Voice Of Addiction – The Lost Art of Empathy

This started out as a piece on one track from their new album, an introduction for us sent by Voice Of Addiction which was so persuasive the whole album had to instead be the focus of attention. A multi-flavoured punk rock roar from the Chicago based band, The Lost Art of Empathy is one rousing confrontation which has the body bouncing and spirit leaping with its boisterous escapades from start to finish.

Becoming a potent part of the Chicago punk scene through their explosive live shows, Voice Of Addiction have been stirring up ears and venues since 2004, with a handful of releases and a host of compilation appearances marking their way. At their centre is vocalist/bassist Ian “JohnnyX “ Tomele joined upon the latest Voice Of Addiction stomp by drummer Dennis Tynan, guitarist/backing vocalist Jake Smith, and backing vocalist Luke Ostojic. Listening to the treat that is The Lost Art of Empathy, it seems impossible that the band is not a more widely recognised proposition within the global punk scene; a prospect their new album just might trigger.

With politically and socially challenging lyrics matched by a sound which bites however it comes across it’s twelve tracks, The Lost Art of Empathy opens up with that first song heard here. Rustbelt instantly coaxes ears with a spicy hook which is soon joined by a grouchy bassline and jabbing beats. Together they surge at the senses, developing an infectious urgency as Tomele’s vocals with equally potent backing swiftly capture the imagination. In no time the romp is igniting ears and appetite, its drive towards one irresistible chorus just as manipulative as everything from hardcore, pop and classic punk seems to get involved.

The following Dead By Dawn has a rawer manner in tone and touch but is equally as contagious with athletic beats and the grumbling bass shaping the assault from within which a collage of vocals and the clang of guitar entice. Smith spins a web of sonic endeavour as unpredictable as his riffs are rabid before Unity brings its own belligerent defiance to the party. Tomele’s bass again whips up the appetite, its magnetic prowess matched by another potent mix of vocals across the band.

Petty Schemes swaggers in next with a knowing mischief before bounding into a snarling and keenly eventful melodic punk blaze while the soulful Corporate Pariah evolves into a ska punk canter before which feet and hips are leaping as thoughts are provoked by the tracks incisive words. Both songs hit the spot, the second especially persuasive before Lockwood uncages its sonic spiral and subsequent punk contagion to eclipse both. Across the album bands such as NOFX, Bad Religion, and Angelic Upstarts come to mind, this track especially hinting but there is no denying that Voice Of Addiction embrace all into their own individual furor.

The street punk fuelled I Can’t Breathe invitingly brawls with the listener next, the band merging US and seventies UK punk for its tenacious attack and triumph; a success matched by the visceral punk holler of Everything Must Go. It too is a collusion of styles within the punk banner; alternative and math rock flirting with hardcore tendencies to enthral and arouse.

Through the caustic yet melodically hued tear up of Ad Nauseum and the equally uncompromising and enticing Eviction Notice, the album continues to grip attention even if the songs do not hit the same level as those before them; a plateau Alcorn Queen definitely flirts with straight after with its Mars Volta meets Converge like adventure and animosity. The track is superb, stealing best track honours at the death though there is still time for the acoustic brilliance of Are We Even Human Anymore to shine with Tomele vocally luring ears like moths to a flame.

The Lost Art of Empathy is a moment in time not to be missed; indeed all punks should make it their cause to share its compelling sound as too the presence of Voice Of Addiction. America is catching on, now it is our turn around the world.

The Lost Art of Empathy is available now @ https://voiceofaddiction.bandcamp.com/album/the-lost-art-of-empathy-2

https://voiceofaddiction.com/    https://www.facebook.com/voarockers/    https://twitter.com/VoArockers

Pete RingMaster 09/08/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Spunk Volcano & The Eruptions – Not Wired Up Right

Always a dirtily feisty and rousing mix of punk and raw rock ‘n’ roll, we can announce that Spunk Volcano & The Eruptions has managed to breed an even more ravenously incendiary fusion of both within their new and third album Not Wired Up Right, a proposal living up to its title in character and intent whilst stomping around like a bull elephant in heat.

Having set their 2017 off in fine style with the aggressively raucous Ram Raid EP, Spunk Volcano and co devilishly finger  its raw virulence and fresh whiff of bruising rock ‘n’ roll to a new aroused state within Not Wired Up Right. It has been a riotous clutch of years since Dirt Box Disco guitarist/co-songwriter Spunk unleashed his own project with the aid of drummer Maff Fazzo, bassist Deadbeatz Chris, and guitarist Ste Lingard; a time kicked off in striking style with a self-titled EP and an insatiable persuasion only perpetuated by debut album Injection that first year, 2014, its successor Shit Generation two years later and the aforementioned Ram Raid EP a few months back. Each release has had the body stomping and a defiance driven attitude roaring; a triumph unsurprisingly just as rampantly repeated with Not Wired Up Right.

With its current line-up completed by guitarist Tom ‘G Force’ Batterbee and newest addition in lead guitarist Stu Page alongside vocalist SV, and fellow DBD members Maff Fazzo and Deadbeatz Chris, the band gets straight down to it with contagious antagonism and bare arsed rock ‘n’ roll through the album’s opener and title track. Not Wired Up Right instantly preys on ears with its corrosive metal bred riffs, a hungry tide of guitar soon driven on by the senses battering swings of Fazzo as SV unashamedly roars. It is a minute and a touch of hook lined punk manna, a storm of balls swinging rock ‘n’ roll swiftly backed in listener manipulation by Nobhead. With a title like this you just know at some point you will be bellowing in zeal fuelled unison with the song and that point comes within thirty seconds of a vocal and riff set up breeding eager anticipation for that incoming moment. The infectious lure of Chris’ bass courts the unspectacular but seriously compelling riffs of Batterbee in the meantime; together laying down the landscape over which the melodic scythes of Page lure and of course the moment to leap on board with vocal energy to match that of SV erupts.

The following Shutdown offers its own collusion of punk and metal lined rock ‘n’ roll next; prowling riffs and biting rhythms a predacious incitement matched in success and intrusive magnetism by a litter of hooks and vocal unity. Standing at the fore SV is the trigger, his tones a belligerent yet welcoming cause to get on board with whilst the bass simply seduces the appetite with its devious groove. The track rocks the joint with ease, bodies and speakers rocking just as tenaciously through the more corrosive presence of Gatecrash and in turn by the seriously irresistible of Fuck This For A Game Of Soldiers. The first of the two lacks some of the sparks of its predecessor, such the former’s inventive bent, but still has full command of again throat and physical participation with its dirty punk ‘n’ roll while the second simply snarls and invades the senses with its primal hearted, melodically catchy antics. Initially a predator in sound and invention, it evolves into another SV anthem which chews up the listener whilst stirring them into an outpouring of unbridled energy. Not Wired Up Right features a special guest in Ginger Wildheart on guitar and backing vocals on three tracks and it would be no surprise if this superb dirt-fest of a romp was not one of them such its unsterilized gutter nurtured rock ’n’ roll.

Next up, Your The Bastard has the same kind of seeding in its punk clamour, a Motorhead meets Grumpynators fuelling which makes its minute and a handful of seconds irrepressible and irresistible before Out Of The Blue reveals to its inescapable tempting a poppier nature contaminated with the band’s ear grabbing stag rock ‘n’ roll. Across all tracks Page adds a broader styled enterprise ranging from melodic metal, punk rock, and of various rock ‘n’ roll seeding but here afforded a clarity which really shines alongside the band’s infection loaded harmonies and chorus. His presence has certainly brought a new fresh air of flavouring to the band’s sound without defusing its distinctive character and presence, Dementia Hurricane another prize example within the release; an encounter which if you are not boldly hollering with its chorus by its second round, deafness of worse may have descended.

Smack In The Teeth is just the same, an eye balling prospect of getting battered which of course the senses do with the rhythmic antipathy and caustic riffery backing up SV’s threat. You can just imagine venues chasing fear into surrounding streets as band and fans inevitably vocally unite in the song’s virulent incitement live.

The album concludes with two of its major highlights amongst nothing but peaks. First up steps Knuckledusters & Scars with an initial surge of rancorous riffs and stabbing beats which alone ignites the passions; metal, heavy rock, and rapacious punk rock soon entangling in its delicious steely tempest with emotional rabidity and primal imagination just as prevalent in its gloriously uncompromising yet still ridiculously catchy howl. Somehow though it still gets eclipsed by the simply captivating Purely Medicinal, a song brilliant in its resourceful simplicity, inspired in its captivating croon as SV opens up heart and suggestion within a subdued but oh so potent web of sound.

It is a final two minutes epitomising the creative strength, new adventure, and instinctive epidemic like catchiness of the band’s sound. Sometimes when review after review of a band’s releases carry nothing other than drooling praise you almost set out to look for faults. Spunk Volcano & The Eruptions relish that challenge and from the first seconds never allow anything other than ardour to once again arise with us.

There are two bands which are making British punk n roll the most exciting it has been in a long time, maybe ever been, and both embrace the headstrong creative instincts of Spunk Volcano and indeed Maff Fazzo and Deadbeatz Chris. Enough said!

Upcoming live dates:

Sun August 6th – Blackpool – Winter Gardens (Rebellion Festival)

Sat August 19th – Cambridge – BOAT HOUSE

Sat September 30th – Northumbria Students’ Union (NE Calling)

Sat December 23rd – Manchester – Star & Garter (STP Xmas Show)

Fri December 29th – Birmingham – Venue TBC

 

Not Wired Up Right is released August 3rd on STP Records; for more info

http://www.spunkvolcano.co.uk    https://www.facebook.com/pg/spunkvolcano/   https://twitter.com/SpunkVolcano

Pete RingMaster 01/08/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Bloodclot – Up in Arms

Pic Rick Rodney

Bringing together the highly recognised talent of certain individuals from various acclaimed bands does not always guarantee something special but in the case of Bloodclot, it feels a given such the instinctive union between its collective. The band is the coming together of Cro-Mags vocalist John Joseph, former Danzig and Murphy’s Law guitarist Todd Youth, drummer Joey Castillo formerly of Queens of the Stone Age, Danzig, and Eagles of Death Metal, and Mondo Generator frontman and ex- Queens of the Stone Age, Kyuss bassist Nick Oliveri. Together they confirm that given with debut album Up in Arms, a physical and lyrical roar of hardcore defiance.

Unleashing twelve ravenous slices of punk rock with more inescapable hooks than found in Leatherface’s pantry, all fuelled by raw irritability at the state of the world today, Up in Arms is a crowd uniting battle cry. It fuses familiar essences with the fresh appetite and invention of a quartet seemingly destined to come together at some point. Everything about it is as organic as it is rabid, as challenging as it is rousing; taking no prisoners but rewarding those who it devours time and time again.

The album’s title track crashes in on the listener first, springing from an invasive sonic mist with a slavery of guitar and rhythmic predation as Joseph pokes and stirs the senses with voice and word. Castillo’s beats are rapier sharp and imposing, Oliveri’s bass carries an infectious brooding whilst Youth’s riffs and hooks ensnare across four eventful minutes.

It is an ear gripping, appetite inflaming beginning which only kicks up a gear with the following Fire, a belligerent brawl of punk ‘n’ roll instantly chaining ears with a  virulent hook as rhythms jab and incite. If the Angelic Upstarts was merged with Sick Of It All, this could be their anthem while Manic infuses an even greater physical psychosis and unforgiving attitude to the torrential gait of its predecessor in its own addictive multi-flavoured rumble.

Through the sonic call to arms scourge of Kill the Beast and the Dead Kennedys scented Prayer, new twists of sound and invention force themselves through ears, each with a virulent strain of spiky hooks and body twisting grooves, while their successor has things bouncing like a dervish. Siva / Rudra is a contagion of enterprise as cantankerous as it is exotically seductive marked, as all three, by Oliveri springing basslines as funky as they are carnal. Alongside, Youth’s riffs and grooves come as primal as they are compelling whilst Joseph squeezes every ounce of uncompromising adventure and emotional incitement out of tone and syllable.

Soldiers of the New Babylon locks metal and punk together in its prickly vent, a testy proposition woven with nagging riffs and a magnetically throbbing bassline before Kali throws all those attributes into an insatiable maelstrom of punk rock temptation, taking best track honours along the way. Barely seeing the one minute mark, the track is irresistible but swiftly rivalled by the crabby assault of Slow Kill Genocide, the catchiness moment within Up in Arms and arguably the most choleric.

Pure punk rock truculence shapes the breath-sapping antics of the following Slipping into Darkness, Oliveri spawning his most addictive moment within the album bound in the searing flames of Youth’s guitar as vocals and beats vent their animosity with Life as One backing up its triumph with its mercurial but always commandingly imposing tapestry of quarrel and imagination.

The album is closed by You’ll Be the Death of Me, a slab of rock ‘n’ roll taking big chunks out of the senses as it excites with its Lard-esque espionage. Addiction has never been more vicious and seductive within three and a half minutes, certainly in recent times, as that spawned by the outstanding finale to one of the year’s biggest treats so far.

Produced by Zeuss (Hatebreed, Revocation) and mixed by Kyle McAulay at NRG, Up in Arms transcends being just a great release from another so called ‘super group’, it has given hardcore a fresh new breath and snarl which we can only hope is the first of many gales from Bloodclot.

Up in Arms is out now on Metal Blade Records across most stores and @ https://bloodclot.bandcamp.com/album/up-in-arms

https://www.facebook.com/bloodclotofficial/   https://www.instagram.com/Bloodclot2016/

Pete RingMaster 26/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

4 Past Midnight – Battle Scars & Broken Hearts

Over a career expanding over a decade or more there are moments when a band openly dips below their previous heights. That blip has yet to come with Scottish punks 4 Past Midnight since raising their middle finger back in 1989 and is not on the horizon yet as their new album, Battle Scars & Broken Hearts, proudly declares. Offering fifteen slices of the band’s uncompromising yet relentlessly infectious punk rock, the album holds no major surprises in a departure from that instinctive sound but easily refreshes an already established appetite for their militant roar across its tenacious body.

The Glasgow quartet’s sixth studio album among numerous singles, EPs, and compilations, Battle Scars & Broken Hearts sets out its agenda straight away with Do it Now. An opening scuzzy chord opens the gateway to a surge of rapacious riffs and punchy rhythms through which the distinctive lead vocals of drummer Peter McCartney gravelly growl. A delicious hook adds its bait from within the roar too, reinforcing the track’s instinctive punk ‘n’ roll contagion with addition inciting traits.

From one great track to another as For Life strolls in next upon the swinging beats of McCartney, the guitars of Tam Bowman and Fred Stevenson uniting in a calmer but no less boisterous invitation. As vocal chords quickly join in with McCartney’s, hips are bound in the groove of Stevie Goldsack’s bass, its grumble a flirtatious tease within the chest beating declaration of the track before being a similarly compelling lure within the drama clad, politically scathing Politician. Bowman again weaves ear grabbing melody lined hooks as Stevenson’s riffs crawl over the senses, they and the rhythmic prowess of Goldsack and McCartney gaining in aggression and adrenaline as the song hits its finale.

Through the more controlled yet predacious growl and narrative of the UK Subs-esque Guilty and the brief instrumental shuffle of Tonight, variety and further pleasure consumes ears, both tracks anthemic in their keenly individual ways though not as imposingly as 4pm On Tour (4pm crew pt4). The fourth instalment of the band’s rebel rousing, spirit sparking anthem, it swiftly declares there is no point trying to resist its instinctive persuasion to roar your head off and physically stomp especially through its virulent chorus; the track leaving the body and heart elevated in a way only 4 Past Midnight can.

The sultry melodic hues of Bowman’s guitar immediately ignite next up Hope, Fear, Pain, Love, Desire if not lingering around long enough when seducing ears across its contagiously muscular canter for personal tastes while Survive just blisters the senses with its energy and rapacious tone. Though neither quite hits the levels of songs before them each brings hooks and invention which resourcefully leaves a smile on lips before being fully eclipsed by the chest beating might of Let’s Go. For any band, punk or not, wanting to learn about creating organic but purposeful anthems sure to whip up the hearts of their fans, this fevered soundtrack to any uprising has it all; 4 Past Midnight continuing to deliver such incitements album after album at times almost song after song.

Its bold corralling of emotions and spirit is followed by the rough and ready insight and equally tone of Alone, where a blend of old school and modern street punk with a whiff of hardcore for good creative measure is unleashed, and in turn by the Oi infested I Hate My Life. The first of the two again hits the spot without inflaming it leaving that to its ravenous successor and the magnificent Day After Day within which Goldsack’s bass brews up a primal almost carnal grizzle in its tone and virulence. The goodness does not stop there as Bowman takes the imagination into a melodic metal nurtured detour before things get salaciously punk again.

Accompanied by the piano elegance of someone simply called Vivian, McCartney shows his melodic vocal side to surprise and enthral as Whithered Roses next serenades.  Written by the band with Clare Bowen, it is a magnetic beckoning subsequently leading into the waiting jaws of the track with the bass again finding a bestial hue to its growl as hooks sink deep within the passions as McCartney is back to his sandy throated best with matching rhythmic dexterity. The track is superb, rock ‘n’ roll to whole heartedly give energy and zeal to.

The album is completed by firstly The Reason, a song hinting at pop punk instincts whilst roaring with a flavoursome mix of rock, and lastly through the gnarly and seriously catchy blaze of Can Anyone Hear Me; a plaintive call which grabs attention on every level. Together they provide a grand finale to another mouth-watering and increasingly thrilling encounter from 4 Past Midnight.

It is hard to pick the best album from the band, though there is no doubting that they are only increasing their impressive reputation as not only Scotland’s best punk band but one of the UK’s most essential propositions with each release, but for sure  Battle Scars & Broken Hearts is right to the fore of their biggest punk triumphs to date

Battle Scars & Broken Hearts released through Hedgerow Records (UK) on Vinyl and on CD via the band, Combat Rock Records (France), and Bosstuneage Records (UK),with its digital store @ https://4pastmidnight.bandcamp.com/

http://www.4pastmidnight.co.uk/    https://www.facebook.com/4-Past-Midnight-215468135159655/    https://twitter.com/4pastmidnight

Pete RingMaster 26/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Reckless Intentions – Lights EP

UK outfit Reckless Intentions might be primarily tagged as pop punks but as their debut EP shows, they have an instinctive devilment and creative belligerence which reveals there is much more to their aggressively magnetic sound.

Embracing inspirations from the likes of Green Day, The Clash, and Foo Fighters through to others such as All Time Low and Moose Blood, Reckless Intentions host varied flavours in their music which is clearly audible and potent within the Lights EP. Equally, the Brighton hailing quartet bring an individual character to their songs and presence which is maybe still slightly more potential than realisation but is already helping shape them into a prospect which stands out.

Formed in 2016, the band concentrated scene last year on establishing themselves on the south coast music, and successfully so, before linking up with Alex Gordon at Brighton Electric Studios to work on and record their first release in the sprightly shape of Lights. With its five boisterous tracks, the EP quickly shows it has the intent and energy to stir up richer attention the way of the foursome but more so the imagination to make Reckless Intentions a rather exciting prospect.

The EP opens with the outstanding Ghost Town, a song swiftly making a successful claim for best moment and most potent lure within Lights. With a great slightly off-kilter indie rock revelry to its punk rock tenacity, the track like a mix of Asylums and The Wildhearts, things are swiftly bold and sweaty as the swinging beats of  Josh Woolnough scythe through the nagging riffs and spiky grooves of guitarists Matty Halliwell and Lewis Horsley respectively. The energetic vocals of the former equally inject an energy and fresh identity to the encounter, it all colluding in an adventurous and unpredictable mix driven by the alluringly throbbing groan of Laurence Burkitt’s bassline. In no time body and vocal chords are enlisted by the arousing antics of the song, its dynamic and almost bitchy start the perfect introduction to Reckless Intentions.

Stitches, the band’s latest single is next, its melodic bait and harmonic enticement quickly flirting with ears. The hooks of Horsley beckon within a more familiar temptation of sound; the track openly sharing All Time Low meets Brand New like essences within its infectiously swinging exploits. Halliwell again makes a potent vocal lead, his tones giving the track something more unique than other pop punk outfits though something its enjoyable sounds arguably lack a touch. Nevertheless, the song hits the spot before evolving into the short instrumental of the EP’s title track, a piece which neither detracts or adds to the overall strength of the release but keeps an appetite for its adventure on board.

The following Outcast only enriches the fun though, its instant Smash Mouth like swagger led by the ever flirtatious bass easy to get hooked on prime bait with vocals again a strong pull at its core. Becoming more punk ‘n’ roll with every lively beat and niggling riff, the song growls at and flirts with the listener, all the time brewing a pop catchiness which has hips enlisted in quick time. The song also reveals yet another hue to the band’s songwriting and sound, a variety exposed once more by closing song Home. With his own suggestive piano melody alongside, Halliwell plaintively croons from the speakers; melancholy lining his words and fingers. Alluring ears with ease, things only become more intense and potent as the band eventfully bring their emotion and craft to the reflection; the song catching fire with pop punk catchiness caught in an emotion soaked blaze.

It is a fine end to an ear pleasing first delving into the Reckless Intentions adventure, the first of many more highly pleasurable unions if they build on the undoubted potential and fun of Lights.

The Lights EP is out now across most online stores.

http://www.recklessintentions.co.uk   https://www.facebook.com/recklessintentionsuk/    https://twitter.com/recklessband_uk

Pete RingMaster 18/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Katalina Kicks – Cold / I Want The World

There are some bands which simply kick ass, some that try and miss, but just a few who grab it first, give an over familiar squeeze, and then give it a firm boot with their sound. Katalina Kicks has persistently been in the camp of the latter over the years and definitely stake their place with their new double A-sided single. Taken from their acclaim gathering new album Vices, the twin attack of Cold / I Want The World is a mix as aggressive as it is seductive, as agitated as it is thoughtful, and across both tracks relentlessly magnetic.

Consisting of band founding original of 2010 in vocalist/guitarist Ian George with bassist Nadia Silverstone and drummer Jase Wilkinson alongside, Katalina Kicks have just come off a successful 20-date UK and European tour in support of Vices and have prepared a summer of matching busyness and attention with their new single.

Two distinctly different styles of sound and imagination, Cold swiftly and firmly steals the show with its irritable ingenuity. Featuring grime artist GT Solo, the track instantly has ears enticed with dirty riffs and punchy beats, their punky nature an instinctive arousal of our personal appetites for attitude driven dirty rock ‘n’ roll. It is a spiky mix swiftly reinforced by the militant vocal expression of George backed by the spatial sheen of Silverstone’s melodic tones. Taking a biting swipe at the British Conservative government and their austerity cuts, the song is a belligerently potent incitement in word and sound embracing a new voice in the shape of the self-penned words and vocal dexterity of South London lyricist GT Solo. Quite simply irresistible stuff, the track is punk rock raising a middle finger at the establishment with craft and a lingering rock ‘n’ roll snarl.

I Want the World is a much calmer proposal though with its own underlining bite as melodic and classic rock merge in a clean cut but still enjoyably dusty roar. The clang and melodic prowess of the guitar is courted by the moody yet infectious shuffle of the bass, Wilkinson’s beats swinging with forceful intent across their catchy union. Maybe less striking at first compared to its team mate, the song only grows to increasingly tempt and persuade with every eager listen.

The single makes for a highly eventful and resourceful doorway into the diverse sound of Katalina Kicks, a potent glimpse of their bold escapades. Whether it is their finest moment, we cannot say not having heard all their adventures but it and especially Cold is one of the best moments, song wise, to be heard this year.

July 21st sees the release of Cold/I Want the World.

http://www.katalinakicks.com/    https://www.facebook.com/katalinakicks    https://twitter.com/katalinakicks

Pete RingMaster 19/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Suicide Generation – 1st Suicide

Basking in its own dirt and scuzz, the Suicide Generation sound is a fervid rush of trashy goodness which ensures the band’s new album is an unmissable treat for all fans of uncompromising rock ‘n’ roll. The bastard son from a salacious collusion between members of Atomic Suplex, The Cavemen, and Trash Culture, the London based punksters feverishly graze ears with a raw wash of garage punk/rock from start to finish within their debut full length 1st Suicide, sucker-punching the senses along the way with rapacious hooks which just worm into the psyche like a virus.

Supposedly coming together “to fill in for cancelled support slots across the Tuesday night London gigging circuit”, Suicide Generation has quickly become an eagerly devoured proposition on the capital’s live scene with their chaotic and explosive shows; their attack and intent as unpredictable as their sound. Recently linking up with Dirty Water Records, the band is now gunning for bigger attention with 1st Suicide, a release which swarms through ears like a plague of buzzsaw carrying harpies.

The album descends on ears with opener Suicide Generation first of all; one minute and a handful of seconds of clanging rock ‘n roll led by the exasperated tones of frontman Sebastian Melmoth. Every aspect of the track is as muggy as it is concussive but veined by intricate melodic acidity which winds seductively around the fuzzy antics of Emily Crowler’s rhythm guitar. It is a potent, enticing smog of sound swiftly out powered and shone by Why Can’t I Play With You. The second track needs mere seconds to lay down heavy seductive hooks within a similarly intensive weight of sound. A Cramps-esque hue smokes vocals and sound alike, Suicide Generation finding a gripping rawness which even their assumed inspirations would have eagerly embraced as the song flirts and dances with garage rock and punk irritability.

Set Me On Fire has a certain air of The Reatards to its similarly crotchety rock ‘n’ roll straight after, guitars scything across the senses as rhythms rumble with tenacious zeal, while Nora aligns a fifties smoulder with seventies punk waspishness for its individual stomp. Both tracks have the body and imagination eagerly throwing discord loaded shapes before London Blues strolls along with dirty blues punk falling like drooling saliva from every note and syllable. An open psychosis oozes through voice and music alike, its mercurial heart unpredictable and constantly in flux as it captivates and assaults the listener.

They are instantly involved with the brawling escapade of Love Is Hate straight after, the track a beguiling animus of sonic and emotional testiness enjoyably harassing the senses with the clamour of guitars and the spite of rhythms. It is a mix also fuelling next up Little Mama, the track resembling The Phantom basted in rock ‘n’ roll filth whilst sending the hips into an anxious frenzy.

That same instinctive primal sound infests Evil Everywhere and once again the band twists it into something distinct within the release and other propositions; the track a hyperactive dirt ball of sound and energy leading into the closing treat of You Love Me. Initially prowling ears with a devious glint in its creative eye, the band’s punk instincts soon ignites in a high-strung blaze of sonic causticity and wired verbal dexterity driven by rhythms which just seduce attention whether the track smoulders or roars.

1st Suicide is a collection of songs which just please themselves with a similarly arrogant creativity, in turn their brashness and swagger turning on ears and an ever keen appetite for unpolished rock ‘n’ roll. The Suicide Generation is here and openly ready to tear up your world.

1st Suicide is out now on Dirty Water Records @ https://suicidegeneration666.bandcamp.com/releases and http://www.dirtywaterrecords.co.uk/shop/#!/Suicide-Generation-First-Suicide-album-download/p/86922972/category=2749844

https://www.facebook.com/suicidegeneration666/

Pete RingMaster 12/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright