Crimson Star – The Olde Dawg

It might be fair to say that UK outfit Crimson Star have not yet found the widespread recognition that their previous EP, Bay View, suggested they deserved but certainly acclaim, a greater reputation, and a fresh wave of fans did follow its unveiling two years back. Now the band has its successor ready to tease and tempt and again we can only say that their voracious rock ‘n’ roll carries all the attributes to provoke richer attention.

The time between releases has seen vocalist/guitarist Jay D Shaw and bassist Roj Ash joined by new addition in drummer Chris Hopton; the Birmingham based threesome uniting to create a trio of tracks which almost prey on ears within The Olde Dawg. The new EP bears the same rousing roar of its predecessor but swiftly reveals something hungrier and more dramatic in character and presence.

Recorded with Romesh Dodangoda (Lower Than Atlantis, Bring Me The Horizon, Funeral For A Friend), as its predecessor, the new release opens with Living A Lie. Emerging on a sonic dawn, punchy rhythms are soon rupturing the air to be quickly joined by bass and guitar bringing the ripe grooves and hooks the band has already earned potent praise for. Once into its eager but controlled stride, engaging melodic enterprise wraps the muscular dynamics of the track which are especially fertile around its eruption of a chorus, dynamics emulated in the similarly potent vocals of Shaw. Groove thick, the track is a striking and stirring start to the EP revealing alone the new strength and imagination in the band’s sound.

The outstanding Norma is next up and immediately accosts ears with its own gripping grooves and rapacious rhythms. The growl of Ash’s bass instantly had ears and appetite greedy to be swiftly matched in touch and temptation by the swinging grooves of guitar and the firm flying beats of Hopton. Again Shaw’s vocals provide a similarly magnetic proposition, at times almost teasing the listener as the song twisted and turned as it got under the skin; unpredictability lining every move and creative trespass offered.

The EP’s title track closes up the release, The Olde Dawg again an insistent bordering on predacious enticement which devours the air in riffs and rhythms whilst tempting ears with melodic and contagious enterprise. Moments of harmonic imagination only adds to the track’s lure, moment s of siren charm within waves of voracity which sweep the senses.

It is a great end to an EP which left us thick in pleasure and keen to suggest all go sail upon The Olde Dawg with Crimson Star, one of the UK’s brightest rock bands.

The Olde Dawg EP is released April 3rd.

 

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Pete RingMaster 03/04/2020

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

Medusa – In Bed with Medusa

 

Having found ourselves taken with sound and invention of UK trio Medusa with their 2011 released second album, Can’t Fucking Win, it quickly became apparent that there was nothing predictable about the band’s music but as confirmed by its successor Headcase’s Handbook three years later it has persistently proved a thickly compelling affair. Both albums were rich in the band’s punk fired rock sound and bold in their intrigue loaded magnetism, traits again just as fertile within the band’s new album, In Bed with Medusa.

The new release though is a whole new beast to be tempted by, one which still bears the inimitable breath and touch of the London based outfit but as its title suggests has an unwrapped intimacy which challenges as much as it fascinates. It is a far darker and rawer involvement with Medusa, one which startled from the off and has persistently caught us off guard with its almost feral emotions and untamed enterprise but fair to say with every listen has left us thickly hooked.

Emerging in 2006, Medusa is the creation of vocalist/guitarist/songwriter Julian Molinero, the band’s line-up on the new release completed by bassist Kotaro Suzuki and Towers of London drummer Snell, the latter recruited barely eight weeks before recording which took place with Steve Albini at his studio, Electrical Audio, in Chicago across the first four days of  December 2019. You can only imagine this intense recording time has added to the raw energy and heart of a release though equally such its resourceful drama and touch you can only feel it was always meant and going to be such a soul bearing proposition.

Oblivion opens up the album, a song which instantly unravels an instinctive infectiousness in voice and sound even before hitting its more aggressive and energetic punk ‘n’ roll stride. Molinero’s tones are as bare breathed and provocative as the melodic wiring escaping his guitar between punk bred chords, rhythms a potent anthemic incitement beneath it all.

*love not included seamlessly springs up from the closing straits of its predecessor, the track another with a persistent, indeed voracious catchiness to its punk ‘n’ roll incitement. Hooks and sonic wiring lured and gripped ears as boldly as rhythms and vocals, the track provoking and inviting keen involvement in its naked heart and touch before River Phoenix, inspired by a biography on the actor, lays a calm hand on ears before erupting in a tempestuous rock ‘n’ roll squall again embroiled in emotional turbulence.

There is an open richness to Medusa sound which is entangled in a host of rock flavours, alternative and hard rock textures among them involved within the melodically woven, deviously contagious reflection of The Girlfriend Experience while Lost in Dystopia shares more classic hues in its virulent canter; a grunge lining to both tracks as well as others within the album accentuating the wonderfully unvarnished feel of its presence and heart. Indeed Ride the Styx bears Nirvana-esque shading to its greedy nagging of the senses, the first of our favourite moment considerations within the album swiftly set.

The pair of No Such Thing and Inverse Paradise offer up quick challenges to that choice though, the first with something of an Everclear air around a classic metal wired holler another pinnacle of the release with the second eclipsing both through its almost XTC like setting bound in blues nurtured wiring as Molinero muses proving irresistible. The latter is also one of a pair of acoustic tracks which were recorded in a hotel room overlooking Bran Castle, known as Dracula’s Castle, in Transylvania.

Lenore provides a fiery enticement for ears, maybe one which lacks the sparks of its predecessors for us but still held eager attention before that final slice of acoustic enterprise in the shape of Distress Signal brought In Bed with Medusa to a fine close. Whether bred on intimate experiences of its creator or through observation, it is a potent engagement with ears and thoughts alike; one epitomising the stripped and exposed fertility of the album.

A release which grew in presence and enjoyment by the listen, In Bed with Medusa simply backs up its predecessors in suggesting Medusa is one of Britain’s brightest and unique propositions and with its own openly individual endeavour a band all should at least consider checking out.

In Bed with Medusa is out now and available @ https://medusaworld.bandcamp.com/

http://www.medusaworld.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/medusauk   https://twitter.com/medusaworld

Pete RingMaster 26/03/2020

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

Molly Karloff – Supernaturalation

Two years after their acclaimed debut EP, Dancing for Money, UK rockers Molly Karloff have uncaged its successor in the fiery shape of Supernaturalation, a collection of songs which quite simply and hungrily demand attention.

Oxford based, the trio of vocalist/guitarist Simon Guilliard, bassist Dan Podbery, and drummer Jowie Adkins has bred and earned a strong reputation for their high-energy performances and a similarly energetic sound bred on hard rock, grunge, and punk ‘n’ roll inspiration. The Dancing for Money EP back in 2018 more than alerted the UK rock scene of their rousing presence and though it has taken a couple of years to follow that potent introduction, Supernaturalation not so much builds on the success of its predecessor than leaves it in its dynamic wake.

Unleashing a vocal dispute with the issues life endures, Supernaturalation swiftly rips into attention with its title track, the EP opener dangling an instant hook impossible not to bite on as bass and drums add further thick bait. It is an entrapment which continues to grip as Guilliard’s similarly potent and energetic tones erupt. Familiarity and individuality collude in the track’s rousing roar, boldness of imagination which only grows more fertile across the release adding greater drama to the enterprisingly crafted encounter.

It is a great start to the EP which She Said, its lead single only reinforces. With slightly less energy but just as magnetic intensity, the track builds its might and roar resulting in a chorus which explodes on the ears as a rich climax to appetite nagging verse and creative escalation.

As stirring and thickly enjoyable as both tracks are, the pinnacle of the release for these ears comes across the next pair of Do You Wanna? and Do It Again. The first of the pair is pure virulence, bursting upon the senses with insatiable hunger with its riffs as predacious as they are contagious. A ferocious fusion of grunge lined hard rock and primal punk rock, the track swiftly proved irresistible, hooks a passion scything lure and rhythms a ravenous incitement within an enterprise which only grew more adventurous by the twist while its successor in its own individual vein proved just as viral driven and shaped by the swinging beats of Adkins and Podberry’s brooding bassline. That rhythmic unity quickly got under the skin, an addiction which bound in the guitar wiring and coaxed by the vocal prowess of Guilliard only escalated.

The Other Side brings things to a close, its funk nurtured swing the seed to another individual slab of Molly Karloff hard rock as keen to get the body bouncing as challenging, in this situation, taboos. With a fire in its belly and roar in its throat, the track provides a powerful and thickly enjoyable conclusion to one impressive and equally thrilling release.

The best rock ‘n’ roll leaves an indelible mark and incites the rebel inside, both fiercely potent traits of the Supernaturalation EP

Supernaturalation is available now through Roulette Media; available on CD and vinyl @ https://mollykarloff.co.uk/super-ep/

https://mollykarloff.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/MollyKarloff/

Pete RingMaster 13/03/2020

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

Sheafs – Vox Pop

With rebellion in its heart and every senses trespassing riff that it unleashes, Vox Pop is the debut EP from UK outfit Sheafs and we suggest one of the most rousing and truly exciting encounters you will be likely to come across this year.

Formed in 2015, Sheffield hailing Sheafs has certainly teased and tempted attention with their songs and live presence which has seen them support the likes of The Amazons, The Coral, IDLES, and Greta Van Fleet but they have now made a full-blooded demand on scrutiny and recognition with Vox Pop which surely will prove impossible for the masses to ignore. Produced by Dead Nature/Spring King talent Tarek Musa and Jonathan Hucks, the EP pounces on ears from its first breath, its indie rock/pop punk nurtured sounds insatiable in their aggressive virulence and defiant condemnation loaded words “confronting the frustrations of a consumerist world that profits from people’s low self-esteem and self-doubt” a potent incitement.

Thinking Out Loud bursts from EP and speakers first, the track rhythmically pounding out an invitation to which guitars add rich impetus with their inviting grooves. Once a thick bassline joins the enticement, the song was in full control of attention, vocalist Lawrence Feenstra completing the fertile lure with a delivery as striking as the hooks which litter the already irresistible song. The guitars of Chris Goodacre and Charles Mellor spring a web of riffs and melodic wiring, clarity and fuzziness aligning within its irrepressible trap. The song is superb, addiction spilled with every note and syllable as the band’s already proving individual sound leapt upon ears and appetite.

As reinforced by next up World Is Falling Apart, the distinctiveness of Sheafs‘ sound is inescapable though there is something of an Asylums meets Baddies breath to it at times. The EP’s second track shows more restraint in its energy though every aspect is a boisterous incitement from its intoxicating groove to the rhythmic shuffle cast by the bass of Callum Wright and Charlie Eastap’s beats. A psych rock spice wraps each melody and seeps into every atmospheric intimation bred in the open imagination of the quintet as again inherent infectiousness fuels every intensity soaked moment uncaged before the band’s new single Total Vanity erupts. Straight away rhythms and riffs seize the moment, each pounding out audacious virulence incitement as Feenstra’s tones and words spring their own inimitable motivation upon ears and thoughts. The track is raucous splendour, a slice of fearless irresistibility sure to lead fresh hordes to the mutiny of Sheafs.

Shopping equally gripped from its first call, a post punk nagging at the heart of another unapologetically virulent tempting. As with all tracks there is a delicious tempestuousness which boils up in varying degrees but always adds riveting drama and energy to the contagion of in this case consumer exploitation.

With the just as magnificent Care Less bringing the EP to a close, the incendiary track an insatiable infestation of punk bred, dissent soaked rock ‘n’ roll, Vox Pop is an explosion of sound which certainly stopped us in our tracks. New music consistently grabs attention and excites but few things spark real anticipation of major things ahead; Sheafs and their full introduction is one of those rare moments so are you ready?

Vox Pop is out now via Blood Records.

https://www.sheafs.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/sheafsband   https://twitter.com/sheafsband

Pete RingMaster 13/03/2020

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

Radio Mafia – Don’t Think About It EP

An email from band member Dave introduced us to Irish outfit Radio Mafia and a debut EP which offered surprise after surprise. Don’t Think About It springs four tracks upon ears which are openly distinct to each other but united in treating expectations with contempt.

There is little we can tell you about Radio Mafia right now apart from they being a quintet hailing from Drogheda who have been a potent part of the local and Dublin music scene. They also have a debut album set for release later in the summer but first there is the small but seriously potent matter of this first EP to explore and quite likely get excited over.

With a general tag of being a rock band, Radio Mafia swiftly reveal that term covers a canvas of flavours and styles which never left us anything less than fascinated. Don’t Think About It opens with its title track, the song a gentle lure on ears with its instinctive funk pop stroll. The deep tone of the bass swiftly proved thick captivation matched by that urged by the emotive prowess of the vocals, both gaining a fiery energy as the track brews an earthy rock fuelled eruption.

It is a potent start to the release but soon eclipsed by the impressive presence of B.R.S., the second track immediately revealing muscle in its character and infectiousness. With eager riffs and ripe hooks aligning with thick swinging rhythms, the song roars and growls, unapologetic irritability coursing through its veins as electronic intimation adds bold temptation. In time, that energetic aggression turns into a senses crawling predation with a sludge thick appetite, the track only escalating its weight of persuasion and enjoyment with the unforeseen twist.

Glass Soldier is next up and again immediately had attention gripped with its flirtatious bassline, one soon matched by keys and the general swing bred nature of the track’s eager stroll. The bass continues to throw its rhythmic sway as drums set the track’s manipulative shuffle, guitar and keys brewing their own particular melodic captivation around the united vocals of the band. As with its predecessors the song simply hit the spot and as those before it in sharing its own particularly unique sound showed expectations a middle finger and pleasure a warm welcome.

Fit To Die completes the line-up, the track another with a heavier rock heart with just a touch of Therapy? like punk to its rapacious roar. As temptation lines every raw melodic wire intensity wraps each vocal roar just as aggression soaks the rhythmic intimacy of the track. It is a great end to a fine first union with Radio Mafia, an EP which may be thrilled the most with its earthy rock instincts but only lit ears and imagination from start to finish.

Don’t Think About It is out now.

https://www.facebook.com/RadioMafiaOfficial/

Pete RingMaster 13/03/2020

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

Scant Regard – You Know The Drill

Pic Dave Cox

If its predecessor, Skipping Over Damaged Area, was an exploration and echo of the “apocalyptic destruction and devolution of the planet we live on”, then You Know The Drill is the bold new adventure in its escape; a sci-fi toned tapestry of intrigue and contagion wrapped in sounds which just infiltrate and enliven the body and imagination.

You Know The Drill is the new creative exploit from Scant Regard, the solo project of Will Crewdson; guitarist/musician/songwriter previously acclaim notorious for his work with Rachel Stamp, Adam Ant, The Selecter, Johnette Napolitano, Bow Wow Wow, and Flesh for Lulu as well as currently one half of the equally irresistible She Made Me Do It. It is an encounter which still sows its seeds in the decay and destruction of the modern world but within its body ventures into the hope and relief brought through space lit, sci-fi cultured escapades. Crewdson’s previous offering, the deviously magnetic Skipping Over Damaged Area, felt like the corruption of hope and light by a creeping darkness. You Know The Drill is the reverse in many ways, bringing light and respite to the sunless breath of the world; both encounters casting trips of sonic poetry and rich intimation drenched in uncompromising infectiousness.

 You Know The Drill opens up with Ulterior Motives, electronic pulsing instantly nagging on ears and attention before rhythms collude to pitch immediate contagion upon the senses. In swift time Crewdson’s vocals join the hungry enterprise, the knowing deception of the song’s sarcasm springing greater catchiness by the second before saving its thickest dose of virulence for the delicious throaty bass led groove which breaks out.

The album’s title track follows, blues liquor fuelling its opening flames before a surf kissed breeze courts the controlled but pungent rhythms at its core. As the opener sprung a lure of descriptive intimation in its sound alone so its instrumental successor weaves an even more stirring sonic tale of drama and suggestion to play with before No More follows suit with its shadow wrapped stroll into ears and thoughts. Again every hook carries creative revelation for the imagination to conjure with; the track nurtured in the same suggestive espionage and danger which marked the best themes tunes of sixties and seventies TV shows such as UFO, Space: 1999, The Avengers or The Prisoner.

Its dark temptation is followed by the thickly enticing lures of Projectile Comet, bait which erupts in another of those riveting hooks and grooves which Crewdson has proven so irresistible and diabolical with across the years. The intergalactic hue of the track brings threat and adventure, the concussive rhythms at its heart chased by voracious riffs and intoxicating grooves in a mix which hungrily got under the skin, an infiltration being quickly replicated by the post punk incident that is the outstanding Calamity’s Creation. Bass and guitar unite to project an instant infiltration of theatre and seduction, vocals riding the groove wired hook lined incitement with matching lust bugging enterprise. There is something of The Monochrome Set to the track at times, the scent of Lester Square creative prowess aligning to the inimitable craft and imagination of Crewdson as another momentous moment within the album is cast.

The swarthy southern hues of Nevertheless bring another hug of instrumental suggestion straight after, ears and thoughts united in their swift embrace while both A Process of Illumination and Charmed I’m Sure share thick fascination with their respective electronic web of insinuation and industrial rock incitement, the latter a piece as aggressively imposing as it is mentally manipulating.

Rogue Prototype similarly draws on industrial instincts, its cyber hull the host for pop tempting and dark post punk menace. The track proved pure fascination in its breath and imputation, suspicion and drama soaking every note boiling and erupting in its tempestuous body before leaving Heart Torn Blood Ratio to bring the gripping release to a close. Melancholic beauty and solemn radiance coat every second of the brooding serenade as darker heavier throes of enterprise rumble in its depths; the track an enthralling end to an album which danced with the imagination and provoked eager attention from start to finish with rich pleasure the outcome.

Look up the definition of fascination and you find the likes of captivation, attraction, intrigue, magnetism and obsession as similar meanings and all thickly apply to the also gloriously art wrapped You Know The Drill, Scant Regard’s greatest moment yet.

You Know The Drill is out now digitally and on blue vinyl effect CD @ https://scantregard.com/store and https://scantregard.bandcamp.com/album/you-know-the-drill

http://www.scantregard.com   https://www.facebook.com/scantregardpage   https://twitter.com/scantregard   https://www.youtube.com/user/willcrewdson

Pete RingMaster 29/02/2020

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

Within The Flames: Fires of Freya Interview

 

Having been impressed with their debut single a good few weeks back, we had the chance to get to know the band and enterprise behind the striking introduction to Fires of Freya. So with thanks to vocalist Cheryl Reynolds we had the pleasure to stare into the flames of UK band and explore…

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started?

Hello! We are Fires of Freya and we are Cheryl Reynolds on main vocals and keyboard, Shaun Evans on guitar, James Withington on bass guitar and Dan Baldwin on drums. Initially, the aim was to create an all-female grunge type band but it was soon realised that it’s very difficult to find a female bassist, or at least it was at the time so we scrapped that idea and brought in a guy. The members have changed over the time the band’s existed and so the two longest and original members are Cheryl and Dan, Shaun joined in May 2018 and then James came in a year later. We didn’t know each other before forming the band, the beauty of music is that it pulls people together and now we’re like a little family!

Have you been involved in other bands before? If so has that had any impact on what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

We’ve all been or are in different bands, most musicians have a sort of addiction to performing and creating so you do find this often. I was mostly in cover bands and so this was useful in building up my confidence and figuring out what type of sound best suites my vocals, but it came with the comfort of knowing people would like the actual music already!

What inspired the band name?

I love mythology and anything to do with Norse mythology in particular, “Freya” is the Norse goddess of Love and War, among other things, and the “Fires” had a nice epic ring to it.

Can you expand on that specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

Initially yes, we were going for a gunge sort of sound, but when that didn’t work out it morphed with new members coming in, in the beginning we had a more punk rock sort of sound, Alkaline Trio sort of vibes but again our sound has changed from then. We are very eclectic with the music we write; we write what we think sounds good wither it fits a specific genre or subgenre matters very little to us, especially as we all have an array of influences. We aim to be a Rock band, but that title really does have many colours.

Do the same things still drive the band when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

I’d say the same things drive the band, the fact we all get on and enjoy each other’s company, the want to write new material, the want to tour outside the North East and create an album have always been there and still are.

Since those early days pin down how your sound has evolved?

Massively and it continues to evolve, we’ve gone from attempts at being a grunge band to adding punk rock type sounds to then adding soft rock/ballads and when Shaun joined we then took a more modern blues rock route. Now we all add whatever we think sounds good, we have heavier grungy songs, soft rock songs, blues rock vibes and we even have a couple verging on pop rock. Our gigs are never boring, put it that way! But it all seems to work and have a similar flow so we tend to get away with being so varied.

Always more of an organic movement of sound or predominantly the band deliberately setting out to try new things?

It’s the band wanting to try new things, infuse our own influences and keep it fresh. Our sound has definitely matured organically over the time we’ve been together though.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

Shaun coming into the band added a blues style of play to our songs, blues rock isn’t something I personally listened to much before, but I’ve discovered an appreciation for it.

Is there a process to the songwriting which generally guides the creation of songs?

Sort of, we’ve got 2 methods we use. 1. The lesser used option, but we do sometimes just have a jam and see what we can come up with. I’ve got a bank of lyrics written with no allocated music as of yet and so I’d then go through these to check which ones fit the song we are jamming out! 2. One of the band writes the bones of a song, the initial idea.; then he writer will record this just on our phones, so if it’s me with an idea, I’ll record my idea on either guitar, bass or keyboard and sing it and send it into the guys. Shaun and James do similar but always leave me to add lyrics and vocals.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

Emotions and situations in life. We have songs that are loosely based on heartache from failed relationships, the feelings generated from the way someone has treated me, love and past loves; some songs that are full of attitude and speak of not letting people put you down.

Give us some background to your latest release.

21st of February we release our new single “Complicated”, it’s rocky and bouncy and a little bit bluesy (although it may not be any of those as I’m not very good at naming genres!) with powerful vocals and a blinding solo! It’s partly based on touching base with the topic of mental health and the struggles of fighting the “demons” of your mind and how this can interfere in relationships and how showing a little support and encouragement can go a long way.

At the moment it’s just the one song, explained above, but it will form part of our debut album which we hope to release at the end of 2020. Our debut single “Take a Bow” was more about not allowing people put you down, it’s full of attitude and self-empowerment!

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

We go into the studio with the song pretty much in its final stages but are always open to idea and once we record the 1st draft we always listen through over and over to see if there is anything to add or take away. Backing vocals and layers are something that happens in the studio and they are done in the studio, not normally pre-planned.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably a favourite aspect of the band?

We love performing live it’s true. We’ve been told we suite a big stage in the past and that our stage energy is similar to that of bands like Bring Me the Horizon. If there is room to move around, we’ll make use of the entire stage, ever inch! If there is the ability to come off the stage and get amongst the crowd, I tend to like doing that. We are also able to calm it down and perform our emotional tracks and I hope bring the emotions across. I tried to bring big beach balls to a show once but I bought them online and they turned out to be massive! Way bigger than I expected. Ended up not using them as it was for a gig in a small venue and not only would this ball take up much of the room, if anyone got hot with it, it would probably have sent them flying! Live shows also give our Shaun the chance to break out his shit shirts! He has so many and each more awful than the last!

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods? Are there the opportunities to make a mark if the drive is there for new bands?

It is tough, I think because we are so eclectic, we do need to work hard to build a fan base because people won’t like us for simply belonging to a specific genre. We need to convince people to like us and listen to us because they like our actual songs, their messages and our performances of them. We’ve gigged a lot in the North East of England and in the beginning it was quite a challenge finding gigs to play but now we are more established and know so many other bands in the area it isn’t as hard now. It really is so important to befriend other bands, they will be your 1st fans and support and you theirs, you can make it if you support each other!

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date? Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as the band grows and hopefully gets increasing success or is it more that bands struggling with it are lacking the knowledge and desire to keep it working to their advantage?

Social media is important, it’s the main way we can connect with our fans and let them know what we are up to. The pictures, music and videos we post on there build the band’s image. The more fans you have on there the more popular you seem and so more opportunities come your way for things like festivals which lets you reach even more people. It’s a tool and should be utilised to the best of your ability and used to stay connected with your fans. It’s not the be all and end all though; a lot of our fans discovered us by going to see another band we were billed with, the live scene is still the best way to gain true fans I believe.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Look out for our next single “Complicated” released 21st of February; we’ll also have a music video to accompany this soon after! And check out or website http://www.firesoffreya.com or Facebook page for the next gig and get yourself along!

Check Fires of Freya out further @ https://firesoffreya.bandzoogle.com/home   https://www.facebook.com/firesoffreya/ and https://twitter.com/firesoffreya

Pete RingMaster 18/02/2020

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright