The Scabby Ghouls – Self Titled

Though horror punk is never slow in providing new excursions to venture six feet under with, of which many bring great memorable pleasure, there have not been quite so many in recent times to truly get the teeth into with sanguinary lustfulness. The Scabby Ghouls and their self-titled debut album is one such incitement, a collection of pulp horror driven devilry to bless any meeting of The Monster Club.

Hailing from Omaha, The Scabby Ghouls have dug up a sound as pop contagious as it is horror bloodied and punk driven; a mixture which if not on the major side of unique is fully immersed in the fresh and irresistible within their first full-length.

The album claws out from its mausoleum with opener Body Surfin’, immediately enveloping ears in dark mischief carrying drama as guitar lures mix with the voluptuous throb of the bass. The rolling beats of Nathan Christensen swiftly join and steer the incursion on ears and imagination as too the instantly alluring tones of vocalist/rhythm guitarist Denise Hazard. In no time the web of temptation becomes an appetite embroiling bedlam of creative mania entangled in the equally unhinged grooves and wires of guitarist Louie Hazard. Like a disembodied hand haunting Christopher Lee, the song stalks and fingers with increasing relish and like the big white lingering below its surface has no qualm about taking a more than welcome bite.

The great start is only escalated by the song named after the band. It too prowls the listener, checking them out before springing to its bold feet and instantly indulging in a rapacious saunter. With an essence which reminds of UK outfit Trioxin Cherry at times, the track is equipped with inescapable hooks and teasing riffs matched in temptation by vocals and the great throbbing bait escaping Alex Steffens’ bass. It all comes with a feral lining which is even more pronounced in next up Midwest Zombies, yet a raw wildness which only seems to enhance the instinctive virulence and catchiness of tracks let alone the individual prowess of the quartet.

Black Dahlia Bombshell is next up and soon eclipses its predecessor with its blood-lusting stalking and the subsequent rousing incitement of its viscera driven chorus. The track is pure horror punk wickedness resembling something inspired by the song books of early Misfits and Frankenstein Drag Queens from Planet 13 but quickly established as individual to The Scabby Ghouls before Dreaddy Krueger unleashes its own viral sonic blood-letting shaped by inescapable infernal hooks, rapacious riffs, and rhythms which twist the body like a puppet.

As potent and manipulative as both songs are, their ability to trespass and make the body do their bidding pales to the dexterity of the EP’s final and best tracks. Road Ragin’ is simply glorious, an insatiable surge of tarmac tearing, contagion loaded rock ‘n’ roll with a chorus which infests vocal chords within its first few words. The incitement musically is just as devious and enslaving while album closer, Knife Fight, is an old school punk nurtured holler taking in all-comers with voracious irritability to its infection loaded rumble.

Anticipation for the next endeavour from a band is nothing new or particularly rare but not often it comes with a side line of drool like that already escaping the wait for the next spook animated horror show from The Scabby Ghouls.

 The Scabby Ghouls album is out now via Out-O-Tune Records; available @ https://thescabbyghouls.bandcamp.com/album/the-scabby-ghouls

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 Pete RingMaster 21/03/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Headsticks – Kept In The Dark

If packaging decided best of year choices UK quartet Headsticks will have top honour sealed with new album Kept In The Dark. The surround to its music is simply glorious, easily the best art and presentation seen in many a year by these hungry eyes and embracing music just as mouth-watering it all makes for one irresistibly thrilling offering.

Checking out their previous album, Feather and Flame, three years back we suggested that Headsticks had confirmed themselves “as one of Britain’s most irresistible and essential punk ‘n’ roll adventures.” Well, while assuring you that nothing has changed, the band has revealed that previous success was just the beginning of bigger things; bold triumphs now presented by its successor. Parading their folk ‘n’ punk instinctive sound in all its glory, the new release is Headsticks at their boldest and most boisterous but equally with its richer kaleidoscope of styles and flavours it has equally nurtured its most defined character and individual adventure yet for the biggest pleasure.

Emerging late 2012, Stoke on Trent hailing Headsticks had built and earned a potent reputation through a rousing live presence and acclaimed debut album Muster in 2014; success only accelerated by the following Feather and Flame. That growth will only be escalated again by Kept In The Dark; the band’s finest moment to date as their socially and politically charged songs relish another striking spurt in diversity, imagination, and dramatic adventure.

The new release opens its bumper load of songs, with no filler in sight, with When. From its first breath, the punk ferocity and infectious incursion of the track gripped ears with vocalist Andrew Tranter masterfully steering the rousing trespass. Devious hooks and manipulative rhythms do their persuasive deeds with relish within a song which has echoes of bands such as The Vibrators and Angelic Upstarts to it.

The impressive start is immediately matched by I Love You and its ska natured saunter. As mentioned variety in the Headsticks sound is enjoyably no new thing but it is certainly at its most eager, bold, and fluidly unpredictable within Kept In The Dark. With a Ruts-esque lilt to its stroll, the song had little trouble in getting under the skin and luring participation from body and voice before Peace Or War erupts in a roar of punk ‘n’ roll carousing where the forceful but virulent swings of drummer Tom Carter collude hungrily with the brooding tones of Nick Bayes’ bass as the wiry melodic tendrils of guitar from Steven Dunn align with his rapacious riffs.

The following pair of Cynical and Mushrooms reinforce the album’s instant adventure and prowess; the first a seducing of acoustic punk with irritation fuelling its breath and its successor a mischievous ska pop swinging incitement easily leading hips and vocal chords into action. Both easily got under the skin but still are eclipsed by the superb Mr ‘I’m Alright Jack’. Bred on classic fifties rock ‘n roll, the track is a lure of swerving rhythmic hips and melody enriched rockabilly chords around riveting vocal incitement.

Through the rock driven reflection of My Own War, an easily relatable declaration, and It’s a Matter of Time with its equally melancholic intimacy and Americana twang, enjoyment only built while the hard rock flavouring of Smoke and Mirrors proceeded to add further diversity to Kept In The Dark.

Both aspects continued to blossom as classic metal and street poetry respectively shape the temptation and strength of What If They’re Right and Out of Fashion before Family Tree pounced on social and political unfairness and exploitation upon a reggae borne canter and All of the Trees captivated with its acoustic/punk rock dexterity.

The final trio of The Song For Songs Sake, When the Sun Turns Black, and Baboon Shepherd close the album out as masterfully as it began. The first is a contagion of folk rock irresistible to ear and body, the second a compelling apocalyptic rumble of voice and insinuation; each as magnetic as the other leaving the third to sign off the album with its eleven minute dub infused homage to the career and life of South African footballer Sam Shabangu and the aligning times and experiences of Tranter. It is a track which brings grin and reflection amidst nostalgia across a lengthy landscape which never outstays its welcome.

Headsticks continue to be one mightily engrossing and thrilling proposition which, as Kept In The Dark proves, just get better and better.

Kept In The Dark is out now via STP Records; available @ http://www.headsticks.co.uk/shop.html  or http://www.stprecords.co.uk/page2.htm and other online stores.

http://www.headsticks.co.uk   https://www.facebook.com/headsticksmusic   https://twitter.com/HeadsticksMusic

Pete RingMaster 05/03/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

AM Taxi – Shiver by Me

As much as craft and imagination guides our choice of musical pleasures and favourites it is instinct and organic connections which truly steer reactions and loves, both fully behind our swift and unconditional ardour for Shiver by Me. Not that the creative invention and agility of AM Taxi and their release falls short, it all going to make for one rousing slab of punk ‘n’ roll, but quite simply it is an album which just knows what our personal wants and pleasures are and feed all with tenacity.

The successor to We Don’t Stand A Chance, the Chicago band’s well-received 2010 Virgin Records released debut, Shiver by Me provides a romping, stomping fusion of old school punk and alternative rock with modern pop instincts. It snarls as it bounces, reeking defiance as it unleashes virulent catchiness across eleven boisterous encounters, all the while leaving ears and appetite greedy for more. It bursts into life with a bang and never leaves a want for anything thereon in.

Saint Jane provides that explosive beginning, cavorting rhythms linking up with a teasing guitar jangle as vocals wait to add their lively energy. Hitting full swing as guitarist Adam Krier adds his lead tones, the track is an insatiable pop punk temptation springing seventies punk with indie pop feverishness. There was no escaping its manipulation of body and vocal chords nor the swift ardour sparked and carried on by the following Harpoon. Echoing its predecessor, the track is just as persuasive and irresistible vocally as it is musically, Krier and the band’s backing effortlessly getting under the skin just as the swinging beats of Chris Smith, the brooding but eager grumble of Jason Schultejann’s bass and the melodic shenanigans of Jay Marino’s guitar alongside those of Krier. With devious hooks at every twist and turn, the track is viral contagion to which personal hollering was inevitable.

Next up Movie About Your Life proved to be no less of a puppeteer either, its acoustic strum and persuasive handclaps teasing to the great vocal snaring quickly in tow with melodic intimations lining the captivation as it bubbles up while Swim Before You Sink (Short Time on Earth) straight after uncages bold imagination brewed rock ‘n’ roll which fed every want in the personal book. Both tracks are simply outstanding continuing the impressively rousing roar of the album already in full flow.

Fighting in Cars is relatively calmer but still a spirited proposition with its lithe rhythms and melodic web while L’ Patron provides an ear romancing saunter with a fire in its belly and passion in its heart. Each of the pair hit the spot with their openly individual proposals; success fully matched by the indie rock hued punk pop canter of Stuck Around. The hook springing and vocal prowess of the band, let alone an inexhaustible rhythmic agility, is persistent across each track within the release and no more tantalising than here.

Through the Clash kissed Brandy Don’t Let Me Down and the reflective and skilfully dramatic Minute Alone, the album is as compelling and striking as ever, both slices of pleasure matched in creative kind by the soul nurtured Shaken Over You. Sam Cooke is named by the band as one of their influences, an inspiration breeding this treat, a song elevated further by a Jam-esque whiff.

The album closes with Warsaw Blues, a gentle slice of melodic intimacy which maybe did not inflame the passions as those before but left a certain pleasure and appetite for more of its almost smouldering temptation.

Shiver by Me is one riveting adventure from start to finish and AM Taxi a band no punk or rock ‘n’ roll fan should skip by without giving at least a curious listen.

Shiver by Me is out now @ https://amtaximusic.bandcamp.com/album/shiver-by-me and also available on limited vinyl this April through Mutant League Records.

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Pete RingMaster 11/02/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

DeeVer – You Need This

If like us you were taken with Only Enemy, the recent single from UK rockers DeeVer, we can tell you and you will be excited to hear that it was only a mere teaser to the rousing goodness which makes up the band’s debut album. You Need This is a collection of contagion and imagination loaded tracks that burrowed under the skin in quick time; quite simply it is rock ‘n’ roll which more than backs up the title it roars under.

Formed by ex-Inglorious guitarist Wil ‘Billy’ Taylor in 2017, North East hailing DeeVer has bred a sound blending the rapacious essences of punk, metal, and hard rock. It is a mix of the familiar and hungrily fresh with the latter driving its enterprise and tenacity. Alongside the band’s frontman is the rhythmic prowess of bassist Phil Appleton and drummer Dan Higgins as well as the stirring exploits of fellow guitarist Stevie Stoker. Through previous singles they have garnered references to the likes of Foo Fighters, Shinedown, and The Senton Bombs; easy to understand comparisons even within what is an individual character and holler to the band’s, definitely in the case of You Need This, irresistible sound.

The album opens up with Fire At Will, a song which swiftly turns the tap to the ridiculously infectious virulence which flows through the DeeVer songwriting and album. Eager riffs lay the first lure, quickly joined by muscularly swinging rhythms and soon after the potent tones of Taylor. Already that instinctive catchiness is infesting song and ears, steering the twists and turns springing from the craft and voices of the quartet. It is a commanding start to the release casting the anthemic quality of the band’s sound quickly taken up by the following All Come Running.

The outstanding second song easily had ears gripped through the opening throaty throes of Appleton’s bass, the subsequent punk hued stabs and staggers escalating the persuasion. Soon finding a brooding groove, the song evolves into a bold and voracious croon built on wiry strands of guitar and mellower melodic coaxing; every second offering up new imaginative temptations before making way for the creative drama and exploits of Alright. Again riffs and grooves align as the track swiftly rises to its stomping feet, that organic catchiness once more flooding the blossoming adventure and hearty roar of the encounter to quickly seduce ears and appetite.

The subsequent creative manoeuvres of Back Down and Waves only back up the potent and captivating success of the album so far; the first a classic rock nurtured offering with steel in its touch and a snarl in its voice. Though not quite hitting the spot as those before it, the song effortlessly had us bouncing before its successor sparked a similar reaction with its poppier rock ‘n’ roll. There is something very familiar to the track especially within its chorus but an essence hard to pin down with its boisterous and at times rapacious deeds.

Parachute is next up bringing a blend of alternative metal and melodic rock which again had body and vocal chords quickly engaged while the voracious Only Enemy simply continued its thick persuasion as a single as another major highlight of the album. With a feral metal breeding to its punk attitude loaded roar, the track instantly gets down to business throwing rhythmic punches amidst predacious riffs. Again Taylor’s vocals draw keen involvement as easily as the whole band’s enterprise; it all bedding in the imagination and lusty appetite in quick time.

Through the equally hungry if relatively more restrained We Are and the rock pop canter of Jim, pleasure instinctively bubbled with the closing I Am The Cavalry sending the album out on another peak with its new wave meets pop/hard rock shuffle. With calm verses leading to crescendos of wolfish almost untamed sonic contagion, it is a glorious end to a similarly striking release.

When peaking at the band’s past singles we suggested that DeeVer “has all the armoury and daredevil to make a major dent on the British rock scene.” You Need This shows we may just have underestimated their impact in saying just a dent.

You Need This is out now across most online stores with hard copies available @ https://deever.bigcartel.com/products

https://www.deever.uk/     https://www.facebook.com/thisisdeever   https://twitter.com/thisisdeever

Pete RingMaster 11/02/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Beth Blade And The Beautiful Disasters – Show Me Your Teeth

Show Me Your Teeth is a romping stomping slab of hard rock; a tenacious roar of defiance, attitude, and hungrily rousing rock ‘n’ roll. It is also the new album from UK rockers Beth Blade And The Beautiful Disasters proudly hollering out all the reasons why the band is riding a tide of success and plaudits.

Fan and critical acclaim are no strangers to the Cardiff bred quartet with previous debut album, Bad Habit, luring high praise and attention. Around and following its success, Beth Blade And The Beautiful Disasters have shared stages with a host of major artists such as Electric Boys, Dan Reed and Danny Vaughn among a great many and appeared on the KISS Kruise last November with the likes of KISS, Ace Frehley, Bruce Kulick, The Dead Daisies, Vintage Trouble, The New Roses as well as played Monstersfest with Dan Reed Network, The Dead Daisies and Tygers Of Pantang. The last year also saw the band concentrate on writing and creating Show Me Your Teeth, an offering which as potent and enjoyable as its predecessor was, leaves it waving from its wake whilst suggesting 2019 will be even busier for the foursome.

Show Me Your Teeth builds upon all the striking elements of that first album with relish whilst bringing its own individual enterprise and adventure to the fore. Swiftly it reveals the growth in the writing and imagination of the band and their prowess in casting boisterous riffs, inescapable hooks, and anthemic old school classic rock nurtured temptation; this fronted by the electrifying and hearty tones of Beth Blade.  It is a bolder affair with a breath suggesting the band has completely lost the shackles of trying to please and impress people and just go with their own hard rock passions and instincts. Certainly inspirations such as Halestorm, KISS, and Black Stone Cherry can be heard but Show Me Your Teeth embraces all familiar hues to its very own vociferous heart and roar.

The album opens with the outstanding Secrets and fair to say as its opening lung full sees Blade fronting up ears we were hooked. From there with the fuzz of guitar for company, she continues to coax the song to its feet, an air of menace surrounding its emergence before erupting in a contagious, attitude driven infestation of punk and hard rock. That raw edge continues to fuel its confrontation and rapacious catchiness whilst vocal harmonies seduce around the stirring tones of Blade. The track soon proved irresistible, increasing its enslavement as a delicious predacious bass growl and devious hues of unpredictable imagination became more vocal.

Such the first’s rousing and impressive tempting, the album’s following title track had a hard time to match its presence but with a teasing blues lilt, melodic wiring which just wrapped around eager ears, and the already predictable vocal dexterity and talent of Blade here was little to relinquish full attention to before Give It All You’ve Got shared its old school spiced rock ‘n’ roll. As the previous track, there was a strong familiarity to the encounter but equally an energetically passionate heart within just as open craft which manipulated and scooped up an already seriously contented appetite.

There is something of an early Pretenders-esque scent to next up On And On at times which combines well with its blend of nostalgic and hungrily fresh enterprise while You And I is a web of guileful hooks and melodic adventure around vociferously candid vocals which easily set another lofty peak in the album’s landscape.

From that incitement of controlled yet raucous persuasion, melodic calm accompanies emotive intimation hugs ears within successor Crazy. It is a simmering heart though as flames erupts around reflection and melancholic beauty. The track never erupts into a full blaze but boils over with stirring cunning as it too sets a major highlight within Show Me Your Teeth before I Ain’t Got Nothin’ (If I Ain’t Got Rock N Roll) provides everything you would expect from its title as it swiftly pulled our rocker instincts and animation into play.

Across the likes of Lost In You and Into The Light, the album only continued to tighten its hold even if neither track quite flattened the inhibitions of song and listener as those before them. Even so both are a tantalising and thickly satisfying fusion of melodic wine and barely restrained rowdiness which just hit the spot though the following 1974 soon eclipsed both with its virulent stroll and creative temptation. Its sound unsurprisingly echoes the rock ‘n’ roll era of its title’s decade but adds mouth-watering hues of punk and power pop which take it to another level of greatness.

Who Do You Love Now? with its own multi-flavoured mix of styles and decades is just as expert in persuasion and adept at casting a spell of enterprise and sound; another seriously captivating moment set down and one more than matched by the muscular, predatory almost grumpy stomp of album closer Jack And Coke. Inescapably enticing riffs and grooves collude to enslave ears, each seemingly knowing personal wants in rock ‘n’ roll whilst the song growls with infectious savvy and anthemic irritability.

As it started, Show Me Your Teeth ends with one of its most inspiring and thrilling moments and with so many more in between it is an album which we can only forcibly recommend. It is classic and hard rock, it is punk and pop rock all bound into one roar; quite simply rock ‘n’ roll at its and most electrifying best.

Show Me Your Teeth is out January 25th.

https://bethbladeandthebeautifuldisasters.com/   https://www.facebook.com/BBATBDofficial/  https://twitter.com/BBATBDofficial

Pete RingMaster 26/01/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Felons – Violent Society

Offering up three short bruising shocks to the system, Violent Society is the new EP from UK quartet Felons; an encounter providing all the reasons why punk rock still gets our juices going like no other genre.

Southend based Felons have a sound which scowls like a mix of Crass, Angelic Upstarts, and The Varukers. It is old school hardcore punk bred but anything other than a dated trespass on ears and enterprise. Already this year the foursome of vocalist Jay, guitarist Josh, Bassist Lew, and drummer Pike have uncaged their debut EP, Creeps; an encounter receiving strong support and plaudits. Violent Society springs another threesome of attitude driven trespasses which will surely follow suit in success and in taking Felons to a broader and eager landscape of attention.

Who’s In Debt To Who? opens up the Dan Bazan recorded and produced EP, the track following its initial welcoming hook with a furious holler of middle finger raised defiance and observation as imposingly infectious as it is unapologetically irritable. Whipping the imagination back to the late seventies/early eighties whilst stirring up its own modern individuality, the track effortlessly incited inner dissent whilst stirring an ever eager punk appetite with its irreverent exploits.

The following Pacing offers up a mere 47 seconds of sonic subversion but  a fleeting time as untamed as it is instinctively manipulative and all infernal goodness. The dual vocal attack inflames an already organic dissonance, a combination spewing fractious incitement within an unbridled tetchy attack which needed little time, which is lucky considering the length of the trespass, to ignite ears and appetite.

The release closes with its title track; Violent Society slowly, in comparison to its predecessor, enticing ears with a bass grumble as the guitar flirts from time to time before breaking into a deliciously nagging stroll with a Disorder-esque glare to its choleric breath. In no time it announced itself as the best of three irresistible infestations of sound and attitude, reinforcing its claim by the second

Violent Society is our introduction to Felons and, with hindsight and a just as enriching meeting with its predecessor to support its declaration, installs its creators as another of punk’s new exciting perpetrators giving reason as to why the genre can still incite and arouse like it did way back.

Violent Society is available now @ https://felonspunx.bandcamp.com/releases as a name your price digital release and on CD.

https://www.facebook.com/felonsband

Pete RingMaster 14/11/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Healthy Junkies – Delirious Dream

Two years on from the album Box Of Chaos outshining its impressive predecessor The Lost Refuge, which had started the trend by eclipsing the band’s debut Sick Note, UK punksters Healthy Junkies have again repeated the feat with their fourth album. Delirious Dream is a collection of tracks embracing the band’s broadest kaleidoscope of flavours yet over a punk ‘n’ roll landscape; a 15 song strong release which is for sure their finest moment to date keeping expectations clueless and the imagination enthralled.

Recorded with Brian O’Shaughnessy and mastered by Pete Maher, Delirious Dream is the songwriting and sound of the band at its boldest yet most intricately woven. With the founding duo of vocalist Nina Courson and guitarist/vocalist Phil Honey-Jones tapping into their most imaginative depths yet alongside the rhythmic prowess of bassist Dave Whitmore and drummers Pumpy and Adam Lewis, Healthy Junkies have created a new magnet of sound which needs mere seconds to demand attention through album opener When All Is Said And Done.

Instantly the track is strolling eagerly through ears with a rich melodic hook amidst eager rhythmic bait, all the while keys adding their intimation. Courson’s ever alluring vocals quickly join the mix, adding elegance and harmonic radiance to the earthier breath of the song. With drama soaking every note and syllable, theatre intensifying across the host of twists and turns making up the simply outstanding punk ‘n’ roll incitement, the track immediately sets the high creative bar and striking character of the release.

This Is Not A Suicide brings its own exceptional roar of sound and enterprise straight after. Dirtier and grumpier than its predecessor and driven by attitude fuelled riffs and senses biting rhythms, the track sets its own particular pinnacle within Delirious Dream. Nagging grooves and garage punk spicing also add their incitement to the bracing trespass before the even tempered rock ‘n’ roll of Juliet’s Call saunters in. Like a gothic rock nurtured punk inspired collusion between Siouxsie and The Banshees and In Evil Hour, the track is pure virulence.

The band embraces more hard rock like hues for next up Johnny Demented, its raw sonic haze magnetically tempered by Coulson’s angelic tones. The song did not quite raise the roof as its predecessors in appetite and the passions here yet from start to finish it is a full captivation raising the ante as its holler and breath erupt across its eventful body.

Through the infectiously tenacious croon of Some Kind Of Girl and Ghost Without A Soul with its shadow draped atmosphere, riveting sound and adventure abounds with unpredictability and rapacious enterprise while All Talk brews an emotive entanglement of old school punk and classic rock in its own individual recipe of temptation. All three tracks easily grip ears and appetite though the delicious punk instincts and pop flirtations of The Sound Of My Guitar outshine all. The track is Class-A addiction spurning late seventies kissed new wave/punk rock slavery as ripe with hooks and celebration as a festive holly bush.

The following Boy Or Girl is something akin to a meeting of early Blondie and The Photos and quite irresistible with its successor, Meet & Greet preyed on an already aroused hunger for what is on offer with its predacious escapade resembling a kind of X-Ray Spex/Spinnerette collusion as the band take a swipe at musical greed. It is simply another major highlight of the album echoed in success by the frisky indie/pop punk animation of This Condition with Honey-Jones leading and dueting on vocals.

The album’s worst track is next and These Boots Are Made For Walking is nothing less than full pleasure as Healthy Junkies make the classic their own by giving it a predatory breath as classic rock guitars blaze before James Dean rumbles with old school punk ‘n’ roll lust and uncontainable ebullience.

The album concludes with the pair of Theft and Part 2. The first is a rebel rousing protagonist vivaciously prowling the senses before breaking into a similarly ravening rock ‘n’ roll canter with erupting psych rock bred flames while the second is its dark but incandescent underworld where physical and emotion elements of the tracks shimmer, smoulder, and burn.

Together they make for a fascinating conclusion to Delirious Dream, echoing its title despite their brooding volatility and showing there is so much more to the creative palette of Healthy Junkies, one they have still yet to fully explore.

We always feel a sense of excitement when a new encounter with Healthy Junkies comes along as they have always manage to outdo themselves so far; Delirious Dream is no exception; in fact it pretty much outshines most other punk/rock nurtured offerings around this year too.

Delirious Dream is out now via Banana Castle Records/Cargo Records UK across most online stores.

http://www.healthyjunkies.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/healthyjunkiesband   https://twitter.com/HealthyJunkies

Pete RingMaster 17/10/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright