Jack The Envious – In Your Own Way

Having already grabbed attention with their debut EP last year, UK outfit Jack The Envious have bigger things in their sights with the release of its successor In Your Own Way. It is a more creatively adventurous affair swiftly revealing a new confidence and bolder exploits from within the band which only increasing experience and expanding imagination can bring.

Formed in 2012 by vocalist Nir Perlman and guitarist Guy Avnon with bassist Guy Checkarov subsequently  linking up, all this going on during their military service, London based Jack The Envious took their time honing their sound and live craft as national service absorbed their time. Debut EP, Pull You Down, made a solid impact with its release last year, its post hardcore nurtured sound a potent introduction to the band. Its first steps though have now been strikingly eclipsed by In Your Own Way, the Jack The Envious sound having evolved with those new previously mentioned attributes and a maturity they can only breed. With its line-up completed by drummer James MacPherson, the quartet has moved from being another promising post hardcore proposition into an imagination grabbing and openly distinct incitement looking back on a lagging behind genre crowd.

In Your Own Way opens up with Shut Me Off, intriguing ears and thoughts with its darkly toned atmosphere and pulse veined by a melodic tingle. Soon guitars and rhythms are crowding around the senses though, subsequently uniting in a tenacious and lively stroll blessed with a delicious bass sound and the wiry exploits of the guitar. With Perlman’s vocals equally as distinct and enticing, punk and indie rock lining the track’s post hardcore breeding, it erupts in a magnetically eventful blaze with numerous increasingly gripping twists and turns. The track is superb, quickly stamping a new creative authority and adventure upon the band’s writing and its portrayal.

The pop punk entrance of Begging For More belies the forceful tide of sound in close pursuit and remains an enterprising texture within the mercurial landscape of the song. Fiercely infectious with a matching strength of aggression and imagination, the track is a fascinating tapestry of styles and invention keeping the listener busily captivated before the band’s new single Guilty takes over. Its gentle melancholy scented opening similarly draws a wall of intensity and trespassing sound without losing  the poetic integrity within the blossoming heart and guitar weaving scenery of the song. Imposing drama also brews within the song, laying out its temptation as Avnon conjures and rhythms challenge alongside the ever enticing vocals.

Mrs. Grim swings into view on a trapeze of guitar woven tendrils straight after, the track embracing a host of indie, punk, and hardcore spawned flavours in its appetite stoking invention. The most imaginative and creatively bold encounter within the EP it is also one of its most inescapably catchy making, as most songs here, a riveting gateway into the world of Jack The Envious whilst challenging the first as the best song within In Your Own Way.

The EP ends with Never Look Down, the calmest proposition within the release but brewing its own keen to erupt blaze of energy and sonic fire within the song’s melodic hug. Though not quite lighting ears up as those before it, the track is a fine end to quite simply one exciting release. With their first EP Jack The Envious said here we are, with their second they have declared themselves ready to make a leading role in shaping the future of British post hardcore/ melodic punk.

In Your Own Way is out now as a free digital download @ https://jacktheenvious.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/JackTheEnvious/

Pete RingMaster 19/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyrigh

Stripped down and bouncing: venturing into the lively world of Cinders

Exploding on the Salt Lake City music scene in 2015, Cinders has been a bundle of great sounds and fun luring fresh waves of new fans year by year, song by song. Their diverse indie-pop/alternative rock sound has been acclaimed by those fans as “rowdy acoustic pop”, a tag which perfectly fits their releases to date and a live presence which leaves a venue smiling breathlessly. We took the chance to find out more about the sextet with both hands, chatting with the band about beginnings, music, the lure of their live shows and plenty more…

Hello all and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started?

Chelsey: Well- we have Adrian our ’emo punk’ that studies jazz, Jordan ‘the one who never grew up’, Montana our ‘spikeball extraordinaire’, Austin ‘the one with the dad jokes’, Brad ‘the sex appeal’ and me…. band mom. We are just a bunch of geeks that like music.

I would say the vision of Cinders came from Montana and Jordan. As to how we all came together, some members of the band are long time high school friends, work friends, others met later in life while living in Tennessee, and even social media has played a large part in the formation of Cinders.

Have you all been involved in other bands before? If so how has that possibly shaped what you are doing now?

Austin: Everyone has had experience in bands prior to Cinders, even if that experience was jazz band, wind symphony, or marching band… Jordan, Montana, Adrian, and Brad all played in “cool” high school bands. Adrian and Chelsey both studied jazz in college so between the 6 of us we have a lot of experience in many different styles of music.”

What inspired the band name?

Montana: It was the title of a terrible song we wrote in high school, and we thought the name was super cool and deserved more than just that terrible song. It was also the very first song Jordan and Montana ever played together about 7 years ago.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

Jordan: None of us have really ever had a backup plan in life ha-ha. We found what we wanted to do and we are going after it! Music is everything to us and when you find 6 people who all have the same goal in mind, work just tends to get done. We are all pretty happy and positive people and think that the world could use a bit of a more hopeful sound. So although not all of our songs have the happiest lyrics, we try to keep in that hopeful tone to spread the feeling that everything will be okay and life is good.

And that still primarily drives the band or have they evolved over time?

Montana: I think we can all agree that of course the love for music drives us, but nothing drives as like crowd interaction at shows. Seeing them dance to the rhythms and hearing them scream the lyrics is the most rewarding feeling on earth.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved and has it been more of an organic movement or more the band deliberately trying new things?

Jordan: The band started off a bit more calm and chill until we performed live. We would be jumping, screaming, and stomping on stage to acoustic songs sans drums and it was awesome! It helped us realize more that people want to see a show and they want to see a band loving what they do for a living. I think we have all been to those shows where the band looks sad and stands still the whole time. After the show is over I’ll sometimes hear them saying “that was the funnest night of my life.” you can do those same things at a funeral (though at the end of the day they probably wouldn’t say it was the funnest day ever). We wanted to start creating music that fit our live performance better, so we did, and we still are. We want to whole heartedly say each night “This was the funnest night of our life.” Our fans come to have a great night, so that is what we work to give them.

You touched on it earlier, across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approaches and ideas to creating and playing music?

Jordan: We definitely come from very different musical backgrounds, but that is something we root ourselves in and take pride in. Music is not one sound or genre so we don’t want to be that either. We want to sound like who each of us are. Every Cinders song is like a cake. The cake isn’t all good, big and pretty until all the ingredients and frosting are added. We are each an important ingredient (Chelsey and Austin are the couple on top of the cake). So I guess the inspiration comes from trying to see outside of the box. Yes it has definitely helped us to look at music in a more open way!

Is there a regular process to the band’s songwriting?

Brad: So the songs at the beginning generally come from Jordan’s or Montana’s mind. With a few ideas, a riff, or some lyrics. Once we get something tangible to work with, I’ll usually record some drums for them. And then bit by bit we each add ideas and mess with it. Montana works his pro-tools magic and next thing you know we’ve got a solid demo, or a song.

Where do the prime inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs come from?

Jordan: Personal experience, words with friends, rhyming dictionaries, childhood books ha-ha. It comes from everywhere. I feel like all of us writers have very strange minds. They are like caves full of thoughts waiting to come out, it is just a matter of searching hard enough to find them. That search can be very tough but super fulfilling.

Would you give us some background to your latest release and some insight to the themes and premise behind it and its songs?

Brad: Our latest release is our acoustics vol. 1. We love to rock out, but we also love the chill feel of stripping everything away and revealing the songs as they are by themselves. We call it vol. 1 because we plan on doing an acoustic vol. 2 of course. Not for a while though! 😉

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

Adrian: For our first record we had the mentality of the final state is what we were recording. And then we would only slightly modify what we had. But that has definitely changed. We are now working on demos and having a group production phase to our songs.

Tell us more about the live side to the band, presumably the favourite aspect of the band and as many bands will attest to, it is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield, how have you found it your neck of the woods?

Adrian: Our fans are definitely our favorite part. We wouldn’t be a band if it wasn’t for them. And as for the opportunities out here in Utah they are great. Utah has a great sense of community in live and local music.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date?

Jordan: Social media is awesome! It has created a way for artists and fans to communicate and connect in ways they never could have 20 years ago. We really owe it all to our friends and fans who have shared our music all over social media to help us get to where we are! Wherever our fans are, we want to be there as well. So we have loved being able to keep them updated with photos and videos of each show. We have even started a Patreon so that they can be a part of the writing of our new album! The music industry is changing and I think social media is a huge part of it and I think it is very positive.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Thanks again for having us, we really appreciate it. To those reading, we love you and are so grateful for all of the support you have shown us! Thank you for everything and look forward to #album2 coming soon!

Check out more about and from Cinders @ https://www.facebook.com/cindersmusic/ and http://www.cindersmusic.com/

Pete RingMaster 19/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Katalina Kicks – Cold / I Want The World

There are some bands which simply kick ass, some that try and miss, but just a few who grab it first, give an over familiar squeeze, and then give it a firm boot with their sound. Katalina Kicks has persistently been in the camp of the latter over the years and definitely stake their place with their new double A-sided single. Taken from their acclaim gathering new album Vices, the twin attack of Cold / I Want The World is a mix as aggressive as it is seductive, as agitated as it is thoughtful, and across both tracks relentlessly magnetic.

Consisting of band founding original of 2010 in vocalist/guitarist Ian George with bassist Nadia Silverstone and drummer Jase Wilkinson alongside, Katalina Kicks have just come off a successful 20-date UK and European tour in support of Vices and have prepared a summer of matching busyness and attention with their new single.

Two distinctly different styles of sound and imagination, Cold swiftly and firmly steals the show with its irritable ingenuity. Featuring grime artist GT Solo, the track instantly has ears enticed with dirty riffs and punchy beats, their punky nature an instinctive arousal of our personal appetites for attitude driven dirty rock ‘n’ roll. It is a spiky mix swiftly reinforced by the militant vocal expression of George backed by the spatial sheen of Silverstone’s melodic tones. Taking a biting swipe at the British Conservative government and their austerity cuts, the song is a belligerently potent incitement in word and sound embracing a new voice in the shape of the self-penned words and vocal dexterity of South London lyricist GT Solo. Quite simply irresistible stuff, the track is punk rock raising a middle finger at the establishment with craft and a lingering rock ‘n’ roll snarl.

I Want the World is a much calmer proposal though with its own underlining bite as melodic and classic rock merge in a clean cut but still enjoyably dusty roar. The clang and melodic prowess of the guitar is courted by the moody yet infectious shuffle of the bass, Wilkinson’s beats swinging with forceful intent across their catchy union. Maybe less striking at first compared to its team mate, the song only grows to increasingly tempt and persuade with every eager listen.

The single makes for a highly eventful and resourceful doorway into the diverse sound of Katalina Kicks, a potent glimpse of their bold escapades. Whether it is their finest moment, we cannot say not having heard all their adventures but it and especially Cold is one of the best moments, song wise, to be heard this year.

July 21st sees the release of Cold/I Want the World.

http://www.katalinakicks.com/    https://www.facebook.com/katalinakicks    https://twitter.com/katalinakicks

Pete RingMaster 19/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Antigone Project – Stellar Machine

Last year French outfit Antigone Project not only took their sound to a more accomplished plateau with the From Its Room EP but hinted it was just the beginning of a whole new soundscape to their already easily engaging sound. It was a clue now realised by the band’s debut album, Stellar Machine a journey through spatial clouds of invention and diversity but as universes lead into new universes, equally feels like an adventure leading to many more bold journeys.

The creation of Frédéric Benmussa, a multi-instrumentalist, songwriter, producer and no doubt much more, Antigone Project has grown from a solo project in 2002 to be one of France’s most engaging electronic rock/metal proposals. With the talented prowess of bassist Manu Ventre and drummer Fred Monaco alongside Benmussa, the band had its hands on attention with the release of a self-titled first EP in 2015. It was the debut clue to the expansive and expanding sound growing within the outfit, a suggestion taken further by From Its Room a year later and now truly unfurled within Stellar Machine.

Inspirations to the band’s sound and certainly new album range from Soundgarden to Deftones and Nine Inch Nails on to the likes of Depeche Mode, Jean Michelle Jarre, and Devin Townsend. That is enough to suggest the kaleidoscope of flavours making up the band’s album; they all involved with an even richer vein of Muse meets Radiohead like drama. Do not think you have a handle on Stellar Machine just yet though as ears will soon find a far thicker and greater carousel of the band’s own individual invention across its unpredictable body, one placing the listener into “the skin and shoes of a futuristic cosmonaut following the adventures of outer space travellers on a “stellar machine”.”

Climbing on board, ears are fastened into their seats by the powerful creative straps of opener Poison, its electronic/industrial lift off instantly swarming around the imagination. In turn, it leads to the virulent rock ‘n’ roll heart of the starter where riffs and rhythms are swiftly harrying and enslaving body and instincts, the calmer almost floating tones of Benmussa glazing the infectious exploits with a plaintive Matt Bellamy scented delivery. A compelling groove reinforces the song’s hold, the lively beats of Monaco dancing tenacious across the senses as keys bring cosmic scenery to bear on the imagination. Even in its calmer drifts, the song is forcibly infectious, the trio painting their creative canvas with an array of textures within skilfully woven enterprise.

The following Schizopolis needs mere seconds to have the body moving with its heated funk lures and enveloping synth pop enticement. A few seconds more brings a steelier tone and intensive edge to things, Ventre’s bass a darker brooding incitement which continues to lure and court the twisting infectious exploits of the song. Imagine The The meets Nine Inch Nails and the second track feeds expectations before taking them into deeper richer realms, leaving ears and appetite on a high ready for the moodier, crepuscular skies of III. The song’s air is as enticing as its predecessors, but within its emotional and atmospheric twilight a smouldering seduction matched in energy by the similarly calm vocals and keys.

Another fresh climate is brought by Mantra Nebulae, a dirtier rugged rock/metal contemplation over which vocals and melodies glide while Raphe Nuclei surrounds ears with an almost glacially reflective electronic embrace. Neither track quite lit up ears here as those before them but with the snarling dexterity of the first and the emotionally intensive vocals of Benmussa crawling the second, both tracks enthral and increasingly ignite the imagination over time.

In contrast The Black Widow instantly ensnared instincts and the passions, its intrigue ridden, noir coated web of dramatic coaxing as threatening as alluring. Hooks and grooves collude in seduction, vocals prowling with infectious devilry as bass and beats just flirt; a mix addiction was intended for. There is a touch of Fad Gadget to the song, eighties electronic/new wave essences as readily embraced as other more rapacious textures by the band and the increasingly volatile moments of the outstanding proposition.  The song is superb, a major highlight of Stellar Machine which Pretty Pain straight after easily backs up with its Mike Oldfield/ Devin Townsend nurtured symphony. As all tracks, every passing minute is unique to the last yet a continuation of their revealing cosmic travelogue and emotional revelation.

Cardio Machine is simply raw temptation, a fusion of predatory rock ‘n’ roll and synth pop virulence which has a firm restraint on both yet employs their attributes along another highly addictive body of enterprise. There is something enjoyably familiar about the song but nothing which can be pinned down, just simply and greedily enjoyed with every listen.

The album’s title track is eleven minutes of sample built introduction within senses stroking atmospherics, moving into electronic painting and progressive weaving where every minute adds to a flight feeling far shorter than its actual length such the beauty and captivation on offer. The song alone captures the mood and adventure of the theme; playing like a recap but of another past or future heroic planetary flight.

The album concludes with the atmospheric grace and beauty of Sun’n’rain; a rhythmically bold, melodically heated serenade beneath earthly pleasures. Drawing on the strongest Muse like flavours yet, the track with its almost Bond like theatrical lining brings the album to a powerful and more importantly thrilling close.

Stellar Machine confirms that Antigone Project just go from strength to strength, from bolder adventure to adventure yet still you get the feeling we have not come close to their most monumental exploit yet. Another must investigation for you all.

 Stellar Machine is out now through Lazy Freddy Records via most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/antigoneproject    https://twitter.com/projectantigone

Pete RingMaster 18/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Tunabunny – PCP Presents Alice In Wonderland Jr

PCP Presents Alice In Wonderland Jr is the new and fifth album from US Transcendental Dance Poppers Tunabunny, a huge adventure which sees the Athens, Georgia hailing quartet at their most poppy, darkest, experimental, and compelling. A double album breaching 28 imagination stoking tracks, it is a kaleidoscope of sound; no track like any other or pretty much any offering from the band to date, and a carousel of creative drama which pushes the listener into places they might not know exist let alone have contemplated.

Apparently PCP Presents Alice In Wonderland Jr is “structured as a song-by-song response to The Beatles’ White Album” and through its songs explores themes such as surveillance, futility, alchemy and winter, metamorphosis and anger whilst its fourth side features a twisting song cycle about motherhood; from pregnancy to birth, through postpartum emotional desolation, to the rebirth of self. Whatever their inspiration, the album’s songs challenge and arouse physically, mentally, and emotionally ensuring you get a full and thrilling workout with the foursome of Mary Jane Hassell, Scott Creney, Brigette Adair Herron, and Jesse Stinnard.

Rather than do our usual track by track look, such its bulging size, we are going to pluck the moments which ignited the imagination most forcibly but be assured barely a moment passes within the whole release without making a potent and appealing impact. From the opening atmospherically sinister Cartesian Theater, a track which appears like an intro but is so much more, Tunabunny set the speakers and passions on fire with Incinerate. A recent single, the track is glorious; a slice of indie pop which has the head bobbing, feet shuffling, and ardour brewing within its first round of seduction. Adding one’s own breath is inevitable to a sublime chorus, the vocals a flirtatious beauty matched in temptation by the gentle swing of the sounds cradling their charm.

There is no better moment within the album but plenty of times rival the height of the superb encounter, the following Noise Problems a swift example with its post punk/new wave canter carrying a definite resemblance to eighties UK band The Passions. The stroll of the bass is as deeply appealing as the wiry jangle of the guitars, vocals again an inescapable magnetism in diversity and harmony whilst the song’s emerging discord is simply delicious.

The indie/psych pop of Seek Consequence is another major magnet; the swaying vocals siren-esque as darker hues brew and evolve behind their lyrical wiles until heatedly bubbling up with a drone like fever while Blackwater Homes rises up from a gentle melodic murmur into another virulently infectious and shadowed canter playing like a mix of Stevie Nicks and Pylon. Worryingly easy to be seduced by its haunting lures, and not for the first or last time fiercely tempting post punk bass bait, the track swiftly worms into the psyche.

The bass again grips the instincts within Oracle, its Psycho Killer like coaxing backed by shiny tendrils of guitar as vocals procrastinate; its success followed by the matching triumph of Start It where PiL meets The Breeders is a good hint to the track’s melodic post punk clamour. These tracks alone show the diversity within PCPPAIWJR, The Raincoats tinged pop clang of Nevermind The Cobblestones and the Slits scented monotone shuffle of Yellow Heart Is My Sky Sign further evidence, both tracks bringing fresh greed in a healthy appetite for the release.

A healthy addictiveness is spawned by the raw swing and charm of the boldly infectious The Way The World Works, the song a dulled yet sparkling gem in the album’s jewellery box of sound and another collusion of band and listener rarely matched outside of the album though within, the minimalistic pop of Me And Nancy, a track with an echo of The Cure on their very first outing, and the dark scuzz fuelled post punk of Pretending To Bend as well as the similarly styled but oh so different Count To Ten rise to the challenge.

There are tracks on the album which explore noise and its depths of suggestion, each inciting the imagination even when they barely grasp a handful of seconds in length; times which really test  but reward the listener’s ability to compose and interpret. With further moments of never less than thoroughly enjoyable and provocative adventure across the album, songs like It Could Be Something, the absorbing and inexplicable Shiftchanger featuring Jason Jackson Wellz, and Magic January all tantalising and enthralling, things are brought to a lengthy imposingly and enjoyable close with the fuzz pop clamour of I Thought I Caught It (With You).

As suggested, every track is a fresh and rewarding twist in the landscape of PCPPAIWJR, not one of them merely filling space and all firing up ears and imagination. Not for the first time Tunabunny has provided not only a real treat to mull over and enjoy, but another new plateau in their invention and imagination.

PCP Presents Alice In Wonderland JR is out now via HHBTM Records @ http://hhbtm.com/item.php?item_id=640 and https://tunabunny.bandcamp.com/album/pcp-presents-alice-in-wonderland-jr

https://www.facebook.com/Tunabunny/

Pete RingMaster 12/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Temple Of Lies – The Serial Killer Suite

From its predatory nature alone, The Serial Killer Suite ensures ears and an appetite for imposing metal are aroused; add potent individual craft and an instinctively woven web of grooves and rhythmic threat and you have a release which stalks attention. The third album from UK metallers Temple Of Lies, it is a rapacious contagion of sound and intensity living up to its theme and untamed protagonist.

With its first pair of singles making persuasive hints of things to come, The Serial Killer Suite swiftly shows each were accurate clues to, if still slithers of, the adventurous character of the album. The successor to the well-received From Sand, it also sees the Temple Of Lies exploring heavier and darker corners of their sound and imagination; areas as dirty and bloodthirsty as they are groove nurtured infectious and hungrily energetic. Since emerging in 2010, the Leicester hailing outfit has shown an imposing growth in their sound, an evolution now having its head within their third full-length whilst still suggesting the exploration is far from over.

The Serial Killer Suite opens up with Epic Doom and instantly prowls ears with its groove lined swagger and growling riffs and bass line. Like a ringmaster vocalist Si Shaw steps into the middle, sowing the seeds to the psychotic devil in the album’s midst. Equally from the song’s initial breath, Jon Scranney’s guitar spins a web of enticing yet rapacious hooks and grooves, bait matched by the tenacious swings of drummer Alex Gamble and Jags’ similarly grouchy bass. It is an irresistible welcome into the waiting emotional carnage and ill-intent and swiftly backed by the just as gripping exploits of Broken Mind. Again band and sound court the senses with a threatening stealth, the bass pressing intimidatingly as Shaw’s gravelly tones join its trespass. As thrusting beats and harrying riffs add their lures, the song surrounds ears with hungry enterprise, the wiry tendrils of Scranney’s guitar rich spicing.

Illusion of Choice draws on the grungier side of the Temple of Lies sound, fusing it with their ever ferocious and enticing blend of metal. Instantly the track is on the boisterous balls of its feet, rhythms scything and riffs snarling as vocals and hooks collude in a virulent temptation with a touch of Disturbed meets Spineshank to its short but fiercely persuasive body before Modus Operandi lays down its individual creative intent. Often tempting like a fusion of Monster Magnet and Suicidal Tendencies, the track has ears and imagination hooked in no time, every twist a captivating moment, each turn a fresh treat merging the familiar with the unpredictable; an essence which applies to the whole of The Serial Killer Suite.

Latest single Skin is next, the track starting with a great bass grumble and proceeding to place layer upon layer of growling dexterity whilst creating another seriously catchy proposal. Shaw again prowls it all with vocal character and quality, every syllable spawned from the psychotic menace of the album’s heart. It is inescapably magnetic stuff pretty much matched in the irritable presence of I Cut You Bleed, though the song for personal tastes just misses finding the final persuasive ingredients of its predecessors. In saying that, there are also times when the song has ears and pleasure truly in the palms of its venomous hands.

Through the calmer though still instinctively volatile Sleep and the tenebrous tone and heart of its initial single, Dark Energy, the album has ears firmly gripped and enjoyment full. The first is a mellow proposal compared to those around it but deviously dark and tantalising with Scranney again showing his melodic craft and invention. Its successor also offers a less imposing proposition initially but there is a tempestuousness and emotional toxicity which brews and catches throughout the track’s poisonous embrace.

Both are tracks which also do not quite reach the heights of earlier roars yet leave the listener wanting for nothing before being eclipsed by the crabby rock ‘n’ roll of Teeth, another song with a great whiff of the crossover thrash of the previously mentioned Mike Muir led Californians in its snarl. Gamble’s beats leave the senses bruised from within the compelling encounter, the grievously addictive tone of Jags’ bass mutually greedy as Shaw and Scranney again enthral.

In turn Face of Grey hits the spot with its almost carnally toned intent and nature though it too is overshadowed by the following Symbiotic Parasite. As soon as church bells and senses intruding beats rise, there is an air of something special brewing, a suggestion only added to by the nagging riffs and controlled but fiery net of fleeting grooves. Subsequently things erupt in a voracious stomp, a swarm of infection and energy though still on a ferocity rein sparking a gripping tapestry of adventurous enterprise.

Nihilist Dreams brings things to a fine conclusion, the song an epilogue of emotional admission and creative resourcefulness which grows more tempestuous and imposing with every passing second. It is a great end to one of the year’s most enjoyable moments so far. Certainly being picky, it would have been interesting to see Temple Of Lies push the majorly adventurous and unpredictable moments of the album with an even bolder intent, to see it become truly distinctive, but there is nothing about The Serial Killer Suite that leaves disappointment or a lack of rich enjoyment. Temple of Lies is ready for global recognition; whether the world is ready for them time will tell.

The Serial Killer Suite is out now through Attic Records on iTunes and @ https://templeoflies.bandcamp.com/album/the-serial-killer-suite

http://templeoflies.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/templeoflies/   https://twitter.com/lies_of

Pete RingMaster 11/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Andreas S Jensen – Trust is My Anchor

With a new album due to drop this coming September, musician/songwriter/producer Andreas S Jensen releases new single Trust is My Anchor this month, a song which alone sparks plenty of intrigue for what the upcoming Disturbed might offer.

Moving to London from his native Denmark in 1998, Jensen first started working as a session player with the band Dweeb before concentrating on writing and production and signing a publishing and management deal with Wise Buddah Music. As part of writing team The Funktuary, he co-wrote and helped put together the radio edit/remix of Armand Van Heldens club classic My My My before the team released their own well-received EP. From there he joined Dub Pistols, who he still gigs with, and released a debut solo EP in the shape of Disconnected in 2014 and over the years has worked in various ways with the likes of Kevin Lyttle, Nate James, Stefanie Heinzmann, Dido, Rizzle Kicks, Beenie Man, Nerina Pallot, and Loick Essien among numerous others.

Jensen’s own music draws on the inspirations of artists such as David Bowie, Tom Petty, Soundgarden, Elliot Smith, and The Zombies; essences you can feel more than hear within Trust is My Anchor. A fusion of melodic rock and pop balladry, the song caresses ears initially with a single guitar alongside Jensen’s emotive tones. Both entice the listener into the heart of the track and the waiting muscular roar of the chorus. It is a quickly engaging mix; the minimalistic tone of the verse a blend of melancholy and hope openly sharing the track’s plaintive cries and its sturdier crescendo a defiant response which easily arouses the spirit.

Trust is My Anchor is a firmly satisfying encounter which invites rather than demands attention but easily provides a memorable and increasingly enjoyable experience.

Trust is My Anchor is released June 23rd.

http://www.andreassjensen.com/    https://www.facebook.com/AndreasJensenMusic    https://twitter.com/andreassjensen

Pete RingMaster 21/06/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright