Show Of Bedlam –Transfiguration

They may not be the most prolific of bands recording wise but without doubt when Canadians doomsters Show Of Bedlam uncage their creative imaginations and sonic dexterity it results in something truly irresistible and memorable. That claim is richly confirmed yet again with the band’s new seven track EP/mini album, the quite stunning and unnerving Transfiguration.

The Show Of Bedlam sound has never been solely confined by that doom tagging, their fusion of sludge, post hardcore and punk, and atmospheric malevolence a cauldron of raw and transfixing invention and suggestion but never has it been so mesmeric, bone-chilling, and psychotically arcane as within Transfiguration. The release is a furnace of raw emotion and intensity soaked in a suffocating beauty; the band creating an evocation of macabre intrigue and corrosive psychosis which if the Witchfinder General was still a figure of ‘responsibility’ would have Show Of Bedlam burning at the stake.

From their debut release as one half of the split Autocannibalist with Jucifer in 2009 to first album Roont in 2012 and now Transfiguration, Montréal hailing Show Of Bedlam has kept ears and fears waiting and richly rewarded. The time between releases has seen the band continue to nurture and hone, push and experiment with a sound which is instinctively unique and dramatically imposing. For all their previous successes, Transfiguration is easily the band’s finest moment to date and the moment they surely blossom from a widely known secret to a fully-fledged inspiration within the metal scene.

Twelve minute opener Blue Lotus immediately engulfs the senses with its sonic smog of intrigue and melodic discord; enticing and intimidating in equal measure as it crowds the listener ready for the equally haunting and inescapable prowess of Paulina Richards’ presence and voice. There is virulence to all the dark thoughts and visceral imagery escaping the stifling atmospheric density; infectiousness as easily trespassing body and thoughts as the psychosis of sound carrying it. With a gothic wash equally blossoming and recalling Xmal Deutschland at times, the glorious predator of a track swallows the listener with its tapestry of creative spite and despair simultaneously disturbing and invigorating with its oppressive magnificence and intimate examination of the senses.

Latest single Taelus swiftly follows, teasing ears with its melodic beckoning as beats wait to lay an occasionally anthemic hand on an already eager appetite. As a sample lurks, the song simmers and bubbles, bursting from its confines as vocals and guitars entwine in another caustic wash of sonic tempting stalked by the hungry rumblings of bass. As its predecessor, the similarly deceitfully catchy track is as descriptive sonically as it is vocally, every fresh wave and adventure of intensity and cunning a new twist in the nightmarish landscape painted note by note, syllable by syllable.

At two minutes plus, the album’s title track is a short and powerful insight into a blossoming defiance and turning of the worm within a rhythmically entrancing and gripping affair, inciting the senses physically and  emotionally before Hall of Mirrors rises from its slumber with carnivorous breath and intent. It crawls over the listener, dragging its sludgy weight and doomy intensity with rapacious relentlessness as Richards roars with unbridled emotive intensity and persuasion. It too ebbs and flows with energy and greater volcanic urgency, consuming the senses with lava-esque ferocity lined with more of the band’s contagious groove spited toxicity; it all leading to a climax which simply consumes all before it.

Lamentation offers a respite of sorts, its twenty odd seconds a detour into a fresh fly infested charnel house from which the oppressive elegance and invasive almost cancerous  tempest of Easter Water broods and escapes. With every passing second it looms up and imposes its weight and immersive embrace, bullying whilst igniting ears and imagination. Subsequent slips into less intensive though no less spine-chilling and fearsome pastures as well as the darkest corners only adds to the theatre of sound and its realm of the portentously obscure, and to the imagery festering and conjuring in the imagination.

Closed by the brief sonic ruin of L’Appel Du Vide, quite simply Transfiguration is glorious; daunting and alarming for sure but a sonically and emotionally distressed alchemy of sound and invention which leaves the majority of releases this year so far and easy to suspect to come, looking bland and uneventful. As the world falls further into disaster and decay, so Show Of Bedlam rises, their sound and new offering the perfect soundtrack and antidote.

Transfiguration is released May 12th through PRC Music and Sentient Ruin Laboratories with pre-ordering available now @ http://www.prcmusic.com/store/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=1447 and https://sentientruin.bandcamp.com/album/transfiguration

https://www.facebook.com/Show-of-Bedlam-231634652456

Pete RingMaster 18/04/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Show of Bedlam – Roont

Photo by Renaud Sakelaris.

Photo by Renaud Sakelaris.

We were hearing very good things about Canadian doomers Show of Bedlam because of a split with Jucifer in 2009, the band’s only release up to this point, and were told that we should take an interest in the band’s debut album Roont, released this week. This we did and discovered a release best described as a creative cauldron of sonic and emotional intensity filtered through howling atmospheric turbulence, i.e. one of the most exhilarating albums so far this year. It is as fiercely seductive as it is corrosively demonic, as virulently contagious as it is toxically inhospitable, and quite simply irresistible.

Hailing from Montreal, Show Of Bedlam’s sound is certainly doom metal bred but it is equally as sludgy as it is hardcore, as punk as it is noise and occult spiced rock ‘n’ roll. Influences are said to include the likes of Neurosis, Electric Wizard, The Swans, UFOMammut, Babes in Toyland, and Sonic Youth. The reality is for all references and inspirations cited and probably deserved, Show of Bedlam brew up a hellacious and thoroughly gripping mix ultimately distinct to them.

SHOW_OF_BEDLAM-Roont300x300    The album’s title track sets things off, a cold and harsh ambience looming in from afar, quickly joined by portentous rhythms and a maelstrom of sonic and noise bred provocation. It is an embrace of sound and incitement to match the band name, no coherent unity obvious yet a concussive invitation with control and instinctive enmity. From its thickening smog, acidic grooves and heavy senses roaming rhythms emerge, their imposing presence matched by a dark bass tone and the instantly engaging tones of vocalist Paulina Richards. Attitude and intensity drips from every syllable she expels, her delivery managing to be part croon, roar, and threat simultaneously. Hers is a soaring fury matched by the sounds around her, guitars spinning a caustic yet beguiling web whilst rhythms pummel and craft anthemic bait for every one of the song’s hellacious seconds. The track is fascinating, uncompromising textures and unpredictable imagination entangling every twist and turn in the passage and creation of the song, all those flavours earlier mentioned and more aligning to craft nine minutes of feral, bordering on satanic beauty.

An interlude comes next in the shape of 19, though contrary to most similar moments there is no escape into calm and safe waters here, the track an unrelenting harsh sonic wind with fleeting glimpses of another evocatively melodic realm. You can almost touch those elements as they are smothered in sound but always to no avail as the track insidiously escorts ears and emotions towards the following Vermin. Show of Bedlam have already shown themselves adept at using samples, opening up this track with another before binding the passions in addictive hooks, dramatic grooves, and a punk bred infectiousness. It all entices from within a tempest of swarthy stoner-esque sonic psychosis with occult rock like flavouring. The track is outstanding, an emotional and intimidating turmoil to get lustful over casting a maelstrom of styles and ingenuity which just ignites the imagination. The song never lingers on one aspect for long but is equally unafraid to return to those choice essences and involve and twist them into fresher incitements again. At one point the song had a feel of L7 meets Blood Ceremony to it, then in the next it was something else again, and constantly spellbinding.

Next up, Dress for sale slips into darker and colder climes, its darkly shimmering countenance mesmeric as basslines and riffs crawl with menace through ears. It is a track soon ablaze though, acidic guitar enterprise and fierce vocal expression roaring with searing flames of energy whilst carrying just a hint of venomous intent. Once more the band has ears and imagination enthralled; abrasing and seducing both with ingenuity and simple but ingeniously woven creative aggression.

There is poetry to the sound and lyrical premise of all songs upon Roont, an almost corrosively romantic essence which especially floods the epic exploit of Itamu. The track is pure inventive drama, a journey through unforgiving yet intoxicating climates of sonic and emotional exploration. As everywhere, the track’s narrative is as engrossing as the music sound-tracking its story and predominantly because of the diverse and ever shifting delivery of Richards. She can brawl with ears as perfectly as she can seduce them, spark with aggression as potently as she can lure unbridled attention with a croon. With the rest of the band conjuring sounds of the same creative and effective dark majesty, the result is a track and release which borders on perfect.

With a bonus demo version of Vermin adding an extra treat, Roont is something all doom, sludge, heavy metal, and even hardcore fans should not be without. Very special is a description not easily offered in music these days but we tell you now, Show of Bedlam is that with the potential of being much more.

Roont is available now on CD via PRC Music @ http://www.prcmusic.com/store/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=1317 and digitally @ https://showofbedlam.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/showofbedlam

RingMaster 07/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Vulcano – Wholly Wicked

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Considered the first Brazilian extreme metal band, and by others the first South American one, Vulcano has earned their legendary stature on much more than that alone. Their ferocious mix of thrash and death metal embracing plenty of old school heavy metal essences, has ensured the band has been a constantly and eagerly devoured protagonist across eight variously successful and generally acclaimed albums since forming in 1981. Now they unleash their ninth full-length in the blistering shape of Wholly Wicked, a rampant unrelenting blaze of contagious aggression which predominantly feeds expectations but not as wholesomely as it breeds total enjoyment. The album puts skilled and anthemically voracious rock ‘n’ roll before originality, and in doing so provides a metal rampage hard to get enough of.

As mentioned Vulcano began in the early part of the eighties, and from their first single Om Pushne Namah, the band was luring potent attention and support. A demo and live album followed before Bloody Vengeance in 1986 began awakening even richer responses and awareness, the release tagged as Brazil’s first black metal album. The next three years saw a trio of albums uncaged before the band underwent a quiet period following a series of band problems and tragedies. They returned to action in 2003 with fifth studio album Tales from the Black Book released the following year. A split with Nifelheim followed in 2006 whilst their next album Five Skulls and One Chalice arrived three years later, a period leading to Vulcano hitting Europe with their live presence for the first time. Plenty of line-up shuffles have spiced up the band, as has another two albums, a live full-length, and another split EP on a growing recognition and acclaim of their music, retrospective and current. Now the quartet of last remaining band founder and guitarist Zhema Rodero, vocalist Luiz Carlos Louzada, bassist Ivan The Darkestt, and drummer Arthur Von Barbarian have expelled Wholly Wicked on the world. Like so many also not fully aware of the band’s earlier work, it is hard for us to say how the album stands up to what has come before, but on the modern landscape of thrash/death incitement, it is one maybe unremarkable but seriously exhilarating proposition.

VOLCANO_Whollywcked_300x300     With a low key release last year via Renegados Records, Wholly Wicked is getting its deserved global spotlight through PRC Music and goes straight for the jugular with opener The Tenth Writing. Riffs and rhythms instantly savage ears whilst hooks and mini grooves grip attention and appetite before the song bursts into a furious ear nagging charge. Guitars and bass provide a hungry web of provocation and enticing, the former also adding flirtatious shards of melodic intrigue and imaginative twists as the excellent vocals spew grouchy aggression. With the drums punching the heck out of it all, the track is a storming tempestuous start, not forgetting irresistible one, which swiftly matched in potency and attraction by Pentagram. A glam metal tinged start looms up on ears first, twisting on arrival into a barbarous and addictively compelling tempest of aggravated riffery and spicy sonic revelry, matched in spite by the rhythms. As suggested there is little brand new to mull over in the album and this song, but there is no escaping the imaginative and riveting weave the recognisable aspects are creatively woven into as once more little unpredictable twists and fluid changes in gait impress.

Both Daughters of Pagan Rituals and Infusion of Hatred keep ears and satisfaction ablaze, the first as virulently alluring as it is bracingly intensive. Every hellacious beat, torrent of antagonistic riffing, and tangy groove is incendiary to feet, neck muscles, and enjoyment. The track is irresistible, extreme metal hitting the sweet spot, here to not forge new boundaries but turn what exists into a blur of anthemic devilry with accompanying glory. Its successor reins in the undiluted attack of the previous song but emulates its raw and imposing hostility with a battery of brutal beats and carnivorous riffs bound in squirming sonic enterprise. The track is brief and unfussy, lacking creative glamour and pure addiction for ears.

There are some similarities between a few songs on the album, the niggling riffing of The Return of a Long Night already exposed and coloured well on Wholly Wicked yet entangled in fresh vitriolic and inventive exploits through subsequent songs, basking in the craft and maturity of its creators so it is never anything more than a passing thought as attention and appetite closes in on the next captivating proposal. Thirst for Vengeance offers familiar hues but from its initial groove alone, the song flirts with best of honours whilst growing diversity through things like magnetic throaty bass bait and greatly flavoursome vocals only pushes the excellent encounter into being a firm favourite on the album. For these ears, the best thrash is healthily punk, and the most gripping death, thrash seeded in its heart and this song has it all.

The crawling entrance of the album’s title track offers a new twist next, though it cannot contain the need to decimate ears and senses and is soon an insatiable and frequently twisting onslaught rich in classic metal enterprise and rabid anthemic war cries. By this point in the album, the body is already breathless but it gives no respite as first Tormented careers through ears and stomps all over the senses in infectious primal fashion followed by the even heavier barbarous savaging offered by Malevolent Mind. Each of the pair simply inflames thoughts and emotions, their essences of familiarity and unsurprising natures only adding to the thrills.

The album closes with the anthemic and hostile rampancy of Blowing Death, a mighty carnivorous end to one non-stop explosive ride. Wholly Wicked is like a roller coaster, thrill ridden and devilishly exhausting. Like such rides you also know what you are going to get but it does not stop the enjoyment and hunger for more growing with every trip. It might not be bursting with originality but Vulcano have provided one start to finish favourite.

Wholly Wicked is available now on CD via PRC Music @ http://www.prcmusic.com/store/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=1314

http://www.vulcanometal.com/   https://www.facebook.com/VULCANOMETAL

RingMaster 07/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.n

 

Gorelust – We are the Undead

w_Gorelus

It is fair to say that there has been a feverish and increasingly growing appetite for Canadian death metallers Gorelust since they disbanded in 1996, a hunger and attention as new genre fans discovered and devoured the band’s one and only album Reign Of Lunacy which was released the previous year. The acclaimed encounter became a hard to get, desperate to have proposition; that, fan clamour, and no doubt a personal passion for the band in PRC Music owner Rémi Côté leading to a long awaited re-release at the end of 2012 with the label. Now twenty years after their debut’s original release, Gorelust return with its successor and it is as if the band has never been away.

Feeling as if it comes from a time only moments after its predecessor but offering a fresh and modern brutality, We are the Undead is a ravenous beast of a proposal. Consisting of songs written before the band came to an end alongside new offerings, the album is old school death metal at its invigorating predatory best; arguably not loaded with major surprises but still sheds plenty of shadow over similar genre driven releases from younger and newer bands. When there is skilled craft and creative hunger inherent in a band it does not go away with time, the evidence right here in the cold embrace of We are the Undead.

With four of the five which released Reign Of Lunacy back on board, the Québec quartet open up We are the Undead with Lunacy Still Prevails…. It is a scene setting intro primarily, but a viscerally haunting coaxing with a threatening atmosphere and textures drawing ears and imagination into the raw turbulence of the following Rape the Rapist. The drums of Francis Marmen are an immediate flurry of intimidation and brutality, their threat matched by the throaty tones of Pascal Chevrier’s bass and the still distinctive and recognisable guttural roars of Jean Beaulieu. It is a thick and ferocious combination bound in the coarse riffery and sonic enterprise of guitarist Martin Fournier, it all uniting for a nostalgic come modern fury.

The imposingly solid start to the album is pushed on again by Entering the Kill Fest, its initial tenderising of the senses a tasty appetiser for the striding stalking of riffs and rhythms which take rein of the track soon after. There is a swing to the grooves and in less open declaration the delivery of Beaulieu, whilst the sonic invention of the guitar is a searing captivation. Mostly though, the track is pure anthemic temptation, a gripping persuasion emulated in the contagion of There Is No God. The song mixes its gait with fierce charges and more intensively threatening saunters accosting the senses, that alone inescapable bait though it is the primal growls of Beaulieu which put the tang in the poison, especially in the closing seconds where surely his throat lining was torn to shreds.

The album’s title track steps up next providing vicious smog of malevolence and musical savagery, as well as one of the loftier peaks within We are the Undead. Like a hell bred hound with a glint in its eye before ripping out its victim’s throat, the track sizes up and devours ears and psyche with addictive rhythmic bait and a torrent of unpredictable and swiftly changing riffery. It is a fascinating and blistering incitement, vocals and guitar ideation both an enthralling and flavoursome colour to the primal trespass of the listener.

The pair of Penetrating the Weak and City of the Cannibals keep this new plateau firmly prowled by the album; the first offering a rapacious and tenaciously attentive examination of the senses. Once more hell for leather onslaughts are fluidly led in to slower intrusive crawls and just as seamlessly out again. Every second of the track is a descent into the bowels of emotional corrosion and aural violation. Its successor has a more tempestuous almost bedlamic nature and enterprise to its body. Marmen as everywhere batters and bludgeons the senses with tremendous spite and inventive craft whilst musically the song is a maelstrom of sound which never settles in one thought for long. This ensures intrigue and pleasure is high and expectations left empty apart from being swamped by an old school sound which heavily satisfies every constant want from a death metal tempest.

Decapitate the Holy Whore and Farewell to the Flesh both have ears and appetite licking lips again. The first of the two is another delicious stalking with riffs and grooves as infectious and venomously bullying as the deep caustic scowls of Beaulieu and the rugged and salacious tempting and swings of Chevrier and Marmen respectively. Farewell to the Flesh is similarly sculpted in its template but soon spinning a web of sonic enticement and alluring colour through Fournier’s adventure and arguably the most compelling and tasty bassline on the album. Another pinnacle of the excellent release, it again has a more chaotic potency to its design and intent, and maybe it is telling that the very best songs on the album are those with this looseness and slightly experimental character.

We Are the Undead is completed by the hellacious Wretched Life, a final tsunami of death metal voracity to bruise ears and ignite the emotions. It is simply a fine end to an excellent encounter. As suggested earlier, Gorelust and We Are the Undead are not rewriting death metal or really challenging its boundaries, but without doubt both are giving it a thoroughly enjoyable treat.

We Are the Undead is available now via PRC Music @ www.prcmusic.com/store/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=1249

https://www.facebook.com/gorelustband/

RingMaster 12/10/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://www.thereputationlabel.today

 

Hereza – Misanthrope

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Offering a thickly promising and swiftly engaging slab of groove infested death metal, Croatia band Hereza make a rather appetising introduction to their presence with debut album Misanthrope. It is not a release to set a cat amongst the pigeons of extreme metal but with additional punk encrusted tenacity and blackened fury, it certainly makes for a very flavoursome base for the band to push on from.

Formed in 2014, the duo of Slobodan Stupar (guitars, bass, drums, backing vocals) and Ivan Kovačević Kova (vocals) take their seeds from the old school origins of death metal but vein their creativity with the potent essences previously mentioned resulting in a familiar but persistently enticing onslaught. Seemingly embracing the inspirations of bands such as Entombed, Entrails, Misery Index, and Marduk, Hereza take little time in gripping attention with Misanthrope and its opening title track.

The song flies at the senses with sonic nostrils flared and rhythms hungry to inflict intimidation. It is a furious and pleasing proposal enhanced by grouchy vocals and emerging predatory grooves, each a fresh threat from the song’s malevolence. With especially its intensive beats ringing in ears, it makes way for the similarly voracious tempest of Grob. Leaving little time for a breath to be swallowed, the track is a hell for leather assault with the skilled craft and enterprise of Stupar impressing. There is a potent rawness to song and indeed album which accentuates the hostile and unforgiving nature of release and sound, an intensive tonic emulated in the broader caustic rock ‘n’ roll of Kraj and the darker toned Unholy Flame of Eternity. The blend of both sets of vocals amidst a spicy melodic adventure lures potently within the first of the two songs whilst the second is marked by a more classic metal infestation of hooks and a contagious swing to beats and riffs alike.

We Are the Disease provides a major pinnacle to the album, its feisty and lighter swagger of sound and character instantly anthemic without defusing the vicious roar and violent heart which HEREZA_Misanthrope_COVERlies within its infectious breast. Grooves are just as insatiably addictive too, and though the track is really barely scratching the surface of something truly new it rocks like a bitch taking body and emotions with it. Its catching infectiousness is matched in Objesen which emerges from a sinister intro to flex muscles and rhythmic animosity with bestial potency. Grooves again make the difference between a good and a great song but are in turn impressively backed by the vocals and simply the energy of the track to swiftly recruit eager submission to its lures.

    Whole World Burn with its opening Michael Caine sample stalks ears next, lurching over and snarling at ears with predatory maliciousness while both the corrosive hardcore corruption that is Bullet Storm and the tangy sonic adventure of Cancerous Demise keep album and satisfaction boiling quite nicely. All three offer some inventive and appealing twists to their savage bellows, each individual to the next and employing well used but in the band’s hands, tasty creative ingredients.

That variety continues in the punk driven Pills, the song taking the genre’s raucous antagonism into its death metal foraging of the senses with a furious chorus to match, whilst Noc Zivih Mrtvaca unearths a delicious dirt encrusted bass rapacity to prowl its bruising and volatile belligerence fuelled rock ‘n’ roll. Each leave healthy impressions and pleasure in their grudge loaded wake, the rhythmic lure of the latter powerful bait, before the excellent Death Army March stomps over senses and into the passions with a heavy footed animus. Another peak of the album, it is pure militant bad blood with vocal and creative spite to match.

Closing with the outstanding Erase the Disgrace, a song with the best entrance by far, a haunted sepia lit climate which subsequently erupts into a voracious tempest of aural ravishing, and finally the peddle to the metal charge of Mud, the album inspires full satisfaction with its proposal. Misanthrope is not loaded with surprises apart from being a striking unexpected debut, but succeeds in igniting only good feelings and reactions to its potential soaked presence, and that is more than enough to warrant an investigation by all extreme metal fans.

Misanthrope is available now via PRC Music @ http://www.prcmusic.com/store/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=1242

https://www.facebook.com/herezametal

RingMaster 11/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://www.thereputationlabel.today

 

 

Doom’s Day – The Devil’s Eyes

 Photo: Phil Rousseau photographe

Photo: Phil Rousseau photographe

    The release of their debut album The Unholy just over a year ago brought Canadian occult metal/horror punk band Doom’s Day into a closely inspected view and though in many ways the release was more promise than substance it was a thoroughly enjoyable encounter sparking intrigue and anticipation of greater things ahead. Their second full-length The Devil’s Eyes, easily justifies those expectations and hopes with its eight gothically atmospheric striking songs. With a maturer sound and better production than its predecessor, the release unveils a band with still plenty more surprises and potency to come you suspect but in the midst of an impressive evolution.

     Hailing from Quebec , Doom’s Day has been on a steady and recently rapid ascendency in grabbing attention, locally through their live shows and more widely with The Unholy. Originally released as a hand numbered CDR consisting of just 50 copies, the album drew the attention and enjoyment of PRC Music owner Remi Cote who proceeded to give the record a wider re-release. Certainly no stranger to strong and positive responses, the album made a good base for the band to move on from which their new album, again out via PRC, has explored to impressive success. Continuing with a sound seemingly seeded in the likes of Mercyful Fate, Venom, Ghost, and at times early Misfits, The Devil’s Eyes brings a stronger unique voice to the band, one arguably more heavy metal spawned and a big pleasing step on from their introduction.

     The Offering sets the listener off on the occultish stomp of the album, strikes of drums and guitars cutting through the wash of doom'sday_devilseyesthe atmosphere casting keys. Immediately ears and imagination are led into a shadow clad mausoleum of blackened intent and demonic provocation, an evocative and expressive caress darkening the soul. Into its steady gait the track expands with strong vocals, singular and as a dual persuasion, and a sonically hued guitar enterprise ripe with acidic colour, all adding greater adventurous intrigue to the narrative. It is a magnetic start, an infectious lure setting up album and appetite impressively.

    The following Cathedral Of Lies provides a warmer enticement to its temptation, mellow vocals and harmonies almost chant like in their beckoning within the spiralling web of guitar endeavour and forcibly grabbing rhythmic frame. Like the album, it is a song easy to immerse within and feed thoughts and visions off of, haunting keys and chilled melodies the strongest bait to sculpt adventures with. Also offering an emerging throaty bass sound as appealing as the riffs and invention of the guitars, the track makes way for The Outsider. Sinister from its first breath, and certainly the initial caustic stroke of vocals, the song stalks the senses with a predatory gait and enveloping gothic keys. It constantly probes and provokes the imagination, again with dark scenery and noir lit enterprise. The best song on the album it pushes it and band to a new plateau with irresistible invention.

     The release continues to stir up the passions with firstly the title track which rattles cages with its antagonistic almost violent rhythmic agitation and flowing keys, a vault of malevolence and anguish unleashed to embrace and taunt the listener. Its bordering on insidious tempting is matched and surpassed by Watery Grave, a song which takes longer than some to seduce but emerges as another highlight. Slow in its taking of the imagination, laboured in its preying of the ears, the track is a deceptively contagious submission from the release. It seems to evolve before the ears turning from a strong emotive menace into a highly seductive consuming of heart and soul. Those earlier mentioned influences seep through across the album but equally here you feel a stronger psychedelic essence which flickers up whispers of The Doors.

    The additive lure of The Devil’s Eyes never waivers as the final trio of songs set up home in ears and thoughts. The first Lost Soul is maybe less dramatically gripping as previous songs but is rich in stimulating riffs, commanding rhythms, and expressive keys. The vocals equally impress, and across the album to be fair, like the music and invention, standing much stronger than on the band’s first album. Offering an excellent solo, the song is followed by the dark ‘hymn’ Ave Satanas, a predominantly instrumental psalm of melodic excellence and evocative ambience. It is an outstanding piece of composing and craft which is ousted and contrasted by the closing track, Crush The Cross. In quality and excitement the song is easily the equal of its predecessors but whereas the previous song was an enveloping of melodies, this is an all-out charge of harsh riffery and rhythms, an almost thrash honed blaze of sonic corruption to end things on a high.

     As stated earlier Doom’s Days’ debut pointed at a strong chance of greater things to come from the band but The Devil’s Eyes easily outshines any expectations and hopes. There is still improvement to come you feel but there is little to defuse the pleasure from and praise for the release. Doom’s Day is now a band you can confidently say is going places.

https://www.facebook.com/dooms666day

http://prcmusic.bandcamp.com/album/dooms-day-the-devils-eyes

8/10

RingMaster 26/02/2014

 Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Among Gods – Malstrøm

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     Giving a potent sizeable teaser of their impending second album Monument, Norwegian death metallers Among Gods have just released Malstrøm , the first single from the new full-length. It is a great groaning slab of captivating metal which sparks intrigue and imagination for the upcoming PRC Music released album. It is admittedly not an explosive encounter, not a force to bring knees to the floor and senses to heel, but with a stalking predation and inventive sonic weave the song certainly leaves an appetite for the bigger narrative to come.

     Hailing from Bergen, the band started as a solo side-project for vocalist Ripper (Syrach) in 2010. The following year saw Among Gods expand to a quintet with the addition of guitarists Broke (ex-Arvas, Vithr) and Andrea Costanzo (Syrach) on guitars, bassist Remi Skråmestø (ex-Arvas), and drummer Ivan Rolstad (Vinterbris, Neoplasma). Working on and recorded their self-titled debut album across the rest of the year its well-received unleashing was followed with a vinyl release in late 2012. Reducing to the threesome of Ripper, Broke, and Ivan thereafter, Among Gods returned to the studio last year to begin bringing Monument to life, its emergence scheduled for May this year.

    The entrance of the single, like its overall presence, is restrained and steady but soaked in a rapacious intensity and atmosphere among_gods_logo_lowwhich intimidates and invites full focus. A rhythmic coaxing starts it off before the guitar winds a sonic lace of sound around the senses.  It is instantly engaging bait soon joined by the burly coarse vocals of Ripper, his tones initially overwhelming the enjoyment already bred by the emerging sounds but eventfully falling into intrusive place. The prime groove which flirts with the imagination is a delicious lure and the strongest potency within the song but with Broke’s guitar craft and the ever badgering rhythms of Ivan taunting and teasing the imagination, the track is an imposing, dramatic, and malevolently engrossing proposition.

     The one concern rising from the song is the production, which maybe can just be put down to the digital copy received here, its touch meandering in quality across the length of the track with certain moments soaked in up front clarity and others, like the vocals, seeming like they are drifting in a distant landscape. If the song is a demo cut, than all is good and anticipation for the album is ripe but if that aspect is the final glaze than a little uncertainty raises questions ahead of Monument. Nevertheless Malstrøm is a strongly satisfying and fascinating encounter helping spark a definite appetite for Among God’s sophomore album.

https://www.facebook.com/amonggods

7.5/10

RingMaster 12/02/2014

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