Elizabeth The Second – Two Margaritas at the Fifty Five

photo by Filippo Galvanelli

A handful or so weeks back Italy based outfit, Elizabeth The Second, unveiled their debut single ahead of their first EP. It was a rousing introduction to the trio and a flirty teaser for Two Margaritas at the Fifty Five, which now here equally suggests this is a band to keep a close eye and eager ear upon.

Consisting of Ben Moro (guitar and vocals), Michele Venturini (bass guitar) and Luca Gallato (drums), Padova hailing Elizabeth The Second spring a sound upon ears which is part garage rock, part punk, and an infectious amount of dirtily edged pop rock. Inspirations come through the likes of by The Clash, Blur, The Libertines, Artic Monkeys, Nirvana, and The Stone Roses; all hues which certainly flavour the band’s sound as too the breath of seventies nurtured power pop and nineties Brit pop.  For all that though, the band’s music escapes speakers with open individuality casting a great mix of familiarity and undisguised freshness.

Two Margaritas at the Fifty Five opens with that previous single and fair to say that No One Cares instantly grabbed ears with its first lure of guitar, its melodic clang equipped with a swing which is soon equally embraced by rhythms and vocals as the track hits its catchy stride. The fuzzy grumble of Venturini’s bass in turn takes over the virulence, its lone coaxing delicious before Moro’s guitar returns with its own shade of the contagion as Gallato’s beats bounce. The song is an irresistible slice of garage pop ‘n roll, its repeated cycle all the more addictive, and itself as a whole as potent as when it graced ears alone to provide a great start to the release.

Its persuasive traits are keenly embraced and built upon across the following tracks too, Mickey weaving its own infectious blend of pop and rock in a boisterous proposition blessed with lively rhythms and a spicy hook. With its body woven from an array of flavours and Moro’s vocals further great persuasion the song effortlessly hit the spot before Yesterday I Was 20 stepped forward with matching prowess. A sixties hue teases from its melodic grace as that power pop essence fuels its shuffle, the song in some ways reminding of bands such as Purple Hearts and The Chords and though it did not quite raise the passions as those around it, there was only pleasure and an appetite to indulge again in its infection.

As its companions the following Soho revels in its catchiness and playful enterprise, melodies and enticing hooks as manipulative as the roar in Moro’s voice and the dexterity of the rhythms driving the song, let alone the imagination gluing it all together. Again an array of styles make up its character and voice before it leaves the just as potent Gimme One Euro to bring the EP to a spirited close with its own recipe of just as varied ingredients and flavours. As with every song on the EP, pop, punk, and rock essences meld perfectly with the classic rock wiring which escapes Moro’s guitar especially in his spice rich solos and in all tracks there is nothing which allows attention to be cast elsewhere.

One superb single and one addictive EP, there could be a rather rosy reign for Elizabeth The Second ahead.

Two Margaritas at the Fifty Five is available now digitally and on CD @ https://elizabeththesecond.bandcamp.com/album/two-margaritas-at-the-fifty-five

https://www.facebook.com/elizabeth.the.second.band   https://twitter.com/Elizabethe2nd

Pete RingMaster 28/11/2019

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

King Hiss – Earthquaker

Having found ourselves more than caught up in the sound and adventure of King Hiss through their Snakeskin EP back in 2013, there is always a real leak of eager anticipation approaching every new encounter with the Belgium hailing rockers. So far it has been rewarded with a creatively roaring and rousing experiences especially with the band’s last album Mastosaurus but nowhere to the extent of lustfulness found for its successor, Earthquaker.

The band’s new album is a thunderous and explosive unleashing of a sound which has developed with the same hunger as we have found for its evolving exploits. To use our own words, Mastosaurus proved “exceptional and increasingly so with every listen” but is now simply left in the dramatic wake of Earthquaker.

King Hiss create a tempest of sound as infectious as it is invasive as they embrace the key essences of hard and stoner rock alongside the rich marrow of grunge and groove metal. Familiar and unique flavours continually entangle and flourish in the band’s increasingly distinct songwriting and music and fair to say over three full-lengths it has grown to be as irresistible and we suggest as essential as anything out there in the rock landscape.

Earthquaker is pure creative virulence from start to finish, even the introductory forty odd seconds of Critical Failure pure enticement as its intrigue flooded menace lined coaxing invades ears and imagination to draw the listener into the unscrupulous swing of the album’s title track. Grooves immediately infest and shape the song, Earthquaker infesting speakers and listener with relish before developing its darker and deeper web of textures and threat. The tones of vocalist Jan Coudron as ever enthral as they drip with drama and emotion whilst the melodic and voracious exploits of guitarist Joost Noyelle enthral as they invade. With rhythms pure manipulation, the track had album and us boisterously bouncing in no time.

Defiance urging incitement and spirit erupts in the following Revolt!, the track as feral as it is skilfully composed in its intent and craft. Whipping up a storm, drummer Jason Bernard drives the rebellion of song and word with glee whilst the bass of Dominiek Hoet is a snarling predator in the mix of temptation and riot, they together inciting the epidemic of untamed contagion unleashed. Even so, its virulence is eclipsed by that of Desertsurfer and with almost immediate effect. From the first second the track is an unapologetic weave of addictive hooks and grooves wrapped in melodic and harmonic temptation yet as all songs is wired with muscle and attitude bordering on the confrontational.

Through the Alice In Chains meets Twelve Boar predation that is Monolith and the dirt clad but melodically seductive GTWHR, the boldness and variety within Earthquaker is further accentuated. Unpredictability and evocative enterprise is as openly persuasive in both as across the whole release and further cemented within the grime laden, grooved rock ‘n’ roll joy of Kilmister and in turn Butcher and its gripping ruination. The track is as mesmeric as it is threatening, Coudron at the head of its haunting presence and instinctive blood lust with inescapable rhythms stalking and striking out within another compelling web of drama springing from Noyelle’s strings.

Drop Dead Leader may have not quite ignited the same lust as those before but with its southern tinged invention it still left imagination and pleasure united companions while Vomit had the former alone more than involved in its own adventurously fertile curiosity and craft; another major highlight added to the bulky amount already provided by Earthquaker.

The album is brought to an end through firstly Black Wolf, a track which weaves and swerves like a rattle snake before striking and unleashing its resourceful and venomous prowess, and lastly the sonic infection that is Sum of all Nightmares. Again grooves and hooks are as lethal and irresistible and the carnivorous riffs and barbarous rhythms escaping the band within both songs unbridled pleasure and rousing incitement.

In many ways it is no surprise that King Hiss had us over excited once again as they just get better and better but Earthquaker is a whole new ballgame for the band and their truly dextrous sound which no one should pass by without at least one concentrated listen.

Earthquaker is out now @ https://kinghiss.bandcamp.com/album/earthquaker

https://www.king-hiss.com/   https://www.facebook.com/kinghissband   https://twitter.com/kinghissband

Pete RingMaster 19/11/2019

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

The Sums – Better

Another band who found themselves caught up and severely losing out in the collapse of Pledge Music, The Sums persevered with the recording and release of their new album, Better, to bless the year with one of its finest and most irresistible collection of rock/pop songs.

It has been a tough time since their last album for the UK outfit, the death of lead guitarist Lee Watson hitting band mates, fans and indeed music hard but using his memory and enduring inspiration the Liverpool quartet forged ahead with long-time friend in guitarist Richy Northcote joining up with vocalist/guitarist Peter ‘Digsy’ Deary, bassist/vocalist Chris Mullin, and drummer Chris Campbell. As mentioned Better had its own trials and tribulations to face but has just been unveiled to light up ears and spirit with almost mischievous intent.

The album opens up with Kick Da Bucket, a rousing slice of rock ‘n’ roll with an edge to its voice and virulent groove to its character. With Digsy like a carny barker in the midst of its melodic carnival, hooks and melodies bring an enslaving swing to the song as rhythms dance and prey on a swiftly subservient appetite for its eager stomp. The track is superb but only a sign of things to come as Better unravels its web of enterprise, variety, and adventure.

Here To Stay is next up and immediately shares its own seductive melody to hook just as quick attention. Its gentle but assured swing is pure summer glee but as ever there is that shadow in word and tone which gives it an easily relatable grounding. Not for the last time across the release there is something akin to Hed PE meets Steely Dan to a song, a comparison which may only be heard in our ears but feels the best way to suggest the enthralling feel and presence of the infection escaping the speakers before All Messed Up brings its pop rock canter to bear on greedy ears. Already three songs in, the broad tapestry of sound and flavouring within the album is inescapable, the band providing their most diverse and fascinating release yet but it is still unmistakably The Sums in every aspect. With keys adding to its infectious weave the track joined its predecessor in hitting the spot in quick time.

The calmly thoughtful repose and serenade of Go is melancholic rapture urging people to reconnect with the world and each other, its orchestral breath and intimate touch captivating while I Run A Mile straight after provides a funk nurtured shuffle for body and voice to get eagerly involved in. Brass and keys smoulder across Mullin’s and Campbell’s rhythms, the rousing bass of the former almost sullen between the crisp swings of the latter as Digsy and Northcote spring their equally engaging prowess.

Though even after a wealth of plays, it has proven impossible to pick a favourite track but Give Me Something always figures to the fore in thoughts, the song viral in its rhythmic nagging and dirty rock ‘n’ roll breeding and simply beguiling in its pop catchy and melody rich croon. Nail us down and it would have to be the moment which brought the greatest lust but constantly challenged as shown by its immediate successor, Contraception Is Rife. With a country rock twang, the pop breathing balladry of the track is again full captivation which Nowhere Left But Home soon shares through its own distinct croon.

Better is brought to a close through firstly the glorious Cold One, it’s almost Lowry painted air enough to get the imagination weaving with the tones of Digsy and Mullin alone pleasure bound, and lastly Salt Of The Earth. The final track simply brings a smile to the face, its acoustic sway and vocal glee total captivation from which pure contagion erupts in a devilish chorus.

And that is Better, an album which brings a warm glow to the year’s cold closing weeks and confirmation that The Sums is one of Britain’s finest rock and pop bands which not enough people know about though that could and should all change now.

Better is out now through https://www.thesums.net/better-new-album-out-now/

https://www.thesums.net/   https://www.facebook.com/thesums/   https://twitter.com/thesumsmusic

Pete RingMaster 22/11/2019

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

Impulsive Compulsions – SAMPLER 4

Another compelling issue of the In The Club Magazine from Perfect Pop Co-Op and another treat in word and sound had us basking in some of the very best independent goodness. The autumn 2019 edition of the online magazine from the label, issue 41 to be exact, comes with the fourth edition of their free sampler Impulsive Compulsions featuring artists and sounds from within the embrace of the Perfect Pop Co-Op family. It is fair to say that its three predecessors left us and an increasingly great many basking in a rich array of sounds and flavours but No 4 might be the most eclectic and irresistible mix yet meaning to ignore it would be an act of great stupidity.

Formed in 2011 by members of The Tuesday Club; Dave Worm, The Beautiful Wolf and Andreas Vanderbraindrain for the sole purpose of releasing their own music, Perfect Pop Co-Op has grown and stretched its reach to, as mentioned earlier, bring a great many other artists into the family; they regularly featured on The Andreas and The Wolf Radio Show, the in house monthly podcast, and teasing the imagination within the Impulsive Compulsions samplers.

The latest begins with Andreas and the Wolf and their track All I want is you. Its relatively calm entrance belies its pop punk instincts yet it is the melodic enterprise and drama from guitar and keys which enlists the imagination most firmly. The track is a ridiculously catchy affair, an aural romancing of ears and for us the most captivating offering from the band yet as the Sampler gets off to a potent start which continues with the mystic rock magnetism of Nashville hailing duo Hello Dearies. Like a shadow bound nursery rhyme All The Pretty Boys and Girls simply beguiled, its Wicker Man-esque spiced chant a tenebrific celebration and just delicious upon our musical palate.

Nine Day Decline is a newcomer to these ears but swiftly through their contribution to the sampler had us rushing to their social media profiles to learn more. With the likes of Altered States, Dead Heaven, Complicity, Christian Death, Counting the Mad, F.O.C., Section 3 and more in their histories, the British trio cast a goth clad post punk tempest as atmospheric as it is emotive. Decisions is a haunting slice of sonic dissonance, its raw melodic drone and impassioned breath akin to a mix of Play Dead, Sisters Of Mercy, and London After Midnight but openly unique to the London based outfit.

Inadequacy (day 197) is the track from sampler regular Reverse Family, an electro spattered piece of DIY enticement from the solo project of Dermot Illogical and a piece of soul searching reflection with its own sneaky swing while Dislocated Flowers immediately after wraps its psychedelic seduction around ears and imagination with Orange Roses and Yellow Tulips. Both tracks quickly and easily got under the skin being rapidly joined by The Scratch through their punk nurtured power pop rocker No two castles are the same. Taken from their excellent last album, Great Adventure, the song infested and resonated beyond its stay; always a sign of something rather tasty.

Equally flavoursome and a spark to greed is 50ft Woman and Psychic Hygiene. From its initial sonic squeal a devious swing erupts, the just as guileful tones of Minki riding its infectious pop punk ‘n’ roll sway. The track is another which leaves on-going tendrils of flirtation igniting continual companionship before She Made Me Do It ensured they get their chunk of the passions through their track, Fun and Games. The union of Shaheena Dax (Rachel Stamp) and Will Crewdson (Rachel Stamp, Adam Ant, Scant Regard) is one of our favourite propositions to erupt from speakers and their latest song is pure alt-pop manna, a virulent contagion defeating any ill wished cure.

One of the biggest traits of these samplers is that we have yet to come across anything which merely satisfied, no fillers ever on offer and the fourth is no different as it continues with GLUE from The Dodo, a keenly catchy post punk/punk rock stroll with a definite Swell Maps tinge and heart to it, and straight after Night of the Wild Mind courtesy of Suicide Tapes. A quartet from Ware in the UK, the band similarly has post punk instincts to a goth rock heart and upon a contagion of rhythms weave a magnet of a track which had us hungry for more. Originally formed in 1983, the band reformed a short while back and are raising a stir, no surprise with tracks like this Flesh For Lulu scented incitement.

The Tuesday Club and Venus Overload bring this particular treat to a close. The first gives us a live slice of fan favourite Lady Gargar, a track revelling in all the mischief, imagination, and uniqueness which fuels the band and its rare fusion of punk, indie and the creative devilment which shapes the best rock ‘n’ roll. The latter of the two provides Afghanistan Bananastand, a ravening dance of garage and psych rock intimation which had hips and feet as keenly engaged as ears and imagination.

That is Impulsive Compulsions 4, a release which had us basking in great sounds, fresh adventures, and new explorations of artists which like those before them deserve proper attention. The fun involved was just icing on the cake.

Check out the latest and past editions of In The Club Magazine @ https://perfectpopco-op.co.uk/magazine/  and further releases from within Perfect Pop Co-Op @ https://theperfectpopco-op.bandcamp.com/

Pete RingMaster 31/10/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Coilguns – Watchwinders

Pic laure gilardhucci

Always seeking proposals that challenge and ignite the senses whilst forging new invasive temptation, Swiss quartet, Coilguns, has always been a rewarding refuge and evolving adventure come trespass of noise and imagination. Unpredictability and creative intensity has as much shaped and fuelled their tracks, EPs and albums as physical intimation and intimidation and new album, Watchwinders is no exception; in fact it is the band’s most compelling, ravenous, and rousing slab of incitement yet.

With both debut album Commuters and its successor of last year, Millennials, we have come away wondering and in regard to the latter maybe doubting whether Coilguns could emulate let alone eclipse their feral majesty. We will not be allow that fruitless thought to arise with Watchwinders despite its magnificence but simply bask in its irresistible provocation and intrusive craft.

Released as all the band’s encounters via Hummus Records, the label founded by guitarist Jona Nido, Watchwinders was written and recorded during one intense month-long session, and as always with the band recorded live, and there is no escaping the instinctiveness of its breath and assault. There are moments when it is as if the band itself does not know what is coming next yet each song is a skilfully woven tapestry of sound, texture, and dissonance as fluid and earnest as it is unscrupulous verging on psychotic.

The album immediately lured unbridled attention with opener Shortcuts. For a minute and a half, Luc Hess manipulates with his galvanic senses poking beats, the vociferously presented tones of vocalist Louis Jucker just as potent in enslaving ears and appetite. In swift time the swipe of noise punk proved enslaving and only enforced its hold and drama before Subculture encryptors forced its thick and also quickly gripping body through speakers. As rhythms fall over themselves to invade, the guitars of Nido and Jucker create a sonic scourge; one only further bracing once embracing the great raw pestering of the latter’s vocals. From the abrasive flurry a just as devious calm emerges, rhythms and sonic threads a virulent nagging matched in prowess and magnetism by the vocals with the synth of Donatien Théivent carrying the same composed yet volatile enterprise, as the track revolves in rapacious noise and intent.

Big writer’s block erupts with its own contagious spite and captivation next, rhythms again at the core of its bold and vigorous creative coercion where punk and hardcore essences entangle in noise and sonic voracity. A breath taking cauldron of untamed and tense captivation it is followed by the album’s title track which eagerly uncages an esurient flood of urgency and compulsive tempestuousness in sound and emotion. The track is superb, managing to eclipse its mighty predecessors even by the brief time it takes its cyclone to slip into a bewitching oasis of magnetic voice and synth. Even so a current of rhythmic badgering escapes the agility of Hess, niggling and inviting as Jucker’s throat provides a similarly rich coaxing.

The prowling doomy presence of The Growing block view follows, the track skirting and courting the senses with its dark, heavy and evocative bait before Manicheans shares it’s twisting and turning, threat carrying drama. It is another drenched in discord bred thought and sound, a track fraught and agitated physically and emotionally with both songs effortlessly adding to the persuasive weight of the release.

Prioress is next up, an encounter haunting and staining the senses with its respective calm intimacy and drama bred turbulence. Locked away in its gripping, slightly suffocating dark defiled rapture, ears and appetite again found themselves defenceless to the band’s invention with eventual escape from the song’s creative confinement only the doorway into insatiable carnal tenacity courtesy of The Morning shower. A rapacious noise punk trespass as psychically catchy as it is emotionally disharmonious it joined its companions in easily luring us to stomp to its tune.

The unpolished, blemish embracing reflection of A Mirror bias beguiled with its singular but potent tenebrous breath with Urban reserves straight after unleashing a hardcore winded cyclone animated tempest to equally enthral and incite. With the keys of Théivent alone a portrait of fateful and predictive suggestion within the track’s tumultuous and unstable expulsion, the second of the two is the kind of infernal uproar that makes Coilguns and indeed Watchwinders so unique and addictive.

The album closes out with firstly the devouring hounding of Broken records and lastly the hypnotic seduction of Periscope. The first simply engulfs and consumes all in its path without suffocating its organic infectiousness while its successor arises upon a sonic line to draw and open up every predatory shadow and caliginous depth of false utopia and together they provide a fearsomely glorious conclusion to an outstandingly impressive release.

Once more Coilguns has left us open mouthed and lustfully devouring an album which leaves the world a better if more soiled place.

Watchwinders is out now via Hummus Records on CD and vinyl; available as a name your price download @ https://coilguns.bandcamp.com/

Full Coilguns tour dates w/ Yautja

08.11 – Paris (F) @ Espace b

09.11 – Sheffield (UK) @ Record Junkee

10.11 – Leeds (UK) @ Temple of Boom

11.11 – London (UK) @ The Macbeth Of Hoxton

12.11 – Glasgow (UK) @ Broadcast

13.11 – Manchester (UK) @ Satan’s Hollow

14.11 – Northampton (UK) @ TBA

15.11 – Utrecht (NL) @ TBA

17.11 – Gdansk (PL) @ Ziemia

18.11 – Warsaw (PL) @ Poglos

19.11 – Krakow (PL) @ Warsztat

20.11 – Wroclaw (PL) @ DK Luksus

21.11 – Berlin (D) @ Zukunft am Ostkreuz

22.11 – Stuttgart (D) @ Ju-Ha West

23.11 – Fribourg (CH) @ Hummus Fest / Fri-Son

24.11 – Lyon (F) @ La Marquise

26.11 – Clermont-Ferrand (F) @ Raymond Bar

27.11 – Angers (F) @ Jokers Pub

28.11 – Oss (NL) @ Lollipop

29.11 – Fontaine l’Evêque (B) @ MCP Apache

30.11 – Liège (B) @ La Zone

https://www.facebook.com/coilguns    https://twitter.com/COILGUNS

Pete RingMaster 04/11/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Crepuscular calm: the Dark Serenity Interview

Introducing hard rock trio Dark Serenity

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started?

We are Dark Serenity, composed of members Zach Barnes (bass), Kate Emrich (guitar and vocals), and Mike Bergamo (drums). We started writing music in Kate’s basement back in high school, which is where we met each other. We were brought together by a similar level of ambition in addition to the obvious shared interest in being in a band and creating music.

Had you been in other bands before?

We haven’t been involved in other bands before, but we went through a few line-up changes until we discovered which members would stick. I’m sure it led to a change in style and direction, because we are a group that values the insight of each individual member.

What inspired the band name?

The band name means that there is light in the dark, and more specifically that the motivation for life and light lies within the reality that death and darkness are inevitable.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

We didn’t approach the formation of the band with the intention of sounding a certain way. We wanted to create a sound that sounded like us, one where each one of us used our respective influences to make our own sound.

And that instinct still primarily drives the band now it is more experienced or has new aspects evolved over time?

I would say the same things still drive us. Those things being the intent to succeed in our field and inspire others to do the same, as well as to live our own lives the way we want to.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

I would say our sound has matured, basically, as we have as musicians. We write in different song structures and utilize our instrument’s capabilities more fully. We can write parts that complement the other instrumentals more effectively, and more clearly communicate our messages.

Has it been more of an organic movement of sound or more the band deliberately wanting to try new things?

It’s both. When you deliberately try new things you tend to find a more of an organic movement and vice versa.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

We are inspired by the creations of many of the greats, such as Led Zeppelin, Deep Purple, Black Sabbath, the Jimi Hendrix Experience and the Who. That being said we’ve never deliberately practiced their songwriting approaches.

Is there a particular process to the band’s songwriting?

Yes, typically we write by picking a key and a time signature, then doing an improv session within those specifications. The body of the song usually comes first, with the bass and drums; then the guitar, and then the vocals are written last.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

More often than not our lyrics cover subjects that include and challenge societal norms. We have songs about deviating from said norms.

Could you give us some background to your latest release?

Our latest release is our debut album that we released last year. It’s called ‘Memento Mori’ and is eight tracks. It was a live tracked album, which we did on purpose to emulate the experience of a live performance.

Give us some insight to the themes and premise behind it and its songs

The themes we mentioned discussing our commonly used lyrical themes are the themes we applied to the tracks on this album.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

We go into the studio with our songs completed. We don’t like bringing unfinished material because there’s no guarantee you will come out with something you’re happy with. When a song is complete there’s not really a question as to whether or not it will turn out like you had hoped.

Tell us about the live side to the band, obviously a favourite aspect of being in the band?

Live we deliver an animated and authentic performance. We’ve been told that our passion for what we do is obvious and felt throughout the room. We want to deliver the best version of ourselves.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it?

We have found it difficult yet worthwhile. We are lucky to have been brought up as musicians in the metro Detroit area where there are a lot of music fans and a decent number of live venues. It’s arguably harder to get your foot in the door when there are several other groups going for the same goals as you. However, in addition to that difficulty, you also find the most support from the other musicians. You have to work hard, break a sweat, then gain respect…But the respect that you gain is worth it.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date? Do you see it as something positive within a realm flooded with artists and a short attention society or more of a necessary trial?

Bands nowadays need to utilize social media to their advantage, just like any other form of entrepreneur. You’re selling yourself as the product, basically, and in today’s market, you need to unapologetically market yourself with the tools everybody else is using to have a shot at mainstream success. So yeah, not being able to properly use social media can hurt your career, but most likely, will stunt your growth overall. There are obviously always exceptions to a rule, though.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Thank you for having us! We just want to add that you can find our music on every streaming platform, and that you can find us on Facebook or Instagram. Please show us your support!

https://www.darkserenityofficial.com   https://www.facebook.com/pg/darkserenityband   https://www.instagram.com/darkserenityband  https://twitter.com/Dark__Serenity

Pete RingMaster 06/11/019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Stirring the senses: Vital Noise Interview

Meet Vital Noise

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Thanks so much for having us!

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to Vital Noise?

Our band consists of Andrew Wilmot, lead vocals/ guitar; Preston Wilmot, bass; and Reid Campbell, drums. Andrew and Preston are brothers and have been playing together since a very young age.  We met Reid in 2018, and have been playing with him ever since.

Is Vital Noise the first project it for you all and if not has previous ventures had a direct effect on the band?

We have all been involved in several different bands/ musical projects throughout the years.  Being in those bands has definitely inspired a change in direction as none of us had been in projects in the genre that we play (hard rock/ metal), and definitely made us want to build a band around that.

What inspired the band name?

To be completely honest, we came up with it when we were very young and thought it sounded cool, and it has just sort of stuck with us since.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

All of us really were in to heavier music at the time and wanted to make a band that played that kind of music, so that drove us to come together and actually make it happen.

Do the same things still drive the band when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

Things have definitely evolved over time; we have all gotten much older and matured a lot since we first formed the band which has played a big part in that.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has particularly evolved?

Definitely… At first we just wanted to play straight up metal, but now we are much more into writing music that tends to be more radio friendly, but still heavy of course.

And that has been more of an organic change or deliberate?

It is been more organic.  It has just naturally seemed to happen as all of us have matured.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

Bring Me The Horizon has probably had the biggest impact on the band and our writing style, as we have drawn tremendous inspiration from them.

Is there a process to the songwriting which generally guides the writing of songs?

Every song is a little bit different, but generally speaking, one of us will come in with a riff or some sort of musical idea, and then will kinda jam around it until a full song starts to form. Then our singer, Andrew will put lyrics over it.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of the band’s songs?

We draw inspiration from what we happen to be going through in everyday life.  Whether we be happy about something, sad about something, going through relationship issues, etc., we find a way to write about it.

Give us some background to your latest release.

We most recently released two singles entitled “The Ones” and “Famous”, they were both written during the summer of 2017 and we consider them to be some of our best work to date.

Please give us some insight to the themes behind them.

“The Ones” is about people fighting against societal norms and embracing individuality, it was meant to go out to people struggling with those issues and meant to show that it’s ok to be different, and it’s ok to be an individual.  “Famous” on the other hand is about people letting materialistic things and unimportant things in life take precedence over things that are actually important like friends and family. This happens way too often in today’s society, so we decided to write a song about it.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

We tend to get into the studio with songs in their final state, even though we do very often make little tweaks here and there.

We try to make our show as energetic as possible.  We try our best to get the crowd as into it as we possibly can, as we feed off of the energy that they give us.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods?

We are from Los Angeles.  Because of this, the scene is very overpopulated, so it is definitely hard to get a ton of recognition, but nonetheless we are trying our best.

How have you found the impact of the internet and social media on the band to date? Flooded with bands and artists, do you see it as something primarily positive or more of a negative on the band’s progress so far?

The internet and social media has definitely helped us in getting gigs and reaching an audience we otherwise wouldn’t have.  However, it is definitely hard to get to that next level, but we know we will get there eventually!

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add for the readers?

Thanks so much for having us.  Be sure to check out our website and social media (links below) and to listen to our music on Spotify and all other digital streaming platforms!

Check Vital Noise out further @…

https://www.vitalnoise.com   https://www.facebook.com/VitalNoise/   https://www.instagram.com/vitalnoise/   https://twitter.com/vitalnoiseband

Pete RingMaster 06/11/019

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