Raucous times and roaring escapes: exploring the heart of US rockers Long Time Divided

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Sometimes there is no escaping the lure of a band, whether in sound, presence, personality or whatever. One proposition definitely equipped with that kind of instinctive temptation is Pittsburgh rockers Long Time Divided. Formed in 2008, the quintet has been a persistent rock riot grabbing an enthused and growing loyal fan base locally and spreading further afield. Renowned as one of the hardest working bands on and from the Pittsburgh music scene, Long Time Divided is beginning to stir broader attention. With a new album beginning to boil in the band’s horizon, it felt the right time to find out more about the band, so with thanks to vocalist DJ Beckage we set about exploring the origins, inspirations, and acclaimed live presence of the band.

LTD DJ Beckage - SingerHey DJ;  thanks for talking with us.

Please introduce the band members and give us some background to the band.

Well there’s me, DJ, the lead singer, and then we have two amazing guitarists in Paul Terry and Dean Toughlian. And then we have one of the best 1-2 bass and drum combos in rock with Bob Beveridge on bass and Slick on drums.

As for the band, we’re a hard rock band with a bit of a metal and blues taste mixed in and we’re based out of Pittsburgh, PA (U.S.A.). I always like to categorize us as a blue-collar rock band. We work hard and play harder and we’re really not the “green room” types, you know what I mean? We’d much rather be out having fun with our fans. We had a green room before and it was horribly boring. HA!

Where did you all meet and what did you have any specific intention behind bringing the band to life?

I had dissolved my old band and was looking to join a fully formed band in need of a singer and lyricist and it just happened that the original line-up of the band, including Bob, were looking for a singer. The guys had me audition and that first night we wrote three songs (Breaker, Spiders, and Take Me Away). Everything just clicked. It was great. Later, Paul joined the band so we would have two guitars. Slick came on board after our original drummer just up and left town (weird), and he brought a level of power to his play yet he’s attune to the dynamics of the song and what is needed. Lastly, Dean joined the group, which I think brought a refreshing outlook on the group.

Your sound seems generally described as hard rock yet there is much more in the mix for us. How would you portray it to newcomers to the band in words?

We’re a blue-collar band. We’re the guys you’d want to go with to the bar for a night of drinking and partying. We have a good time at our shows and try to bring everyone along for the ride. Times are tough and we want to be that kick-ass escape for people.

What predominately drives and inspires the lyrical and emotional side of your songs?

I (DJ) typically write what I’m feeling, whether the narrative is about something that personally happened to me or one of my band mates, or if it’s just something I heard or read about in the news. I love bringing a level of honesty to our songs because it gives the listener something to grab hold of and make his or her own.

The textures and melodic flames which sculpt your songs are as imposing as the muscular side of your invention. It suggests songs are carefully and intensely composed. What is the general writing process for the band and do you aim for particular ideas with each song or let them develop organically?

Thanks. That was about as badass a compliment of our music as I have ever heard.

We typically write as a whole group. One person may bring a melody or riff to the group and we just build the songs out from there. I love this because it gives ownership of the song to everyone, which helps eliminate ego from the writing process.

As for our “particular aim,” it goes back to the fact that we want to write music that we want to hear.

You have earned a great reputation for your live presence, highlights so far?LTD 3

I think the highlight for me has been all the big name acts we’ve had the opportunity to play with, like Fuel, Static-X, Soulfly, Jimmie’s Chick Shack, Soul Asylum, and Ace Frehley. Opening for Fuel was my biggest highlight so far. I think the fact that we’ve had these opportunities acknowledges the hard work that we’ve put in to making our music.

What have you in store for the year and fans across 2015?

Well the big thing this year is our sophomoric album. We’re aiming for April to start recording tracks for the new album and I can’t wait. There has been a wonderful growth in all of our song writing skills and I think people will be thoroughly please with the product.

Thanks for talking with us; anything you would like to add to tempt people to check out your vibrant sounds?

Thank you for having me. Anytime I get to talk about how awesome my band mates make me look (Ha!). No, seriously, thank you. We work hard and it’s always a pleasure to have this time to talk about the love for our music.

I want everyone to go to iTunes or Amazon or wherever the hell you–yeah you!–get your music and pick up the Long Time Divided debut album. It’s a helluva rock album and we want all of you to join the LTD Army!

https://www.facebook.com/longtimedividedband 

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 29/03/2015

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Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

Soul Fire Saints – Smoke

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It is fair to say taking inspirations from the likes of Alice in Chains, QOTSA, and Red Hot Chilli Peppers to NIN, Faith No More, and Rage Against The Machine will do no one’s creativity any harm, especially if they align it to fresh and distinctive, equally robust ideation. That is something UK rockers Soul Fire Saints do with captivating success in new single Smoke. The band has been accomplishing such inventive feats for a while now to be fair but this new offering, taken from their similarly impressive new EP Death in Technicolor, sees the band now ready to break into the fore of British rock ‘n’ roll.

With the seeds of the band being laid in boozy stag do celebrations in Prague in 2011, Soul Fire Saints took their time exploring and honing their prospective sound before hitting the live scene in 2013. Their debut came at the MAGNA centre in their home town of Sheffield and in front of a 2,000 strong exuberant audience. It was a first big leap which spring-boarded the band into swiftly descending new spotlights as they proceeded to add supporting Fallen Trees, playing venues such as O2 Academy, Corporation (both sold out shows), and the legendary Leadmill, as well as festival appearances at Tramlines, Mosborough Music Festival, Live at the Castle, and MBMF to their CV. Now the quintet of vocalist Taylor, guitarists Ol and Andy, bassist Jow, and drummer Lee are looking forward to making 2015 their biggest success yet, an intent off to a potent start with the release of Smoke.

Pungent beats rap at ears first, their opening bait accompanied by a spicy caress of guitar. It is a simple but inviting start soon empowered again by the potent vocals of Taylor and the wash of sultry sonic enterprise which swirls and teases in the song’s heated atmosphere. In no time the track is strolling with hefty rhythms and smouldering melodies across the senses, its snarl Rage Against The Machine like whilst it’s sonic adventure comes wrapped in blues rock expression. It is a virulently feisty encounter, raw and instinctive rock ‘n’ roll fuelled by impassioned energy and devilish tenacity, and though it never explodes as you might expect or occasionally want, it has ears happily on edge and satisfaction beaming with its wonderfully musty temptation.

Smoke is an irresistible doorway onto the adventure of Soul Fire Saints, an appetising lead into the Death in Technicolor EP, and a suggestive offering sparking expectations of even bigger exploits ahead.

Smoke is available now via Sneaky Balls Records with the Death in Technicolor EP out this month @ http://www.soulfiresaints.com/discography?id=10087

Upcoming Soul Fire Saints Gigs:

14th March – Heebie Jeebies – Liverpool

20th March – Dove and Rainbow, Sheffield

https://www.facebook.com/SoulFireSaintsUK   http://www.soulfiresaints.com/

RingMaster 11/10/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

EofE – Stars In Hollywood

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Formed in 2012, UK rockers EofE has been stirring up attention with a handful of potent releases though their new single Stars In Hollywood is the first to cross our radar. It is destined not to be the last though as the track alone proves enough to understand and reinforce the growing buzz around the Black Country quintet. The single is a rigorously captivating slice of muscular rock ‘n’ roll with nothing lightweight about its enterprise and everything captivating in its presence.

Stars In Hollywood has been announced as the band’s first official single but follows a host of digital tracks released on the likes of iTunes across 2014. Each of Dirty Diana, Lust, Kiss Me Like You Mean It, and Piece of You awoke increasing attention, which now after hindsight listens is easy to understand, but it was the acclaimed Bridges last November which breached greater media and fan spotlights. Its success and keen radio play was backed by an 11-date headline tour across the UK. Now EofE follow it up with Stars In Hollywood, its unveiling coming straight after the band completes another extensive tour supporting UK metallers Glamour Of The Kill. 2015 is sizing up to be another potent year for the quintet of Tom Harris, Dan Bremner, Luke Bradley, Nicky Waters, and Reece Luke, with Stars In Hollywood the next striking temptation.

The single rides in on a sonic lure and jabbing beats, building up its walls before it all crashes down into a melodically fuelled yet pungently weighty proposal. The dark throated bassline is an immediate attraction, its heavy growl never far from the surface of the song and sparking great satisfaction. Swiftly in full energetic stroll, the song’s great vocals align to just as expressive guitar enterprise. Stars In Hollywood is also unafraid at times to relax for just a voice and bass seduction and other moments the same of vocals and guitar, but ultimately t storms senses and the imagination with a rousing stride of sonic tenacity and melodic invention. The anthemic urgency and prowess of the song is just as impacting and inescapable, easily pushing EofE onto that continual to watch list.

Stars In Hollywood is a treat, a single which whether an introduction to the band or confirmation for fans of their impressing growth, sets down a new marker and peak for the band’s creativity and sound to date. We will be joining a great many keenly anticipating their next proposition from hereon in.

Stars In Hollywood is available from March 9th @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/stars-in-hollywood-single/id958688837

https://www.eofe.com/   https://www.facebook.com/EofEOfficialBand

RingMaster 09/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

 

The Riptide Movement – All Works Out

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It is an understatement to say that last year was a big year for Irish rock band The Riptide Movement in their homeland. It was a massive attention grabbing time which saw the release of debut album Getting Through, a gold-selling release which provided a tremendous cap to a series of top 10 singles and sold-out headline tours. 2014 basically thrust the Lucan, Dublin quartet, on the back of their previous increasingly potent presence, into a major spotlight in Ireland, one the band is now looking to emulate in the UK and further afield with their first British single All Works Out. Taken from Getting Through, which will also be getting its own British unveiling later in the year, the new single grips ears and imagination with a rousing three and a half minutes of undemanding but infectiously captivating rock ‘n’ roll. A mix of melodic rock with folkish essences and just a hint of Irish Americana, the song is a highly enjoyable introduction to The Riptide Movement.

As suggested it has been an increasingly potent time for the band since forming in 2006 and especially heady over the past couple of years. Recent successes has seen the band play across numerous cities from Dublin through to Delhi, support The Rolling Stones in Hyde Park in 2013, and lure hordes of new appetites at Glastonbury 2014 with their acclaimed performance. Getting Through was not slow in luring success with its Irish release, the album being included on the Meteor Choice Music Prize Shortlist for Irish Album of the Year. The Riptide Movement is certainly 7e05df8f-175d-436c-9766-2324249034bca band on the march with Britain next in line as they reinforce their successful festival appearances with All Works Out and subsequently the album, which was recorded with Ted Hutt, one of the founder members of Flogging Molly, this summer.

     All Works Out makes a low key entrance, a simple countrified twang of guitar making the first beckoning. It is swiftly joined by the punchy beats of drummer Gar Byrne and a resourceful bassline from Ger McGarry though, creative flames constantly lit as the guitars of J.P.R Dalton and Mal Tuohy expand their initial lure. It is still a minimalistic and appetising coaxing, the song never exploring anything beyond a feisty liveliness, yet all the time building an anthemic climate to further captivate ears and attention. Vocals across the band unite in a seriously infectious lure for the chorus whilst the bass slips into heaver and darker tones after time to contrast the fiery melodies which similarly emerge in the growing roar of a song. A little like Doves meets fellow Dubliners K.N.O.T.S., the track bounds through ears with a contagious revelry, a vibrant enterprise which maybe is not testing originality but definitely employs familiar spices in an invigorating and a thickly appealing way to incite the imagination and appetite.

All Works Out gives us a healthy hint at the reasons for Ireland taking The Riptide Movement to their hearts, something The UK will be copying if not now indeed come the summer we suspect. With this release, it is hard to imagine that anticipation for Getting Through will anything but hungrily eager.

All Works Out is available from March 9th via Caroline International/Universal

http://www.trm.ie/     https://www.facebook.com/TheRiptideMovement

RingMaster 09/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

 

Jarboe and Helen Money – Self Titled

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It is almost frightening how spellbinding the collaboration between Jarboe and Helen Money is on their self-titled album, how immersed into its dark inviting depths and ravenously siren-esque shadows ears, imagination, and simply reality becomes. The release is quite extraordinary, embroiling the listener in a soundscape of harmonic drones and sonic distortion but equally a sinister beauty and psyche engulfing adventure. It should probably be no surprise the impact of the album. When you place the evocative invention, craft, and voice of Swans co-founder and former vocalist Jarboe alongside the creative dark majesty of visionary cellist Helen Money (aka Alison Chesley), something startling was bound to happen, though an understatement in the case of their album.

Neither lady is a stranger to the skills and adventure of collaborating, Jarboe having worked on over 63 projects with the likes of Philip Anselmo, Neurosis, Jim Thirlwell, Merzbow, Bill Laswell, A Perfect Circle, Colin Marston, Cobalt, Cattle Decapitation, Justin K. Broadrick, Jesu…and the list goes on, alongside her 36 solo albums, whilst Helen Money has linked up with artists such as Mono, Anthrax, Russian Circles, Joe Lally and Shellac over time. They are experiences and bold adventures which have added to their own subsequent imaginative creativity, something their album reeks of.

The delicious tones of Money’s cello is the first caress as album opener For My Father embraces ears, its melancholic voice provocatively coaxing senses and thoughts under a just as darkly lit ambience. The heavy emotional air parts just a slither for the instantly magnetic presence of Jarboe, her radiant tones instantly poetic like against the shadows and the crinkling texture of her keys. The track continues its increasingly broadening embrace as both ladies unveil further shafts of melodic light and doom lined expression through their respective skills. The song is simply mesmeric, a golden sunrise of enterprise and melodic temptation but equally a breeding of dark clouds and imposing drama. As expansive a minimalistic proposition you are ever likely to be lost within, certainly outside of the album, there is an immediate immersion into the heart of the release, external light not to be seen and felt again until the album decides.

The following My Enemy My Friend is similarly a swift fascination of noir wrapped radiance; the alluring string plucking of Money tensing the spring for the flight of intensive sonic and emotional exploration. Within seconds the instrumental is resonating through body and thoughts, the lyrical and social nudging of the first track seemingly spreading into the intimidating but seductive breath of its successor. Keys and cello create a labyrinth of haunting and ominous suggestiveness, an incitement the imagination tenaciously casts scenes with whilst emotions bow before the weight of the track’s rousing portentousness. It is meditative and unsettling, and quite riveting, a success matched by the outstanding Hello Mr. Blue.

The almost carnivorous opening of what feels like bestial bass is glorious, something to sell your soul for. Whether it is bass or a brilliant merging of keys and cello which is also possible as repeat listens twist and turn with indecision, it is an enslaving start which only escalates into a kaleidoscope of, well creative alchemy to be honest. The floating harmonies of Jarboe seduce with celestial beauty whilst Money’s cello flirts with darkly centred eyes, every note having a knowing smile to their heavy persuasion. As Jarboe unveils the warmly delivered narrative, the track in contrast becomes a brewing maelstrom of agitation and aggravation, egged on by the contagious rhythmic dance of the piece. Every track already has breached new plateaus and taken the listener into inventively denser and increasingly threatening exploits, and this continues that exhilarating success as its marches towards its controlled but vocally bedlamic closure.

Wired is pretty much what it says on the tin, its presence a fibrous mesh of sounds and sonic intrigue presenting an intensive and feverish climate for ears and a sea of opportunities for the imagination to interpret and develop further, whether through its voracious incitement or the more of a harmonic smoulder it also harbours. There is little time for those thought bred adventures to take long term root though before the intimacy of Truth inspires with its own reflective beauty. Keys and sublimely drifting harmonies soaked in an air of loneliness kiss ears first before Jarboe opens up her vocal heart in a theatre of those continuing initial croons and just as emotive guitar stabs.

It is hard with words to present the drama and emotive intensity which comes with every bewitching track and the pair’s creative ingenuity which unrelentingly and deeply works away once breaching ears, but easy to enthuse over the ever evolving experiences which re-invent themselves in sound and visceral adventure with every listen. The closing Every Confidence is a perfect example. We can only hint at the tempestuous nature and climate which seeds from and descends on the senses and psyche after an initial gentle mesmeric croon of sound, but rigorously recommend its rapacious hunger to stretch not only the listener and their emotions, but the creative emprise bred by the artists pushing their instrumental and vocal limits.

It is a challenge and success which applies to the whole of the album. It is an astonishing encounter, a scourge of everything bland and predictable in modern music which goes beyond being something merely to listen to. You feel and almost taste the dynamic and intensive atmospheres of the tracks, you breath the drama and emotional intensity of the sounds and their inspiration, and ultimately it is a journey provided by Jarboe and Helen Money which you take and will never be the same again after.

Jarboe and Helen Money’s album is available now via Aurora Borealis as a black vinyl LP, on CD and digitally.

http://www.thelivingjarboe.com/     http://helenmoney.com/

RingMaster 04/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

 

 

The Permanent Smilers – One Real Big Identity Crisis

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One Real Big Identity Crisis, the new album from UK band The Permanent Smilers, is a release with no apparent direction or framework to its intent and enterprise; a release which basically lives up to its title but boy is it a slab of irresistible fun. Through thirteen songs, band and album take on a torrent of different styles and nostalgic flavours which really should not work alongside each other as coherently as they do, and all come with a humour and mischief which adds to rather than overrides the adventure of the individual characters. It is slightly deranged but not chaotic and thoroughly unpredictable yet not messy considering the vast sounds employed from song to song. Most of all though it is simply a compelling proposition which comes from left-field, keeps its heart there, and leaves the most enjoyable experience in its wake.

There is little we can tell you about the band itself, though The Permanent Smilers is fronted by Richard Lemongrower who was the songwriter behind Norwich band The Lemongrowers, a band releasing two albums on Noisebox at some point in time. Produced with Jonny Cole and mixed by David Pye, One Real Big Identity Crisis takes little time in lighting ears and imagination, though it opens with maybe its weakest song. That is a little misleading as it takes a song to get a handle, or try to, on the release anyway but certainly Identity Crisis did not really grip attention as much as elsewhere and left thoughts with a slight wondering of what have we got ourselves into. Strongly swung rhythms and similarly intensive riffs clasp ears within the first breath of the song, their bait a jabbing lure against the unpolished yet engaging tones of Richard. It is an easily flowing and energetic slice of rock ‘n’ roll with the bass of Jonny Cole pungent bait at the centre of the stomp. Truthfully there is little wrong with the song but it lacks a spark in its presence which evades the reaction it probably deserves and is easy to imagine being found with others.

The good if unsure start is soon a thing of the past as Uh-Oh takes over with its festive folk swagger and emerging carnival like devilment. Sporting a splash of Tankus The Henge to its relaxed but vibrant stroll, the song is a constant swing of melodic hips as it moves towards an unexpected and mouth-watering slip into a Dukes of Stratosphear like ethereal psychedelic charm and climate, returning back into festive mood soon after as if it had just emerged from a dip in the sea. The song is fascinating and bewitching, and just the first of numerous adventures into different landscapes, as shown next by the punk pop devilry of You Know Where To Go. Bred from seventies power pop and carrying a mix of The Flys and The Lurkers to its hookery, the song just hits the sweet spot with its insatiable energy and mischief, before making way for the more relaxed melodic embrace of Elastic. The keys and guitars of Richard weave another enthralling web of sound here, this time with a sniff of sixties pop to it which is punctuated by the crisp beats of drummer Pete Fraser and dark bass lures of Cole. By its close, the song somehow becomes a thumping anthem without losing any of its melodic and gentle elegance, a potent feat for any song to offer.

Both Just No Good and It Doesn’t Work Anymore keep album and ears bouncing with energy and pleasure, the first using a garage rock spicing again teased by a sixties almost Doors like toxicity, whilst the second again spawning from the same kind of seeding brings a rawer punk grouchiness with its presence. Each has feet and emotions joining their rigorous coaxing before Ghosts allows a breather for the body if not the imagination with its Simon and Garfunkel meets Burt Bacharach like embrace. The brass persuasion of Dave Land seductively flames over similarly captivating keys and vocal caresses through the song but as always there is a scent of devilment to the song with thoughts wondering at times if they should be enjoying this as much as they are. There is no escaping its thick charm though.

The next pair of songs brings a rich sense of XTC to their enterprise and persuasion, Rebel broadening that over time with a seventies kissed soar of progressive fuelled psyche rock whilst its successor, Voodoo has the stamp of Andy Partridge to its flirtatious pop and virulent enterprise. The pair leaves nostalgia glazed lips licked and, through the latter especially, ears basking in psyche pop of the most delicious kind complete with jazzy brass and funk spirited unpredictability.

You Know When To Go dives straight back into punk infused rock ‘n’ roll for its brief but sparkling instrumental before Unforseen manages to conjure an encounter which recalls the quirky indie pop of The Monochrome Set and the plainer but no less tasty essence of Tom Robinson. The song alternatively stomps and swirls around ears, every passing hook and melody it conjures an intriguing and quaint yet voracious tease before it moves off into the distance allowing the outstanding See Through You to make its lingering mark. Acoustically shaped with an avalanche of panzer gun delivered rhythms, the song initially is a smouldering and majestic sway of sound. It subsequently explodes though into a tempest of energy and revelry which only lifts a great song to a heady plateau. Imagine the volatile energy of De Staat at their most devilish with the epidemic hunger of eighties punk/power pop and you get a sense of the glorious treat.

One Real Big Identity Crisis closes with the acoustic lullaby of Sleepyhead, the album ending as it started with a track which does not catch the ardour triggered elsewhere but certainly graces ears with tantalising propositions. This album is one unexpected and seriously enjoyable adventure; not breaking down boundaries or venturing into the unknown but never providing a moment when you are not surprised or wrapped up in its refreshing simplicity woven by skill and invention. There is only time left to lick lips all over again as we close off and dive straight back into The Permanent Smilers’ irresistible arms, something we suggest you do too upon release.

One Real Big Identity Crisis is released in April via IRL Records with new single Identity Crisis out in March.

http://www.thepermanentsmilers.com/   https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Permanent-Smilers/1539697962929725

RingMaster 23/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://www.thereputationlabel.today

Hawk Eyes – Everything is Fine

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Debut album Ideal set the seeds for a lustful appetite which the following That’s What This Is not only cemented but took to new feverish heights; so anticipation for us and their fans for new album Everything is Fine was not exactly calm. Every want and expectation demanded of UK rockers Hawk Eyes it has to be said is swiftly met by the bands second full-length but it is only half of the story. On their breath-taking new encounter, the band explores new instinctively primal and raw depths within a greater and furiously fevered invention. Everything is Fine is rock ‘n’ roll at its most rugged and voracious, but also offered in its greatest imaginatively virulent form.

The heart and persuasion of the Leeds band began in the guise of Chickenhawk, a proposition similarly making a potent impression through their live presence and the album Modern Bodies of 2010. It was from the name change to Hawk Eyes though, that the unit tapped into a broader and richer vein of attention and personal creative exploration with a similarly expanding and creatively rebellious sound. The first album under the new guise, Ideals set a bigger roar within the British rock scene which That’s What This Is pushed even further but now having had Everything is Fine raging through ears into the passions, it is easy to say they were just hearty appetisers for a much bigger inventive meal.

The writing of the PledgeMusic funded Everything Is Fine began in 2012, songs emerging within and round the band’s constant hunger to tour and play shows, which included supported the likes of System of A Down at arena shows and playing the biggest music festivals across Europe, as well as SXSW over in the States. Even writers block for vocalist and guitarist Paul Astick could not derail the oncoming creative storm driving the new album, the man solving his problem by absconding to a hole at Spurn Point in Yorkshire on a really bleak evening with the outcome an oppressively dark and wonderfully ravenous title track.

The album though starts off with the inescapable lure of The Trap, a song making a gentle and slightly melancholic entrance with an air and dark stringed caress to match. Its first minute is a 4ca338c20ba067f7ab9f5dd77375627a0tantalising coaxing for ears and imagination before parting its veils for the pungent and anthemic rhythmic lure of drummer John Mackenzie aligned to the just as compelling throaty bassline offered by Ryan Clark. The outstanding vocals of the band are soon crooning and lifting the energy of the song, never letting it off its leash but prowling the senses and emotions with riveting expression and expertise. There is a breath of Dioramic and Pigeon Lake to the track, a harmonic and shadow wrapped breeze which only lifts the passions further as the opener crowds excitingly around the listener leading them towards a superb hook loaded vocal and almost combative climax.

The exceptional start is backed feistily by the sonic agitation of The Ambassador, a song grasping a dirtier hardcore laced vocal and rhythmic confrontation to its melodically clothed and tenaciously muscular breast. Hooks tease and riffs abrase from Robert Stephens and Astick, as vocals eye ball the listener with their boisterous tones and narrative. It is a blend ensuring body and emotions continue to be tightly clasped ready for the exceptional call of Die Trying. Soon offering punk vivacity to its heavier metal seeded tempest, the track equally finds an alternative rock contagion which offers shades of bands like Baddies in its unique creative brawl. It is a thumping encounter bringing further spices to its magnetic turbulence, a grungy essence as intriguing and gripping as the sinew driven aspects of the masterful persuasion.

There is strong variety to the flavours of the song and even greater diversity to the album, as straight away shown by the raucous heavy rock stomp of Permission with its progressively honed melodies and the catchy warm stroll of The Ballad Of Michael McGlue. The first roars like a mix of Queens Of The Stone Age and Therapy? whilst the second looks at another more indie/alternative rock canvas coloured with funky beats and melodically inflamed evocative hues. Both captivate with ease, though the sudden stop of the latter and the immediate charge of the following More Than A Million soon has album and listener hitting greater exhaustive energies. The wonderfully toxic snarl of the bass and accompanying acidic grooves chain the passions instantly, whilst the continually impressive vocals of Astick along with the unpredictable nature of song and individual creativity within the band, enthrals as they lure body and voice into the swing and anthem of the track.

Terribly Quelled shows its aggressive proclivity next, snarling with resourceful and inviting belligerence attached to punk fuelled anthemic suasion before Night Music absorbs a Faith No More like climate as it provides another fascinating and increasingly addictive inducement complete with roaming rhythms, mesmeric vocals, and sonic blazes. Both songs leave emotions high though are soon in the shadow of the outstanding I Never Lose and the album’s scintillating title track. The first of the pair twists and flirts with an agitated new wave bloomed enterprise reminding of the likes of We Are The Physics. This is aligned to an unbridled stalking of heavy rock ‘n’ roll rabidity for striking success, whilst the latter is a tempestuous consumption of ears with a post punk and discord lit bluster of predatory imagination and sonic causticity. It is also, from within its corrosive smother, one seriously infectious proposal brilliantly closing with a thrilling parade of enterprise which hints of very early Adam and The Ants.

Everything Is Fine is brought to an engrossing end by firstly, the controlled yet ferocious avalanche of rhythmic intimidation and sonic examination that is Enemies, and lastly the seven minute plus TFF. The final song does not quite match up to all that went before it, yet leaves the listener engulfed in a tapestry of melodic and dramatically multi-flavoured adventure, which shows just how exceptional other songs are to outshine it.

In many ways Hawk Eyes had a head start thanks to the already hungry appetite for their sounds already bred by the band previously but Everything Is Fine surpasses all hopes and greedy demands with quick and masterful majesty. Start those best of year lists right now and put Hawk Eyes right at the top.

Everything Is Fine is available from February 9th through Red Vole @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/everything-is-fine/id962728478

Check out Hawk Eyes on tour@

Thurs Feb 12, Maguire’s Pizza Bar, Liverpool

Fri Feb 13, Barfly, London

Sat Feb 14, The Joiners, Southampton

Mon Feb 16, Louisiana, Bristol

Tues Feb 17, Bodega, Nottingham

Weds Feb 18, Sound Control, Manchester

Thurs Feb 19, The Cluny, Newcastle

Fri Feb 20, Nice N Sleasy, Glasgow

Sat Feb 21, Brudenell Social Club, Leeds

http://www.hawkeyesmusic.com

RingMaster 09/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://www.thereputationlabel.today