Astral Cloud Ashes – Too Close to the Noise Floor

Album Art_RingMasterReview

With three attention grabbing and imagination sparking singles under the belt, Astral Cloud Ashes unveil debut album Too Close to the Noise Floor. It is a collection of songs which arouse and serenade the senses, often simultaneously as the project’s mesmeric songwriting and emotive melodic elegance seduces.

Astral Cloud Ashes is the new project of Jersey bred songwriter/musician Antony Walker, previously better known as one half of the Channel Islands hailing Select All Delete Save As. Having already created music under the name ALPA, amongst other monikers, Walker quickly sparked attention to his latest project last year with first single Too Close To The Noise Floor, the now title track to the new album. Primarily a solo project but with backing vocalist Jason Neil a permanent fixture in the band, Astral Cloud Ashes draws on inspirations ranging from The Cure, Bloc Party, Interpol, At the Drive In, Mars Volta, and Say Anything as well as flavours bred in indie and alternative rock/pop. Equally though, the album shows bold ventures into more progressive and post rock pastures without losing the instinctive catchiness and melodic romancing found in those earlier propositions.

Mixed across its tracks by Gareth [The Fold], Edd HartwellPaul Miles, Daniel Szanto,  and Walker himself, with the mastering undertaken by Tim Turan, Too Close to the Noise Floor opens with The Man I Had To Become. Instantly a temptation of bubbling guitar captures ears, the coaxing quickly joined by a wave of rhythmic jabbing and a thicker weave of melodic guitar and harmonious vocals. It is a gentle yet boisterous affair easily whipping up the imagination and spirit with Walker’s distinctive tones the mellow flame within a more combustible web of enterprise. It is a great mix which marked those early singles but already seems to have blossomed within the album into a more adventurous and confident entangling of the listener.

The great start is followed by the album’s title track, Too Close to the Noise Floor showing a rawer, more imposing energy as it takes the imagination into the intimacy and adventure of cosmonautics but equally involves “family values and unwanted first-world paranoia” in its energetically hugged theme. Punching its rhythmic and contagious essences home, it also carries a hazy climate to its atmosphere with the bass a deliciously throaty lure amongst nothing but virulent temptation. Embracing a XTC feel and Melvins like revelry, the track has body and appetite eagerly involved in swift time.

Grateful for the Ghost In Our House steps forward next and as the last track showed a more formidable presence to its predecessor, this song reveals a fiercer predation to its opening and subsequent invention within another wash of suggestive melodies and smouldering dynamics. Though not in the actual sound, it is easy to see where an influence of The Cure comes into play, Walker creating an emotional and musical drama which has the senses riding a roller coaster.

Recent single Get Real follows, strolling along with the ever present catchiness which Walker conjures with seeming ease across every track. Guitars pop and bubble throughout the song as rhythmic tenacity creating an anthemic frame to the vocal and melodic ingenuity before Flashback takes over. A calmer and mellower engagement but even more emotively forceful, the song caresses ears with a lone guitar melody before being joined by a heavily shadowed bassline aligned to a broader floating melodic enterprise. Vocally, Walker provides an introspective narrative as provocative as the poetic almost volcanic fuzziness of his guitar. Adding another individual shade and hue to the album, the track shows the broader landscape of Walker’s songwriting and an intimacy, whether personal or observational, which fuels his words.

With drummer Max Saidi guesting, Avant Blah! strolls boldly in next, its lo-fi pop ‘n’ roll blending Weezer infection with Pavement-esque invention while its successor Lites almost lumbers into view in comparison with the brooding bass and irritable riffs to the fore. In all songs there is a great repetitious quality brewed by Walker, here almost coming over drone like to great effect around the solemn melody and the similarly melancholic vocals. As it expands though, a wave of rich textures and rousing energies flood the song, returning throughout the low-key yet thickly enjoyable, almost imposing encounter.

The excellent This Once Great Place has an air of The Cure again with its atmospheric landscape, reminding of the A Forest/Pornography era of the trio across its own captivating journey before the equally impressive Housing in a Bubble makes a grab for best track with its more punkish/grungy roar of sound. Everything about it has a snarl not heard on the album previously; revealing more of the diversity the release carries whilst stirring up a fresh greed in ears and pleasure.

Our Holiday brings Too Close to the Noise Floor to a sombre and enthralling close, the track initially a dark sigh but soon building its own catchy canter loaded with spiky hooks and spicy melodies around another slightly foreboding and compelling bassline. Once more thoughts of Robert Smith and co are sparked but again as a flavour in something individual to Astral Cloud Ashes. It is a riveting end to a striking and increasingly impressive first album from Walker.

The clues to the project’s potential were there in its first trio of singles, and now confirmed and partly realised by Too Close to the Noise Floor. The feeling is that there is plenty more to come and to be explored within that promise, and going by the strength of this thoroughly enjoyable offering, we are all in for many treats ahead.

Too Close to the Noise Floor is released July 11th @ http://apple.co/1RFvoL8

https://www.facebook.com/astralcloudashes   https://astralcloudashes.bandcamp.com/   https://twitter.com/AstralCloudAsh

Pete RingMaster 08/07/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Billy Bibby and The Wry Smiles – Are You Ready?

Billy Bibby_RingMasterReview

Reinforcing the attraction and quality found in the band’s recently released debut EP, Bide Your Time, British quartet Billy Bibby & The Wry Smiles unveil new single Are You Ready?, a song which infests ears and imagination with its earthily melodic rock ‘n’ roll laced with an inviting tinge of Americana.

The band is the new venture of former and founding lead guitarist of Catfish and the Bottlemen, Billy Bibby. Uniting his string and lead vocal prowess with that of lead guitarist Rob Jones, bassist Matt Thomas, and drummer Mike Pearce, Billy Bibby & The Wry Smiles came together in the Autumn of 2015. Within their first six months, the band went on a 26-date UK tour and recorded the well-received Bide Your Time EP. Its tracks and especially its singles, Waitin’ for You and Don’t Fall, found potent radio play across the likes of BBC Wales, BBC Jersey, Radio X, and Virgin Radio UK alongside numerous national and global indie stations.

It is a success sure to be matched and potentially surpassed by Are You Ready? , a track which Bibby recently talked of, saying “This song was the last one to be practiced and finished as a band before our first UK tour together,” continuing to add “but as soon as we’d finished it with our own input into our own individual parts it seemed to stand out as a major contender for the next single.

The song opens with the ear luring tones of Biddy being cradled in gentle strokes of guitar, a union quickly joined by crisp rhythms and the magnetic jangle of Jones’ melodic enterprise. As the vibrant passage of the verse leads to a boisterous chorus, there is an undefined familiarity to the proposition, but an essence which simply adds to the infectious character and imaginative nature of the encounter.

As swift as it is an ear pleaser, the sense that the song will be a live crowd pleaser emerges and in many ways it has that live air to its rousing presence.

The Bide Your Time EP was an impressive introduction to Billy Bibby & The Wry Smiles which Are You Ready? takes to an even more potent level while providing the summer of 2016 with an instinctive anthem to embrace.

Upcoming UK gig and festival dates:

JULY

14 Rawtenstall | The Artisan

15 Perth | The Green Room

16 Dundee | Buskers 17 Glasgow | Broadcast

23 Stockport | Blackthorn Festival

29 Banbury | Also Known As

30 Haverfordwest Castle | Pembs Fest

31 Lake District | Kendal Calling | House Party Stage

AUGUST

06 Whitby | Coastline Festival

20 Doncaster | Blackfest

26 Manchester | Night & Day Café

SEPTEMBER

02 Lode, Cambridgeshire | Lodestar Festival

03 Merthyr Tydfil | Bowstrong Festival

17 Tickhill | TFest

https://www.facebook.com/billybibs20   https://soundcloud.com/billybibs20   https://www.instagram.com/billybibs20/

Pete RingMaster 08/07/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

 

Unbridled arousals and stomps: exploring The Conniption Fits.

The Conniption Fits_RingMasterReview

Formed in 2004, The Conniption Fits create their own ear catching mix of alternative, progressive, and indie pop; rock ‘n’ roll which rouses the senses and imagination and has so across a host of releases. Drawing comparisons to the likes of Jimmy Eat World, Green Day, Foo Fighters, Silversun Pickups, U2, The Police, and David Bowie and having shared stages with artists such as Weezer, Panic at the Disco, Kings Of Leon, Train, 3 Doors Down, Fastball, Mighty Bosstones, 7 Mary Three, Blue Oyster Cult, Mountain, Warrant, and Cinderella among many over time, the New Hampshire hailing trio make a noise which easily sparks the appetite. Grabbing the chance to learn more about the band, we had the pleasure of chatting with member and The Conniption Fits co-founder Stevens.

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started and what brought you all together?

That’s a long story.  I’m Stevens Blanchard, lead singer guitar player for The Conniption Fits.  The drummer, Shawn Snyder and I met back when we were kids.  My current band needed a drummer and he was a friend of a friend, not to mention a fantastic drummer with tons of attitude.  When that band broke up, we founded The Conniption Fits.  Jamie Hosley, or bass player, came along when we were looking for a new bassist.  Again, he had a reputation as being “the man” when it comes to bass, naturally we had to have him.

So The Conniption Fits is not the first band for you? Has previous projects had any impact on what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

I think I just answered that above, but yes.  We had a previous band, Motorplant, which did quite well for about 8 years.  You can still find all of the music that Motorplant produced all over the web including iTunes and Spotify.  When Motorplant disbanded, we wanted to head in a slightly more alternative direction.

What inspired the band name?

If the conniption fits, wear it.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

Far from it…We just enjoy playing and entertaining.  As far as the sound goes, I just want to create ear candy.  Songs with depth sonically and lyrically that are accessible and a bit unpredictable at the same time.

Do the same things still drive the band when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

Always evolving…You can tell album to album.  Every record seems to represent where our minds were at musically at that period of time.  I’m always hearing new bands that are doing really cool things that we want to incorporate into our own stuff.  I’d say we listen as much, or more, than we play.

TCF2Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

We deliberately try new things.  Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn’t.  On our second album, A Heaping Helping of Perspective the guys thought it would be cool if we recorded live without a click track.  I hated the idea, being a stickler for tempo.  It led to a different album and different songs for sure.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

Too many to mention, from Jazz to Metal…Speaking for myself I’d say bands like Nothing But Thieves, The Shins, Bear Hands, Coldplay, Eve6, Green Day, Foo Fighters, Kongos…  I love creative rock/pop/alternative songs that still have a hook, but avoid the same four chords and progressions that are so typical.

Is there a particular process to the band’s songwriting?

I am usually the idea man then we flush it out as a group.  Sometimes I’ll record the whole song then we will replace the drums and bass later. I’m into results; I don’t care how we get there.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

Life; I’ll sing lyric variations to a demo while I’m out for a run.  I usually find cool ideas that way.  I also hear the parts that suck and need to be changed.

Can you give us some background to your latest release?

I Need You (Ay-O) is an old relate that became new again when it started treating on-line. We’ve always loved the song and are happy to have it finally breaking through the “clutter”.

Give us some insight to its theme.

I need you is about wanting to leave a relationship, but continuing to be drawn back in; then dealing with the fact that needing somebody can be for very different reasons.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

I own the studio we record in.  It’s an amazing luxury because we are not “on the clock” burning money.  So we just show up with nothing and play.  Often I’ll have scraps of ideas ready to jump off from.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably the favourite aspect of the band?

Yeah, live is where we bring it.  We entertain.  We always have a great time and that usually transfers to the audience.  It’s also the only real way we’ve made any money.  So we play live to survive, and we love it.

It is not easy for any band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods? Are there the opportunities to make a mark if the drive is there for new bands?TCF_RingMasterReview

Not easy, but work hard and offer something great.  It doesn’t even have to be unique, just great.  Make people say “holy shit!”, and you’ll do fine.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date?

The internet grants everyone access, even the garbage.  I think we handle it well, but there is that constant drive needed to stand out in all the noise.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Check out our website, http://www.conniptionfits.com/ to listen to all of our songs for free and look for our new EP this summer!

https://www.facebook.com/conniptionfits/  https://twitter.com/conniption_fits

Pete RingMaster

The Ringmaster Review 01/07/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Snarling blossoms: exploring the heart of The Bad Flowers

The Bad Flowers_RingMasterReview

Drawing on influences found in the likes of Black Sabbath, Led Zeppelin, and The Who, British rockers The Bad Flowers soon showed a sound with its own distinct character after emerging in 2014. The West Midlands trio has continued to grow and earn a potent reputation for their rousing sound and equally spirited live presence. Ahead of a new EP, we had the pleasure to throw a few questions at the band who kindly revealed more about the emerging might of The Bad Flowers.

Hello all and thanks for sparing time to talk with us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background what brought you all together?

We are The Bad Flowers from Cannock; we have Tom Leighton on lead vocals and guitar, Dale Tonks on bass and backing vocals, and Karl Selickis on drums. The band came about from projects we were working on individually that ran their course, but we all came together when we were playing on the same bill and we kept in touch from there.

So The Bad Flowers is not your first outfits? How have previous endeavours impacted, if at all, on what you are doing now; in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

We have all been in bands before and have been playing for as long as we can remember. When we came together we found that we all wanted to follow the same direction and it worked really well for us, our focus is to play music that we enjoy, that we all have input into which we hope will bring something new to the industry whilst maintaining the influences of the music and bands that have inspired us.

What inspired the band name?

It was a lyric from a song of one our previous bands that we kept going back to, and when it came to us making a fresh start it just felt right.

TBF2_RingMasterReviewWas there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and if so has it changed?

There was no specific idea it has just developed from what we enjoy playing and what we feel works well, and we are really grateful for the support we receive.

The drive to write great music and put on exciting live shows has always been there. The music itself has definitely developed as we have grown as artists, but we’ve always maintained the same sound.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

We take more time over each song; we want to make sure each element of the song is exactly how we want it to be. Before we debut a new song, we lay down hours of practice to ensure we’ve got it right.

Has any shift and movement in your sound been more organic or deliberate in wanting to try new things?

The movement has been organic. As we’ve grown up and gained more experience the sound has moved with us.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

There is no one in particular, but as individuals we all have different inspirations which when we write together gives us our sound.

Is there a general process to the band’s songwriting?

It usually happens by one us coming up with an idea and we jam it out during practice until we have a rough idea of where we want it go, then we take it away and work with it to make it tighter and it evolves from there.

How about lyrics? Where more often than not, where are they drawn from or inspired by?

The inspirations for our lyrics come from Tom; he is always thinking of lyrics at work or at home to put into the songs.

Can you give us some background to your latest release?TBF3_RingMasterReview

The next release is a four track EP which includes our most recent songs that are more powerful and slightly dirtier sound than what we have released before.

How about some insight into its themes and songs?

The songs are based on our experiences in the band and as individuals. There is a song based on a recent tour of Europe and we try to make the lyrics relatable and something people can connect with.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

We get the songs to the point where are happy with them, we practice them over and over again before we go into the studio to record. There are often times where we may make a few tweaks when we hear the recorded version to better the song.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably the favourite aspect of the band?

We really enjoy playing live and we go out to put all of our effort in no matter where we play or who we are playing to. There is nothing better for us than seeing people enjoying our music and leaving with a smile on their face.

The Bad Flowers tour dates_RingMasterReviewIt is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods?

In the midlands there is a thriving scene for new music and there are great local venues that support the industry. After playing all over the country it is still great to come back and play sold out local shows.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date?

We keep people updated on Social Media of up and coming gigs, any news we have and it’s also a great way to keep in touch with fans, as well as giving us a platform to promote ourselves to people who may not have heard of us before. Social Media is a great tool to use as long as it is used on the right respect.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Thank you for taking the time to read our interview. Keep your eyes and ears pealed for the future and we hope to as you soon.

http://thebadflowers.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/thebadflowersband

Pete RingMaster

The Ringmaster Review 16/06/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Risa Hall – Kids on Victoria Avenue

Risa hall_RingMasterReview

Photo – Andy Darbyshire

New York City born and now Manchester, England residing, singer songwriter Risa Hall has a voice and heartiness to her melody rich rock ‘n roll which simply urges ears to pay attention. The evidence comes with new single Kids on Victoria Avenue, a song rousing the spirit whilst laying down a rather tasty teaser for her upcoming album, Love is Telepathic.

An attendee of Forest Hills High, which was immortalised in The Ramones’ Rock and Roll High School and also lists Simon and Garfunkel among former students, with the legendary quartet great friends of Hall, she has built a healthy background as an actress before turning to guitar and songwriting; appearing as Frenchy in the Broadway Cast of Grease, touring as Mae in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, and performing in radio plays among her successes. Inspired by KT Tunstall and Nerina Pallot, she turned to music with the well-received Apple Tarte EP catching eager attention with potent radio play on both sides of the Atlantic following.

Subsequently working with Nigel Stonier (Waterboys, Thea Gilmore, Sandi Thom), Hall released the well-received album Glass Full…?, an eclectic collection of ten ear catching songs. New album Love is Telepathic is its anticipated successor, a release recorded with producer Daniel J. Logan and being offered a potent teaser through Kids on Victoria Avenue. Straight away a romancing melody escapes the guitar to caress ears, rhythms similarly inviting as Hall’s voice and lyrical suggestiveness paints a warm picture for the imagination. A great Chrissie Hynde hue lines her voice, adding to an instinctive drama in tone and word which lures the listener in with ease.

Musically the song is just as gripping, its vibrant catchiness a spark for shuffling feet and a lively spirit easily involving the listener from first note to last. It is an infection wrapping insightful lyrics and sure to awaken some keen anticipation for the forthcoming Love is Telepathic.

Kids on Victoria Avenue is released June 24th.

http://risahall.com/   https://www.facebook.com/Risahall   https://twitter.com/risahall

Pete RingMaster 16/06/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Creative espionage and inventive intimation: an interview with Aiming For Enrike

 

Photo: Marius Mada Dale

Photo: Marius Mada Dale

Without doubt, one of the year’s most exhilarating and inventive propositions has been Segway Nation, the new album from Norwegian duo Aiming For Enrike. The encounter is a fascinating instrumental adventure in sound and captivating aural suggestiveness; a multi-flavoured infectiousness created by drummer Tobias Ørnes and guitarist Simen Følstad Nilsen. Offered the chance to learn more with the duo, we set about discovering the creative heart of band and album.

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

First of all can you tell us about yourselves as individuals?

We are two quite calm persons; a guitar player and drummer. We love making and playing music, so we spend a lot of time in the rehearsal space, practicing, jamming, and composing.

When did you first meet and what sparked the idea to form the band?

We met in 2010, when we attended a music school in Oslo. We were both into experimental noise rock music. After seeing some mind-blowing bands like Monolithic and Zu, we wanted to do something like that as a duo. By using loops we managed to get a huge sound even though we were only two. In the beginning we had more of a noise/prog sound but over the years the songs developed into more conventional song structures where we have incorporated a lot of influences from electronica, funk etc.

Is there a specific meaning behind the band name?

Yes, but not worth sharing😉

Photo © Haakon Borg / Magpie

Photo © Haakon Borg / Magpie

It is wonderfully difficult to pin down the Aiming For Enrike sound for us, how would you describe it to newcomers to the band?

It’s an adventurous band with good melodies, cool grooves, and lots of energy. It has a very distinct sound, but still the music can go in many different directions.

What and who have most inspired your musical ideas and subsequently sound would you say?

Our sound is kind of schizophrenic and has a lot of layers because of a wide range of influences. Of course we can be inspired by other things in life, but I think it is only music and music gear that have a direct influence to our sound. Aiming for Enrike is the result of two people and sounds like something none of us would have made by ourselves.

Here are some names: Miles Davis, Josh Homme, James Brown, Nels Cline, Radiohead, Sonic Youth, Greg Saunier, Hot Snakes, Glen Branca, Mike Patton, Moha…

I am no expert on the broad expanse of the Norwegian music scene right now, generally coming across the diversity of metal and rock bands from there, but I get the feeling that your music is a one of a kind there; something unusual to the Norwegian landscape of sound. Is that the reality and if so how have they taken to it?

In Norway it is very common to have musical collaborations across genres. If you look at the jazz and improvisational music scene, you have lots of artist who play music that have more in common with pop, rock/metal, electronic music than traditional jazz. In jazz festivals you can go and see pop acts, and in commercial festivals there are jazz bands playing. So I think in general people are very open to new stuff.  Most artists are not so focused on sounding like the other one. It is a good thing to be original, and have your own thing going. We don’t know of any other Norwegian band that sounds like us but way more people than we would have guessed have been positive and open to it.

You have just released new album, Segway Nation; a release which had our imagination as busy and enthralled as ears and feet. Where does a ‘typical’ Aiming For Enrike song start composing wise?

We always start by just playing. We spend a lot of time just improvising, or trying out different kind of ideas. It is important that we are inspired when we play, and that there is a fun factor. We try to follow our intuition, and not doubt our choices too much. Then we record our ideas and make tunes out of them.

Throughout the album, there is an organic freedom, almost as things were created, played, and improvised in the moment. Tell us about the recording of Segway Nation; were songs already AimingForEnrike-SegwayNation_RingMasterReview2400written before recording them or was there an element of conjuring twists and turns there and then?

Everything is played live in the studio, without any click track. That might create a more «free» or improvised feel. On Segway Nation we composed all the songs before we recorded them, but there are some parts in the songs where we improvise. It can be open sections, or written parts played in different ways. That keeps it interesting for us, and hopefully for the listeners. Some of the more «free form» songs like Minitrue and Phone Phobia are the result of some improvised recording sessions.

Another great aspect to the album is the way it inspires the listener’s imagination to create its own adventures. Can you tell us about some of the actual themes and inspirations to the tracks and their suggestive dramas?

We didn’t have any specific plans for this. But it is a good thing if the listeners make up their own adventure in the music. I don’t think there are any specific themes to the songs, but there are specific inspirations to some of the songs. It can be a groove, melody, riff etc.

The past few years has seen some impressive and ear striking duos emerge with varying styles and dynamics within their union. Often it seems that the slimness of personnel allows a band to bring its live presence much more easily to recordings. It is the same with you guys; there is a feeling that listening to Segway Nation would be like standing in front of you on stage. Do you think there is some validity in that thought from your perspective; less bodies and minds leads to less of a leaning on technology and tricks when recording music?

There is more space in the music when you are a duo, and that makes it easier to follow your intuition and play in the moment. Since we record our music live in a room, the recording becomes very representative for us as a band. There are very few options sound wise with only a guitar and a drum kit, so I think it is hard to lose the live feeling in the recording.

Marius Mada Dale

Marius Mada Dale

Tell us about your live side; how you translate the dynamics of songs to the stage?

It works really great! We played the songs live many times before we recorded them. So the recording is not much different from a live performance. With the live performance you will also get the visual aspect and a bit more playful approach to the material.

What is next for Aiming For Enrike now that the album is out and earning acclaim and new hearts?

We are working on new material, which is turning out really good! And we have some festivals coming up this summer; first there´s Nattjazz festival in Bergen, then Øya festival in Oslo. We are planning a European tour in the fall! So lots of cool stuff coming up!

Once again many thanks for giving your time to us. Anything you would like to add?

Check out our album Segway Nation, and also the live in Rohdos garage videos on YouTube.

Read the review for Segway Nation @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2016/05/06/aiming-for-enrike-segway-nation/

https://www.facebook.com/aimingforenrike    http://www.namemusic.no/aimingforenrike/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 04/06/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Attack The Day – Felons EP

Pic Michal Spigiel

Pic Michal Spigiel

Attack The Day is another of those bands with a sound which defeats exact tagging due to its nature and eagerness to weave in a host of diverse flavours. The Northern Ireland hailing quintet, though it might be that they have lost a member since recording their new release,  are generally classed as alternative metal/rock but as Felons shows, they have the snarl of punk, the rousing tenacity of raw metal, the swing of funk, and the unpredictable character of post rock in their invention. The band’s second EP is an ear pleasing, imagination sparking encounter which captivates more and more with every listen.

Formed in Enniskillen in County Fermanagh in early 2012, Attack The Day soon developed a hunger to play live and soon had their local scene won over. Inspirations come from the likes of Sum 41, Mallory Knox, Maximum The Hormone, Slipknot, The Blackout, Gob, and Korn which alone gives you a hint to the variety in their sound. Last year saw debut EP This Is How It Ends released, its singles finding play and support on various radio stations such as IUR FM and RTE 2XM. 2015 also saw the band touring Ireland and play support to Suddenly Human. Now it is Felons poised to stir up further attention, a success easy to assume with its creative step on from its predecessor.

ATD - _RingMasterReviewFrom its opener, the EP shows a new expansion and invention in the Attack The Day sound as We Are The Change grabs ears with a sonic clamour and a tide of group roars. From there the lead vocal of Dáithí Murphy steps forward within a busy hustle of riffs and firmly jabbing rhythms which is part punk, part heavy rock, and quickly infectious. There is no mistaking the appetite sparking attitude soaking the song, but a challenge bound in spicy grooves from guitarist Mark Cadden as Ciaran Fitzpatrick’s bass throatily prowls the intimidating beats of Shane McGovern. Not for the last time, the punkish hue to a song within the EP, hints at a Stiff Little Fingers like growl to add further temptation for ears to embrace.

It is fair to say that the first song is a relatively and enjoyably straight forward slice of raw rock ‘n’ roll, something its successor Bridges I Burn certainly embraces while revealing the more off kilter imagination of the band. Its relatively mellow start is soon a lively funk fest of grooves and energetic rhythms, but a revelry which in turn sparks vocal animosity and imposing metal bred intensity. It is a passage of invention which repeats with increasing potency, every round revealing a fresh essence and spice within the adventurous exploits.

Epidemic follows that compelling proposal, bringing its own creative captivation with elegant melodies and suggestive beauty, the instrumental a warm yet melancholic caress of the imagination and senses before Part To Play springs its irritable metal and post hardcore causticity on ears. The slightly dour tones of Murphy work a treat against the fiery nature of sound and the band’s bullish harmonies, but the unpredictable character of the song soon has ears and thoughts buzzing in other ways. Slips into ska seeded swings and atmospheric caresses are great moments matched by the contrasting and corrosive winds of sound and intent which also wash across the senses, each providing a fascinating and successful piece in the inventive jigsaw of the track.

The EP is concluded by the boisterous rock stomp of Who We Are, a song emulating the first in providing an anthemic punk ‘n’ roll charge which just hits the spot. It is a great end to a thoroughly enjoyable second encounter with Attack The Day. Fiercely agreeable on the ear, the release also highlights the potential within the band, a promise and quality hard not to see making a bigger impact on the British rock scene ahead.

The Felons EP is released 20th May, available @ https://attacktheday.bandcamp.com/releases

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Pete RingMaster 18/05/2016

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