flame, song by song, in the bushfire of pleasure which runs through album and its thorough enjoyment.

Time to free the primitive in us all with The Cavemen!

The Cavemen album is released via Dirty Water Records on April 25th @ http://www.dirtywaterrecords.co.uk/shop/ and digitally @ https://thecavemennz.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/thecavemennz

Pete RingMaster 25/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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BarCreeps – The Hour Between Dog And Wolf

Dog and Wolf_RingMasterReview

As to who BarCreeps are is a mystery and will remain so with the UK based band presenting themselves anonymously; set to represented by a generic ‘BarCreep’ in a challenge to “the current fragmentation of music into ‘writer/programmer’ and ‘celebrity personality as singer’ and [their]feeling that this process is syphoning the artistry out of culture.” What is no secret going by debut single The Hour Between Dog And Wolf though, is that the band creates one seriously enjoyable and raw punk rock incitement.

Roaring out of London, BarCreeps is said to consist of a quartet of members from all over the world united by a love of record labels such as Fat Wreck, Epitaph, Touch and Go, Jade Tree, and Dischord. Their individual histories seem to include bassist Railgrind formerly being in The Pipettes who toured the world with the likes of Amy Winehouse and The Beastie Boys. As for vocalist Bannister and fellow guitarist Hendricks, they “started the Hong Kong loft show scene” and shared a stage with Fugazi whilst the former has also been in The Young Playthings whilst the latter put on ‘Refugee Rock’ last year, where the Wedding Present headlined a gig that helped raise over £3,000 for the immigrants in the Calais jungle. With a line-up completed by drummer Campari, who played in Italian band Cream Pie as well as Italy’s premier Ramones tribute act, BarCreeps is a proposition that has a lively background but revealing little about themselves at the same time.

Bands should always let their sound do the talking of course, and BarCreeps certainly do that in The Hour Between Dog And Wolf. Their first single opens on a group howl and proceeds to entwine ears in catchy tendrils of guitar and ripe hooks framed by heftily landing rhythms. The equally raw and dirty tones of Bannister add a further easy to take up invitation to a caustic slice of joy which, with its uncomplicated yet potent melodic hardcore scented roar, becomes increasingly magnetic as it breeds a NOFX meets Propagandhi like rousing of ears and attention.

It is only one song heard so far, so too early to say how unique the band’s sound is though The Hour Between Dog And Wolf suggests that such an essence is still in the brewing stage. Fair to say though, that the single hits all the right spots with its uncompromising and highly satisfying punk rock and in return we eagerly await the band’s next offering.

The Hour Between Dog And Wolf is released April 15th on BCHR Records.

Upcoming Live BarCreeps Dates:

April 23rd – The Barfly Camden, London

May 14th – The Queen’s Arms, Reading

August 27th – Sea Change Festival, Totnes

https://www.facebook.com/BarCreeps   https://twitter.com/barcreepsband

Pete RingMaster 15/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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I Plead Irony – The Solution Is The Problem

IPI_RingMasterReview

Just a handful of months short of three years ago, UK trio I Plead Irony uncaged one of the most rousing and creatively imaginative rock ‘n’ roll albums heard that year and to be honest since. This Statement Is False was compellingly equipped with ferocious and virulently contagious alternative and punk rock roars which, though frequently acclaimed, never quite got the rich attention it and the band deserved. Fair to say though, the Farnborough hailing band was certainly recognised as one of the UK’s most exciting emerging bands by a great many. Now the biggest spotlights are under serious tempting once again with the release of the band’s second album The Solution Is The Problem, it another creatively raucous and energetically incendiary slab of sound and invention to get lustful over.

In many ways, The Solution Is The Problem takes over from where its predecessor left off; imagination stirring and inventively mischievous songs to the fore but swiftly it reveals the broader landscape of creative tenacity and imagination now colouring the fresh maturity in songwriting and sound. Managing to provide more of the riveting same whilst unleashing a whole new character of insatiable adventure, the album is an inescapable arousing of spirit, imagination, and greedily devouring ears.

Formed in the early days of 2011, I Plead Irony was a growing force on the south eastern live scene from its first steps. Sharing time with its members’ other projects such as Ipanema, The Fins, Atomic Garden, and Welcome The Howling Tones, the band released This Statement Is False in 2013, their debut mixed by French producer Guillaume Doussaud. It awoke a new wave of national ears and appetites to the presence of the band and in turn a new host of fans to excite with their renowned live prowess. Now The Solution Is The Problem is the bait to really stir things up; an enticement which has all the qualities and potential to make the threesome of vocalist/bassist Rauf Jordan, guitarist/backing vocalist Paul McDonald, and drummer/backing vocalist Lawrence Arnold, the name on eagerly sharing lips and recommendations.

The album impressively opens with Tiny Violin which enters on a rusty cinematic coaxing. Soon after, a wiry guitar invitation winds around ears, hefty rhythmic swipes and a brooding atmosphere soon in close attention. In no time, the track is strolling with eager intent through ears, the excellent vocal presence of Jordan leading a thick mix of textures and flavours busying themselves within the song. There is a touch of Hundred Reasons meets Japanese Fighting Fish to the track, a spice within a sound which is swiftly and increasingly recognised as prime I Plead Irony. It is simply superb, a rousing and dramatic proposal thick in emotion and intensity entangled in strands of inventive endeavour.

art_RingMasterReviewThe potent expanse of diversity within the album is soon beginning to reveal itself with What If. From vocals to sound, it carries a rockabilly meets melodic rock ingenuity which simply seduces as the track, with the bass on the front foot, prowls ears. Hooks litter every lure of the song’s invitation whilst a virulence of emotive and creative dexterity infests the imagination and psyche. As its predecessor, the track is aural gold and an unstoppable manipulation of the body and listener participation, much as Not The Face which follows straight after. It too is quickly in command, its buoyant infectiousness aligned to imposing aggression and anthemic tenacity with a Billy Talent like resourcefulness to it all.

Already the album is an addiction in the throes of success and strongly backed by the feisty persuasion of Sisyphus and even more so its successor Just A Machine. The first of the two is a relatively reserved and reined proposal but with the bracing edge and slightly cantankerous nature that frequents the I Plead Irony sound. If without sparking the same lusty response as those before it, the sonically fiery song has ears and pleasure full before the second of the two steals the limelight with its Foo Fighters toned incitement. From the delicious crankiness of the bass and the lung roaring vocals of Jordan through to the maze of off-kilter dynamics and ever evolving energy, the track is an anthem to stir the passions and a tapestry of unpredictable invention to ignite the imagination.

What’s Best For You bounces along next with a Jimmy Eat World infectiousness and agitation though yet again any references offered are mere hues in a thick slice of I Plead Irony originality, as evidenced by the rumbling rock ‘n’ roll of Unsung Champions straight after. Jordan and Arnold needs little time to create a web of rhythmic seduction and intimidation which McDonald binds in melodic and sonic enterprise as the vocalist’s vocals shine with narrative and expression. There is nothing about the song not to greedily like; every chord and rhythmic roll the prelude to a theatre of discord lined imagination and spirit inflaming flirtation, it all honed into rock ‘n’ roll alchemy.

The body is soon lost to the addictive shuffle and contagion of Prove Me Wrong; its imposing catchiness wonderfully aligned to a metal inspired trespass as magnetic as the track’s virulence is epidemic like. The song is also another reflection of the bigger and bolder landscape to the band’s writing and invention, an aspect pushed further by the equally intrusive and dynamic Divide[…]Collide. A tenacious snarl is never far from the surface, even as a melodic saunter works with the darker tone of voice and emotion , but similarly the band’s striking imagination is consistently there leaning in on every unexpected twist and resourceful turn of the excellent encounter.

The Solution Is The Problem is brought to a thrilling close by firstly the web of intrigue and galvanic textures making up the Kill The Crow and finally Tragedy Debut, a glorious slice of punk ‘n’ roll which sends the listener this way and that whilst having them, like a puppeteer, physically and emotionally dance. Both tracks hit the sweet spot with the closer especially exhilarating with its invasive and memorable theatre of blues, punk, and muscular alternative rock.

Such the might of This Statement Is False, it was never going to be easy to follow it up but The Solution Is The Problem makes light work of the challenge with its bigger and bolder, not forgetting thrilling plateau of invention and persuasion

The Solution Is The Problem is out now via Rose Coloured Records @ https://ipleadirony.bandcamp.com/

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Pete RingMaster 12/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Senton Bombs – Mass Vendetta

SB_RingMasterReview

There is nothing better than watching a band which catches the ear build on previous successes whilst pushing themselves and sound. UK rockers The Senton Bombs is a band which consistently manages that impressing trait and has so again with new album Mass Vendetta. The band’s most diverse and boldly adventurous offering yet, the eleven track stomp sees the band pushing into feverishly imaginative and variety spun territories whilst still rocking like a bitch in season incited hound.

Formed in 2004, the Blackpool quartet seemed to hit the ground running in sound and attention, become a greedily devoured live proposition matched in support for their early releases including a pair of well-received albums. Fair to say though as successful as they were, the band really hit the spot on with Chapter Zero in 2013. In many ways it was a landmark in the band’s growth, The Senton Bombs honing their persistent embracing of varied flavours and styles into something which really set the band apart from the crowd. Various singles and the excellent Phantom High EP of 2014 saw the band pushing their fusion of hard and blues rock fired punk ‘n’ roll on again; their rousing and inventive stomps heavily nudging on worldwide awareness which this fourth album will surely only ignite.

Such its bold step forward from its predecessors in imagination and character, though hindsight shows the seeds were already openly audible in past releases, it took ears a first listen to get to grips with the Ronnie Bomb produced encounter. From there though, it was full steam ahead as body and imagination got eagerly involved with the album’s dramatic roar which starts with recent single Trailblazer. From its initial percussive coaxing, spicy grooves spiral out, wrapping eager ears as rhythms add their thick thump. The potent start is soon stirred up further by the recognisable grainy vocal tones of bassist Joey Class and his bass’ similarly familiar throaty sound. Equally, the imaginative twists and turns which emerge as melodic calms and clean vocals collude with fiery expulsions and energetic tenacity only increase the song’s potency. Further encasing ears in a blues lined sonic web cast by guitarists Damien Kage and Johnny Gibbons, the great track is a pungent hint of things to come with its entwining of unpredictable and dynamically varied textures.

art_RingMasterReviewMainstream comes next, a track already soaked in acclaim as a single last year. It opens on similar blues laced grooves to its predecessor, they entangling the rampant swings of drummer Scott Mason before things relax a touch as bass grooves join those of the guitars and Class’ always alluring and anthemic vocal delivery. Rising strands of creative theatre and rousing energy adds to the brewing drama and contagion of the track, the album itself increasingly gripping an already eager appetite as it heads towards an even headier plateau through the following pair of Train Wreck and Out West. The first of the two grips ears straight away through Mason’s rolling beats alone; only increasing its persuasion as flirtatious riffs and grooves joins the rapacious energy fuelling a rockabilly courting slice of bracing rock ‘n’ roll. Like Turbonegro meets The Pirates, the track has the body bouncing and appetite greedy before its successor explores a melodic and emotively enticing landscape. The song is as virulently catchy as anything on the album but takes the band into new creative scenery with its melody evocative and emotively inspired alternative rock balladry with a definite Midnight Oil feel to it.

The album’s title track strolls boldly in next, its feisty punk ‘n’ roll a rebel rousing exploit for body and spirit led by the scything beats of Mason and Class’s attitude soaked tones. The track is simply rock ‘n’ roll to lose control to, a mosh pit inciter and rebellion instigator which just needs to be the next single. Then again that can apply to numerous tracks within Mass Vendetta, as the contagion bulked 13 Days instantly proves. Riffs and hooks dig deep, anthemic vocal and energy infests, and rhythmic predation only excites as the track throws itself around like a creative dervish.

Allowing a breath to be taken, Avalanche saunters in next, sharing surf rock flames across its sultrily ambient skies and gravelly smouldering vocals. Unsurprisingly, the song also has an edge to its heart and creative nature which magnetically contrasts with the almost exotic hues and bracing emotion sharing their tempting.

Back to next single choices and the blazing romp that is Pretty Tricky makes a loud shout. Hard and punk rock meets classic and glam spiced rock ‘n’ roll, the track has feet involved by the end of its first torrent of chords and burst of rhythmic rampancy, the voice on board within the first round of the seriously addictive chorus.

Wedlock Horns brings another irresistible twist to the album, its reserved but eager entrance providing eighties rock/new wave flirtation from which Class and band swing with a southern blues infused revelry which again has restraint but stronger zeal in its lively heart. If without leading the body into bad habits, the song enthrals just like the folk punk lined Red Shield. With Class’ cleans tones as compelling as the lyrical drama and incitement, the track sublimely grips ears and imagination whilst sharing its emotive snarl.

Mass Vendetta closes with the highly enjoyable Apex, another imposing and predacious slab of infectious hard/punk rock brawling giving the album a rousing finale and the listener one last reason to hit the play button again. As in some ways expected, the band has moved on again in sound and invention but this time with their biggest leap in creative diversity and bravery yet. If it did not already, the world is about to know all about The Senton Bombs.

Mass Vendetta is released April 15th via 7Hard @ http://sentonbombs.com/store

http://www.sentonbombs.com/   https://www.facebook.com/thesentonbombs

Pete RingMaster 05/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/