Dave Barbarossa – Mudsharks

Some musicians have the most distinctive style and enterprise that it is easy to know who they are just from a burst of sound. When it comes to drummers for us here it is not so easy but one man has a touch and style to his rhythmic imagination that it is impossible not to recognise. That artist is Dave Barbarossa and he has just released a rather irresistible new EP as part of the Icon Series.

2013 saw the publishing of Dave’s excellent debut novel Mud Sharks and the new EP adds its apparent connection through its title. The Mudsharks EP provides three instrumentals uniting his trademark style with electronic intimation and endeavour; at times marrying the rhythmic sound which ignited so many musical journeys in the seventies with his just as potent exploits through more recent projects such as Cauldronated.

The EP opens with Buttercup Girl, a slice of tenacious dance music with summer fervour in its keys and melody and flirtatious incitement in its rhythms. Like a flight through spatial climes but with earth bound muscularity pulling at its exploration, the track has the body bouncing and imagination conjuring in no time.

It is a rousing start though one for us swiftly eclipsed by the following pair of tracks. First up is Keep Walking, a piece which strolls along with relentless tenacity through cosmopolitan air over a more defined urban landscape. Dave’s rhythms just shape the imagination; suspense and drama fuelled by his web of swings as a cinematic weave is cast by electronics and synths. Quickly addictive and more so by the listen, the song reveals itself a viral persuasion.

The closing arousal of the EP’s title track is the perfect union of nostalgia and new. MudSharks harkens back to the irresistible rhythmic exploits of Bow Wow Wow but incitement draped in thick electronic intimation and drama amidst the floating lures of vocal harmonies. As its predecessors, it masterfully lures thoughts into painting adventures whilst turning hips and feet into its puppet.

Dave Barbarossa has been integral in numerous major treats and now the Mudsharks EP can be added to the list.

The Mudsharks EP is out now on download and Ltd. Edition Cassette Tape via Icon Series.

https://www.facebook.com/dave.barbarossa   https://www.facebook.com/iconseriesrecords/

Pete RingMaster 13/08/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Smash Fashion – Rompous Pompous

With a mere but rather tasty single in between, it has been a long wait for the successor to their highly enjoyable and highly praised third album Big Cat Love but finally US rockers Smash Fashion have unleashed its successor in the shape of Rompous Pompous and a devilishly mischievous and captivating proposition it is.

Eagerly anticipated, the album lives up to its excellent title with eleven slices of multi-flavoured rock ‘n’ roll which romp and stomp in a way only the La quartet can. As ever the band feeds on rich rock essences from across the decades; everything from fifties rock ‘n’ roll, sixties mod and psychedelia through to seventies punk/new wave aligned to eighties glam and hard rock going to flavour a sound just as spiced by subsequent years and modern enterprise. As its predecessor, Rompous Pompous is an adventurous and lustily fun stomp with the band but with even keener diversity and a sharper definition to its writing, performance, and character.

It opens up with Can’t Take You Anywhere and straight away a potent hook with something more than familiar to it keenly entices. It is just a lure though into the song’s own invention with the vocals of guitarist and band founder Roger Deering swiftly to the fore. Its classic rock breeding is littered with new wave and seventies pop rock flirtation, the tenacious rhythms of bassist Scarlet Rowe and drummer Reijo “Repo” Kauppila driving its boisterous stroll as lead guitarist Lloyd Stuart Casson weaves real temptation within the just as magnetic tease of keys.

It is a potent start to the release ensuring attention is firmly on board and equally strong as the following Soft As A Rock (Helium Head) takes its place with an air of Cheap Trick meets The Motors to it. Its infectiousness is swift and eager as hooks join grooves in casting a net of catchy enterprise around Deering’s ever alluring presence while within the album’s following title track the band pulls the listener in with a fifties rock ‘n’ roll nurtured saunter with a delicious B52’s-esque lilt to its blossoming revelry. The track is superb also hinting at the respective glam/art and hard rock of bands like Sparks and The Tubes as it caught ears and imagination.

Wolves Of Wonderland brings a blues flavouring with its steady hard rock canter next with not for the first time just a sniff of Queens Of The Stone Age to the melodic graining while Teenage Demon is a punk ‘n’ roll courting holler with a garage rock lining which swiftly had feet and neck muscles rocking. Again there is no missing a seventies/eighties seeded nature to the excellent track; a regular ingredient in the increasingly individual Smash Fashion sound.

Another putting a firm hand on best track honours is the Bolan-esque Proper Way To Eat A Muffin, its flirtatious almost salacious swing aligned to classic rock ‘n’ roll equipped with power pop boisterousness and lyrical devilment. Quickly and unerringly hitting the spot it had the body eagerly swinging before Runs In The Family adds further diversity to the release with its pop, punk and melodic rock collusion with a great resemblance to The Vapors to it. It too is one of the major highlights within Rompous Pompous closely matched by the Bowie kissed Tender Was The Hook, a song also embracing a sixties tone with a Hollies like scent to it.

Through the likes of the blues rock sprung Ugly Thugly and Gentle Hand with its slightly dirty melodic radiance around one irresistible hook, the album continued to light up ears even if neither song quite lived up to the heights of those before them. Nevertheless each left thorough enjoyment in their wake leaving the emotive balladry of Smiles & Daggers to bring the album to a fine close. Beginning with drama carrying piano with big shadow clad rhythms in close company, an entrance reminding of a certain Boomtown Rats classic, the song is a magnetic example of the more mature and bolder songwriting within the album. As all songs, deeper into its body you go more the different flavours and twists emerge to please and fascinate.

And that applies to Rompous Pompous as a whole, a release which gets you going from the off and just gets more intoxicating and infamous by the listen, much like Smash Fashion themselves.

Rompus Pompous is out now via Electric Pudding Recordings across most online stores.

 http://www.smashfashionmusic.com/   https://www.facebook.com/smashfashion

Pete RingMaster 14/08/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Matty T Wall – Sidewinder

It is easy to get the feeling that Matty T Wall is a well-respected and keenly supported artist in his Australian homeland, his new album carrying all the intimation and just as simple to expect its fine body of songs to push the man towards far broader international attention. Sidewinder is an imaginative and inventively accomplished proposition bred in the blues and its roots but Wall is an artist also unafraid to embrace an array of other flavours modern and past. This makes for a release which captivates and surprises with regularity; a record which is a real pleasure to join.

With bassist Stephen Walker and drummer Ric Whittle alongside, Wall creates a tapestry of genres and styles with his openly creative and individual playing. His guitar spins tales as potent as his voice, evidence immediate in album opener Slideride. The instrumental in seconds had ears gripped, the fuzz of guitar and tease of keys provided by Gordon Cant instant devilry inciting body and imagination as the track’s devilish stroll erupted into life. Flames of horns from Steve Searle just added to the manipulation, the song a swinging rousing slice of enterprise kicking the album off in magnificent style.

It is a start kept lively and potent by the album’s following title track. Blues and hard rock unite in a song which swiftly has the body bouncing, Wall’s vocals a rich ingredient in its growing engagement with ears. It has a traditional air to its flavouring but united with bold enterprise from modern imagination providing something unashamedly familiar but keenly fresh.

As suggested earlier, there is an eclectic character to the album no better epitomised than by the following Something Beautiful. A cover of the Troy “Trombone Shorty” Andrews track it is a glorious slice of pop shaped rock which just radiates temptation from the magnetic vocals to the uncomplicated but flirtatious tease of guitar and the understated but potent moody hues of the bass. It is a superb rival to its predecessors for best album song and in turn matched by another cover in Wall’s version of Sam Cooke’s Change Is Gonna Come; itself a firmly captivating take on a great song with the strings of Jonas Petersen an added pleasure.

Can’t Stop Thinking shares its seductive prowess next, the fiery vines of Wall’s guitar compelling heat to the darker stroll of the bass and the crisp raps of Whittle’s beats. Cant’s organ is a link between the shades, a suggestive glaze and temper to the song’s electric jazz fire. From its relative calm, the rock ‘n’ roll of the excellent Shake It had the body bouncing with ease straight after, its blues intoxication a boozy but defined incitement firmly rivalled by Going Down. The latter is a version of the Don Nix classic originally recorded by Moloch in the late sixties. It is a song given numerous outings by an array of acclaimed artists over the years and Wall’s ballsy rendition ranks high among them.

The jazzy flirtation of Aint That The Truth is a mellower but no less enticing turn in the album’s adventure; a song which lured participation in voice and hips as easily as it had ears hungry for more. Its summery swing was unadulterated temptation setting up the appetite perfectly for the rawer antics of Sophia’s Strut. Whether it was or not, the instrumental feels like an improv slice of fun taking the listener into the charged surroundings of an old school blues club, the track rocking out with Wall’s open craft and its inherent devilment.

The groove woven Walk Out The Door is an even more compelling moment in the release with its fusion of funk, jazz, and blues rock a spark to losing inhibitions as another pinnacle within Sidewinder emerged with style and relish. Bred from essences drawn from across the decades, the track swiftly proved addictive on its first listen before compliant ears were just as drawn by the intimate balladry of Leave It All Behind and its delicate melodies, evocative vocals, and the melancholy draped magnetism of strings.

The album concludes with a cover of the Chris Thomas King song Mississippi Kkkrossroads, Wall adding to its hip hop/electric blues credentials with his own rock ‘n’ roll instincts. It is a great end to an album which has increasingly impressed and aroused. Matty T Wall might be a new name to a great many outside of the Australian rock scene but not for much longer if Sidewinder gets the attention it undoubtedly warrants.

Sidewinder is out now via Hipsterdumpster Records across most online stores.

https://www.mattytwall.com/   https://www.facebook.com/mattytwall/   https://twitter.com/mattytwall/

Pete RingMaster 13/08/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Hypnosister – Self Titled EP

If the celestial angels took a night off from enchanting the skies with some spacey rock ‘n’ roll fuelled by earthbound fire and brimstone, the debut EP from Hypnosister would be the perfect centre piece of temptation. The six track offering craftily seduces as it boldly roars, enticingly caresses as it dramatically trespasses the senses. Simply put it is a real treat for ears and imagination

Hypnosister is the solo project of former Allusondrugs guitarist/songwriter Damian Hughes which the British artist unveiled mid-2017. Describing it as space pop, Hughes weaves an immediately individual and virulent sound inspired by the likes of My Bloody Valentine, Nirvana, and Neutral Milk Hotel. Early singles and live shows soon grabbed attention of fans and the likes of XFM’s John Kennedy, Punktastic and Upset Magazine; support and plaudits sure to be escalating through his first EP.

With no other hand but Hughes involved from writing and playing to recording and producing, the EP opens up with the truly irresistible Poorly Boy. The track rises up with drama and attractive tension in its tone, bringing its thick hues together to burst into an instantly rousing and infectious affair led by the potent voice of Hughes. Though under control, there is tempestuousness to the track which emerges in twists and an unpredictable enterprise that just gripped attention and a quickly forming appetite for the Hypnosister adventure. There is a touch of The Horrors to the song in certain moments too but merely one of the alluring hues in its individuality.

The following Bother emerges on cosmic currents, sauntering in on a slow but catchy swing as waves of infectiousness court its magnetic lures. Hughes’ guitar has something of Lester Square of The Monochrome Set to its character; hooks and melodies springing like tentacles upon the imagination within another gorgeous encounter before Breath injects an earthier presence to the EP’s spatial climate. A post punk lilt to the guitar is contrasted by Hughes’ harmonic but again slightly grainy vocals; the almost funereal gait of the song equally at complementary odds with the natural catchiness of the inescapable temptation.

Next up Ghost serenades ears with harmonic radiance but soon reveals its own wiry enterprise and muscular drama within the ethereal shimmer. Again creative tension just lifted track and the passions alike, giving an edge to its melodic seduction and spirit rousing roar while I’m Going To Die ventures into emotional shadows and dark hues without negating the organic contagiousness Hughes’ songs just seem to breed with ease. With a touch of sixties garage pop to its fuzzy glow and a bold brooding to its rhythmic enticement, the track brings yet another individual aspect to the EP and sound of Hypnosister.

The release concludes with new single Scribbles, a song with angst and psychosis to its emotions, words, and tone but unsurprisingly also has infectiousness which just gets under the skin with guile and a deceitful touch, manipulating and enslaving almost secretively by the second. Bookended with distorted carnival-esque intimation, the track is a mesmeric end to one ridiculously compelling encounter.

With distortion, almost discord infesting the craft of the guitars and fuzz coating its melodic and spatial beauty, the Hypnosister sound borders on creative alchemy, certainly offers undiluted temptation making the first EP an essential piece of space rock ‘n’ pop adventure.

The Hypnosister EP is out now via Sleep All Day Productions, available @ https://hypnosister.bigcartel.com/ and https://hypnosister.bandcamp.com/album/hypnosister-ep

https://www.hypnosister.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/hypn0sister/   https://twitter.com/hypn0sister

Pete RingMaster 09/08/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Boomin – Now That’s What I Call…Boomin

Tagged as “Simply the greatest live party band on the planet!” UK pop rockers Boomin prove why they can be considered so with new album Now That’s What I Call…Boomin. The band’s renowned fun and mischief surges through its title alone but equally it is a name which sums up the release as a whole.  Containing sixteen tracks pulling from 35 artists, it is the ultimate collection of covers squeezed and moulded into medleys, mash ups and simply straight renditions all recreated and twisted in the unique Boomin way. With many songs we instinctively did not like in their original form there was no real expectation of being enthused about the release but in the hands of the little tinkers we simply felt nothing less than rich enjoyment at their and the album’s antics.

Consisting of guitarist/ vocalist Adam Langmead, bassist/vocalist Rory O’Grady, and drummer/vocalist Edd Langmead, Wigan hailing Boomin emerged in 2006. Since then the band has won numerous band competitions, shared stages with the likes of The Script, Scouting For Girls, McFly, Ultrabeat, Basshunter, and Ndubs among many more, and seen their debut album, Original Junkie reach reached No 22 in the iTunes Rock Chart and No.121 in the Album Charts. It was a potent introduction to the band’s pop infused rock and the instinctive fun which now floods Now That’s What I Call…Boomin.

Opener Thuglife sees a medley of tracks from Beyoncé, Christine Aguilera, Dr Dre, and Coolio in the grasp of Boomin, the track setting the tone, character, and revelry of things to come. Each portion flows into the next, the trio rather than re-inventing songs fingering them with their own devilry to stamp their own imprint on them.

Because of that inherent dislike of certain songs, some tracks certainly got under the skin more than others but all left a smile on the face especially tracks like Smells Like Billie Jean, a glorious mash up of the Nirvana and Michael Jackson classics. There is a vein of unpredictability to the song even with their extremely well-known sources which teases, as good as grins at the listener as song and band romps.

Other moments joining it on the front line of captivation include an impertinent take on Pulp’s Common PPL, a rousing stomp with Sum 42’s Fat Lip, and a bluesy hard rock lilted roar with Come Together from The Beatles. Alongside, the shameless fusion of Björk’s It’s Oh So Quiet and Sinatra’s New York, New York is pure incitement for vocal chords and energetic revelry from band and listener alike, but as suggested the whole album gives plenty for body, imagination, and energy to dive into, the irrepressible King Of The Swingers testament to that.

We will leave you to discover the rest of the album and your particular favourite moments to run riot with and you will more than once whether drunk or sober.

So Boomin the ultimate party band? Well Now That’s What I Call…Boomin offers little to deter such a statement, in fact nothing at all.

Now That’s What I Call…Boomin is available now @ https://boominmerch.bigcartel.com/

https://www.boominband.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/boominband/

Pete RingMaster 27/07/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Black Space Riders – Amoretum Vol. 2

Though Black Space Riders teased us with the news that the successor to the outstanding Amoretum Vol. 1, released this past January, would also be uncaged this year maybe few expected it to swing into view within six months of its acclaimed sibling. But indeed it has and we for one could not be any more pleased because it is one stunning slab of what the German outfit does best and which is individual to anything else.

As Vol. 1 took the listener into the dark depths and thickly shadowed corners of the modern world with intimations of hope and resolution its successor “explores the tension between darkness (fear, hate, rejection) and light (empathy, love, acceptance).” Their title is a fusion of the words Amor and Arboretum, the band’s symbolic reference to the sanctuary of nature and love. The creative and musical link between the two is strong and open; no surprise with the tracks from both albums written at the same time in 2017 and recorded together, yet Vol. 2 has a devilment in its imagination and body which makes it an even more unpredictable and at times bewildering experience. The second book in the concept flourishes whether standing alone or as a continuation of the first. Its press release asks, “Is Vol. 2 the rebellious older sister of Vol. 1, or the young, untamed brother?” Often it seems like an alter-ego, a kind of Riddler to the first’s Edward Nygma or indeed both making up a sonic Magneto where light and dark entangle for varied shades of captivating character.

The quintet of JE (lead vocals, guitars, keys, electronics), SEB (lead vocals, keys, percussion, electronics), C.RIP (drums, percussion, digeridoo), SLI (guitars), and MEI (bass) have also conjured the most eclectic flavours within their sound across the fourteen tracks of Vol. 2; at times it blazes with punk like ferocity, in other moments trespasses with metal bred inclinations before seducing with pop rock irresistibility and psych rock magnetism with plenty more in store along the way.

Set over six chapters, it opens up with Before my eyes, percussion luring ears into the snarling jaws of the track. Punk, metal, and rock all collude in its grizzled climate, grooves aligning to crisp rhythms as vocals growl. In no time it had the body bouncing and vocal chords gurning, contagion soaking every second of its forcefully magnetic enterprise. The clang of post punk guitars only adds to the irresistibility before LoveLoveLoveLoveLoveLoveLoveLove Love (Break the pattern of fear) slips in on a dark saunter. Initially it shares a Bauhaus like breath before breaking into a garage punk meets alternative rock stroll though, as becomes the norm in songs, it begins evolving by the minute if not the second. If the opener was bliss to the ears, its successor was pure rock ‘n’ roll manna and it proved just the beginning of one exhilarating ride with Black Space Riders.

Next up is Walls away, a far calmer affair with a melodic temperament which captivated from its initial lure. It has a raw undercurrent though which accentuates its elegance breeding, that aforementioned unpredictability lurking at every corner while Slaínte (Salud, dinero, amor) has a Celtic lining to its infectious festivities; an Irish Gaelic inspiration which again had the body bouncing across its primarily instrumental canter sharing “good health”.

Assimilating love leaps in straight after, its punk ‘n’ roll grumble a collision with grungier textures and space rock dynamics as it harasses ears with rousing irritability before In our garden serenades the senses with its melancholic caress. Something akin to the dark rock of Dommin in an embrace with the neo folk of Death in June within an indie sunset, the song is as enthralling as it is sombrely radiant as too the following track, Leaves of life (Falling down). For us the song is part of the pinnacle of Amoretum Vol. 2, though such its lofty heights we continue to debate that point as thoughts change by the listen. It has an energy which infests body and spirit but equally a dark glow which draws attention and the imagination like a moth to flame, and there is a definite heat to the track as its intensity and contagion rises.

Its glory is then more than matched by Body move, a quite magnificent and addictive slice of creative manipulation which has the body swinging to its funkiness and vocal chords clinging to its virulent delivery. Pop, funk, trip hop, and infection do not come any better and wonderfully invasive than this; the imagination as firmly locked into its growing web of drama.

The dub lit and outstanding Take me to the stars had hips swaying without thought within moments next, the song another weave of individual flavours in a wholly unique yet strangely familiar bold croon while Ch Ch Ch Ch pt. I (The ugly corruptor) emerges from a sonic mist to cast psychedelic hues and intimation before Ch Ch Ch Ch pt. II (Living in my dream) draws ears through the former’s growing raw volatility into its own tempestuous heavy rock envelopment, those already in place psych flames and sighs cascading off its feral storm.

The album’s final and sixth chapter is made up of firstly the melodically wired but still gnarly Chain reaction which is followed by the devilish rock pop bred No way. The first of the two did not grab us as its companions but still leaves most tracks heard this year chasing its wake while the rousing second has a whiff of pop, psych rock, and death metal to its inimitably catchy almost fearsome clamour.

Finally The wait is never over concludes the release, the track another kaleidoscope of flavours with echoes of Ruts DC in its dub shimmers and Helldorado in its swarthy atmospherics. It is an initially low key close, a kind of epilogue but one which just transfixes from its irradiant start to its ravenously tempestuous middle on to its apocalyptic climax.

Well Black Space Riders has done it again, had us drooling at their ever startling endeavours. Quite simply Amoretum Vol. 2 is immense in every aspect. It is a treat from first to last wave of imagination and creative devilment but we suggest listening to both Volumes of Amoretum as one for a complete rush of inspiration and pleasure.

Amoretum Vol. 2 is released July 27th through Black Space Records / Cargo Records on double vinyl (w/ CD), digipack CD and digital formats; available @ https://blackspaceriders.bandcamp.com/album/amoretum-vol-2

 

http://www.blackspaceriders.com/    https://www.facebook.com/BlackSpaceRiders     https://twitter.com/BlackSpaceRider

Pete RingMaster 26/07/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Buñuel – The Easy Way Out

If the soundtrack to the fall of the world is The Easy Way Out, the new album from Buñuel, then our arms for one can easily embrace the demise of all. The eleven track tempest is simply glorious, a collusion of sonic and emotional dissonance within a voracious carnival of noise which devours as it seduces.

The Easy Way Out is the successor to the quartet’s acclaimed 2016 debut album A Resting Place For Strangers, a release pushing the walls of the former’s ferocity, imagination, and psyche twisting trespass far further. The US/Italy hailing foursome create an often suffocating, frequently corrosive, and perpetually rousing assault of invention from within its walls, taking ears and emotions on an visceral rollercoaster ride fronted by the vocal prowess of Eugene S Robinson, already renowned for his part of Oxbow. Like a barker to its twisted sideshow but decisively more ringleader than narrator, his lyrical inharmony breeds a vocal dissidence and tenacity which is pure magnetism. Equally the ravenous sounds cast by bassist Pierpaolo Capovilla and drummer Franz Valente (both One Dimensional Man, Il Teatro Degli Orrori) alongside guitarist Xabier Iriondo (Afterhours) inspire as they corrupt, arouse as they deviously manipulate.

Opener Boys To Men emerges from its dark depths on a ponderous yet hypnotic prowl, Robinson instantly crawling all over its muscular drone bred awakening with vocal aberration as delirious as it is lucid. Inescapably transfixing across its increasingly tempestuous, intense fibrous yawn, the track invades like something akin to Swans meets Pere Ubu, and simply had ears and imagination afire.

The Hammer / The Coffin follows and instantly takes its own tight grip on attention as the feral temptation of Capovilla’s bass aligns to the swinging rabidity of Valente’s beats. Vocals and guitar toxicity are soon infesting song and listener, their carnivorous discord raw contagion as the noise rock seeded invasion swiftly has body and thoughts bouncing with equally bedlamic eagerness before the track releases its puppet into the waiting subversive rock ‘n’ roll jaws of Dial Tone. Harmonic toxins vein the boisterously bruising stomp, lighting up its heavy tenebrous flood of sound to easily get under the skin whilst exhausting the senses though it in turn is just a warm up for the even more debilitating roar of A Sorrowfull Night. With strand like hooks recalling The Fall within its tsunami of voluminous sound, the track is a post/noise punk trap to which capture and addiction was a done deal within its first few breaths.

Next come the monotonous sludge thick advance of The Sanction where rhythmic and citric enterprise bewitch alongside the ever compelling presence and dexterity of Robinson while Happy Hour twists and turns straight after like a punk dervish, flinging visceral grooves and sonic splinters with relish. The first of the two epitomises so much of the album with its mercurial landscape, its unpredictable terrain of imagination evolving and wrong-footing with ease, the second a less pronounced but just as inspired echo within its carnal punk ‘n’ roll.

Next up is The Roll which is simply magnificent. From its opening dance of keys against the raw discordance of the bass, the song invites as it taunts. Female vocals alongside Robinson similarly grab ears as they light the hungry onslaught before Augur stalks and fingers the senses with its rock ‘n’ roll schism. Like a meeting between Big Black and The Filthy Tongues with Shellac looking in yet truly unique to Buñuel, it is raw magnetism from start to finish.

Shot is just wild noise punk at its best, fifty seconds of anarchy before Where You Lay intimidates, threatens, and physically harasses the senses and psyche. Vocally, Robinson is as imposing and invasive as the sounds uniting around him, the track like a disconnected tangle of sinews and tones coming together layer by layer never disguising the portentous corrosive outcome their unity will bring.

The album concludes with Hooker, a final but accepting fissure on the album’s theme within a sonic misting as toxic as it is deceptively calm; a last corroded breath in the stark, barren outcome of the album’s sonic apocalypse.

With the amount of releases we are blessed to be sent it is not too hard to find plenty to get excited over but to be truly blow away by it a rare occurrence but one The Easy Way Out achieved. It is a definite album of the year contender with already a grip on top spot but easy to suggest also one of the decade’s most essential moments.

The Easy Way Out is released July 27th via La Tempesta International and Goodfellas Records.

https://www.facebook.com/Bunuelband/

Pete RingMaster 24/07/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright