2Minute Minor – Snake That Ate Its Own Tail

The closing of one chapter and the beginning of another can be said to be at the heart of Snake That Ate Its Own Tail, the new album from Chicago punks 2Minute Minor. As the band suggests in its liner notes, the release can be and maybe should be looked at as two separate EPs as the first five of its tracks were written and recorded with one line-up mid-2018 and the remainder in the March of this year with a revamped set of personnel bridged by the constant presence of vocalist Wiley Willis and guitarist Bob Shields. It is a seamless change though in the context of listening to a release which only impressed and aroused from start to finish.

The initial quintet of tracks sees guitarists Virgil Lloyd and Mike Perlmutter, bassist Noam Ostrander, and drummer Zach Bridier alongside Willis and Shields. Keep Your Guard gets things underway, immediately setting down rhythms that hungrily rap at the senses, riffs springing from guitars with matching verve before it all momentarily pauses to return with greater urgency and aggression. Willis roars in the midst of the contagious trespass, mischievous hooks and grooves colouring the hardcore bred incitement as it easily sunk under the skin.

There is a definite Dead Kennedys hue to the song and many that follow yet a spice to the band’s own, if not unique, certainly individual holler as reinforced by Fallen Empire. With menace in its breath and virulence in its stomp, the song brews a cantankerous proposal which proves very easy to engage with though that depth of infectiousness is only elevated by the following Bottom Feeder. The track is pure contagion even with its voracious snarl and rapacious bursts of urgency and one of the biggest highlights of the album, though it is more than matched by the esurient rampage of Conflict Machine. As so many, it has a blink and you missed it length but makes use of every second it owns with feral catchiness and hungry enterprise.

Epic in comparison is the two and a half minute lure of Resistance ’87, a Clash flavoured roar with a swagger in its gait and spirit uplifting energy in its breath which deliciously smoulders as the song flits back to ska roots and subsequently uses them to weave another virulent escapade.

Corruption Runs Deep is the first of the songs with the band’s new line-up; guitarist Jeff Hostetler, bassist Sean Kelly, and drummer Brad Swanson completing the quintet. A enslaving bass coaxing is the spark to an attitude loaded expulsion of sound and voice but again one as infection soaked as it is defiantly belligerence fuelled while  unleashing thirty seconds of untamed and uncompromising punk rock. As swift a presence that it has, it stilled wholly gripped and aroused like all around it to set up ears and appetite for the street combat and resistance of Gentrified Ghetto; its intransigent defiance to political corruption and apathy rife just and as the sounds driving its holler are inescapably involving.

Featuring Omar of Negro Terror, Wesley Willis is next to step up, the song inspired by the singer-songwriter and visual artist who led punk band Wesley Willis Fiasco back in the nineties. With wild gang shouts and hooks that tease as they bite, the track effortlessly had the body bouncing and throat roaring before, and after the skit of Stop Spending ZAP Records Money, the indomitable presence and reflection of the album’s title track stands up to seize its own plaudits. There is a feeling of being reborn within the band with its new line-up, the album’s title reflecting that and Snake That Ate Its Own Tail, the song, echoing and exploring the circle of life and death with its inimitable punk heart.

2Minute Minor is a band which provides action packed songs and as their album proves, a big shake-up of members cannot blunt their energy or songs which are as sharp and biting as they are pure contagion.

Snake That Ate It’s Own Tail is out now via ZAP Records; available @ https://zaprecords.bandcamp.com/ and https://2minuteminor.bigcartel.com/

 https://www.facebook.com/2minuteminorhardcore   https://twitter.com/2minute_minor

 Pete RingMaster 11/07/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Kid Klumsy – Singing Our Souls

When covering their last EP, Spit Your Dummy Out, we suggested that Kid Klumsy were despite being around for a few years already “ready to grab a chunk of the limelight”. That they did with that particular release which just grabbed body and spirit like a rebellious puppeteer. Now they are getting greedy and going for even bigger rewards and rightly so for new offering, Singing Our Souls, is one seriously rousing incitement of the band’s uproarious punk ‘n’ roll.

Released on the UK band’s highly anticipated appearance at this year’s Rebellion Festival, Singing Our Souls hosts another six slabs of the Coalfield outfit’s voracious rock ‘n’ roll. Mischief and defiance are as ripe as ever within their bold and tenacious bodies of punk bred sound, Kid Klumsy stamping their own inescapable individuality with increasing vigour and relish throughout another outing which just had us leaping with over enthusiastic rigour.

Straight away we were being reeled in by the devious lure of guitar as opener Mr Right Man waited to pounce and that it did with zeal as rhythms bounded in and a devilish hook colluded with similarly virulent riffs. In no time the familiar tones of WEAB, also known as the front henchman at Dirt Box Disco, were stirring up their own side of belligerence, accosting and inciting with relish. A glorious scowling bassline just completed the epidemic of temptations fuelling song and listen, gang vocal persuasions only inflaming already eager engagement in the track’s virulent antics.

Not to be outdone, Slob thrusts its body forward with matching prowess and gusto next, the guitars weaving a web of catchy endeavour as riffs and bass snarled. The immediate sing-a-long enterprise of the band grabbed instinctive involvement, the song almost preying on an inherent weakness to resist such anthemic arousal.  With muscles and catchy imagination swinging, the song devoured inhibitions before Dislexic Munkiz stormed the breathless remnants with its own rabidly catchy rock ‘n’ roll leaving exhaustion grinning from riff harried ear to ear. Ferocious in breath, devilish in touch, it just epitomises the Kid Klumsy creative audacity.

Love Is A Battery Field entangles ears next, initially with a guitar wire before breaking into an animated surge of predacious riffs and hungry rhythms, a fusion just as tenacious as fresh hooks and vocal baiting erupt around it. The bassline cast by Alistair in the midst of it all simply infested the passions being ably matched by the guitar incitement of Carl and Greg within the dynamic punches of drummer Jamie as vocals roar. Together it made for one fiercely persuasive attack though soon eclipsed by that of She’s A Fu*k. Alistair again leads the temptation, his lone hook at the start teasing eager ears before being ablaze with the fiery motivation of the guitars. With metal forged steel in its prowl and old school punk in its bearing, the track proves addition sparking rock ‘n’ roll with increasingly inventive temerity.

Maisy’s Song concludes the pleasure, its punk rock weave a swift and persistent urging on ears and body relentless in its nagging whilst relishing its success. It is a rousing end to another release from Kid Klumsy which effortlessly demanded and received unbridled attention; we sure to be merely one of a hefty crowd corrupted by its goodness upon its release, starting with those at Rebellion.

Singing Our Souls is released August 1st through STP Records. http://www.stprecords.co.uk/

Upcoming Kid Klumsy dates:

Friday July 5th – Mayhem At Micks Leicester

Saturday July 6th – Macclesfield Nags Head

Sunday July 14th – Coalville, The Vic Bikers Pub.

Friday July 19th – Leeds Brudenell (with Sham 69)

Friday July 26th – Stafford Redrum

Saturday July 27th – Sutton In Ashfield New Cross Pub

Saturday August 3rd – Carlisle The Brickyard (with The Skids, acoustic set)

Sunday August 4th – Blackpool Rebellion Festival

Friday August 30th – Basingstoke Irish Centre

Saturday August 31st – Southampton Shooting Star

Saturday September 28th – Newcastle, Northumbria Uni (North East Calling)

Saturday October 12th – Lancaster John O Gaunt.

Saturday October 26th – Manchester Ritz (with The Macc Lads)

Sunday November 3rd – Brighton The Prince Albert

Sunday November 24th – Bedford Esquires (Holy Molys)

Thursday November 28th – Nottingham Rescue Rooms

Friday December 13th – Abertillery Dolls House

Saturday December 21st – Manchester Star & Garter

Sunday December 22nd – Sheffield Corporation

Monday December 30th – Birmingham Hare n Hounds

Tuesday December 31st – Coalville The Vic – NYE Party

https://www.facebook.com/officialkidklumsy     https://kidklumsy.bandcamp.com/

Pete RingMaster 02/07/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Spunk Volcano and the Eruptions – Double Bastard

This month sees the release of the fourth album from UK rockers Spunk Volcano and the Eruptions and like with all its predecessors just the news of that had us drooling in anticipation of its sure to be boisterous antics. Like so many others, the rousing exploits of the band to date ensured such eagerness and we can confirm right here and now no one will be disappointed. We will not announce Double Bastard the band’s finest offering to date such the thrills and spills within the likes of Injection, Shit Generation, and Not Wired Up Right before it and that is ignoring their equally rousing EPs, but it is right up there and insistently increasing its right to be announced top dog by the listen.

Ever the prolific songwriter vocalist/guitarist Spunk Volcano, also like drummer Maff Fazzo of Dirt Box Disco revelry, has filled the belly of Double Bastard with twenty five slabs of the band’s inimitable multi-flavoured punk ‘n’ roll. Expectantly his songs swing hooks like a predatory angler whilst lustfully ensnaring ears and participation with lung rousing choruses and virulently anthemic hollers and as ever their hearts are inspired by the intimate, social or simply everyday items and other sources of fun. But predictability and echoes of past shenanigans never rear their heads across the double album only mischief, craft, and pleasure.

With so many tracks within its bulging walls let’s get the fillers out of the way first…..OK that’s done! Truly every moment with Double Bastard is an essential incitement of rock ‘n’ roll with Teenage Teenagers the first to exploit an admittedly already in waiting appetite. From its first breath the song is an infectiously eager clamour, vocals leading the manipulation as Fazzo’s beats and Joey Strange’s throaty bassline direct its catchy stroll. The guitars of Tom ‘G Force’ Batterbee and Stew Page weave their own melodic temptation into the familiar SV and the Eruptions mix but one wholly individual proposition.

Swiftly the deliciously rapacious lures of Marvellous Manifesto and the rhythmically animated and sonically devilish Fixtures and Fittings infested eager ears with their voracity in heart and tenacious catchiness. The instinctive rock ‘n roll of each track is just as bold and persuasive before Plasticine playfully prowls ears and imagination with the barely diminishing nostalgia and lure of its inspiration, a song as memorable as it is devilish in presence.

It feels mean to pick out certain songs over others as all simply pushed the album to further greatness but among the contagion loaded and diversely flavoured likes of Shit Excuse, Edging on the Side of Caution, TCP, and Spare Room, persistent peaks were set by the sinisterly sauntering, deviously compelling Super Dooper and the voracious trespass of Independent Fire. The metallic edging of the hardcore bred first is accentuated in the punk/thrash toned foray of the second yet both reveal so much more in their sound and flavouring than that suggests,.

Similarly Red Rings with its engulfing melancholy and the irritable uproar of Road Rage brought new heights to the release just as potently matched by the pandemic melodic rock temptation Old Wives Tales with Fazzo‘s skills alone inescapable bait, the track bringing CD 1 to a magnificent close.

In many ways CD 2 shares a more feral side to the band’s sound, their punk instincts gloriously festering in the raucous hearts of tracks just as infectious and variously flavoured as their album companions before them. Death or Glory and Sucking Up quickly instil that feeling, the first track just muscular in every riff and heavily landing beat, biting hooks and rowdy vocals adding to its punk ‘n’ roll rampancy before its successor bares its old school punk snarl and seventies pub rock disorder like a brawling mix of Eddie and The Hot Rods, The Damned, and Motorhead.

The nagging prowess of Here Come the Zombies proved pure manna to personal tastes, the track building on the just as irresistible punk brawl of Dirty Pictures before it, the latter the definitive epitome of the band’s sound from day one and its perpetual evolution ever since; like a whiff of every release is embraced in its own particular bedlam.

Inevitably some tracks burrowed under the skin further than others, the insatiable almost savage onslaught of Personality Black Hole as mercilessly addictive as Inbred with seventies punk irreverence flooding its hooks is carnally seductive and Scared of Needles is effortlessly manipulative on spirit, body, and vocal chords.

Even so the likes of the 99% with its varied weave of melodic rock, the antagonistically anthemic Sick of Saying the Same Things, and the pop punk tunnelling rock ‘n’ roll of Daft as Brushes ignited the passions with no trouble or resistance.

The album is brought to a close by firstly the hard rock/pop punk infested melodic bellow of Blinded and then You Think Your Rock n’ Roll But You’re Not, one final punk ‘n’ roll blitz on ears and inhibitions which both fell in seconds for its cacophonous contagiousness.

Double Bastard is prime yet wholly fresh Spunk Volcano and the Eruptions and just another stomp with the nefariously enterprising quintet we can only loudly recommend.

Double Bastard is released via Avenue Recordz on 21st June.

https://www.facebook.com/spunkvolcano/   https://spunkvolcano.com/   https://twitter.com/SpunkVolcano

Pete RingMaster 03/06/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Battalion Zośka – Self Titled

Like all instinctive punk fans seventies punk and eighties hardcore will always fuel the passions no matter what major moments which have and will continue to follow that defining moment in time. There is no doubting that it is the same for Philadelphia hailing Battalion Zośka; all the evidence raising and roaring aggressive irritation within the band’s self-titled debut album. But there is no mistaking that its 13 slices of sonic and defiant belligerence are far more than echoes of inspirations and other’s glories. The album is a fresh breath and striking protagonist embracing the seeds which fired up us all decades past.

Formed in 2018, Battalion Zośka features members of hardcore punk outfits Violent Society and Combat Crisis and their sound provides a politically charged trespass as aggressively catchy as it is emotionally dissonant. Rhythms unapologetically bite as riffs harass and curse alongside similarly tetchy vocals, the hooks and enterprise conjured just as fractious and irresistible within one magnificent, rousing debut.

The quintet of Pat, Jim, Johnny, Jonas, and Milo set down the tone and character of the album from its first breath, opener A Country Divided rhythmically teasing attention before being entwined in alluring wires of guitar. The song soon hits its stride, threat and disobedience lining every note and subsequent syllable as inbred catchiness equally shapes its rousing incitement. With a great whiff of Angelic Upstarts meets The Lurkers to it and featuring the first of two guest appearance from Black Flag/ Misfits guitarist Dez Cadena, the track lone tells you all you need to know about the band’s sound and album, both swiftly compelling assaults.

Arm Everyone follows bringing an even thicker dissent and trespass to the senses; its hardcore breeding hungry and ill-tempered in its uprising while the album’s title track thrusts forward with rampant muscle and uncompromising resistance as an Exploited meets UK Subs hued subversion arouses. It is fair to say that together the three tracks had ears and appetite enslaved but the third truly sealed the deal.

Next up, Heather was no light weight in that union either, its strands of melodic wiring a delicious itch in the rich infectious nagging of the track. The song brings another guest to the release in the ever potent craft of Neil Newton, the Angelic Upstarts guitarist also giving fiercer flaming to Moral Coward two encounters later, that song a dirtily cantankerous seventies ripe invasion. In between the equally outstanding Island of the Lost Souls stamped its commanding authority on ears, every rhythmic swing an enticing bitch slap and chord a caustic tempting as it builds towards a chorus which just had body and throat bounding forward.

The subsequent assails of Oi! By Numbers and Sold & Bought did nothing to lessen the album’s grip; the first, an undisguised attack within a familiar yet unique sonic pillory with its successor a virulent Crisis-esque transgression. Each simply pummelled the spot before being rapaciously matched by the esurient assault and arousing of 80’s Kid, the song sharing the second ear grabbing appearance of Cadena.

A pop punk essence helps blossom even greater temptation within Once Again, its untamed Vibrators meets Adicts breeding an anthemic tonic for the spirit while the equally galvanic rallying of No More and Scum of the Streets with its feral indeed predacious stalking and sonic hounding only accentuated the impressive and inspiring body and disagreement of the album.

Completed by the carousing punk ‘n’ roll of The Beer Song, the Battalion Zośka album is simply punk rock at its most honest, uncomplicated yet imaginatively bred best. Expect to hear a lot more of the band as once its full-length stirs up a punk uprising of attention and lusty support they will have little choice but to submit to demand.

The Battalion Zośka album is released this June via Violated Records; available at http://www.violatedrecords.com/ and https://battalionzoska.bandcamp.com/album/battalion-zo-ka

https://www.facebook.com/Battalionzoska/

Pete RingMaster 03/06/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Plastic – Drink Sensibly

Last year saw UK outfit Plastic earning strong attention and praise with debut album Here, There Is No Gravity. It was a release though which did not gather the momentum expected to break the band upon major recognition. Taking its predecessor’s attributes to a whole new level the band now has the Drink Sensibly EP to tempt recognition, an aim such its bold adventure it is hard seeing having similar difficulties.

Midlands based, Plastic brew an ear grabbing roar from a fusion of punk, grunge and metal. It has already proven a tempting mix especially courtesy of the band’s first album but has become a far more imaginative and contagious persuasion within Drink Sensibly. There is a richer blend of sound and enterprise in the writing and sound of the three tracks making up the EP which for us puts the definitely easy to devour Here, There Is No Gravity firmly in the shade.

Approaching the subjects of mental decline and self-loathing, the EP opens up with Munchies and immediately commands indeed demands attention as strikes of guitar spring the punchy but melodic tones of Matthew Awbery. Just as quickly the song breaks into a swinging canter, its rhythms knees high as it strides through ears with a swagger soaked in punk fuelled virulence. A noise punk clamour accompanies its emotive defiance, every rhythmic swipe and sonic jab pure virulence as irritability brews, springs, and adds to the rousing tempest.

It is an outstanding start, probably for us the EP’s finest moment but one seriously challenged by its companions starting with Lovesick. The second track wears its grunge breeding more openly but again a new indie pop catchiness soaks the magnet jangle and rousing clamour Plastic create. With a Nirvana meets Green Day spicing to its contagion, the song had the body bouncing as eagerly and high as its own melodic jounce; joyfulness lining every essence surrounding melancholy spun emotive reflection.

Spit completes the pleasure; the final song a noise rock twisted slab of grunge punk throwing its rhythmic limbs around like a spinning dervish as riffs and hooks harass and tease. Feral yet deviously conjured in ear tempting texture and turn, the track is pure punk ‘n’ roll flirtation which had ears groaning at its and the EP’s too soon a passing as fingers raced to press play all over again.

If the first Plastic album sparked your appetite, Drink Sensibly will simply inflame a fresh hunger while surely enticing a whole horde of newcomers to one increasingly exciting and thrilling band.

Drink Sensibly is available now.

https://www.facebook.com/plasticbanduk/

Pete RingMaster 29/05/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Eat Dirt – Death Is Death

Emerging in 2016, it is fair to say that UK punks Eat Dirt had us fully aroused within a year through their uncompromising exploits within a self-titled debut EP. Annoyingly a subsequent EP managed to evade us but now the band’s first album has descended on our radar and once more their particular riot, defiance, and anger has us fired up.

Death Is Death is an uncompromising roar of dissent fuelled hardcore lined punk rock; an angry trespass bursting with the frustration and ire not forgetting punk goodness which marked that first encounter with Eat Dirt. Yet it has its own character of sound and flavour, one the band admits is inspired by the “Epitaph Records 1990s roster and the Tony Hawks Pro Skater soundtrack.” Across its fourteen swift assaults on ears and its predominant themes of death, the album bites and incites as it violently stirs and infectiously arouses; numerous textures and styles keenly embraced in its punk bred ferocity. It makes for a release which is quickly recognisably Eat Dirt but with an element of unpredictability which keeps you on your toes and the band as one of British punk’s compelling protagonists.

With only a few of its tracks reaching the two minute mark, Death Is Death swooped by in no time but provided twenty five minutes or so of undiluted vitriolic pleasure starting with opener Make Peace.  Instantly a crazed infection loaded hook gripped ears with rhythms soon bitch slapping the senses as vocals hollered with equally contagious enterprise and aggression. Instantly with an Eat Dirt song you realise there are no frills involved, no tricks or deceits, just passion and aggression from a true punk heart but it does not mean they lack the cutest hooks or devious enterprise; the album’s first fury soaked incursion outstanding proof.

Almost before the listener can take a second breath, the brilliant starter shoots off and Worms Of The Earth bursts in. Its machine gun rally of rhythms splintering bone as guitars wire their incendiary intent around the fragments; the song quickly unleashing its own feral demands and ferocity. A whiff of Gallows and early Bronx infests the tempest, manipulative antics just as prevalent as the assault rivals its predecessor in firing up its victim before the multi-flavoured Come And See steps forward to tease with a lone guitar lure. Appetite for its coaxing is soon rewarded by a senses stalking wall of sound and vocal causticity, the track continuing to hound ears rather than savage them to fine effect.

Moribund swings its fists next but every raging blow is wrapped in melodic almost pop punk incited catchiness while the album’s title track revs up its engines to prowl and ravage ears with its punk metal/hardcore inflamed hostility straight after. Anthemic in its rancour and inventively crafted hook equipped design, there was no escaping breeding a lusty appetite, one just as easily held by the following pair of Punk Rock Con and Dog. The first is a punk ‘n’ roll assail of riffs and rhythms, each as barbarous as the next as they stirred up emotions and participation while its successor picked at the remains left by the first with rapacious rhythmic teeth and sonic toxicity around vocal dissonance, melody nurtured hooks only accentuating the reed sparking punishment.

The opening rhythmic shuffle of Night Terrors quickly foraged under the skin as the album continued to impress, the song swiftly building on its infestation with its virulent swing and punk clamour; The Beast emulating its prowess with its own contagion loaded collusion of punk and rock ‘n’ roll exploits before Bones uncaged scars and venom within its similarly involving punk contamination. All three left greed for more in their wake even if maybe they did not quite inflame the senses as numerous predecessors within Death Is Death.

The album’s final quartet of tracks ensured its stirring standards were just as high and potent, Out of The Fire rampaging with almost salacious hostility and emotive discord with Ballad in turn spurting tension through its creative nostrils as jarring rhythms align with harmonic lures and almost carnal enterprise.

As the physical punk ‘n’ roll carousing and vocal inciting of Spend Your Life and the cunningly infectious Pull Out brought it to a thrilling close, the final track especially irresistible, Death Is Death simply demanded and got the quick decision to go all over again. It is one of those albums which proved really hard to tear oneself away from; Eat Dirt once more proving themselves as one formidable and fiercely enjoyable lawless uproar.

Death Is Death is out June 2nd via Bearded Punk Records; available @ https://eatdirt.bigcartel.com/product/death-is-death-pre-order

 

http://www.listentoeatdirt.com   https://www.facebook.com/eatdirtpunk/

Pete RingMaster 01/06/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Parasitic Twins/ The Carnival Rejects – The Parasitic Rejects EP

The Parasitic Rejects EP sees the coming together of two of the UK’s most striking ear shredding prospects in a compelling trespass of a split release. On one side preying on the senses is York hailing crust/hardcore punks The Carnival Rejects and on the other the doom punk ferocity that is Parasitic Twins. Together they create a feral proposition as fierce and intimidating as it is captivatingly thrilling.

Consisting of guitarist/vocalist Jamie Robertson, bassist/vocalist James Briggs, and drummer Fi Rowntree, The Carnival Rejects offer up three punk intrusions for their part in The Parasitic Rejects EP. Disengage is first, its gentle melodic lead deceitfully concealing the antagonistically contagious punk flurry to follow. Happily grabbing a pop punk catchiness to its irritable breast, the song romps and stomps as it shares a skilfully woven holler of melodic and sonic tempestuousness.

Seize Control is their second incitement and immediately worms under the skin with its contagious belligerence and rousing incitement where biting beats unite with grumbling bass as the guitar wraps its caustic yet magnetic wires around the senses, vocals only accentuating the song’s virulence.

The Carnival Rejects finish their contribution with To The Bone, two minutes of feral punk rock with a potent Angelic Upstarts meets Discharge snarl to its causticity.  United, all three tracks prove punk rock is as irritable and rousing as ever, a declaration just as ripe across the trio of intrusions alongside them.

Still reaping attention and acclaim through their debut EP of less than a year ago, All That’s Left To Do Now Is Sleep With Each Other, Hull’s Parasitic Twins reinforce their reputation as one fearsome and captivating proposition with their part in the EP. The duo of vocalist/guitarist Max Watt and drummer Dom Smith unleash senses molesting swarms of doom, punk, and grindcore manipulated into singular uncompromising furies. The first on the EP rises up as Autopsy, the track immediately scalding ears before its inherent rock ‘n’ roll instincts infiltrate its equally blossoming sonic toxicity. Vocals similarly share no respect whilst inciting ears and appetite, metal bred throes adding to its salacious predatory prowl.

Feel Nothing similarly devoured and sparked the senses, rhythms pummelling with determined predation as raw grooves entangle song and listener alike. As its predecessor there is something akin to a corroded blend of Napalm Death and Pig Destroyer to the track though this only seems to inspire its own individual dissonance.

The pair completes their contribution with a cover of the Babylon Zoo classic, Spaceman. Released a handful of weeks back as a single with all proceeds donated to The Campaign Against Living Miserably (CALM), the track finds itself dirt clad and infested with the cacophonous tension and disharmony which marked their well-received EP. Even so it manages to retain its catchiness even as it despoils the senses to bring one very easy to recommend release to a rousing close.

The Parasitic Rejects EP is out in association with Man Demolish Records @ https://mandemolishrecords.bandcamp.com/album/the-parasitic-rejects

https://www.facebook.com/thecarnivalrejects/   https://www.facebook.com/ParasiticTwinsBand/

Pete RingMaster 30/05/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright