Diamond Youth – Nothing Matters

dy Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

It may be only thirty minutes in length but Nothing Matters, the debut album from US alternative rock band Diamond Youth, is jam packed with boisterously contagious songs to party hard and long to. It is a riot of fun seemingly bred on flavours inspired by the likes of Queens Of the Stone Age, Weezer, and Foo Fighters but with plenty of its own distinct characteristics and flavours to create something individual to Diamond Youth. For personal tastes the release is stronger and most tenacious in its first half but every offering within Nothing Matters is a compelling slice of pop rock equipped with feisty persuasion and a good strain of tenacious mischief.

Diamond Youth hails from Baltimore, emerging around 2010 with a line-up featuring members of Trapped Under Ice, Terror, and Down to Nothing; all sharing a common background of art, design, skateboarding, and of course music. Influences range from band such as Pixies, The Nerves, and unsurprisingly Queens Of The Stone Age, and it is fair to say that the quartet has increasingly lured attention through a host of EPs starting with DMND and Don’t Lose Your Cool in 2011. It is Orange in 2013 and Shake a year later, both as the new album released via Topshelf Records, which provided the spark to greater focus and acclaim enveloping the band, in turn sparking strong anticipation for the band’s debut full-length. It will leave no one disappointed and is destined to not only recruit another wave of eager spotlights and fans whilst simply creating a fun time for all.

Recorded with engineer Dave Warsop, the album starts with its title track, swiftly entrapping ears and appetite with stirring rhythms and spicy hooks encased in vocal and melodic revelry. Quickly, especially as the vocals impressively cast their tempting on proceedings, that QOTSA air is an open breeze bringing even greater catchy bait to the vibrant persuasion. It is the tangy hook though which brings the biggest smile in the emotions, that and the adventurous ideation lining the song from first note to last.

Nothing-Matters-Cover Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review     The excellent opening to Nothing Matters is quickly matched by Thought I Had It Right, another song with thick hooks and entrancing harmonic tempting. Slightly more restrained in energy compared to its predecessor, the song saunters and sways with a rich Muse like sultriness to sound and voice. Every syllable comes coated with a spice of angst whilst melodies like a fine wine just become more seductive and effective on the senses with very passing moment. There is also a volatile edge to the contagion posing as a track, its sonic presence flirting with causticity as it forcibly infests and ignites ears through to the imagination.

Spinning steps up next with an even more reserved nature though melodic and vocal passion in turn create a blistering roar courted by a snarl of a bassline. Fair to say that it might be the least feisty song on the release so far but it is the most tempestuous and fascinating, and subsequently quite irresistible as also the following Far Away from Earth. Rhythms straight away lay down an anthemic potency before quickly finding themselves skirted by a deliciously grizzled bassline and a brewing sonic mist of guitar. The mellow croon of vocals does bring a magnetic tempering but ultimately only seems to inflame the growl and rebellious attitude of the song as it erupts in a cauldron of pop infectiousness and rock ‘n’ roll predation. Crunchy and warmly smouldering simultaneously, it teases the psyche like Josh Homme toying with Muse as it creates yet another instant pinnacle upon the album.

A more summery swagger comes with Succulent next, a surf rock/ garage pop colouring the sweltering climate of the bewitching instrumental. Its heated charm and warm elegance are emulated in next up In the Clouds, a bubbling shimmer of sound and harmonies which takes the listener by the emotions and leads them on a dance of addictive devilry. Six tracks in and five of them are easily single potential, an instrumental having little chance of being chosen let’s be honest.

From Riptide onwards, band and album seems to explore a different avenue with a lessening of the agitated sonic invention and an increasing of more immersive melodies and warm radiance. Tracks as this compelling ballad still have a fire in their belly but such the alchemy of virulence in earlier songs they just miss, and it is just, casting the same persuasive spark. Nevertheless the song has ears engrossed and satisfaction full whilst the static kiss and melodic coaxing of No Control and the post punk like rhythmic lure of The Nothing, ensure only the keenest attention is given. The second of the two especially has thoughts and enjoyment lit before Deep Love explores some dark pop beauty. It has a feel of UK artist Rooster Cole to it, with its sombre ambience encased in an excitable adventure of sound. The track is superb, a match for anything before and without doubt also a song on its own sure to trigger greedy reactions.

The album closes with The Difference, itself a humidly aired release of emotional and musical drama, and a fine end to an increasingly impressing encounter. Diamond Youth has taken the qualities nurtured in previous releases to new thrilling and at times spellbinding heights. Whether you want an out and out romp to party with or something with a melodic embrace to sink into, Nothing Matters delivers one very enjoyable time.

Nothing Matters is available now via Topshelf Records @ http://www.topshelfrecords.com/products/545159-diamond-youth-nothing-matters or https://topshelfrecords.bandcamp.com/album/nothing-matters

https://www.facebook.com/dmndyouth   http://www.dmndyouth.com/

RingMaster 20/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Gelato – Self Titled EP

Gelato _ Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

Do you equally miss the days when Queens Of the Stone Age first teased and taunted ears and appetites with raw and undiluted rock ‘n’ roll cast in their inimitable manner? Then welcome to Gelato, a UK band openly wearing inspirations from Josh Homme and co in their feisty sound but only as one spicy ingredient in a contagious mix of punk and indie pop infused rock ‘n’ roll. Personally the biggest similarity is simply the thick tingle of excitement hearing the bands for the first time, the London trio rippling with an indefinable essence which leaves those around them seeming a much paler proposition.

The evidence to such claim comes with the band’s self-titled debut EP; three tracks of quirkily individual and addictively tenacious encounters fuelled by invention and soaked in creative devilry. Gelato consists of bassist Phil, drummer Ben, and vocalist /guitarist Drew, the latter previously of the excellent Hitchcock Blonde. 2014 saw the band make a potent breakthrough with low-key gigs across the London live scene with matching reactions and receive airplay via BBC6. Their EP though is the first major lure into broader awareness and attention, and the first step to big things we suggest.

Gelato EP cover _Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review   Recorded with Tobin Jones (Bo Ningen, Twilight Sad, Cold Specks), the EP kicks off with Get My Way, a track instantly flirting with ears as a wiry guitar hook repeats keenly on the senses amidst a thick prodding of beats. It is appetite raising bait which becomes a feisty stroll with the same sonic lure now embraced by crisp rhythms and a darkly wicked bassline. The vocals of Drew as just as inviting once they emerge too, whilst the QOTSA bred harmonies add a smiling extra to the contagiously engaging adventure. The song continues to snarl and seduce in equal measure, band and sound bounding around like a young colt with the maturity and craft of a rock veteran.

The band’s new single Room Service follows and again has ears and a now hungry appetite locked in with its first touch, this a dirty grizzled bassline which simply resonates in the senses before a spicy weave of guitar and brewing harmonies caress it and a fresh anthemic lure of beats. As its predecessor, the track from a slimmer start broadens into a heavier bewitching tapestry of sound and textures, it all infested in a contagious revelry and charm. As catchy and tangibly poppy as it is though, there is a dark predatory edge to the song especially in backing vocals and rhythms, which lights up air and imagination with further unpredictable adventure.

Ruffians brings the band’s introduction to a close, two minutes of punk filtered pop rock which has an underlying aggression as riveting and majestic as the warmer melodic tendencies wrapping its rugged spine. Arguably the least dramatically sculpted offering, the song still has little difficulty in firing up pleasure and a want for more, the band showing they can rock out or design a seriously involved temptation with matching potency.

As with any brief but impressive offering, there is only a needy want for more by the EP’s close, a wish to dive with haste into further endeavours but that is for the future. Right now we have a seriously impressive and thrilling start to devour from a band in Gelato, which one day might just be spoken of with the same stature of their prime inspiration.

The Gelato EP is available now digitally and on CD via https://gelatomusic.bandcamp.com/releases

http://www.facebook.com/GelatoMusic

RingMaster 17/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Red Spektor – Self Titled EP

Red Spektor Promo Shot Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

There is a rich flame burning away in the Potteries, and it goes under the name Red Spektor. The UK trio are poised to release their self-titled debut EP, a blaze of psychedelic, stoner, and classic rock which fascinates as it engulfs ears and imagination, and unrelentingly thrills as it provides further evidence that heavy and fiery British rock ‘n’ roll is heading towards a fresh heyday.

Hailing from Stoke on Trent, Red Spektor emerged at the end of 2012 drawing on inspirations from the likes of Black Rebel Motorcycle Club, Led Zeppelin, and Black Sabbath. Once the threesome had honed their sound, they proceeded to hit the live scene with swift success, sharing stages with bands such as Carousel Vertigo, Attica Rage, Texas Flood, and Lawless along the way. Every step drew more eager ears to their growing fan base, accelerated by festival appearances whilst the band never letting a week seemingly go by without igniting a venue somewhere. 2014 saw the band record and release their EP via Bandcamp, a 5 track encounter recorded live and straight to tape over two days. Now it has its full digital unveiling and it is easy to expect Red Spektor stoking up a new wave of close and acclaiming attention.

The band draws on essences of “dark pre-war blues right through to the British blues explosion of the sixties and the heaviness of the seventies albeit with a modern and dirty twist” according to their bio, a mix swiftly seducing the senses and igniting the air through EP opener Hard To Please. A lone vocal guitar awakens instant attention, its rich spicy lure soon joined by a solemnly brooding bassline and crispy beats as the song quickly settles down into a feisty tempting. The guitar of John Scane virtually dances across the senses, every riff and hook incendiary and leaving a sultry residue like the trail behind Marvel Comic’s Ghostrider. Vocally he has a mellower but no less potent air, clean and alluring against the sizzling of blues/psyche invention and Rob Farrell’s dark basslines.

Red Spektor Cover Artwork Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review   It is a seriously gripping start quickly backed by the slower, more intensive presence of Transcending. The thick and freely swinging beats of drummer Darren Bowen cage ears and anticipation as an almost melancholic bass coaxing prowls; both sparking swift appetite for the song’s impending offering. A sinister seducing comes with the enterprise of the guitar, and indeed vocals, as sixties and seventies sounds collude with a modern creative rapacity to bewitch and crawl over the listener. The track is a relentless smoulder rather than the blistering eruption of its predecessor but just as persistently magnetic and irresistible.

Third song Everywhere puts a higher gear in motion for its rich persuasion of blues rock; rumbling and strolling along whilst melodic vapours intoxicate ear and air alike. Rhythms cast a dirty tempering shadow and compliment to the searing enterprise, keeping the psychedelic croon earthbound as once more the band has attention bewitched. The exploration of the dirtier textures within the song continues with greater focus and revelry within the next up Redemption, Red Spektor tapping into the purest vat of blues distilled rock and adding their own not exactly unique but certainly distinct flavouring to another transfixing and highly enjoyable proposal.

The song probably does not quite match those before it though, whilst all of the songs before also find themselves in the shadow of the glorious closer Earth Mother. From its first beat and eager riff, the track bursts into a masterful and virulent swagger. An anthemic and delicious groove leads the way, courted by similarly lively and bold rhythms aligned to a throaty bass invitation. The song relaxes a touch in urgency as the vocals add their easy persuasion to the mix, picking its knees and tempo up again between verses and around the fiery enticing which subsequently seeps from every melody, hook, and resonating bass groove. As across all songs, Scane’s solos just burn their way into the psyche, but it is the overall swing and insatiable tenacity to the song which helps it take best song honours.

Many like us missed the Red Spektor EP first time around, and indeed the band’s emergence, but its new full digital unleashing ensures there are no excuses now in not exploring band and sound. No excuses only rich rewards.

The Red Spektor EP is digitally available from May 18th via all online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/redspektorband    http://redspektor.com/

RingMaster 17/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Charge – Sweet Lies

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With a band name like Charge, you need a sound with a suitable intensity of energy and boldness to it, and that is exactly what the French metallers provide with debut album Sweet Lies. It is a storming onslaught of voracious and volatile rock ‘n’ roll, a multi-flavoured adventure which might have a few minor issues but provides a seriously exciting and potential soaked incitement. The band has been around since 2004 and have tucked a couple of EPs under their belts but Sweet Lies is their first thick nudge on appetites beyond the Paris and French rock scene, and makes a rousing invitation many will be compelled to eagerly embrace.

Forming around eight years ago, Charge quickly brought out the demo Ain’t My World, recorded with producer Francis Caste (Zuul FX, The ARRS) who returned to work with the band on their first official EP 8 Miles Away in 2009. It is fair to say both as well as a live presence dishing out adrenaline driven and raucously varied metal, brought potent attention and a swiftly growing fan base locally. The band’s line-up has been through a few changes since day one but now with the release of the album, vocalist/rhythm bassist Ravin, guitarist Sacha, drummer Loïc, and lead bassist Lionnel are now looking at broader spotlights to breach. Consisting of the songs from their EP and new tracks produced by Spirou (Bérurier Black), all mixed and mastered by Caste, Sweet Lies opens with a contagious riot and just does not look back.

From the first surge of the initial groove, the album and its opener Alone has ears and imagination hooked. The potent first breath is swiftly a surging torrent of bass riffs, thumping beats, and squalling sonic enticement, a magnetic start soon providing an inescapable onslaught of anthemic bait. Thrash and groove metal collude with heavy rock and punk essences in the now riotous affair, whilst vocally Ravin, though at times a little wayward, just fires up the gripping turbulence further. The union of basses brings a great growl to it all and provides rich depth to song and subsequently album though Charge does not exploit the opportunities they offer enough in some ways. With both openly skilfully played, the band never quite finds the experimental potential explored by for example Morkobot, but it is a dual attack sculpting thick irresistible bait and resourceful adventure as evidenced straight away by Fantasy.

The second song has a much more restrained start but one soaked in menace and predatory intent. The twin prowl of certainly not identical bass provides a bestial and sinisterly charming proposal pierced by the forceful jabs of Loïc and entwined in the just as rabidly delivered and resourcefully crafted sonic laces of guitar. Eventually the controlled stroll succumbs to a brewing intensity, erupting in a ferocious rampage but one easily slipping through the gears in all directions. There is an element of post punk to the colder acidic hooks and of nu-metal in the psyche enslaving devilry, everything coming together for one thrilling stomp.

Both 84 and That’s It keep album and emotions ablaze, the first merging raw elements of pop punk with melodic rock and more whilst turning each flavour into a cauldron of hostile and infectious endeavour. Its successor is even more contagious, bass and guitar grooves aligning with gripping hooks for a flowing tempting within the lure of the other growling almost carnivorous bass and the senses punishing beats. It also spins a weave of melodic and milder tempered exploits which adds to the irresistible romp before making way for the pungent drama and addictiveness of Just Want More. Also as punk as it is metal, Russian band Biting Elbows coming to mind at certain points, the track is a barbarous and wholly catchy incitement on ears and passions, and as the album just increases in potency and persuasion with every listen.

The sheer force and busy assaults of songs does at times hide the individual skill and invention of the band members, but each only impresses and shows a hungry imagination throughout even if, as suggested earlier, they have the potential to explore greater triumphs not quite realised here. With songs like the following One though, there are no complaints just more anticipation of their future. The track is a juggernaut of heavy duty riffs and towering beats insatiably rolling with the handbrake off over the senses. To that vocals scowl and roar with impressive potency whilst tangy grooves and even spicier hooks leap out from every corner and twist of the exceptional infestation of ears and emotions.

The epidemic lure and rampancy of the album continues with its title track, punk metal unleashed with addiction spawning relish and aggression but aligned to searing flames of sonic enterprise and the ever seducing blend of ravenous bass invention. Such the potency of its onslaught, even sitting down and listening to the album’s best song leaves exhaustion in its wake.

Sweet Lies is brought to a fine close by Ain’t My World, the most hostile and raw encounter on the release, though the band is as unpredictable as ever slipping slithers of melodic calm and warm melodic enticing into the hellacious storm with skilled efficiency and effect. It is a striking end to an outstanding release. There is often something familiar to songs with the encounter but as everything it only helps make tracks an adventure in recognising their source and in baiting a thick physical offering from the listener to its temptations.

Charge, if not through Sweet Lies, at some point will not be just a treat for the French to bask in and be battered by, though the invitation from this album really should be checked out now by all.

Sweet Lies is available now @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/sweet-lies/id912217677

http://www.chargerocks.com/   https://www.facebook.com/ChargeRocksBand

RingMaster 13/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

LaBrassBanda – Europa

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To support and celebrate the band’s recent UK tour, German nine-piece LaBrassBanda have re-released their acclaimed 14-track album Europa, and if like us you missed it first time around, now is the time to join their compelling festival of sound. Uniting the richest contagious elements of everything from techno to funk, reggae to ska, and punk to alternative rock pop, the Bavarian outfit take ears and imagination on a euro stomp of irresistible creative revelry.

LaBrassBanda was formed in 2007, one of its founders, vocalist/trumpeter Stefan Dettl inspired by the Youngblood Brass Band. With a few line-up changes and an expansion of personnel, the band has persistently ventured across Europe with their sound, becoming renowned for their high energy live performances. As mentioned the band’s sound is bred on styles and flavours as diverse as the different musical backgrounds and tastes of its members. Originally released in 2013, Europa gets a fresh UK concentrated unleashing to accompany their just completed and highly successful tour and before the full complement of trumpeters Jörg Hartl and Korbinian Weber, trombonist Manuel Winbeck, bassist Mario Schönhofer, drummer Manuel Da Coll, percussionist Tobias Weber, tuba player Stefan Huber, and guitarist Fabian Jungreithmayr alongside Dettl hit the festivals of Europe.

The album fires up ears and thoughts straight away with opener Tecno, its sound as you would expect from its title a vibrant enticement for feet and dance-floors aligned to a great throaty shadowing of bass and tuba. The expressive vocals of Dettl are equally low in tone but as magnetic as the flames of brass which flirt with the senses across the relatively restrained but tenacious encounter. Thoughts of eighties bands like Pigbag and Mouth spring up as the song dances with ears before passing the baton of infectiousness over to the following Jacqueline. Immediately more feisty and energetic than its predecessor, the song swings and grooves with a funk bred air and gypsy folk devilry, again body swerves and lively feet the target.

0888837022521     The album hits its pinnacle early with the exceptional Holland, the track a slightly deranged waltz of hip hop tinged vocals and an accompanying mashing of syllables courted by a soundtrack of busy and psyche seducing brass. It is just the start of the fun and lustful persuasion though, a fluid step into a reggae spiced, punk hued romp reminding of bands like Asian Dub Foundation causing pure addiction. A track to bring graveyards alive and lungs exhaustion, the track is pure manna for body and soul. What it is about who knows, being Bavarian illiterate we fail you on that aspect as there is not an English word spoken across the whole album but we are led to believe plenty of songs are about beer, girls and partying.

Schweden next nudges and entices the listener with an electro beat based offering equipped with a potent seduction of bass which blossoms into a sultry croon of brass and melodic persuasion. It also has a whiff of nostalgia, parts of it reminding of Dalek I Love You whilst it’s more feisty and lively exotic catchiness has a sense of Mano Negra to its enterprise. The freely flowing encounter never erupts into a blaze but relentlessly seduces before allowing the agitated adventure of Z’spat Dro to tease and bounce with ears and appetite. A punk tenacity and energy surges through the infectious anthemic romp, think Biting Elbows meets Les Négresses Vertes and you have another treat of a track.

The punchy Nackert with is rock pop croon keeps the energies and thorough enjoyment in top gear whilst Sarajevo takes a gentler but no less enthralling flight across a boldly simmering but reserved scenery of melodic craft. The elegant instrumental has the imagination casting its own travelogue of adventure, brass and guitar providing the colour and rhythms the drama for thought sculpted exploits.

Entering into the second half of the album, Europa evolves into a more evocative and suggestive persuasion than the more forceful devilry of its opening half, though first of all the cosmopolitan soundscape of Frankreich reveals itself as another instrumental with bold rousing hints for ears and thoughts to play with. The colder climate of the melancholically charmed Russland comes next, its slow haunting an immersive caress whilst Western straight after saunters along with a jazz funk smile and brassy mysticism as vocals unite in harmonic, almost shamanic prowess.

Though admittedly there was pining for the outright devilment of a Jacqueline of Holland at this point, the album still has the listener firmly departed from the real world attention wise with each proposal, a success continued with the warm and dark theatre of Griechenland and following that, the folk lined shuffle of Vogerl where that gypsy folk/punk tempting returns to take feet and emotions on another flirtatious dance.

Europa ends with firstly the highly persuasive Opa and lastly the melancholic, funereal like sigh of Hymne, arguably the one time not understanding the spoken narrative is missed, though the wake like reverence of the music explains plenty.

It is fair to say that Europa is easily one of our favourite encounters this year and at times offers songs sparking a lust which borders on illegal. To bring your summer and year to life, if you have not already, time to join the LaBrassBanda festivities we suggest.

Europa is available now via Sony Music/RCA @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/europa/id651995604

http://www.labrassbanda.com   https://www.facebook.com/LaBrassBanda

RingMaster 12/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

David Sinclair Four – 4

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The fourth album from David Sinclair and the first with his band as a quartet, 4 is one of those encounters which makes a decent first proposal and then with increasing tenacity continues to endear itself to ears and thoughts over time. The David Sinclair Four release contains ten varied and highly flavoursome slices of rock ‘n’ roll which spring from a blues rock seeding but never restrict their enterprise to any single musical colour. Equally there is a feel good factor which fuels songs looking at and springing from the diverse culture of the artist’s home, London; the result of all essences together being one enjoyable proposition.

The current band line-up came together in 2013, bassist Jos Mendoza and guitarist Geoff Peel linking up with vocalist/guitarist Sinclair and his drummer son Jack, their addition turning the David Sinclair Trio into the David Sinclair Four. Before this the band had already released a trio of acclaimed albums in the shape of Hey (2006), Threewheeling (2008), and Take Me There (2013). Live too the band has been a greedily devoured proposal and list playing with the likes of Wilko Johnson, the Oli Brown Band, Marcus Bonfanti, Johnny Dowd, Graham Bonnet, and Willie Nile amongst many on their CV. Now the four-piece are setting about bringing the summer a healthy stroll of rock to swagger along through their new album, a release easy to see following its predecessors in drawing the plaudits.

The album opens with Sick Of Being Good and an initial potent caress of guitar to awaken ears. Imagination is swiftly stirred too by a subsequent sturdier stroll of energy and sound led by an infectiously enticing hook. The song continues to lure in appetite and attention with its blues hued catchiness and David’s vocals, backed well by the band. There are few surprises in the song but plenty to get hungry teeth into with an expressive guitar invention, warm harmonies, and colourful enterprise shaping every twist of the song.

The strong start is matched by the following treat of The Click-Clack Man. The tale about a character on the search to meet I am led to believe Tom Waits; the song has a seductive swing and resourceful adventure to its quickly enslaving presence. Hooks and grooves create an inescapable web to which a deliciously roving darkly toned bassline and crisply swung beats add further drama and temptation. The song is irresistible to feet and emotions, the biggest highlight on the album though often rivalled.

The sultry blues climate of next up Life Gone Cold brings further variety to the album, its slow saunter equipped with fiery flames of guitar and emotive intensity. It does not have the spark of the first two songs though but with again mouth-watering guitar craft and potent rhythmic bait alongside straight-forward and easily accessible lyrics, ears held easily before being excited again by Crude Emotion. Rhythmically muscular and casting a heavy stride from its first breath, the song is another unveiling of contagion posing as grooves and hooks. The swing of its body is an incitement to physical participation and the funk infused chorus bait to a vocal union, as band and track create another major moment within 4.

The excellent Down By The Canal comes next, and swiftly transfixes as the excellent guest vocals of Maxi Priest flirt with ears alongside the tones of David. The song’s reggae hued scenery is just as magnetic, drawing a swift smile with its engaging revelry before making way for the blues smoulder of World Turns Around. The harmonica of Paul Jones, another guest on the album, is a spicy flirtation matched by the fiery craft and sounds uncaged by Peel as the song swerves with the persuasion of a temptress within ears. Both tracks entice and reward enjoyably whilst providing further fresh textures and creative ventures within the album.

The remainder of the album for personal tastes does not quite match up to what comes before, though songs like The Illness & The Cure and Give Me A Rose which follow, only provide easy to consume and enjoy offerings with their individual blues rock spiced ventures. They just do not have the extra ingredient to ignite these particular ears, feeling a little flat against the quality sounds earlier in the release. It will obviously not be the same for everyone though and there is nothing less than enjoyment gained from the tracks or the closing pair of Coming Out Of The Rain and Coming Off The Rails, they also strong and enjoyable encounters but again just do not have that extra ingredient found in other songs upon the album. The penultimate song sees David dueting with Lorna Reid, who also co-wrote the song, their union another flavoursome delight, whilst the closing song again embraces the vibrant flair of Paul Jones.

The bottom-line though is that 4 is one highly satisfying and at times addictive encounter, David Sinclair and co’s finest moment yet and a definite recommendation for blues rock ‘n’ roll fans with an appetite for others like Paul Weller, The Rolling Stones, The Kinks and especially on the guitar and blues side, Seasick Steve.

4 is available now via IRL @ http://irl.bigcartel.com/product/david-sinclair-four-4 and on most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/DavidSinclairFour   http://www.davidsinclairfour.com/

RingMaster 12/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Ophite – Basic Mistakes

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With their Basic Mistakes EP our introduction to the band, French band Ophite from out of the blue sneaked up and dared ears and imagination to party with its individual revelry. It was an invitation impossible to refuse as six multi-flavoured and devilishly captivating tracks provided easily one of the most enjoyable and irresistible romps this year so far.

Formed in 2012, the Paris quartet consists of vocalist Marie Portier, guitarist Yoann Dolmare, bassist Nicolas Guenard, and drummer Kevin Jr. Musically the band conjures up tracks which blossom on essences of grunge, blues, groove, and pop but equally offer numerous other spices and textures to fascinate and entice. Anticipation for Basic Mistakes had already been sparked by the release of the video for the track Phoenician Sailors, but the EP whilst fulfilling all the promise found in that one song, reveals an even greater tapestry of invention and adventure to the band’s sound.

The title track opens up the devilment of sound and persuasion, a thick bold bassline with a suitable swagger the first line of alluring bait instantly accompanied by a percussive enticing. The potent coaxing is just as quickly joined by bluesy strands of guitar and similarly sultry riffs, as well as the immediately magnetic tones of Portier. Her voice as the bass line, has a swing to its delivery which is emulated in the fuzz lined sonic enterprise of guitar, a tempting which has ears quickly onside whilst the funky, Red Chili Peppers like stroll of the song has feet and body enthralled.

Ophite-Basic-Mistakes   The track is a vibrant and hazily captivating start quickly backed and surpassed by the fiery stomp of Catacombs Of Happiness. Hooks and sonic tempting opens up the quick step of throbbing bass rhythms and crisp beats, it all ignited further by the lively and impressive vocals. Virulent rock pop with a grunge spawned edge and punk mischief, the track balances pure melodic catchiness with unpredictable agitation, rhythmically and sonically resulting in a glorious and addictive incitement.

The diversity of Basic Mistakes is as striking and compelling as the sounds themselves, the following Somebody Take Me Surfing combining surf rock and punk pop with a more sobering post punk saunter. As guitars expel sultry caresses of melodic twang and the bass casts a darkly seductive tempting, the song is a bewitching croon, especially as harmonies from Portier flirt with celestial elegance. Her more down to earth lead delivery makes a great temper to the exotic climate of the song and bridge from that to the stormier chorus. All the time there is creative devilry at work though, lurking in the lining of the song rather than playing openly like in its predecessors, which adds a mischievous and expectations defeating invention to the song.

The One In My Head re-embraces the flames of blues rock next, guitars blazing within the controlled walls of the encounter though rhythms and at times vocals do have moments of losing their composure to great effect whilst its successor My Pretty Columbine is a riveting acoustic croon of voice and guitar with additional creative tinkering. Both tracks offer something different to the release, new food for thought in songwriting, and yet more of the impressive musical imagination of the band.

The EP closes with Phoenician Sailors, which on the CD version comes in the form of the video clip earlier mentioned. Reggae seeded guitar taunts open up the inviting swing of the song, a pulsating bass line soon showing the same kind of inspiration as Portier spreads her expressive tones over the inescapable lure feeding ears. Like a sea with increasingly turbulent waves, musically the song evolves from a gentle wave to a rocky and feisty protagonist, bringing an outstanding release to a climactic and hypnotic close.

It is probably fair to say that Ophite is an undiscovered treat for most right now but take our word for it deserving of investigation because of Basic Mistakes alone. It is potently accessible and at times offers a familiar if indefinable temptation, but they are just two pleasing aspects which converge with imagination, craft, and a creative rebellion to create one highly exciting encounter.

The Basic Mistakes EP is available now

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RingMaster 11/05/2015

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