Living in the flames of Vaya

“Her spirit is screaming and blowing on the stage. She is the drums and her soul rises up through the sacred fire of music.”

This is a line from the Vaya biography on social media which sums up the creative and instinctive roar of the Canadian singer and band, and reason enough to find out more which we recently did with great thanks to the trio…

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started?

Victoria VAYA: Actual VAYA’s members Raphael, Philippe and me have met through this project step by step. First I met “by hazard” Raphaël through a “next door” music shop, when I had just moved into this area. The people talked about him, he is a good drummer so I contacted him. And Philippe joined us when the album was recorded and when we need to build a team for the live shows. I think he just answered to the music call. It was written. Then we are managing the stage from one year sharing the same powerful feeling for the rock music and eclectic colours if it.

RAPHAEL: Hi RingMaster, Victoria VAYA learned that I played the drums from a music store in Gland (CH). One day, she called me to record the first drums of VAYA. I never left since!

Have you been or are involved in other bands? If so has that had any impact on what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

Victoria VAYA: Yes I was. It was totally different. It was interesting but I was always feeling that is not my all expression in it. It was good experiences for the studio record part than the stage but I felt not complete. Now with VAYA, I really have so much pleasure to express all that animal and mystical energy through sounds and rhythms: it’s magic!

Philippe: Yes, actually I’m involved in 4 different bands: 1 funk, jazz, fusion band, 1 country blues folk band, of course Vaya and I’m starting a new jazz, salsa, samba band with another guitar player and we’re looking for other musicians too. 4 years ago, I played in a Celtic rock band and a blues rock band too. It’s very different than what I played in my former bands and in my actual bands but it’s interesting to combine those different styles and I always try to adapt myself in every situations.

RAPHAEL: I have been involved in many bands before. Now, I mainly focus on VAYA. Meeting other musicians with influences from all over the world has always been a positive and constructive impact on my drums’ play.

What inspired the band name?

Victoria VAYA:  AHAHAH I like this question. GOD? Or the Blow of it. As artists we just receive the flow of ideas around and translating it. So VAYA is the Legend of The White Wolf blowing on Earth. Ameridian people know more than us about the spirit of it but for sure it’s guiding and inspiring VAYA step by step. Something spiritual and for sure human.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

Victoria VAYA: Specific Idea? I don’t know. We are guided between intuition, talent combined and lot of passion and work time. So our sound is colourful and the most important, authentic.

Do the same things still drive the band when it was fresh-faced and how would you say your sound has evolved over time?

Victoria VAYA: We are “Evolution” by defining human being. We are simply always bounded by sharing our musician souls everywhere in the world.

Philippe: Yes we evolved a lot, first we were more like a metal band, than we changed the style, we use more percussions and now we start by using keyboard and it brings a new sound of the band!

Victoria VAYA: OH VAYA has an interesting evolution and it’s probably why I’m stoked with it. 😀 The first step of the album was done with a French composer, then he has to quit and I have to continue. So arrived a Hungarian composer with a real good classical background and a good rocky spirit and he gave a lot of keys for the arrangements of VAYA tracks album. Then for the next step VAYA needed to find a powerful evolution to go on stage and it’s when VAYA met the volcanic Chilean blood of Sebastian, also with a real good academic background. So I mean VAYA is rich of differences and musicians souls

Philippe: When I was young, I was more inspired by hard-rock, heavy-metal, then I changed, I started listening, studying and playing jazz, after played more blues and now, I play so many kinds of music and I’m back to rock.

RAPHAEL: My drums are now stronger into the groove. I am happy about this, it is really for VAYA!

I have a nice memory of the recording of the first studio album. There was someone who directed the arrangements and told what I had to play. Sometimes, I had no idea what would be the final results! When I listened to this album, I was well surprised!

The live album is more representative of my own sound.

And that movement in sound and anything else has been more organic or deliberate?

Victoria VAYA: We still experienced things. No limits for music, it’s a big playground!

Philippe: Yeah, we always try to experiment new things, new sounds, new songs, new ideas, it depends in what mood we are!

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

Victoria VAYA: Poetry of Jim Morrison, visionary as David Bowie, psyche as Jimmy Hendrix, sensitive as Bjork.

Philippe: I always try to adapt myself, to play and compose songs depending of the different styles I play in every band.

Is there a process which generally guides the writing of songs?

Victoria VAYA: So I am actually on the composing roots. Could be change never know, I always send ideas and people catch it for developing it, that’s the sharing part. No process. Sometimes it’s a drum that will be the first step, sometimes lyrics or a guitar riff or a keyboard song. I am receiving it and managing it to put all together.

Philippe: I think when someone has an idea for a new song, he or she brings it to the band, then we listen to it, we talk about it and then we try to play it together the best we can and everybody’s free to give his own opinion to change something, or to improve it.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

Victoria VAYA: Everywhere.

Philippe: Sometimes when I’m home and I try to find something good, or when I’m outside, in the street, in the train or wherever, it can happen anytime in any places

Give us some background to your latest release.

Victoria VAYA: WOW, it will take too much time, just listen and discover our double album it will connect you to your deepest part.

How about some insight to the themes and premise behind it and its songs.

Victoria VAYA: Oh my Dear. So the biggest thing who’s giving to you power what is it? The law of Nature :)))))) Then second is: Human experiences/observations. And you do a bridge between them.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

Victoria VAYA: Both of it. For sample Biscuit and Friends are born on studio record. The arrangement of My little curl too…So a mix of it.

Philippe: Actually, we went once to a studio to record altogether and now, we’re working on new songs for the next album, so right now if we have ideas for new songs, we record it on our own on the computer.

RAPHAEL: I’d rather prefer to go into the studio prepared to win some time (and some money). Sometimes it could be interesting to develop a song in the studio. The song BLOW is a nice example.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably a favourite aspect of the band?

Victoria VAYA: Absolutely: it’s being true and powerful for giving a real good travel to you guys! 😉

Philippe: The favourite aspect is when we’re on stage, with a good sound and with an enthusiastic audience, when we all have so much fun!

RAPHAEL: a live show that you will remember. The voice is so powerful, and without any light shows. I am always surprised that the audience is thankful and go back home with a smile.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found?

Victoria VAYA: I am always surprised people liked our live show. First in Switzerland where we met each other; the public there is really difficult to “ seduce” with a new way of expressing music; but they liked the spirit of the sacred fire. And such a lovely warm welcome into our last East of Europe tour. It’s growing step by step but because public is really welcome and is clearly a part of our music, VAYA is continuing with them. I would like to take that opportunity to say again thank you for all your encouragements everywhere we have played.

Philippe: It’s really hard for every new band to get known! You have to keep playing as often as possible in many different places. And Yes everything can happen, if you work very hard, if you focus and believe in yourself and the band, great things can happen!

RAPHAEL: I have worked for years in order to meet the good people in the music business to get the trust in my projects. This is paying now.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date? Do you see it ultimately as a negative or positive?

Victoria VAYA: So Raphael is probably the right person to answer to that question

Philippe: Sometimes things go right and sometimes wrong, it’s not easy!

RAPHAEL: One day, I put the band on Instagram and someone discovered us from Canada. Zolla Productions is now in charge of our booking in Canada. It takes a lot of time to manage the social media, but I think this is essential nowadays to show people the development of VAYA.

Once again our big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Victoria VAYA: Come and share the sacred fire with us. VAYA VAYA.

Thank you Ringmaster!

Vaya are:

Victoria VAYA: songs writer, singer, drums and keyboard

Philippe: guitar and bass

Raphaël: Drums &Percussions

https://www.facebook.com/VAYA.Official/   https://www.vaya-official.com https://twitter.com/VAYA_official

Pete RingMaster 07/12/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Eastern Swell – Hand Rolled Halo

Having been spellbound by their debut album, there was a definite intrigue as to how its successor would rise to sit alongside if not above its captivating predecessor. Fair to say that Hand Rolled Halo took little time to unveil its own compelling beauty and mesmeric dexterity to answer the question; the album with its matching craft and imagination sitting firmly alongside the first as one essential electric folk/melodic rock adventure.

The Eastern Swell is an electric folk outfit from Edinburgh which emerged in 2014 and inspired a flood of acclaim loaded attention with their debut album, One Day, A Flood two years later. Released as now its successor, through their home city’s great independent label Stereogram Recordings, the album was a tapestry of poetic storytelling and melodic suggestiveness. Hand Rolled Halo offers more of the same yet is as unique in character and enterprise as you could wish for. Recorded and mixed by Pete Harvey at Pumpkinfield Studios and mastered by Reuben Taylor, the album just smokes and simmers on the senses as it seduces ears and imagination from start to finish, Hand Rolled Halo sharing a tempering but welcoming intimacy to any hot lascivious celebration and comforting warmth to every thought haunted, loneliness accompanying cold stark night.

Featuring guest craft from previously mentioned cellist/keyboardist Harvey and trumpeter Al Hamilton alongside the quartet of vocalist Lainie Urquhart, guitarist Chris Reeve, bassist Neil Collman, and drummer Andy Glover, Hand Rolled Halo instantly caresses ears with the melodic touch and intimation of Miles From Home. Intrigue wraps every note, the emerging melody almost sinister in its lure and so enthralling especially as the song slowly but assuredly adds new teases to its invitation. Eventually the smouldering flame of trumpet lights the new warmth coating song and the senses, Urquhart’s siren tones swift seduction as too the darker attitude and tone of Collman’s bass. Still drama soaks every note and movement within the excellent track, even in its livelier swing and twists, allowing the imagination to conjure alone as well as with the personal reflection of a track where the word captivation does no justice to its enthralling hold.

The band’s version of traditional folk song Blackwaterside follows, The Eastern Swell giving it their own gentle but openly imaginative and again beguiling interpretation as heated rock hues merge with the song’s classical heart before The Game brings its adventurous exploits to ears. As with all tracks, the web of individual strands transcends beyond that electric folk tagging they come under; this outstanding instrumental embracing slight but certain dark wave and post punk essences to its suggestion heavy canter to provide a feast for the imagination and senses.

Next up Down Again By Blackwaterside echoes the concept of the dark sad tale shared by the second track, this time though re-imagining the romantic outcome the protagonist in Blackwaterside was expecting rather than the deceit. Again the band treats us to a melodic temptation in voice and sound which chases away the dark a feat its successor, Spindrift, matches but with a shadow draped passage into almost gothic lit introspection. The track is pure charm and again dark intrigue, the band’s music alone as manipulative as it is a platform for the listener to create their own theatre; a richness every song offers up.

From one favourite moment to another as Zeitgeist bounds in with its boisterous waltz. For the main, Hand Rolled Halo has the body gently swaying but here it is urged into full animation as gypsy/jazz and swing irreverence infest the instinctively lively folk heart of the song. Throughout the album the dark strings of the cello transfix and the hot flumes of trumpet incite and here simply throw off any restraints to romp with the feverish appetites escaping the rest of the band.

Through firstly the increasingly infectious and flirtatious serenade of The Scene and lastly the instrumental hinting and pastoral refinement of Dreaming Of St. Jude, the quite magnificent Hand Rolled Halo concludes its temptation and seduction. We called its predecessor spellbinding and no other word truly fits The Eastern Swell’s new adventure either though instantly persuasive and only blossoming in every aspect with every listen, new layers of imagination perpetually unveiled, Hand Rolled Halo borders on alchemy.

Hand Rolled Halo is available now via Stereogram Recordings @ https://stereogramrecordings.bandcamp.com/album/hand-rolled-halo

http://www.theeasternswell.com/   https://www.facebook.com/theeasternswell   https://twitter.com/TheEasternSwell

Pete RingMaster 07/12/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Oxygen Thief – Confusion Species

As a year rapidly draws towards its festive close and best of lists are being considered there is always a few gate crashers to make you think again. One sure to make the biggest noise demanding consideration is the new album from UK outfit Oxygen Thief. Unleashing eleven instinctive roars which simply command greedy attention, Confusion Species is the third album from the Bristol based band and one of the year’s most essential, voracious rock ‘n’ roll releases.

Imagining harnessing the core essence and ingenuity of Reuben, Therapy?, and Max Raptor, then mixing them with a catalyst which breeds and evolves a whole new and unique intoxication and you get a good idea of the rousing holler that is Confusion Species. It is that originality amidst openly imaginative writing and craft which ensures the album simply invites attention and we for one did not need asking twice; one listen enough to be hooked on one of 2018’s most exciting moments.

Lyrically bred and embroiled in the life entangling social and political issues of today, Confusion Species uncages its heart driven blast from its first breath, opener End Of The Pier Pressure instantly and forcibly strolling in with muscle and confrontational intent. Yet there is a devilish imagination to its purpose, ebbs and flows of intensity accentuating the drama which fuels every note let alone twist and turn. The vocals of guitarist and band founder Barry Dolan are pure magnetism, his words accentuating the lure which is echoed in the throaty trespass of Neil Elliott’s bass and the hefty swings of drummer Ben Whyntie.

The track is superb and quickly matched in strength and captivation by Atheist Dior, a song which challenges as it incites; its attack a nagging persistence built on a web of hooks and grooves and ridden by just as rousing vocals alongside a bassline as cantankerous as it is tempting.

The following Uncommon People looms on ears with a metal hued trespass, its prowl a heavy invasion easily devoured as too it’s blossoming visceral tango of wiry sounds and emotive intimation. Earlier mentioned Rueben comes to mind often across Confusion Species, this track especially prompting that reference before the punkier pop rock of Troublethink pounced and ingrained itself on senses and passions with defiance as raw energy fuels its creative animation.

The following pair of Suspension Bridge Of Disbelief and Rubbish Life Is Modern simply escalated the impressive start and lure of the album so far; the first a punchy slice of punk ’n’ roll swinging with uncompromising intent springing hooks which dig deep and riffs which worm under the skin with ease, especially the dirty lures escaping the bass. Its successor shows a more composed attack though the intensity and dynamics of its predecessors are just as eager to infest another compelling moment with post punk echoes adding to its masterful persuasion.

Both I Used To Be Elephants with its stalking riffs and irresistible vocal grooving and Lost In The Post, a track with more insatiable lures than a red light district, enthral, excite and examine body and energy with their individual manipulations. Each also highlights the great backing vocals and harmonies which collude with Dolan’s very fine lead as well as the melodic prowess behind the heavy roars of songs across the release; a tapestry exploited in great style once more within Graffiti; Irony; Lists. The bordering on carnivorous track teases with raw guitar caresses initially; lures soon joined by the earthy strains of a brooding bass and Whyntie’s ever dynamic swings as things gather to hungrily grab ears and imagination.

The album concludes with firstly You Snooze You Lose, a rebellion of sound, texture and word which left ears impatient for plenty more, and finally Practice Makes Perspex. The last track is a maze of enterprise; every way you turn ears confronted by a kinetic eddy of sonic and rhythmic dexterity slightly crazed and just a touch anxious and completely irresistible.

Those last two words sums up Confusion Species perfectly if without sharing all of the magnificence making up its whole. From start to finish it is musical alchemy, so much so that we could not choose a favourite track; all seizing the honour.  So if there is one release you simply must explore between now and any deadline you wish to choose, Oxygen Thief have it ready and waiting to devour you and for you to devour.

Confusion Species is out now via Xtra Mile Recordings; available @ https://oxygenthief.bandcamp.com/album/confusion-species-2

https://oxygenthiefmusic.com/   https://www.facebook.com/oxygenthief666   https://twitter.com/oxygenthiefyeah

Pete RingMaster 30/11/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Owl Company – Iris

Courting the richest essences of metal and heavy rock for a roar which resonates like an invigorating air clearing storm, Brazilian rockers Owl Company have just released their new album. A thirteen track anthemic holler, Iris has an eye on the intimate and worldly explored through sounds which are equally as broad as they are inwardly nurtured; it all resulting in a record which simply thrilled and impressed at every turn.

From São Paulo, the foundations for Owl Company began when vocalist Enrico Minelli and guitarist Felipe Ruiz began writing together, the pair soon bringing in drummer Thiago Biasoli. 2017 saw the release of debut album, Horizon, and the recruitment of guitarist Bruno Solera and bassist Fabio Yamamoto. A flame of attention upon the band was soon burning bright, Owl Company touring the US, and only intensified by the release of their single Pieces which led to them signing with Eclipse Records earlier this year. Now the band is poised to strike internationally with the release of the Matt Wallace (Maroon 5, Faith No More) mixed and Paul Logus (Stone Sour, Pop Evil) mastered Iris.

It opens up with the breath-taking One Last Time. Instantly the great bearish growl of Minelli is melodically snarling in the hug of voracious riffs and tenacious rhythms. A break in its trespass brings spicy grooves and a magnetic swagger bred in a collusion of melodic metal and heavy hard rock. As each song proves, there is an array of flavours entangled in the band’s rousing sound, each spicing united in open craft and hearty endeavour.

It is a thumping start to the album more than backed by the following Boogie Man, the track unleashing its groove from the first second and never relinquishing its lusty grip thereon in. From the earthy grumble of the bass to the voracious enterprise of the guitars, the song is a masterfully animated incitement; Minelli’s tones the ringleader to its anthemic prowess as it grabbed best track honours.

Next up, Rise brings a calmer proposition but one just as earnest in its heart and captivating in its layered dynamics building small crescendos which erupt in emotive intensity. As with all tracks, there is drama in every note and syllable which compels attention, its successor, Antagonist, just one echo in that respect. The band’s new single, it initially badgers and harries the senses before twisting into a flirtatious trespass full of unpredictability turns and stirring imagination. In a clutch of seconds it can stalk and prey on ears and within another few hug its victim with melodic caresses as it proves itself another major peak within the album.

The previous and lead single from Iris is the next,  Shattered Dreams igniting ears and appetite with its own tapestry of styles and textures in an inviting web bordering battlefield of enterprise while Dawn of Days in turn provides a mellower but still fiery offering with Minelli imperial, in a Rasputin way, within the enthralling wiry net of grooves and melody cast by Ruiz and Solera. The big swinging beats of Biasoli as ever provide an imposingly arousing incitement as Yamamoto’s bass springs a sweet spot hitting groove to complete the track’s manipulative persuasion.

Through the big boned, contagious southern rock lined enticement of Broken Paradigm and the predacious emotionally strained lures of Disconnected, the album’s hand only tightens on praise and enjoyment while Forbidden Ground stirs another eddy of full pleasure with its deviously grooved, Clutch-esque bellow. All three hit the spot with the third another pinnacle in an encounter proving an addictive encounter.

The Other Side soon shows that Owl Company are just as adept at emotion woven balladry, the song a tantalising croon with a great mercurial character to its volatile landscape; one especially blossoming on the craft of bass and voice.  Maybe not as immediately striking as those before it, the track only grows by the listen rising to be another big moment within Iris.

The final trio of Shades, with its enlivening dynamics, the intimately reflecting Doors, and the impassioned Angel bring the release to a powerful and stirring close, the final track especially bewitching. Each adds a new shade to the creative palette of Iris and all as rousing in their singularly individual ways as the earlier vociferous anthems.

Among a host of truly impressive and more importantly thrilling encounters to escape 2018, Iris ranks with the very best and Owl Company will soon have to deal with being under the biggest spotlights. Something you can only see them grabbing with eager hands.

Iris is out now through Eclipse Records across most stores.

https://www.facebook.com/owlcoband/

Pete RingMaster 16/11/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Castor Troys – Legends Never Die

We all come across propositions sparking a passion which is just meant to be whether in life, love, or regard to Legends Never Die, music. The new release from Canadian rockers The Castor Troys, everything about the EP caught our instincts and wants in a slab of rock ‘n’ roll whilst providing one of the most fiercely enjoyable encounters this year.

Hailing from Hamilton, The Castor Troys was formed in 2013, taking their name from the Nick Cage character in Jon Woo’s movie, Face/Off. Embracing inspirations from the likes of Headstones, Social Distortion, Motörhead, The Offspring, and Iron Maiden, the quartet forge their rousing sound from a tenacious mix of hard rock and punk with plenty of other strong hues involved around stories of “war heroes, bank robbers and clandestine lovers”. It is a recipe which drew potent praise upon the band’s debut album, Come Hell or High Water in 2015 and will surely lead to even greater attention and acclaim for Legends Never Die.

With shows with the likes of The Planet Smashers, Scarlett, and Silverstein under their belts and having just shared stages with Headstones and Black Collar Union in the lead up to the EP’s release, The Castor Troys get straight down to business from the first breath of the Andre Kaden Black produced EP.

Blackout Love makes the break from speakers first, hungry riffs and swinging rhythms instantly descending on the senses in an inviting trespass. Vocalist Aaron Walsh soon leaps into the mix, his powerful and magnetic tones as compelling as the sounds roaring around him. Straightaway our appetites were hooked, the steely groove of Matthew Bowker’s bass alone irresistible but with the wiry tendrils springing from the guitar of Chris Ledroit and Bryson Emmons’ swinging beats everything about the punk ‘n’ roll holler hit the spot.

The backing vocals across the band alongside Walsh also consistently make for a thick galvanic incitement and are in full force within the following We Are One, the band’s new single. From the first note they are careering through ears pulling the tracks’ devious hooks and eager exploits along with zeal and in no time, its call to arms character and chant fuelled persuasion, with a whiff of Grumpynators adding to its compelling cry and creative thunder, takes command leading body and emotions to get boisterously involved; that always a sign of prime rib rock ‘n’ roll.

The country rock lined Watch the City Burn is next, its sultry grooves and infectious chorus enough to hook the appetite. There is certainly something familiar to the song though nothing which can be exactly defined but, without hitting the heights of its companions, it leaves ears and satisfaction full to the brim with goodness before the EP’s title track uncages its punk rock rapacity. Though it reminds of UK punk metallers Fuckshovel a touch, the track epitomises the individuality of The Castor Troys sound and its insatiable anthemic howl.

Wreck of The Bastard boasts its claim for best track honours next, its melodic vines carrying something of Skids to them whilst riffs and rhythms nag and harass with a punk infused hunger. Even so their organic irritability is perfectly tempered by the hard rock breeding of the track, the song emerging as another slice of unpredictable but easily accessible rock ‘n’ roll scorched in The Castor Troys individuality.

The release concludes with a great cover of the Tom Petty track, Runnin’ Down A Dream. Certainly the song does not quite live up to the heights of those before it, but with a bouncing body and well-worn vocal chords in its wake gets the job done with a firm enterprising hand.

It is a great and again inescapably rousing moment in a release which The Castor Troys deserve all the attention and praise they get for and with Legends Never Die that should be plenty.

Legends Never Die is out now; available @ https://thecastortroys.bandcamp.com/

fuick

Never too late for Vain Galen and Salt The Snail

Though we may be a little tardy in relation to their release dates, we have a couple of singles worth attention anytime of the day and year which we suggest need checking out.

First up is March Of The Walkers from UK trio Vain Galen. Formed in 2012, the West London band has increasingly impressed and lured acclaim through their releases, songs like Galen’s Cage and Biography of a Stickman especially drawing plaudits. Recently the threesome of vocalist/guitarist Wayne Houchin, bassist Carl Tiedt, and drummer John Mcshee uncaged their new encounter, song which pretty much eclipses all the goodness already escaping the band’s imagination.

It is enjoyable not too easy to pin down the band’s music, March Of The Walkers alone a web of alternative metal, punk, grunge and hard rock. It makes for a temptation as unpredictable as it is rousing, the new single stocked with proof of both. Instantly the rhythmic prowess of Mcshee asks for and gets attention, ears rewarded with the rousing exploits of guitar and bass. Already that multi-flavoured hue to the band’s sound is at play, only blossoming as Houchin’s potent tones join the creative affray.

The song continues to entice with skilful hooks and crafty aggression, its fury creating an anthemic climate which the track simply relishes the further it evolves in melodic and imaginative twists, at times teasing with an almost PiL like devilry as it declares itself the best moment in the Vain Galen arsenal yet.

The other track demanding attention is from Salt the Snail, another British band which has already stirred the passions especially through their deviously mischievous previous single Spanish Announce Table. It carried a devilment which had lips grinning and bad habits rising, success boisterously continued by its successor Lazer Quest.

The band writes songs inspired by their own passions; their debut single Coffee was sparked by a love of the obvious, its already mentioned follow-up by wrestling and horses. Lazer Quest unsurprisingly springs from their appetite for lasers and dancing, pleasures shared through the band’s unique fusion of noise, punk, and indie dissonance. Mike Rogers’ guitar grazes the senses initially but only inviting attention to the waiting stomp driven by the swinging sticks of drummer Tom Ashley and The Baron’s throaty bass groove. Once vocalist Krystian Hudson strides in with his equally magnetic attack, the track is in full revelry, twisting and turning only to escalate its delicious antics and enterprise. Something akin to a hardcore infested Swound! meets Asylums meets Houdini bled bedlam, the track is feral manna to any noise loving ears.

Check out both bands further at…

http://www.vaingalen.com/    https://www.facebook.com/vaingalen/

https://saltthesnailband.bandcamp.com/ https://www.facebook.com/SalttheSnailORIGINAL/   https://twitter.com/SalttheSnailUK

Pete RingMaster 16/11/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Unleashing a spring in the step: talking Cinders

So boisterous and tenacious, let alone infectious, that a bouncing body to its bait is inescapable, the Cinders sound is an infection in the waiting. All the evidence is there on the US band’s new album; a collection of indie pop tracks embracing a host of flavours as they romp in the ears.  We had the pleasure to find out more with big thanks to the band, examining the band’s beginnings, inspirations and of course Cinder’s latest album alongside much more…

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

No problem at all! Thank you for having us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all?

Cinders is a rowdy-acoustic-pop band from Salt Lake City, UT.

Members

Adrian De La Cruz: Bass Guitar

Austin Harris: Keyboard / Multi-Instrumentalist

Brad Bennett: Drums

Chelsey Powell: Saxophone / Vocals

Jordan Zabriskie: Vocals / Guitar

Montana Smith: Vocals / Guitar

We were brought together by a love for music and a desire to make a career out of doing something that we actually love. We are all of the same mind-set that if someone has a passion, they should be able to be passionate about it and do everything they can to pursue it! And for the last 3 years that is what we have been doing.

Some of us met when we were teenagers. We jammed to a lot of the same music and rebelled in the same ways (we would wait until the 3rd time our mom asked us to clean our room to actually do it). Some met a little later in life when we had matured a bit, gone to school, and experienced life around different parts of the country. Within our search for self-discovery we would always come back to music. It is what we love most and what we will continue to do the rest of our lives.

Have you been or are involved in other bands? If so how has that had any impact on what you are doing now?

Yeah most of us have been in and out of other bands! Whether they were high school jazz bands, or metalcore bands, we have all come from a musical performance background. Each group/band taught us important lessons about working together and about what it takes to make a successful band.

I think we definitely pull aspects from each band we played in. It has played a big role in creating our genre and how we act on stage. We are very different from all of those projects though so we approach Cinders very differently. Our ultimate goal is to have fun and bring people together. So we try to write songs with that goal in mind.

What inspired the band name?

It felt like an appropriate name for a band of 6 people who have played music for years but never together. It is short and sweet and represents our music well…though because it is so simple, people often feel like it should be more complicated and add in “the” to the title. We are not The Cinders ha-ha. We are a huge fan of The Led Zeppelins though…

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

It was something we all wanted and needed. Music is what drives us. Playing in a band with people as motivated as yourself is awesome. We felt the sound we had to offer was familiar but unique. It is like when you meet someone for the first time and they are super cool, but you feel like you have known them for years. You wonder why you haven’t known it this whole time and from now on it becomes a part of you.

Do the same things still drive the band when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

When we first started, I feel like we had a smaller view of what we wanted the band to become and how we were going to get there. We have always wanted to be a touring band. We were definitely driven by hopes and our dreams and by each other and that has not changed.

But what has been added to the list is a compilation of all the successes, all the lives changed, all the support from fans, all of the small goals achieved, all of the trials conquered, all the lame part time jobs, and all of the fun experiences. With all of these things motivating us and driving us, we won’t stop until we get where we want to be.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

Short dumb answer would be “slowly”. We didn’t realize how much we loved yelling and hitting instruments super hard until we played live. Even the softest songs from our first record became much heavier live. So when we hit the studio again we had more of that mind-set of creating fun live songs that would appropriate to break our instruments to. We of course don’t break our instruments though… because, well, we need them to make music.

Has it been more of an organic movement of sound or more the band deliberately trying new things?

Tooooootally organic for sure… I don’t think we have had very many discussions on what sound we want and there hasn’t been any disagreements with what the songs turn into. I have seen band after band split up because they have different ideas of what they want the music to be. So many start their own solo projects; so many release EP after EP sounding like a new band every time.  But with Cinders, we all just kind of do our own thing and trust each other and build on our demos until a final song just sounds like Cinders.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

Twenty One Pilots, one of the biggest bands in the world right now has a heavy influence on our work ethics, our goals, and our expectations. Tyler and Josh are from Ohio and they started as nobodies. They worked hard, they released music, they toured, they did all those things that bands say “we will do that when we are a big band”. They are proof to us that any band from anywhere with whatever tools and connections they have or don’t have can make a career out of music touring the world. It has inspired us to go all out and make our live shows as crazy and fun as possible. We want people to say “that is the funniest concert I’ve been to” whether we played for 25 people or for 25,000 people.

Is there a particular process to the band’s songwriting?

Songs will typically start with an acoustic guitar and a vocal melody. There may or may not be lyrics written yet. The lyrics will usually come as the chord progressions are discovered. The song will form first as a rough acoustic demo, it won’t really take shape until each member has sat down with the demo to add in their flavor and make necessary changes. We often will sit down and jam with each other before we solidify a song idea.

Where do inspirations to that lyrical side come from?

Inspiration can come from literally anywhere. I remember being in the grocery store writing down the lyrics for 100 Foxes on my grocery list. Typically they will come from personal experience or feelings though. We really try to show what we are feeling lyrically rather than tell it. A story is much more interesting and meaningful than an explanation.

Would you give us some background to your latest release?

We are extremely stoked that our new album, Looking Forward to Looking Back, is finally out! It just came out on September 29th and it is our second full length album. This record is much heavier musically and lyrically. It is a matured sound for the band and really drives emotion. It has been a 2 year project and our proudest achievement to date!

Give us some insight to the themes and premise behind it and its songs.

We really wanted to make something that reflected us and the way we feel, and the way our fans feel. So the premise would be that we want everyone to know that no matter what you’re going through right now, there are always good things that are on the way. The album title, Looking Forward to Looking Back really encompasses the theme of the album. Each song is very reflective and forthcoming at the same time.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

We are very fortunate to have been able to build our own studio. So we are in the studio almost every day. We are always recording new ideas that we have. Whether we have a full song or just a cool line, we want to have it recorded. We started out with just over 30 demos for Looking Forward to Looking Back. In the end we felt very strongly about the 11 we chose. We didn’t want to just settle on any tracks. We wanted to make sure that this album was the best that it possibly could be.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably the favourite aspect of the band?

The shows are the best part! The crowd energy is always insane! The fans are seriously the best part of it. To hear all those people screaming our songs right back at us is so cool. We may have some easy listening songs but we treat every performance like a punk show and go as hard as we can every night. We want to make sure that everyone who paid to see us gets the show they paid for!

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods?

The music scene in Salt Lake City, UT is awesome! There are a lot of college towns around us as well that have great venues and incredibly talented musicians. It is hard not to be a lover and supporter of music when the music scene you are in is so cool. We love touring nationally. There is nothing like coming home and playing a show for your town though. We are always the most excited for those shows!

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date? Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as the band grows and hopefully gets increasing success but in a climate where people are not buying music?

Social media has played a huge part in our success so it is hard to say too many negative things about it (other than it taking over all of our lives ha-ha). There are a lot of awesome YouTubers that have become great supporters and friends who have shared our music to their worldwide fan-base. We rely a lot on the reach of our social media and our online marketing to help reach fans across the world we wouldn’t have normally hit! We definitely look at it as a positive for our band.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Thank you so much for having us! Looking Forward to Looking Back is out now! Make sure to follow on Spotify and Apple Music so you can hear it now!

Check out Cinders further @ http://www.cindersmusic.com/   https://www.facebook.com/cindersmusic/  https://twitter.com/cindersmusic

Pete RingMaster 07/11/2018

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