Embracing the discord: the Matt Finucane Interview

Hi Matt and thank you for sparing time to chat with us.

Glad to. Thanks for asking.

Could you first introduce yourself and tell us how your musical presence came to be?

It’s the old, old story: this never-ending mission to be heard and understood, in other words I’m obsessed and not many people get it, but so what. It was time to move on from making lo-fi electronic-based stuff on my own, playing acoustic guitar in nice clean coffee shops and being called “quirky”…Time to get back on a real stage in unhygienic surroundings and yell at people, so I found a bass player (Stephen Parker) and a drummer (Barney Guy) on the circuit here in Brighton. Luckily, I was able to drag them into my world.

How would you define not only your sound but the creative character of the band?

The sound’s just pure emotional disorder: I can’t make feel-good music. The band’s focused on delivering the songs as tightly and urgently as possible, just keeping it sharp, but there’s a lot of room for personal expression…Which is how it should be… It rocks, but there’s something in there that isn’t… quite… right.

Are there any previous musical experiences for yourself or band members and how have they been embraced in what you do now?

Stephen’s a solo artist himself, used to be in a thrash metal band, can play pop covers; he’s at home anywhere on the music spectrum. This means he comes up with these fantastic basslines, the kind it’s great to listen to just on their own, but really rock in a very direct way. Barney does a lot of session gigs in about 500 bands, as with most drummers, so he’s likewise slick and versatile. This cuts out a lot of flab, we can zero in quick on what works. They bring pop smarts, enhance the actual tunes, but without sacrificing the more out-there elements – it feels quite spontaneous, which is always good. We’re all very into keeping the energy levels high.

Is there a particular process to your songwriting?

I put myself into some kind of self-hypnotic state and rough out the songs, and then write down the chords for Stephen, and away we go – just smash through them until they take a fixed shape. It’s open to any changes the others want to suggest; I’m not sentimental about my own ideas, because I’ve been doing this long enough now to know that you can always create more; I just wait a while for my subconscious to throw something out. It helps to think of song structure in story terms – prologue, opening paragraph, cliff-hanger, that kind of thing.

Would you tell us about your latest release?

“The Seizure” EP is three tracks recorded pretty much as-live by the band, at Church Road Studios with Julian Tardo… plus a final DIY track, featuring Mik Hanscomb of Junkboy on 12-string acoustic. He played drums before Barney then had to drop out and concentrate on making his own album, but we’d also done a few gigs as a duo playing acoustic arrangements of some of my older material. We had one new number, the first thing I wrote after getting out of rehab, which it seemed like a nice idea to include, for contrast to the other songs. They were done loud and raw with the express purpose of showcasing the band. It’s a rock record, brash and nasty, rather than the sort of introverted DIY head music I’d been putting together at home. Also, it was nice to let someone else think about the technical side for once. I’m not exactly hung up on audio quality – I recorded an EP using a mobile phone and some freeware a few years ago – but it was refreshing to work in a good studio with an expert.

What are the major inspirations to its heart and themes?

I keep coming back to addiction, because it directly affects me, and also it seems like practically everyone’s dependent on something, physically or emotionally, to help them through this life. So that’s an underlying thread, even if it’s not spelled out – there’s no preaching or Important Social Message – and it tied in to the idea that it’s hard nowadays to be honest, when there’s so much pressure to present yourself as a viable product for everyone else to consume, while you’re picking them apart in turn. I’m no longer a youth, so it’s also about expressing this discontent in a way that’s age-appropriate and concentrated. That sounds like an ordeal to listen to, but the idea was to put this into really driving, powerful music and make it a cathartic experience, rather than a gloomy slog through My Big Thoughts. So it leads up to a sonic outburst – a seizure, obviously – then ends on a calmer note.

I am always intrigued as to how artists choose track order on albums and EP’s and whether in hindsight they would change that. What has been the deciding factor for you or do songs or the main do that organically?

It varies with each project – the last album had a theme, the stuff before that was more of a patchwork, but in each case I try to have a consistent tone or atmosphere running through the whole thing. As mentioned above, the idea was to vent all this stuff and then torch it. So by the third track, we go abstract, just obliterate it all in a glowing cloud of plasma (I also play with various free improvisation wizards in Brighton, and wanted to apply that method to a rock song)… Then after the seizure, all the discords and harsh sounds, you get the spaced-out calm, which calls for acoustic guitars and deep trenches of weird reverb. It’s meant to be an interesting virtual space to visit, as opposed to just a collection of songs.

What do you find the most enjoyable part of being in a band and similarly the most cathartic?

For context – I used to find getting wasted and stumbling around the stage the most enjoyable part, it’s embarrassing to admit. At first I suspected I couldn’t perform without chemical help then found I could, but chemicals made it so much more fun… then it wasn’t fun anymore, just a flimsy cloak for my own dysfunction. But nowadays, I make a point of enjoying all of it. The whole process – the satisfaction of creating something, shaping it then blasting it out live: the expression of a whole complex of thoughts and emotions. Notice audience approval doesn’t really figure – communication’s the important thing. Also, it’s a way to spend your existence that doesn’t involve chasing around after money or power and then dropping dead in a premature heart explosion of bile and regret – not the way I do it, anyway.

For anyone contemplating checking you out live give some teasers as to what they can expect.

Sarcasm and sudden loud noises… Something that’s unsettling but in a good way, stimulating, like watching a horror movie – but without horror-type lyrics or anything like that.

What has been your most thrilling moment on stage to date?

Hate to burst this bubble, but on the whole it’s difficult to remember, or at least describe, those kinds of peak moments. It’s not like I’m up there sacrificing a live deer with my teeth every night – that, we can agree, would be memorable. It’s easy to describe the fuck-ups and disasters, but very hard to express how it feels when everything really flows and time stands still. Besides, it’s better to think even more thrilling stuff’s yet to come.

Do you have live dates coming up?

Wed 16 Oct, Eight Miles High @ Brunswick Cellar Bar (Brighton) – w/ Seadog & Fane

Wed 6 Nov, Rossi Bar (Brighton) – solo – w/ Junkboy & Jako

Sat 16 Nov, Biddle Bros (London E5)

Sun 24 Nov, Gladstone (London SE1) – solo

Sat 30 Nov, Grub Club @ Global Cafe (Reading) – w/ The Mirror Pictures + Adam & Elvis

Tue 3 Dec, Bloc (Glasgow)

Wed 11 Dec, Green Door Store (Brighton) – w/ Adam & Elvis + tbc

What else can we expect in the near future?

There’s an album’s worth of new songs I’m working through with the band, hopefully to record next year for release in late 2020, with a few guest musicians and a broader palette. More gigs (was hoping to expand into Europe, but now it’s a question of waiting to see how the Brexit fallout’s going to settle). A 24-hour magic ritual in an underground car park…(Not really, but that would be cool.) A fucking nervous breakdown trying to keep all those DIY plates spinning, probably; most of the time, I barely know what to expect myself.

What are the major inspirations to you sound wise and as a musician?

I was ruined by listening to Lou Reed and The Fall at an early age. Whatever it is in me that’s distressed, that’s not at rest, responded instinctively to stuff like that… found a way of making sense out of the world in it… and soon enough I was compelled to try and pass that on. I like the sound of raw electricity, loud guitars or acid synths, whatever – doesn’t matter how it’s conveyed.

And finally what song or release would you say was the spark to your passion for music?

It probably started with some silly pop song that injured my brain in childhood, but it’s not clear. Most musicians, deep down, are started off by the most random, silly stuff that they probably can’t recall or wouldn’t acknowledge (so even if I knew, I’m not sure I’d tell you).

Many thanks once again; anything else you would like to add?

Thanks for listening – it’s good when somebody makes the effort. I guess people just have to be willing to meet me halfway.

Check Matt out further @ https://mattfinucane.net/ and  https://www.facebook.com/Matt.x.Finucane/

Pete RingMaster 11/10/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Matt Finucane – The Seizure EP

This November sees UK singer songwriter Matt Finucane release another moment of wholly individual temptation in the shape of The Seizure EP. Offering four tracks which spark on the senses as they provoke thought and emotions, the Brighton-based troubadour of disharmony again proves himself one of the most unique and honest artists around.

The Seizure EP follows his album Vanishing Island which earned deserved acclaim earlier this year. It was a collection of tracks even in their array of individual sound and discord which throughout embraced a pop rock bred contagion. The new encounter is of the same intent and in many ways is an even more rounded set of songs but each of the foursome stands boldly unique to each other and all ignited the imagination as they got under the skin in emotional and physical dissonance.

Evil Realm is first up, announcing itself with an immediate clang of guitar, a persistent clash of enticement honed into suggestive strumming as dark but just as inviting rhythms stroll. Finucane’s inimitable tones quickly join the infectious pop ‘n’ roll swung, punk infested clamour, his Mark E. Smith-esque delivery as potent as the words and incitement escaping his thoughts and throat. The track is superb, its inherent contagion of hooks amidst a post punk nurtured droning swiftly irresistible and the almost kaleidoscopic nature of its sound compelling with the almost freakish moments of relative calm carrying a Bill Nelson like suggestiveness simply icing on the skilfully instinctive pandemonium.

The following Honest Song is just as magnetic, it too coming in on an ear enticing lure of guitar. The bass of Stephen Parker again proves a dark invitation to get hooked up on; it’s tempting as brooding as it is catchy against the rhythmic swing of drummer Barney Guy. Again there is a post punk breath to the contagion loaded track, the perfect embrace and provocation to the equally invasive and insightful words of Finucane and side by side with its predecessor is our favourite time with the artist yet.

The disquiet croon of Raw Material is next up, the song a call of melodic enticement and vocal implication swaying in the swarthy embrace of cosmopolitan hues yet unsurprisingly there is a clamorous lining to it all and a volatility which leads to a doorway of psyche rock entanglement. It is typical Matt Finucane in its canvas and imagination but unique in his landscape of fascination and enterprise.

The Seizure concludes with the shadow wrapped acoustic balladry of Slaughter Ink. Featuring the 12-string guitar of Mik Hanscomb, the song is as haunting as it is bewitching, the tones of Finucane matching the enthralling draw of the often sepia hued sounds with his thought entangling lyrics.

In our experience every outing with Matt Finucane has proven an absorbing and rousing adventure in some rich level of degree but The Seizure might just be his finest proposition yet; in fact no question, it is.

The Seizure EP is released November 8th through Light Crude Records.

 

https://mattfinucane.net/   https://www.facebook.com/Matt.x.Finucane/

Pete RingMaster 09/10/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Goodbye Mr MacKenzie – Good Deeds and Dirty Rags

Brandenburg photo by Martin Becker

Maybe like for many others, Goodbye Mr MacKenzie is a band which we did not pay enough attention to back when they were a potent part of a Scottish indie/rock scene lauded for the presence of bands such as The Jesus and Mary Chain, The Fire Engines, Simple Minds, The Waterboys, The Cocteau Twins and many others. The fair share of acclaim they earned was impossible to miss and a few familiar tracks, and more than we knew we knew it turns out, left a rich vein of pleasure in our personal musical journey. Funnily enough it was not the recent reforming of one of Scotland’s most iconic rock bands which has most strongly drawn us to the upcoming re-reissuing of their seminal album Good Deeds and Dirty Rags but the fact that one of our current favourite bands, The Filthy Tongues, consists of three of Goodbye Mr MacKenzie’s founders; that and the welcome urging of Shauna McLarnon of Canadian duo Ummagma.

Due for release this coming November and inspired by the massive success of their recent 30-year anniversary tour, Good Deeds & Dirty Rags has been re-mastered and comes with 3 additional tracks from those early years not previously included on the original edition. The band’s line-up at the time consisted of vocalist Martin Metcalfe, bassist Fin Wilson, and drummer Derek Kelly, the trio who have inflamed ears and the passions with their two albums as the aforementioned Filthy Tongues. Alongside them was guitarist John Duncan, previously of The Exploited, the future Garbage vocalist Shirley Manson, and Rona Scobie both providing keys and backing vocals. For the rest of the band’s potent history we will let you go search but there will be no finer way to set it off then through Good Deeds and Dirty Rags.

The album opens up with Open Your Arms, a track which swiftly hooks ears with its sweeping breath and magnetic jangle. Metcalfe’s vocals resonate with the expression and character which we are more familiar with within his current creative adventure as melodies, harmonies, and sharp hooks are woven into a slice of indie contagion. There is a Big Country like grandeur to the song at times and a gnarly edge to the bass which just hit a personal appetite, again something since keenly devoured with Wilson’s presence in The Filthy Tongues.

Wake It Up follows bringing a rousing roar to its composed stroll, every aspect fuelling an unapologetic catchiness which easily swept up eager attention. In some ways there is a larger than life hue to the song which reminds of The Associates but whether familiar with or new to the band through the album there is no denying Goodbye Mr Mackenzie had a distinct individuality.

The electronic hug of the especially enthralling His Masters Voice is just a big warm smile upon the ears but another track with a certain rock ‘n’ roll edge to it which erupts with vociferous voice throughout while Goodwill City is a drama soaked slice of anthemic temptation. It is a song set in climatic layers, each small but tenacious crescendo a rich incitement on spirit and involvement with its creative intrigue and emprise. One of their less familiar tracks before this release the song soon proved a firm favourite even as the riveting Candlestick Park swung its own shadow wrapped, melancholically spun seduction upon ears and imagination. The truth is the song easily matches anything on the release, its mesmeric and indeed haunting presence a siren of craft and sound.

The song, Goodbye Mr Mackenzie, is another which simply infests ears and appetite with its melodic audacity and fertile imagination. The earthy threads of guitar perfectly collude with the celestial breeze of keys and sighs of harmonies as marching rhythms firmly leave their galvanic imprint on the senses; another highlight re-introduced to ears before the band’s most famous track, The Rattler shares its masterful indie pop contagion.

Through the infectious creative animation of Dust and the glorious sonic theatre of You Generous Thing grinning pleasure only rises up, both tracks pure adventure for ears and imagination on

Goodbye Mr MacKenzie 2019 – photo by Karen Lamond

both sides of the speakers; both traits a persistent thrill across the release and echoed again within the equally superb Good Deeds. Straight away rhythmically it had us enslaved; Kelly’s agility and lures reminding of King Trigger before the rest of the band bring their own eager inventive exploits to the fascination of sound.

Good Deeds and Dirty Rags is completed by three demo tracks of Open Your Arms, Diamonds, and You Generous Thing; all from 1987 and each their own portion of thick temptation.

Though listening to the album inspires annoyance at not having embraced it well before now, it is a real treat to discover and you know what? It is not out of place or time within the current indie rock scene at all.

Good Deeds and Dirty Rags is released 2nd November via Neon Tetra Records.

https://www.facebook.com/GoodbyeMrMackenzie   https://twitter.com/gbmrmackenzie   http://www.goodbyemrmackenzie.com/

Pete RingMaster 27/09/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Exploding Head Syndrome – Aristocratical Tendencies

If the recent release of the new Cockroach Clan album was not enough proof there is now the new EP from Exploding Head Syndrome to prove that the Norwegian punk scene is in fine fettle. Aristocratical Tendencies unleashes five slices of punk/hardcore incitement which raucously roar with voracious contagiousness.

Aristocratical Tendencies follows the Oslo based band’s acclaimed 2016 album World Crashes Down and comes just after the quintet have returned from a mini-tour covering Norway, Sweden, Austria, Slovenia, Czech Republic and Hungary and included playing Europe’s Number One punk festival Punk Rock Holiday in Slovenia, sharing stage with NOFX, Pennywise, Frank Turner, Propagandhi, Descendents, Anti-Lam Front and many more. With their live reputation already highly praised and established through their own headlining shows and gigs alongside bands such as Satyricon, Sham69, Honningbarna, The Good Bad and The Zugly and Blood Command, Exploding Head Syndrome only reinforce and push on a similar stature gained through their records with their latest offering.

Shades is first up on the EP, a stroke of guitar igniting a hungry lurch of rhythms and vocal incitement before it all comes together in a virulently voracious trespass of sound. Vocalist Eirik Ekholdt bellows from within the punk eruption, the guitars of Morten Rørvig and Jonas Andreassen casting ferocious yet greedily infectious encouragement around him as all the while rhythms bite and trespass. It is a glorious assault, ripe hooks sprung with keen devilment and sonic threads spun with imposing drama but a song unafraid to go for the jugular.

The following Hardcore Jesus makes a more considered approach, melodic wiring enticing attention as around them a brewing tempest of sound grows. In quick time, the track breaks into a rapacious stroll, the swinging beats of drummer Lars Kirkerud steering its feisty gait as Håvard Jacobsen’s bassline broods. Again it is a feral invitation impossible to ignore and soon resist with its contagion loaded chorus, a hardcore meets hard rock landscape doing nothing to diminish its insistently catchy punk instincts.

I Got Feelings provides two minutes of equally rousing punk confrontation where open irritability colludes with anthemic prowess in a climate of discontent, the result another infectious incursion upon welcoming senses before You Have Your Dreams (I Have My Nightmares) sinks its similarly belligerent and fractious claws into ears and appetite. Once more there is bassline to devour and a creative squall of guitar to swing with, vocals and rhythms only adding to the manipulation as it all heads towards a robust holler.

The EP is closed up by All Change Is Bad, the track springing from the sonic departure of its predecessor with heftily swung beats and an entanglement of wiry guitar enterprise. That alone proves enough to infest body and attitude but with the raw incitement of vocals and the swinging groove of the bass, things only become more insatiable and gripping.

It is a great end to a superb release from a band we only find ourselves becoming more addicted to by the listen.

Aristocratical Tendencies is out now via Big Day Records; available @ https://ehspunx.bandcamp.com/

Upcoming Live Dates:

18.10.19 Oslo Bloodbath X, Oslo

09.11.19 Checkpoint Charlie, Stavanger w/Kåte Klør

15.11.19 Verkstedet Bar, Oslo w/The Nika Riots

http://www.explodingheadsyndrome.net/   https://www.facebook.com/explodingheadsyndrome

https://www.instagram.com/exploding_head_syndrome/

Pete RingMaster 20/09/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Luis Mojica – How A Stranger Is Made

photo by Kelly Merchant

For us music is a grand adventure and the best encounters are those which take us away from the real world whether it is for four minutes of a single track or an hour or so of a larger aural emprise. The new album from Luis Mojica is one such invitation to escape reality, a truly unique proposal which has turned irresistibility into an art form.

Already renowned as part of eclectic avant cello-based collective Rasputina, Mojica has forged his own alluring presence as a solo artist, one which is simply striking within new full-length How A Stranger Is Made, the successor to his acclaim 2016 debut, Wholesome. Mojica is like a troubadour, carrying a piano on his back and a storybook in his voice and imagination with How A Stranger Is Made a quest across a strange land plucking tales and characters from its unique landscape, drawing from their experiences to confess or certainly hint at his own emotional intimacy. The release as a whole is enthralling and each song a piano centred tapestry of the lives of individuals amidst idiosyncratic stories but easy to feel moments which are equally sharing an aspect of the creator himself.

Though it is fair to say that every song within How A Stranger Is Made fascinated and seduced pretty much effortlessly, its opening pair stood atop the mountain of favourites. Insane is first up and immediately hooked ears with the thick beats which announce its entrance and drama. Straightaway there is a contagion in the keys of Mojica, each note dancing and flirting with attention yet equally sharing a just as gripping emotive pungency. Like a siren, the sax of Caelan Manning shines on the shadows of song and word, its smoky lures just as darkly shaded to similarly enslave with the rich notes escaping the piano. The track is superb, easily one of our favourites songs of 2019 and swiftly matched in potency and pleasure by its successor.

Shaman Food strolls in with a swarthy swagger, spirits enticing with vocal tempting before Mojica and his word wrapped keys bounce through the imagination. The rhythm s of Evan Glen Adams infest feet and hips as the man himself entangles thoughts and spirit with his own; another realm of crepuscular shadows brought alive with craft, adventure and a vocal prowess which itself is a cast of a thousand souls.

From its first breath, there is an open intimacy to next up Invoked, the painting of its protagonist revealing more than just a singular entity. The silvery radiance of Mojica’s piano and tones are courted by the darker hues of Jason Sarubbi’s bass, their contrasting textures united in magnetism as rich and inescapable as Mojica’s rousing vocal palette; that mix as thickly enticing within the folkish hued, volatility breathing Moon Men. The cello of Sister Ursuline is a particular seduction, the tones of Mojica another and with his keys ever conjuring, the imagination was ensnared once again.

Across the quirkily stroked, aberrantly woven Cowboys and De La Saint with its melody pouncing, spring in the step sharing shamanic beauty ears and appetite were again enslaved, the latter of the pair a delicious track far richer and diverse than our words can intimate while Witch Love after them offers another shadow draped seduction impossible to hold at bay as once more craft and imagination rise up with startling enterprise.

If not quite to the depth of those before, City Friends only transfixed though there are certain moments of inflamed rapture which absolutely got under the skin, a trait The Ranger similarly offered with its controlled but animated gait and swing. With the violin of Rebecca Moore and Manning’s sax adding their bewitching aural paint the song’s canvas, temptation was inescapable.

Queen Song again unites shamanic and liturgical essences in its own rich musical textile, every note and syllable picturesque for the imagination and leaving a lingering impression as it makes way for the album’s final offering, a cover of Leonard Cohen’s Stranger Song. Though it did not ignite the passions as any before it, the voice and piano of Mojica absorbed time and attention.

It is a mesmeric and haunting conclusion to an album which even after numerous plays just thrills and impresses more and more; Luis Mojica a minstrel unafraid to share worldly and personal souls.

How A Stranger Is Made is set for release on October 4th with pre-ordering available @ https://luismojica.bandcamp.com/album/how-a-stranger-is-made

https://www.luismojica.com/    https://www.facebook.com/luismojicamusic   https://twitter.com/luismojicamusic

Pete RingMaster 24/09/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

InAir – Dreamful

There are many aspects to the sound and songs of British trio InAir but the ones which impress most is the almost nagging quality which effortlessly entices swift returns and then the increasing temptation which rewards every listen. The evidence is most ripe within new EP Dreamful, a handful of tracks which immediately made a strong case for continued attention but truly blossomed in ears and appetite with that incessant curiosity.

Hailing from Reading, InAir introduced themselves with a praise gathering debut EP in 2017, A Different Light revealing the rich flavouring to their alternative/electro rock nurtured sound. Equally live the threesome of lead vocalist/bassist Joe Conneely, guitarist/vocalist Aaron Iley, and drummer/vocalist Connor Shortt has drawn potent acclaim, sharing stages with the likes of Arcane Roots, Defences, Chasing Cadence, Junior, Veridian, From Inside and Death Remains. It is easy to expect the band to again entice eager support for Dreamful such its contagious enterprise. Whether it is their breakthrough moment time will tell but it is hard to deny that point is on the cards at some moment in time.

Control kicks things off, its calm melodic invitation soon engulfed in a fiery eruption. As swiftly though it relaxes into a reserved but catchy stroll as Conneely’s tones proceed to share the song’s heart. All the while that volatile edge still simmers, boiling up with rhythms a tenacious enticement throughout as guitar sparked flames ignite the drama of the encounter. It is an absorbing mix of sound and imagination, fresh and familiar flavours woven into one powerful body.

The following Chemicals is similarly bred, electronic enterprise colluding with rock and metal inspired hues to create a dramatic proposition further enhanced by the emotive strength of vocals. Each though carries an infectious lining which increasingly got under the skin, the dynamics of rhythms adding to this tempting as intimacy fuels the narrative and melodic breath of the song. Eclipsing the opener, it too is maybe just a tad outshone by its successor, Talk To You. It is only slight if it is as together the outstanding pair provides the pinnacle of the EP, the latter an impassioned and lively slice of melancholy draped contagion with potent crescendos and searing eruptions.

The release is completed by firstly Regress, an equally combustible slab of electronic and melodic intensity as anthemic as it is thickly emotive, and finally Life Finds A Way. The closer like those before it simply grew in persuasion and stature by the listen, its unassuming yet enticing beginning breeding some of the EP’s most riveting and rousing flumes of sound and contagion to erupt.

Dreamful is a release which commands attention once given the opportunity, whether it demands it enough will determine if now or in the future InAir really make their mark on the UK rock scene but it is easy to feel they will.

The Dreamful EP is out now.

https://www.inairband.com/   https://www.facebook.com/inairband   https://twitter.com/InAirUK

Pete RingMaster 20/09/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Cellista – Transfigurations

photo by Temira Decay (Yellow Bubbles Photography)

This September sees American cellist, performance artist and the artistic director of the interdisciplinary performing arts group Juxtapositions, Cellista begin a series of live dates in support of her recently released album-book, Transfigurations. They are moments in time sure to fascinate and provoke as classical music, theatre, improvisation and visual art entwine with tapestries and intimations of sound and genres and align with the compelling body of Transfigurations.

The release itself is a politically-charged invitation to thought and imagination with a layer of closer intimacy. From its first breath Transfigurations evoked attention and contemplation as Rupture I opens things up with an aural echo of defiance and oppression. It is a potent introduction to the heart of the album leading to the pure captivation that is Confessions. Featuring the magnetic tones of Rykarda Parasol across the equally transfixing cello led musing of Cellista, the track slowly but firmly strolled through ears, plucked strings a brooding radiance and melodies a captivating sigh alongside verbal intimacy.

Rupture II brings the current US ‘frontman’ with a typical declaration before Look Homeward, Angel steps forward to entice and reward. Cello caresses swiftly and easily seduce and inflame the senses even before the lyrical and vocal rhyming of hip hop artist DEM ONE (a.k.a. Demone Carter) evoke further eager attention. As the track continues to absorb and infest, soprano vocalist Melissa Wimbish accentuates its inherent beauty, it all arm in arm with the simply irresistible lures of Cellista’s strings.

The provocative series of Ruptures continue to separate and mark upon each track, the darkly shadowed and increasingly intense third welcoming the contrasting but no less powerful and consuming piece of narrative that is You Can’t Go Home Again. An electronic shimmer surrounds and accentuates the absorbing storytelling, the track increasingly darker and imposing by the minute and indeed enthralling.

A dystopian air clouds Repetitions, its breath intense and composition unpredictable ensuring fascination embraced every note and creative trespass while the three part movement of When the War Began left a similar maybe even more dramatic imprint on the senses and imagination with its rousing cacophony of tenebrific incitement cast with a craft and invention often as delicate as it is imposing; keys and cello led intimation a wonderfully forceful evocation.

Tzeva Adom brings the album to a close; the sirens of its early-warning radar system the prelude to a radiant and defiant beauty as strings and keys again weave a pungent tapestry of emotion and sound. It is a haunting and arresting conclusion to an album which bewitched from start to finish whilst provoking increasingly darker and tempestuous shadows and emotions.

Words can certainly hint but with Transfigurations only experiencing is the true way to understand its magnificence.

Transfigurations is available now @ https://cellista.bandcamp.com/album/transfigurations-2

Upcoming Live Dates (tickets at the door or reserve online via Facebook):

Sept 20 Seattle, WA – Wayward Music Series (with The Zero Collective, noisepoetnobody)

Sept 22 Portland, OR – a steep & thorny way to heaven (with Operafication, The Zero Collective)

Sept 24 Los Angeles, CA – Coaxial (Noise Soirée) (with The Zero Collective, Crank Sturgeon, Anna Homler)

Sept 27 Denver, CO – Mercury Cafe (with Sean Renner)

Oct. 06 Sacramento, CA – NorCal Noise (Part of Norcal Noisefest)

Oct. 18 Los Angeles, CA – Art Share (with Sean Renner)

Oct. 25 Oakland, CA – Temescal Arts Center (with Mia Pixley)

https://www.facebook.com/cellista.music   https://twitter.com/xcellistax   http://www.cellista.net

Pete RingMaster 20/09/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright