Night Goat – Milk

Ever fancied being violated and aroused at the same time then the debut album from Night Goat offers a glorious opportunity. Milk is a ferocious ten track trespass of noise and intent delivered with a feral energy and dexterity which gets straight under the skin and has spirit and instincts dancing to its infernal dance.

Ohio hailing, Night Goat has earned a potent reputation and fan base across their home state with shows alongside the likes of Whores, Low Dose, False Gods, and Backwoods Payback giving further reason to steer attention upon their senses devouring, imagination peeling noise rock. With inspirations from the likes of Melvins, Sonic Youth, Neurosis, The Jesus Lizard, Unsane, Whores and many more sparking their own unashamed uniqueness, the quartet grip ears and appetite with so many aspects though it is the sanity rasping vocals of Julia Bentley which first demanded subservience. As untamed and corrupt as they are skilfully manipulative in touch and word, her tones are a twisted seduction more than matched by the backing deviancy in voice and the sonic irreverence of husband guitarist Chris and the inexorable rhythmic invasion of bassist Dalin Jones and drummer Donnie Casey. It is a cacophonous deed in sound, enterprise, and scuzzy discontent which had us, from pretty much the first breath of Milk, lustfully dangling from every hook, gleefully bruised from every rhythmic bitch slap, and lapping up its toxic nourishment.

As album opener Smearcase on Shorb quickly and eagerly showed, the Night Goat sound is a thickly flavoured noise rock bred proposition; grunge and doom essences as hungry as the punk and post punk toxins which as boldly enrich the band’s unique scuzz enveloped violation. The track gathers itself sonically initially before riffs devilishly spring forth closely followed by equally rapacious rhythms. Julia’s presence erupts at the same time, her vocals as fearsome as they are captivating; a fusion which describes the band’s presence as a whole throughout Milk. The song continues to batter and bite, Dalin and Donny an inescapable incitement as they steer the invasive pleasure.

Dirty Candy follows, luring ears with a lone calm chord into the waiting turbulence of sound and voice. Every second is as infectious as it is unbroken, a breach of mental security veined with appetite inflaming grooves and fuelled by rapacious rhythmic agility while the demonic Malachai immediately after provides its own individual scourge as it stalks the listener; a prowling threat which hollers with venomous celebration across a predacious gait and intent.

To be honest if the album had gone straight downhill from this point on we would still be urging your attention its way such its mighty beginning but no, Milk just grows and goes from strength to strength unleashing another new striking moment with Chubby Leech. The grumbling but inviting tease of Dalin’s bass insisted on ears first, its controlled inherent swing irresistible as it is joined by subdued yet still concussively threatening beats and the dual vocal ruin of Julia and Chris. The dour swing of the bass infests the whole song as it strolls across the psyche, the track erupting in scalding furies with each more intense and rousing than the last.

Jerusalem’s Lot harasses as it incites, nagging thoughts as it stirs up body and spirit, the track a savage slice of noise punk hitting the spot as hungrily as those before it with Gnarltooth Grim initially contrasting its voracity with a composed entrance equipped with Dalin’s ever persuasive grim bass tempting and Donnie’s persistently fertile rhythms wrapped in the citric toxicant of Chris’ strings. The song’s ensuing stroll is harassment and temptation combined, a two faced incitement echoed in the twin vocal molesting shared within the psyche menacing clamour which had us drooling in quick time as too did the unscrupulous rock ‘n’ roll of My Axe (Your Ribcage) which eagerly leapt on our weakened state right away after. A seductive bully never allowing a breath to be taken until it decided to spin its desire in a momentary spell of matching fever and treachery, the song sets another pinnacle in the album’s increasing collection.

The pair of Head Lice and Bonemeal keeps that trend going with thick individuality; the first emerging from an otherworldly state to seduce and haunt ear and emotions alike. Unstable and increasingly unhinged by each passing breath, the track rose to thrust a hand on favourite track honours, its every disturbed second a feast of and cause of paranoia. Even so its successor matches its glory and more with its cauldron of punk bred persecution, the infestation of sound and provocation evolving into a web of sonic incivility and magnetic craft.

The album concludes with The Greys, a slab of sonic evil that winds around and accosts the senses in a mix of uncompromising disquiet and brutality, one becoming darker and more sinister by each occultist sigh it subsequently unveils. It is a fascinating and riveting end to the release and a last unleashing of ferocity which alone commanded a swift return to the pernicious but invigorating alchemy, or should that be sonic mercury, within Milk an encounter which declared  Night Goat as one of the most exciting new encounters of recent years.

Milk is out now and available @ https://nightgoat13.bandcamp.com/album/milk

https://www.facebook.com/nightgoat13

Pete RingMaster

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

Slumlord Radio – Gonna Be A Riot

Ever since we found the dial to Slumlord Radio through their Tokyo Roadhouse Sonic Sex Castle EP back in 2013, the Grand Rapids hailing trio has had us relishing and devouring each slice of their dirt encrusted, attitude fuelled punk bred sound. Each subsequent release has only seen the band’s sound grow more striking and irrepressible and our enjoyment more intense and with the release of their new single, Gonna Be A Riot, the trend continues.

The release consists of two tracks, the voraciously rousing Gonna Be A Riot and a just as irritably animated cover of The Stooges’ I Wanna Be Your Dog. It has been four years since Slumlord Radio hit the spot and drew rich acclaim with the uncompromising, bruising, and incessantly dynamic Too Pretty For Tijuana EP, time which has seen their sound find even more belligerence, instinctive aggression, and rebel rousing enterprise as proven by Gonna Be A Riot.

Though bred on the raw seeds of punk rock, Slumlord Radio’s rock ‘n’ roll embraces essences of stoner rock, sludge, metal, and garage punk in its roar. Gonna Be A Riot epitomises the recipe behind their songs whilst casting a whole fresh incitement in its craft and devilry. The track springs an initial blast of noise before strolling through ears with a mischievous catchiness. The beats of drummer “Rattlesnake” Matt Claucherty echo that devilment in their senses rapping swing, the bass of Michael “The Westside Wolfman” Todd a matching encouragement as the dirty tones of vocalist/guitarist Tommy “Capt. Hollywood” Erickson share their grouchy goading.

With every twist adding bold unpredictability to the equally fluid stomp of the song it is the crazed enticement of the gang vocals seeing Myron (Dirty Americans/Workhorse/The Workhorse Movement), Christian Cooney (MOTO), Joseph Henry (The Holy Warheads) and Alicia Adams among the holler, which add the final infectious layer to the quickly proving irresistible encounter.

As much as the band stay true to the heart of the original, Slumlord Radio adds their particular predacious touch and prowling threat to I Wanna Be Your Dog, the song’s intent as toxic as it is submissive. It is a superb version of the classic and as its companion sees Cooney provide a guitar solo, the track also welcoming a similar contribution from Jeff Piper (Dirty Americans/Workhorse/Workhorse Movement) and a great piano teasing from Jeremiah Pilbeam who also produced the single.

Though we as a great many wish for more regular encounters with Slumlord Radio when they come around they are moments which so far have had us gripped in rock ‘n’ roll rebellion; Gonna Be A Riot one more great trigger.

Gonna Be A Riot is available now via White Elephant Records on vinyl and as a name your price download @ https://slumlordradio.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/SlumlordRadioMI/   https://twitter.com/Slumlord_Radio

Pete RingMaster 08/01/2020

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

Tarah Who? – 64 Women

Released last month but a release which should escape the attention of no one is the imagination soaked five track punk furores that is 64 Women. The new EP from Tarah Who?, the compelling encounter is an incendiary rock ‘n’ roll device which explodes on ears and senses with ravening appetite.

Consisting of Paris born guitarist/vocalist Tarah Carpenter and drummer/backing vocalist Coralie Hervé, LA based Tarah Who? has regularly tantalised and incited the senses through their releases but there is something about 64 Women which hungrily eclipses all before it. Each song is an individual adventure and trespass of imagination and enterprise united in a punk breeding and grunge/alt/noise rock nurturing. They have a bite and snarl which forces a step back and virulent contagiousness which had us jumping headlong into their devouring no bounds feared exploits.

Fair to say given our enjoyment with previous encounters including acclaimed last EP, Half Middle Child Syndrome, anticipation was certainly alive with maybe unfair expectations of something certain to spark our appetites but it took little time for opener Linger to set the first breach of a whole new ardour for the band’s  voracious assault and bold adventure. Within a breath, the guitar is winding its acidic lure around ears whilst invading them with clamorous thrusts, Hervé’s lurking beats just as invasive before the song explodes in a body jerking, attitude fuelled roar of noise and temptation. Vocals are equally as confrontational and magnetic, swinging from the threads of the continuing infectious clamour with matching voracity. Unpredictable twists and ear gripping enterprise simply add to the ingenuity and rabid flirtation of the track as a whole new level of Tarah Who? incitement unfurls.

Copycat follows, hitting its creative stride instantly with rhythms a swiftly catchy lead to the skirmish of guitar and emotion. Like a rapacious mix of Spinnerette and in some ways 4 Non Blondes, the song reveals rock ‘n’ roll instincts and punk rock belligerence. Again the duo slips into calmer but no less striking moments within the sonic urgency before Hurt shares its own mellow breath as it rises up in a radiant melodic dew with Carpenter’s tones again providing an equally enticing persuasion soaked in emotion and reflective observation. It is a gorgeous moment in the release, a haunting seduction of craft, sound, and heart with inherent dissonance in all.

In contrast but with matching captivation Umbilicus strides from its first breath with punk antagonism and devilment, but another song unafraid to tease with unexpected momentary detours within ravenous goading which only add to its might and irreverence while Numb Killer brings the EP to a close with its own wonderfully nagging virulence and enterprise. Riffs tease and arouse as hooks ignite song and pleasure alike, all the while rhythms prowling and invading with equal contagion. Add the vocal tenacity and catchy intrusiveness of its creators and you have another song within 64 Women which leaves only a desperate hunger for more.

And as a whole the EP has us greedy for the next moment with Tarah Who?, something which has a real task on its hands to outdo the band’s latest riot but easy to suspect will relish and provide a thrilling adventure in trying.

64 Women is out now via Kurukulla Records.

http://www.tarahwho.com/   http://www.facebook.com/Tarahwho   https://twitter.com/Tarahwho

Pete RingMaster 19/11/2019

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

The Domestics / Wolfhour Split 7” E.P.

With three slices of their inimitable sound each, Britain’s The Domestics and Wolfhour from Sweden join together upon a split 7″ E.P to equally ravage and ignite the senses. Both have a punk bred sound which is voraciously individual but as the rousing encounter proves they also have a common bond in uncompromising ferocity and raw discontent.

Suffolk hailing, The Domestics have never taken prisoners with their hardcore confrontation and a sound which has only become more irritable and striking by the release. The three songs on the new split prove the thought, each a ravenous slice of invasive antagonism and all a thick lure for punk ears.

A Cold, Raw System is first and immediately batters the senses in pugilistic rhythms and the vocal voracity of James Domestic. As swiftly rabid grooves and acerbic riffs surge the trespass bringing with them a host of hooks and incessancy which keenly arouses, the guitar of Ted Mint leading the insurgency alongside feral emotion sprung vocals. It is untamed magnetism from the first breath with a corrosive infectiousness just as ably unleashed by the following pair of Maximum Hell and Empty.

The first harasses as it floods the senses for a full minute, the rabid swings of drummer Simon Battery bitter pleasure alongside the equally rousing gurning of Rhodes’ bass while its successor bears an old school punk breeding to its hardcore severity. Both see Domestic spewing lyrical rancour with alluring venom as similarly toxic enterprise escapes the strings of Mint and each leave emotions inflamed and the spirit alive.

Gothenburg bred, 2013 formed, Wolfhour is a quartet which drew potent acclaim with the release of their debut album, Dead on Arrival, in 2015. Featuring members and ex-members of Anti-Cimex, Slakattack, Pi$$er and Driller Killer, Wolfhour propagate a form of Scandinavian d-beat/hardcore with its own character and antipathy. Their three scourges savaging the split’s B-side begin with Dead As Me, an unapologetic incursion of punk rock openly infectious and just as boldly quarrelsome whilst driven by rhythms which simply puncture the senses. The track easily hit the spot leaving a debilitating resonance taken up by the following and just as striking Anger Control, a track inflaming the passions with its initial psyche twisting baiting and as thoroughly by the strident holler that triggers.

Last Encore completes the release with a just as raucously barbed incitement of sound and dispute; an altercation of punk which left ears ringing in sonic tinnitus and the spirit roaring in mutual contestation.

We have a constant intrigue and appetite for the coming together of, on the surface, different bands but which share a creative common denominator. The Domestics and Wolfhour have united for one of the most thrilling in recent times, each openly unique and together the purveyors of the most striking hardcore.

With each side given its own unique artwork, The Domestics / Wolfhour Split 7” E.P. is released 18th October through Kibou Records (UK), Kangaroo Records (France), Amok Records (Germany), and Sick World Records (New Zealand). Pre-ordering available @ https://kibourecords.bigcartel.com/product/wolfhour-the-domestics-split-7 and https://kibourecords.bandcamp.com/album/the-domestics-wolfhour-split-2-song-preview

https://www.facebook.com/TheDomestics/

Pete RingMaster 11/10/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Olymp – Self Titled EP

Raw almost primal, the sound of German metallers Olymp is as intriguing as it is rousing certainly within their new self-titled EP. With its Teutonic heavy metal breeding and hungrily driving riffery described as being traditional 80´s styled, it is a proposition which demands attention yet it only tells part of the sonic picture. There is rabidity and essence of its character which is pure punk rock and an additional multi-flavoured web of flavours and imagination which only gives richer texture to its breath. It all goes to make the EP an introduction to the band that refuses to be ignored.

Formed in 2018, the Augsburg quartet consists of Butschi (guitars, vocals), André (bass), Armin (guitars), and Dommi (drums). There is little more we can tell you about the band but it is all about their first EP and that quickly gripped ears and appetite with opener Lightning Eater. Its initial bass lure simply teased attention, the quickly joining wires of guitar just as enticing as the song rose to its threatening feet though its menace is as alluring as it is predatory. It is with Butschi’s grouchy vocals and the subsequent band hollers that that punk essence arises, a voracious scent which aligns potently with the classic metal teased skilfully woven web of grooves and riffs that fuel the excellent start to the EP.

Fire And Fury is next up and begins with its own dark, imposing invitation for ears and imagination, one proving easy to quickly devour and relish as it continues to darkly stain the weave of metal flames and sonic enterprise wrapping rhythmic agility. As with the first song, its body is perpetually galvanic and chorus anthemic cajoling as once again punk and metal unite in an almost garage bred styling of both flavours.

A Celtic hue lines the beginnings of the following Shut Down, the guitar proving a web of sonic intoxication as rhythms create a contagious shuffle. Dark shadows court both at the same time, brewing an invasive hue to the subsequent punk ‘n heavy metal dance. If you can imagine a hybrid sound from a union of the punk density of The Lurkers, the melodic endeavour of U.D.O, and the metal esurience of Destruction then maybe a hint of the song’s and Olymp’s sound becomes clearer.

The EP ends with The Messenger, it’s melodic beckoning straight away wrapping around welcoming ears before riffs and hooks collude to further and increasingly tempt. From within that potent draw a controlled thrash hued swing begins its own thick enticement. Admittedly by its close it was a track which could not quite find the impressive heights of its predecessors but had plenty to hold court in ears and appetite as imagination shaped its fascination inciting presence.

Olymp’s sound as rousing as it is feels like it is only at the beginning of its journey and evolution and a fine adventure it should be for all if they build on and push the highly enjoyable and impressive enterprise within their first release; we wait in eager anticipation.

The Olymp EP is out now with limited availability @ https://olympmetal.bandcamp.com/album/olymp-e-p

https://www.facebook.com/OlympMetal/

 Pete RingMaster 03/10/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Cockroach Clan – Songs About Blunt Knives and Deep Love

Veterans of the Norwegian punk rock scene, Cockroach Clan has a rich reputation and eagerly loyal fan base but have still been pretty much a secret outside of their home borders. We are only just getting our introduction to them right now and all thanks to a certain producer, Norwegian record label Fysisk Format, and their new riotously irresistible album, Songs About Blunt Knives and Deep Love.

Formed in 1994, Cockroach Clan released debut album Roach that first year with its successor Just Say Blow! unleashed three years later with the Going Underground EP nestled in between. Equally the years have seen the band share stages with the likes of The Toy Dolls, Discharge, UK Subs, The Exploited, Cock Sparrer, Anti-Nowhere League, Vice Squad, and GBH, Cockroach Clan only drawing thick acclaim for their rousing live presence. As for their releases, all three have gained minor classic status within the Norwegian punk scene but given the chance and luck, it is very easy to see the quintet finally embraced far further afield thanks to the glorious irreverent stomp of Songs About Blunt Knives and Deep Love.

Apparently the album came about through an idea cast by producer Hugo Alvarstein (The Good the Bad and the Zugly, Raga Rockers) who told the band, “Pick some gems from your 1990s recordings and rehearse them properly. Then visit my studio and I’ll make that scrap iron shine.” That is exactly what they did, throwing in a handful of new tracks and a cover song for good measure and from the effort has emerged one of the year’s major treats.

The release opens with a cover of the Mountain Goat track, Going to Georgia. Its melodic southern drawl is soon walked through by the punk scowling of Billy Cockroach, a union which lures attention with increasing potency as the slow swing of the track infests ears. It is a great start to the album but to be honest just a healthy appetiser to the more thoroughly addictive morsels to come.

You have a Bun is next, the track almost teasing ears with its initial strum of guitars before settling into an infectious stroll already accosted by Billy’s galvanic tones. The guitars of Akke Knoff Glomstad and Simen Jeistad erupt with a grin on their strings, their craft openly sharing classic rock/metal prowess to their punk instincts. With a slither of Oi goodness to its punk ‘n’ roll, the track makes way for the rousing antics of Fantasyland. Early melodic hookery leads to contagious rioting, mischief coating every note and gravelly shod syllable as the boisterous rhythms of bassist Morten Mormone and drummer Cato Holmen pounce, the song so lively even inanimate objects share its bounce.

The immediate folkish vocal welcome of Three wishes has devilry in its deception, knowing the swift outbreak of voracious punk rock close on its heels. Nevertheless, that initial hue continues to breed a thickly alluring folk punk stomp, vocals an inescapable carousing and guitars again revelling in the skills of their holders.

If the air and exploits of the song are virulent and they are, an epidemic of temptation erupts within the following On an island and indeed its immediate successors. The track bounds in with rhythmic nostrils flared, riffs swinging their muscles as vocals roar. The keys of Hugo Alvarstein add to the incitement, the track a UK Subs-esque riot with a host of sneaky hooks and bold manipulations proving so impossible to resist.

From one of the album’s major romps to another in Crash ka-boom where punk ‘n’ roll irreverence is in full roar and hosting a galvanic vocals mix rich in its own web of hooks aligning to join those in sounds boisterously hugging their horseplay while Necktie party vigorously bobs up and down poking at its victims. Both tracks rigorously got under the skin as too the even deeper burrowing Facts on the wall where old school punk colludes with pandemic rock ‘n’ roll in a track daring you not to leap in with vocal participation and a limb swinging body.

Favourite album moment came with Gene’s got a bun too, a track originally called Barbies on Drugs on the Roach album. Its first breath brings exuberant beats, its second a groove spun hook, both irresistible and only accentuated by the tenacious sounds and rampant vocals that follow with each subsequent lungful of addiction spreading enterprise.

Dit it again with its fiery rock guitar and swinging gait gave body and pleasure another eager workout with its multi-flavoured punk romp, its successor, Believer, then springing another ridiculously persuasive and enslaving hook within its irritable prowl. Both songs just aroused the spot with the latter another which almost alone had us scurrying to acclaim the Cockroach Clan as our new punk favourite to anyone in close proximity.

Closed up by Cockroach Fandango and its anthemic croon, Songs About Blunt Knives and Deep Love is simply glorious, a release no raw edged rocker should ignore. Whether we are talking about veterans like the Cockroach Clan or fresher aged protagonists, surely punk has rarely seen more exciting days with encounters like this thick reason.

Songs About Blunt Knives and Deep Love is out now via Fysisk Format; available @ https://cockroachclan.bandcamp.com/album/songs-about-blunt-knives-and-deep-love

https://www.facebook.com/cockroachclan

Pete RingMaster 17/09/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Torchbearer – Against The Tide

The press release accompanying Against The Tide, suggested that creators Torchbearer “are ready to set the world alight their new EP.” Whether that proves the case time will tell but certainly the five track encounter is one ear gripping, appetite rousing protagonist which demands attention.

With ex-members of Blowgoat and Collapse in their ranks, the South Wales quartet unleash a hardcore/punk sound unafraid to embrace other similarly fierce and intrusive flavours yet as their new release proves, it is a fury equipped with the keenest of hooks and fuelled by ravening melodic fire. An early EP, Pass In the Night, hinted at the potential of the band, one partly realised and fully pushed to greater heights by its rousing successor.

The swiftly magnetic and seriously compelling Time Served opens up Against The Tide, sweeping guitars and robustly animated rhythms instantly descending on the senses to lay potent bait. There is no time to reflect though as within a couple of seconds the band is a raging torrent of vocal ferocity and sonic trespass within which a glorious hook teases and taunts. Andy Mansell’s vocal attack is throat raw and heart driven, the sound around matching his intensity even when pulling back to the moment when it is his ire and the prowling menace of bass uncaged by Mohannad Mamoun Abdul-Rahaman Bashir Ahmed Meckey Ghuleb predominantly alone. Courted by the psyche rapping beats of Scott Harris, that moment sparks another rousing moment as the great clean vocal tones of guitarist Ollie Gould with those of Ghuleb alongside fill the magnetic air which in turn leads to a web of metal nurtured temptation before inherent animosity unites in their thrilling endeavour.

The track is superb, a definite favourite moment within the EP but more than matched by Paralysed and its equally creative examination. A touch less venomous and intrusive but just as inventive in melodic, harmonic, and toxic adventure with Mansell again a gripping fury, the song seized ears and appetite with ease and only tightened its hold by the eventful second.

Ascender provides a calm coaxing through its body and heart, Gould’s ever magnetic chords and hooks luring ears to a waiting nest of viperish grooves and devious hooks within a reflective wrath. As its predecessor, the song is a resourceful proposition, its lures unpredictable and inviting as its breath sears and provokes; qualities just as rich within the following Drown where its caustic air and touch is intensive and animated tapestry of flavours and invention ensnaring; Torchbearer bringing another fresh and darker shade to their sound.

It is a darkness though fearsomely intensified within the EP’s closing track, also called Torchbearer. Its gentle melodic opening has an edge in sound and voice, a fateful tone quickly exposed by Mansell and the rapacious sounds around him. The song’s fractious instincts soak its riffs and temptation but each a strong lure within the increasingly intensive and toxic mood of the track. So unique and opposite to the EP’s opener and just as riveting it gives a fine end to a release which just thrilled and impressed with greater strength by the listen.

Whether Against The Tide will indeed set ablaze the music scene we will find out but it certainly gives it a mighty nudge as to the presence of the rousing force that is Torchbearer.

Against The Tide is out now as a name your price download @ https://torchbearerlondon.bandcamp.com/releases

https://www.facebook.com/torchbearerlondon/   https://www.torchbearer.life/   https://twitter.com/torchbearerldn

Pete RingMaster 02/08/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright