The Dollyrots – Daydream Explosion

A party in the ears, romp with the body, and riot with the imagination; descriptions which can certainly be suggested upon the sound of the Dollyrots to date but definitely and strenuously applies to the band’s new release, Daydream Explosion. Across fourteen slices of the band’s inimitable fusion of punk, rock, and pop, the album incites and captivates but equally fascinates more than anything from the Los Angeles duo yet as diversity and adventure fuel an eclectic mix of contagious goodness.

With previous album, Whiplash Splash, one of the rousing treats of 2017, vocalist/bassist Kelly Ogden and vocalist/guitarist Luis Cabezas have pulled out all the creative stops to outshine that acclaimed release with Daydream Explosion. From the moment it gives its first eager breath we can declare aim accomplished and an irresistible slab of infectious enterprise bred.

Produced by the band with long-time producer John Fields, Daydream Explosion immediately had ears and attention in its hands, a teasing hook bringing in the pop ‘n’ roll of opener Animal. Ogden’s seductive tones swiftly join the broadening stomp of the track; Cabezas’ soon after and as magnetic as the rhythms and riffs which collude in a charge of flirtatious punk nurtured hooks. As catchy and inescapable as barbed wire, the song effortlessly gets the album off to a rousing start.

With beats swinging, riffs nagging, Everything steps up next and just as devilishly infests body and spirit. Again vocals simply incite participation as easily as the rhythms manipulate feet, the song’s chorus a heightened exploitation of an already fired up appetite for the record and eager subservience to its pop persuasion.

In Your Face comes with a steadier gait after but even in its shimmering sway there is a zeal and energy keen to break out which it does in another contagion of a chorus, the song’s seductive pop increasingly volatile and riveting before Naked uncages its alternative rock devilment like a pop infested Blood Red Shoes. With a rock ‘n’ roll shaped heart the track quickly builds its own character and grinning escapade to be unique Dollyrots.

As expected hooks escape the band like rocker instincts bound in one listening to the album, next up Last Ones on Earth relishes its own host of ear snaring conjuring. With a pop breath seemingly taking inspiration from an array of decades the song commands air and attention while exploring more eighties pop seeded breeding I Love You Instead follows to get the body popping all over again and sap the lungs just a little more of their willing breath. With all songs, but here especially, you can almost feel the fun and big broad grins the pair should have had creating one devilish encounter.

Through the ear smooching sixties girl group toned Watching the Storm Go By and the frenetically stomping I Know How to Party, band and album only pulled attention further away from reality, both tracks major moments among only highlights with the latter carrying a mischievous nod towards Andrew W.K. in certain moments while Kat’s Meow more than matched their glories with its virulently frisky stroll.

There is no decline in pure temptation as No Princess springs its own individual pop punk epidemic straight after nor as Flippy In My Red Dress infests hips and passion with its rampant rock ‘n’ roll seduction.  Like a mix of The Hillbilly Moon Explosion and Stray Cats but pure Dollyrots, the song is sublime, a major favourite track challenger though tested throughout the album for that honour as proven by the feisty Oblivious and Talk Too Much with its senses taunting hooks and melodic dance, a combination far too potent to resist.

The album closes up with Daisy’s Song, a final slice of punk ‘n’ rock temptation as instinctively sinful as it is masterfully manipulative and simply beguiling. And that pretty much describes Daydream Explosions as a whole, creatively wicked and unapologetically infectious and most likely the best piece of pop punk you will embrace and devour this year or possibly next.

Daydream Explosions is out now via Wicked Cool Records/ The Orchard; available @ https://thedollyrotswcr.bandcamp.com/album/daydream-explosion

http://www.dollyrots.com/    https://www.facebook.com/thedollyrots/    https://twitter.com/thedollyrots

Pete RingMaster 13/08/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

TV Coma – Body Negativity

If you can imagine the results of Weezer and Swound! musically cavorting with Jan and Dean alongside Blur with a punk nurtured revelry you can get a whiff of the sound of TV Coma though not necessarily the individual mischief and enterprise rampaging through their debut EP, Body Negativity. It offers six tracks of unbridled fun and boisterous deeds amongst cleverly manipulative creative antics and is simply one of the most enjoyable exploits we are sure to indulge in this year.

Emerging from the songwriting revelry of brothers Leo and Max Troy, St Albans hailing TV Coma is a foursome by bassist Jamie Rider and drummer Robert Clark. They also seemingly embrace the punk DIY ethics of yesterday with their first release recorded in Max’s bedroom who then mixed the tracks himself before passing them over to Alan Douches (Ben Folds Five, Converge, Sufjan Stephens, Mastodon) to add his professional gleam to things. The result is an encounter which has an organic roar and an instinctive devilry and one which eagerly gets under the skin with unbridled fun in close quarter.

Have A Party kicks things off and rises up from an encroaching sonic lure with big scythes of guitar and matching rhythms. Everything is an intriguing tease leading to the first vocal rally cry before things settle again into a calm stroll and reflection. It in turn invites ears and listeners to its subsequent chant loaded bellow and a finale which the body, if not already bouncing, can no longer escape. Seriously contagious with a great rock muscularity and edge to it, the track is a glorious invitation into the waiting fiendish clutches of EP and band.

There is no escaping thrusting a Weezer likeness to the following Digital Girl, the LA band one of the major inspirations for the brothers. Even so, the track is ablaze with raw pop punk zeal as it is pop rock catchiness and swiftly inciting physical and vocal participation with its rousing holler before Trudy latches on to its infectious antics for its own particular weave of viral contagion. Something akin to Weezer meets We Are the Physics with Asylums in close attendance, the track just saunters along spilling grooves and hooks like confetti as rhythms cast their own manipulative incitement. Surf pop harmonies escalate the fun and listener’s involvement with a track which never leaves a moment void of creative rascality.

A sonic clamour announces next up Unemployable; a short but attention stalking roar of angst and noise around more of the hooks and enterprising taunts the band seem to instinctively breed. The track instantly and effortlessly leads into inhibition losing shenanigans, reactions even more escalated with Football Song, a Blur meets Television Personalities howl which could easily be adopted by the sport’s fans or haters.

Grow Up completes the line-up of plaintive ejaculations. From its initial vocal wail to the punk rock soaked blaze of sound, the track is a zealously waving finger at immaturity and irresponsible fun whilst creatively providing both.

With each track sparked by traits within modern life, Body Negativity is one spirit rousing adventure. It might not be the best thing you will come across in 2019, though it very well could be too, but there will be few as memorable and even fewer as relentlessly enjoyable.

Body Negativity is out May 31st through Wiretap Records and @ https://tvcomamusic.bandcamp.com/releases

https://www.facebook.com/tvcomamusic/   https://twitter.com/tvcomamusic

Pete RingMaster 30/05/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Erica Drive – The Hate, The Hurt, The Healing

Having introduced themselves in fair style with their self-titled debut EP, UK outfit Erica Drive have provided an even more potent roar for ears to enjoy with its successor The Hate, The Hurt, The Healing. Offering up four tracks built on a blend of pop punk and alternative rock, the new EP is an easy to embrace affair showing revelling in the growth in the band’s sound and songwriting since its predecessor.

Formed in 2017 when vocalist/guitarist Matt Underdown and guitarist Frank Harding started working on song ideas, the Bournemouth hailing band soon became a quartet with the addition of guitarist/vocalist Sam Firmin and drummer Damien Carter. Already stirring up the local live scene, the band released their first EP which subsequently earned over 10,000 plays on Spotify.  The four then became five with the addition of bassist Damian Bruton, the quintet soon after joining producer Mike White (Wolf Culture) to record The Hate, The Hurt, The Healing, with its mastering duties eventually handled by John Naclerio (My Chemical Romance).

The EP swiftly grabbed ears with opener All We Are, the EP’s lead track which does exactly that, leading the release in sound, adventure, and enterprise. As rhythms place a sturdy hand on the senses, guitars cast a dextrous web of riffs and sonic endeavour, a formidable fusion quickly commanding attention. Things relax a touch as Underdown’s vocals add their melodic tones, the song hitting a lively stride inflamed with pop punk boisterousness. Carter’s bold swings drive the captivating encounter with relish, the guitars shaping its body for the equally alluring vocals with Firmin providing potent backing to Underdown’s lead.

The following Better Man almost teases with its opening union of chirping guitar and reflective voice; a calm start growing in drama and muscle with every passing second before hitting its own tenacious stride. Imagination and enterprise accompany its every move, it too simply impressing and pleasing by the listen.

The final pair of Anchor and The Fall provides a just as enjoyable second half to the EP, the first a punchy infectious affair as catchy as it is rousing. Our favourite moment within the release, the track mixes a vociferous snarl with virulent catchiness but equally a composed restraint at times which emphasizes its melodic prowess. In turn the closing track maybe did not stir the appetite as fully as its predecessors, but with its intimate heart and melodic caresses provides a highly satisfying conclusion; the fire in its belly only adding to its enjoyment.

It is fair to say that the Erica Drive sound is not truly unique yet but it has freshness and vitality which added to the band’s instinctive imagination provides a thoroughly enjoyable listen whilst suggesting they could have a rather exciting future ahead as they breed real individuality.

The Hate, The Hurt, The Healing is released April 12th.

https://www.facebook.com/ericadriveband/   https://twitter.com/ericadriveband

Pete RingMaster 11/04/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Fatty Cakes And The Puff Pastries – Self Titled

Primed to have you eagerly bouncing with a massive grin on your face, the debut album from Fatty Cakes And The Puff Pastries is a romp of glorious mischief and mayhem. The self-titled introduction certainly has no reticence in challenging prejudices and the bigoted standards so many live by but does so with a rousingly unapologetic sense of devilish humour. In other moments it is quite simply delicious grrrl riot misbehaviour and throughout instinctive often disdainful fun which we quickly bred greedy lust for.

Consisting of Amber Fargano (lead vocals/ukulele), Vishinna Turner (bass/backing vocals), Audrey Johnson (drums), Victoria Crow (back vocals/glockenspiel) and Staci McDowell (back vocals/chord), FC&PP hail from Fresno, CA. It appears they have kicked off a bit of a stir with their inimitable sound back home and listening to their first full-length it is easy to see why and expect that to spread far further. As soon as opener Panic Attack launches the release, ears are fronted up with a proposal which dares you not to have fun or get heavily involved, a taunt impossible to take up. Senses harrying beats and dirt laded riffs are the first lure, Fargano’s vocal incitement the swift second before the band’s soon established melodic and harmonic revelry gets involved. Just as quickly, the band’s music sets out its inescapable individuality though there is plenty which reminds and hints at bands such as 4 Non Blondes and Lunachicks and even more so here and across the album British artists such as Girls At their Best, X-Ray Spex, The Modettes and in certain moments The Rezillos.

It is an outstanding start easily backed by next up Fat Grl Tears. It is a compelling blend of guitar scuzz and melodic enterprise fuelled by mischievous shenanigans. As proven time and time again across the album though, that devilment cannot hide the fact that the band writes and craft some striking pop punk songs unafraid to involve a host of varied flavours and merciless hooks.

Petty Petty Princess is quickly a case in point, its core lure a jangling hook around which vocals, individual and en masse, tease as rhythms tenaciously canter. The fact the song did not grip as greedily as those sandwiching it is down to their magnificence only especially that of the following Alien Babe. From the delicious throaty bait of bass to the fuzzy wash of guitar amidst vocal incitement, the track got under the skin. Again The Rezillos came to mind as too early Blondie but mouth-watering spices in a unique Fatty Cakes recipe of rousing commotion and pop disorder.

Across the likes of the equally irresistible BFF, a slice of pop seduction with a calm but truly manipulative swing, and the gang fronted punk rock sorcery of Witch, band and album only further their enthralment of ears and appetite while Antifa Cakes (Not My Puff Pastry) provides a melodic intoxication which has the body instinctively swaying before it all breaks into feral punk turbulence and attitude; ingredients as proud within the relatively calm but thickly defiant Grrrl Gang.

The vocal harmonics within the band, whether bold or understated, are just as magnetic as any other aspect and are the delicious fuel to Magic Grl, a superb song which firmly hints at those earlier mentioned UK references before Feminist Gold 2k uncaged its punk ‘n’ roll exploits on an increasingly greedy appetite. As with all songs, it adds another potent hue to the album’s varied but melodic punk palette, a web increasing again through the loudly irritable stomp of Minimum Rage.

The release is closed up by Internet Bitch, a track which stole favourite track honours at the last breath with its rhythmically rousing and vocally animated rascality. With more than a passing echo of the Au Pairs, the track was manna to our ears; its emotional dissonance echoed in sound and imagination whilst springing yet another deviously infectious indeed viral temptation. It is a sensational end to a similarly thrilling encounter from a band before which global attention and ardour is surely on the way.

The self-titled Fatty Cakes and the Puff Pastries album is out now through Emotional Response Records; available @ https://fattycakes.bandcamp.com/album/fatty-cakes-and-the-puff-pastries

 https://www.facebook.com/FattyCakesPuffPastries/

Pete RingMaster 8/01/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Downcast – Self Titled EP

Finding a band which stands out with a truly individual sound within the melodic punk landscape has not proven to be so easy these past years. There have been many outfits which have still impressed but finding that specific individuality is less frequent but now we have British outfit Downcast and the release of their self-titled debut EP. It is n introduction which more than suggests that the band with their emo spiced pop punk has the potential to be something different and such the memorable moments within this their introduction we could say they are already well on the way to realising that promise.

Taking inspirations from the likes of The Wonder Years, Alkaline Trio, ROAM, and Neck Deep, Downcast emerged last year, initially concentrating on writing this debut and honing the sound which flourishes within it. Recorded with producer Ian Sadler (Anavae, ROAM), it would be fair to say that the release made a good if not immediately sizeable impact on ears and thoughts. Yet there was something which easily lured us back more than once or twice and with every play has blossomed into a very enjoyable and impressively potent, potential loaded proposition.

It has moments which simply got under the skin and aroused the passions alongside other instances where expectations were fed even if enjoyment still courted those times. The EP opens with Anthurium and potent guitar bait which lures attention into a waiting tide of pop punk tenacity which takes little time to erupt. Settling down into a robust and busily infectious stroll, the track springs melodic hooks and vocal prowess with ease. Surprises are maybe less open yet the song has a tenacious catchiness and open enterprise which takes charge. With firm often heady rhythms bearing down on the senses, it is a strong and magnetic start to the release swiftly backed by the following Sombre.

The acoustic heart of the second track quickly casts a different breath within the EP, guitar melody and vocal unity reinforced as a potent part of the band’s sound. Short but a full captivation, it offers plenty of reasons for expectations of that real originality emerging ahead as too its successor, Window Seat. It is another song which took and needed time to fully persuade but once hitting its stride after a relatively gentle entrance, it blossoms into a rousing roar nurtured through a strong undercurrent of imagination and boisterousness.

The EP is completed by the pair of 2013 and I’m Sorry. The first is the biggest highlight of the release; its instinctive hooks, spicy melodies, and vocal dexterity an infectious blend blending the familiar with the individual. The final track in turn provides another appetising offering if without finding the heights of its predecessors. From its solid if slightly underwhelming start the song builds crescendos of emotion and drama, flourishing with each before settling back down into that initial mercurial calm. In saying that, there is a captivation to the song which never stops nagging and we can only say enjoyment came with it.

Overall, the EP is a powerful foundation to spring from with potential and pleasure at its heart; Downcast a band it could be impossible to ignore ahead.

The Downcast EP is released January 11th.

https://www.facebook.com/downcastUK/   https://twitter.com/downcastuk

Pete RingMaster 8/01/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

 

The Life Underfoot Interview

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to the band’s beginning?

We’re Life Underfoot from Owego New York. Our guitarist and vocalist Andre and bassist Emory went to school and graduated with each other so we’ve known each other awhile. James our drummer we met through local shows and just clicked!

Have you been in other bands before? If so has that had any impact on what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

We all have different musical interest, James is more of a progressive kinda guy, Emory listens to a lot of underground and grunge music, Andre listen to a lot of music a lot of punk/emo stuff. We’ve all been in other bands as well. James is currently in this rad band called Tom Jolu; check them out.

What inspired the band name?

Our 10th grade bio teacher had a poster on the wall of a cut out section of the ground. On the side it said Life Underfoot and Andre always thought it was a sick name for a band.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

We all just really wanted to be in a band where everyone is dedicated and wants to play shows and tour!!

Do the same things still drive the band from when it was fresh-faced?

We haven’t been a band very long so it’s still pretty fresh faced! But you do start to understand it is not as grand as it always seems!!

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

Hard to say cause we’ve only been a band for going on 2 years, but we played with this awesome band called Vitamin K from Iowa, check them out cause we wouldn’t mind going that route eventually.

Are changes within the creativity of the band more organic or deliberate moves to try new things?

Everything is organic, Andre brings his ideas and demos to practice then we just kinda go from there. James has a lot of knowledge in music so he really helps shapes and perfects our songs.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

A lot of the Warped Tour band from like 2001-2006; we’re big fans of just timeless music that everyone loves and can sing along to. Bands like Taking Back Sunday and Brand New have songs that when they come on everyone sings and has a good time.

Is there a process to the songwriting which generally guides the creation of songs?

Typically Andre write the music, then Emory and Andre sit down to write the lyrics, then James gives pointer where to tweak and make the songs flow better. Really nice process that seems to work for us.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

Well it could be anything; Emory and Andre tend to work on the lyrics together, one line could be from Andre’s life or Emory’s life. From a song either of us really likes. Or just something one of our friends wrote and thought it we’d like it!! Andre’s friends Orion and Connor have both written lyrics for some unreleased songs we’re still working on!

Give us some background to your latest release.

Peaks and Valleys EP…We recorded it at the Lumberyard in New Jersey. Really great EP and had a blast recording it. Wanted to go for an acoustic sombre emo vibe.

Give us some insight to the themes and premise behind it and its songs.

Andre wrote it as a story, not a love story but about any relationship ending in track 1, Our Swan Song, then the protagonist starts to talk about it in track 2, Clock Face, and finally with track 3, Chroma, the character moves on and realises that no matter how hard life hits ya don’t lose ya shade of color that makes you special, hence the line “through all the hardship and pain, that only stain black and grey, think all of that you can gain, just gotta look to the next day.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

We like to have our idea for the song complete and ready before we hit the studio but are always still open to ideas, that’s how great songs are made! Everyone has something that can always bring and take away from parts of a song so never be afraid to at least try out suggestions.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably a favourite aspect of being in a band?

We just like to have a good time on stage and rock out! That’s our favorite part and biggest reason for being in a band! Just that feeling of being on stage and people watching is thrilling.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it?

Well where we’re from Emo and Punk music are the most popular. Mostly Country, Bluegrass, or cover bands. But Binghamton and Syracuse have always been great to us and the scenes are awesome. Same with New Jersey and Connecticut we’ve had more shows out in those states than Owego.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date?

Social media is a great thing for musicians, bands, and artists!! Without that we wouldn’t have had as many of the opportunities we’ve gotten. We’ve gotten the chance to talk to and work with many of our idols because of things like Bandcamp and Facebook!

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Check us out on Bandcamp all our music is free on there!!

https://lifeunderfootny.bandcamp.com/  https://www.facebook.com/Lif3Underfoot/

Pete RingMaster 07/12/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Taco Mouth – A Deafening Silence

If you ever get the feeling that the spirit and feisty devilment of the old CBGB hey days was a distant memory than rush over to the debut album from Nashville bred rockers Taco Mouth. Uncaging ten tracks which has the body bouncing and spirit roaring, A Deafening Silence is a punch of nostalgia and fresh enterprise which pretty much had us enslaved from the first listen of its first song.

The heart of the band is vocalist/guitarist Erica Sellers and drummer Angela Lese, a friendship and musical partnership which goes back to 2011 and the former’s new band at the time, CatFight. Lese’s relocation from Kentucky to Nashville brought that outfit to an end but a regular pleading for her former band mate to join her led to Sellers moving and with three other girls, the formation of The Dead Deads. After several national tours and two full-length albums, Sellers and Lese left the quintet in the October of 2017, quickly forming Taco Mouth with lead guitarist Shawn Hammer (engineer of Chevelle, Conor Oberst, Cursive) and bassist Flip Cooper (Damon Johnson, Brother Cane) completing its line-up.

Earlier this year, the band released the W.G.A.F. EP, a very well-received taster of the band’s punk fuelled, pop infested, ebullient rock ‘n’ roll now making one virulent holler from within A Deafening Silence. With defiance and attitude wrapped in hook ridden contagion, the Michael Wagener produced album immediately sets about getting under the skin with opener You Say. Flames of guitar instantly consume ears, a catchy rhythmic trespass in close pursuit before Sellers’ vocals join the swift coaxing. Within seconds an underlying hook teases but captivation is truly set with the song’s irresistibly rousing chorus. Like a hybrid of The Donnas, Spinnerette, and Sleater-Kinney but urgently enforcing its own individual character, the song as the band’s sound and enterprise sets the tone, manipulation, and adventure of things to come.

Romero follows, almost unwinding its lures as guitar and rhythms stir with predacious intent. The dual invitation of Selles and Lese’s vocals accentuate its temptation until breaking into a calm but determined stroll, bass and drums continuing to challenge as they entice. A sixties pop adds to the raw seduction, a radiant reflection on the track’s rawer observational edge before Burn This City Down springs its own flirtatiously imposing canter led by flesh whipping beats alongside a great bass grumble. Again defiance and catchy exploits collude in a slice of pop ‘n’ punk which had the body and vocal chords worked like a puppet.

Taking its predecessor’s strong mix of pop and punk, Let’s Get a Little Bit brings it to an even richer and keener boil, the song a tenaciously devious proposal orchestrating body and spirit with primal yet imaginative incitement soaked in infectious enticement while Queen of the Stags has a rapacious lining to its individually conniving contagiousness. Both outstanding tracks resound with the band’s skilful mix of flavours and creative cunning, and the pleasure an already greedy appetite was keenly devouring.

If both tracks are scheming, Simmers is pure unscrupulous seduction, the track a slowly evolving temptress with feline moves and inescapable devilment where every moment builds on the one before with darker intent and greater magnetism before the galvanic punk ‘n’ roll of Fighting for Today explodes in ears. An arousing call to arms and battle cry against a certain political leadership but applicable to all, the track just commanded lust and participation for its melodic howl.

The melodic serenade of You Can’t Stop Me is just as compelling, its intimate echo and smouldering uprising irresistible with next up Katie casting a pop hued incitement for ears and instinctive involvement through a rowdy yet inescapably catchy nature awash with crafty hooks and creative antics.

The album concludes with Waiting for the Sun, a song swinging with hip grabbing grooves while invitingly taunting with imagination firing hooks. It is a track epitomising the strengths and personality of the album and the band’s sound, the ever enticing shadows of the rhythms and the seriously magnetic vocals equally adding to its strength and overall to a release impressing more and more by the listen.

This year has seen quite a few striking punk nurtured treats unleashed; A Deafening Silence just might be the juiciest one of them all.

A Deafening Silence is out now and available @ https://tacomouth.bandcamp.com/album/a-deafening-silence

https://tacomouth.com/   https://www.facebook.com/tacomouthband   https://twitter.com/tacomouthband

Pete RingMaster 14/11/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright