Adrenechrome – Tales From Adrenechrome

Pic Credit Dave Saunders_

Pic Credit Dave Saunders_

Just like a blurring of reality and fantasy, the sound of Canadian metallers Adrenechrome is a muggy fusion of styles and flavours, and just like a drug addled climate, it provides an adventure which devours and permeates every pore of the senses and emotions. Taking their name from the a fictional drug in the film Fear And Loathing In Las Vegas, Adrenechrome cast a kaleidoscope of rigorous and virulent tempting as creatively progressive as it is thunderously rock ‘n’ roll, as predatory thrash bred as it is spatially grooved, and as imaginatively ravenous as it is simply seductive. The evidence is all there within new album Tales From Adrenechrome, a seven track encounter which from its classic comic like cover, created by Clownbaby and Tim Kehoe, through to its final suggestive note, is a compelling exploration of self experiences, fantasy, sci-fi, and classic literature.

Hailing from Ontario, Adrenechrome began in 2010, formed by veterans of the music scene with bands such as Gaswitch, Shimmy Rabbits, and The Doug Trucker Band in their histories. Debut EP Hideous Appetites emerged in 2012, inspirations from artists such as Pantera, Black Sabbath, Thin Lizzy, Metallica, Mastodon, High on Fire, and Children of Bodom colouring a sound which soon lured strong support and attention to the release and equally the band’s adrenaline driven live presence which over the years has included playing with Corrosion of Conformity, Green Jelly, Ninjaspy, and Manahan. It is a reaction and success sure to be matched and overshadowed by Tales From Adrenechrome as it spreads its creative rabidity from hereon; with it the band ready to breach and incite richer and broader spotlights.

Album Cover - Adrenechrome - Tales From Adrenechrome _RingMaster Review   The album opens with A Familiar Face, an immediate tempting of bold rhythms and melodically spun sonic enterprise woven into a warm instrumentally led tapestry. The track swiftly captivates as its hooks and grooves seduce as the bass swings and drums badger, a union which only captures ears and imagination with vocal harmonies adding just one more flavoursome texture to the album’s initial temptation.

Things quickly get rugged and heavy as Lockstep storms in next; its thrash breeding is full rabid evidence as vocalist Chris Friesen rides his own riffs and the raw flames of fellow guitarist Tim Kehoe. As becomes the norm, the track is soon evolving within ears. The fury of more extreme metal hues collude with heavy Mastodon resembling grooves and a Torche likened web of flavours as the licking of thrash seeded and groove metal honed flames continues. It is riveting stuff, the body and emotions involved in the devilment as easily as pleasure and an appetite for more, which the song continues to offer with its persistently twisting proposal and Black Brubeck continues with its superb jazz lit imagination and progressively sculpted inventive waltz. As avant-garde as something from a Trepalium or a Pryapisme, and as heftily compelling rock ‘n’ roll as a predacious roar from an Anthrax or High on Fire, the song is irresistible; a fascination with mischief in its heart and fiery passion in its soul.

As all tracks, God Sized Shadow is nurtured with the same fire of intent and character, it even more rapaciously dirty and intrusive than its predecessor but with, greater degrees, the same kind of cosmic air and aggressive volatility, the blackened shades of the latter especially potent. Bewitching and intrusive, with the excellent dark grouchiness of Mike Van Dyk’s bass and the lethally swung beats of drummer Matt Copeland gripping, the track is a primal yet worldly blaze with the rawness of a Triggerman and dark seduction of a Faith No More.

The Heart and The Feather instantly incites ears and thoughts as clean vocals impress within a hug of spidery grooves and sonic expression, Friesen becoming even more compelling as he mixes up his delivery with dirtier tones and rasping expression. Musically the song matches him, again that bedlamic quality a perpetual enticement of unpredictability and highly persuasive surprises woven in to a mix of fierce and richly spiced metal and heavy rock styles. Hips are soon swinging and imagination entangled in the proposition, a success just as easily inspired by Hideous Appetites, a manic appearing and skilfully conjured smog of ferocious enterprise and dynamic devilment; a ravenous beast of a song with melodic and antagonistic weaponry.

Completed by the cauldron of warmth and hostility that is The Lead Elephant, a track which majestically merges melodic tempting, sonic trespasses, and cantankerous metal ‘n’ roll within its tenacious and often enjoyably bruising tempest, Tales From Adrenechrome is a thrilling beast. There is no moment where emotions and appetite are not inflamed and pleasure thicker than the grooves it unleashes.

Grabbing a dose of Adrenechrome is a no brainer as far as we are concerned, Tales From Adrenechrome the release declaring a new band to challenge if not quite now certainly ahead those ‘giants’ mentioned.

Tales From Adrenechrome is out now @ and through most online stores.

Pete RingMaster 28/11/2015

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Second To Sun – The First Chapter

STS_RingMaster Review

At the beginning of 2015, we had the opportunity to check out the Three Fairy Tales EP and a couple of singles around it from Russian metallers Second To Sun. It was an instrumental experience and adventure which just lit our ears and imagination. Now as the year begins to wind down, another proposition from the trio in the shape of a new album has ruffled the mental feathers and ruptured a rich vein of pleasure. The First Chapter is a nine track exploration of the broadest tapestry of metal styles and invention, carrying on from where the EP and certainly singles left off but breeding new experimental and ferocious captivation.

Second To Sun began back in 2012, formed by guitarist/keyboardist Vladimir Klimov-Lehtinen and drummer Artem Vishnyakov. The departure of the latter saw the band as a one man project for a while before bassist Anton Danilevsky and drummer Theodor Borovsky linked up with Klimov-Lehtinen. Debut album Based On A True Story was released in 2013 to welcoming ears and comments with the Three Fairy Tales EP coming towards the end of the following year, its unveiling drawing greater attention and in turn acclaim. Now the trio unleash The First Chapter, an encounter with a title suggesting it is a climax to the first part of the Second To Sun ascent, and tracks that are opening up a new soundscape and emprise of the band’s composing and sound.

Second To Sun - The First Chapter (2015) _RingMaster Review   As mentioned the Second To Sun sound is a ravenous kaleidoscope of sound described as “modern metal with the elements of black metal and ethnic Finno-Ugric music.” It is a thick and rich tapestry that draws on every strain of extreme and melodic hues you can wish for, creating immersive creative escapades inspired by the history and life of the Finno-Ugrian nations within Eurasia. It is also a highly evocative incitement as shown by album opener Spirit Of Kusoto. Inspired by a holy grove of the Mari people with very deep sacral meaning and serving as a “church”, the track places the imagination in the heart of the forest with the strains of Mari folk song Sun rises lighting ears. It is a potent suggestiveness which soon erupts into a more primal and rugged proposal, rhythms a predatory incitement as the guitar spews caustic hues. Almost as quickly a calm and beauty takes over as the bass continues to skilfully grumble; this another brief exploit in the evolving character and landscape of the track. The piece is riveting, an insight to a dark and bright place with danger and warmth almost fighting over themselves to dominate but ultimately uniting in one fluid enthralment as folkish as it is blackened, as mesmeric as it is intimidating.

Red Snow is an instantly more raw and carnivorous place, a torrent of hungry aggressive sound effectively representing the feel and climate of the tale of nine young men who died at the infamous Dyatlov Pass. You almost feel the cold, the starkness, and turmoil endured as rhythms and sonic imagination create a barbarous and compelling provocation throughout but the track is also as potent in its echo of the rural folkish landscape as voices and percussion amongst many flavours emerge. The track is as rousingly bewitching as its predecessor, a canvas for thoughts to interpret and use to cast their own take on events inspiring the piece before the dark, haunting beauty of Me or Him takes over to seduce and inflame the senses and imagination. Simultaneously mesmeric and bedlamic, each contrast superbly cultured and honed by the band, the track is a predator of sound with a gripping maelstrom of emotion and ideation woven into an irresistible trespass of diversely brewed incitement.

Through the djent, death metal twisted Land of the Fearless Birds and the oppressively enjoyable The Blood Libel, band and album only tighten their grip on body and appetite. The first is another fearsomely predacious offering with bloodied melodies and a psyche stirring atmosphere whilst its successor opens up a cauldron of black/death bred heresy with welcomingly invasive enterprise. Both tracks in their own way, impressively stalk ears and thoughts whilst casting an almost hypnotic lure through the scintillating invention and craft of all members. The imagination of guitar and keys from Klimov-Lehtinen is especially rousing, though arousal of instincts and passions are just as powerfully nurtured by the bass imagination of Danilevsky and the resourceful swings and beats of Borovsky.

Narčat in contrast to the previous pair bounds in like a warrior, bold and creatively tenacious like the young woman inspiring its heart. The track is an undiluted assault of energy, aggression, and a masterfully entwined diversity of metallic and melodic styles, all fused into a bracing tempest matched in its own individual storm by Virgo Mitt. Within the track though, an elegant beauty within a melodic oasis emerges to seduce and shape the tale being conjured in thoughts. The inspiration to the piece of music is as fascinating as the sound, and we suggest certainly checking out the background to all tracks via Second To Sun’s bandcamp to gain even more richness to the experience of the songs.

Completed by excellent bonus track Chokk Kapper, a spiny affair of riffs and rhythms branching out with intoxicating sonic and melodic intrigue and invention, and a demo version of Narčat, The First Chapter is a stirring and forcibly impressive provocateur of ears and thoughts, not forgetting pleasure. As progressive and avant-garde in as many ways as it is technical and extreme, the album confirms suggestions made by previous releases, that Second To Sun is one uniquely thrilling proposition.

The First Chapter is available now digitally and on CD via

Pete RingMaster 25/11/2105

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Arcade Messiah – II

John Bassett _RingMaster Review

Though time wise it has been around a year between releases, it feels like a mere breath in sound and relationship between the self-titled debut Arcade Messiah album and its successor II. Continuing in adventure where its acclaimed progressive rock predecessor left off, the new encounter is an emprise of instrumental majesty and incitement reconfirming John Bassett as one of Europe’s finest songwriters, composers, and musicians.

An artist no stranger to garnering thick attention and praise through his band KingBathmat and acoustic offerings under own his name, Bassett’s solo instrumental project Arcade Messiah is another unique proposition from him. Weaving strands of highly varied styles from metal to math rock, stoner to post rock with further diverse and progressive flavours soaked in stirring ambience, the first Arcade Messiah album was a riveting exploration of sound and emotion through individual incitements. Each song worked on the listener’s senses and imagination and as mentioned, II carries on in the same vein but further experiments with textures whilst stretching the fusion of styles and essences to richer and deeper extent. Basset himself neatly sums up II, saying “after the surprise success of last year’s original Arcade Messiah album and after receiving feedback from fans of that album I decided to make a sequel, a continuation of that album, that is hopefully bigger, better, more refined and more dramatic, but which didn’t lose the vibe and atmosphere that was created on the original album“.

Arcade-Messiah-II-Cover_RingMaster Review   II opens with Moon Signal and straight away thoughts drift on the breeze of melodic and atmospheric coaxing. Keys whisper suggestively with their calm caress whilst a guitar emotively entices before sparking a broadening into a thicker and more volatile landscape. The celestial air which painted the start continues to ebb and flow within the spatial yet tightly woven invitation of the track, its journey hinting at vastness and intimacy simultaneously whilst twisting through varied realms as the song explores new avenues of calm, tempestuousness, and imagination.

As expected, Bassett bewitches and provokes ears and emotions with his writing and craft, each piece of music a tapestry of clues and persuasion for the imagination to run with greedily, Red Widow another swift example and success. The second track has a more sinister air to its tone and presence which starting from a sonic mist is soon opening up layers of equally intimidating and seductive expression. The arousal of ear and thought also evolves through many guises within the full umbrella of sonic temptation, a creative travelogue shaping all tracks with the compelling Black Dice Maze a prime example as it glides through sonic intrigue and emotive calm as well as tenacious rock ‘n’ roll and ravenous volatility within its gripping theatre of sound and invention.

The next up Gallows Way seduces from its first touch. Initially it is a surf rock infused ambient hug on the senses, soon spreading out with evocative melodies and reflective sonic shimmers as guitars and keys align with shadowy but restrained rhythms. The skills and invention of Bassett across the instrumentation is a perpetual doorway into the heart of the music, guitars especially descriptive and suggestive across the album but just as potent are the rhythmic contrasts and darker hues that can either ripple or erupt in more forceful intent to temper or enhance the adventure around them. In the fourth song beauty dominates though whereas Fourth Quarter involves rugged scenery of riffs and dynamics within a sonic radiance which immerses the listener with a climate of invitational sultriness and tempting danger. The track is a gripping fascination and rich aural temptation matched in might by the sultry mystique of Via Occulta. The short piece is a maze of shadows, a lure into secrets and hidden depths, and a spellbinding flight even with its brevity.

Across both Read The Sky and Start Missing Everybody, artist and album continue to be a kaleidoscope of aural ingenuity and temptation; each of them evocations which transfix and incite the senses and imagination into unique interpretation of the sonic palette on offer. The closing pair of the two is a melancholic kiss but just as potently fuelled by hope and energy to create something emotionally anthemic.

The CD version also includes the bonus track The Four Horsemen, a striking cover of the Aphrodite’s Child song which was also Arcade Messiah’s contribution to the recently vinyl released compilation album by Fruit De Mer Records called Side Effects. Alone it is worth the purchase of a CD, Bassett giving the track fresh life and suggestiveness, though the cream of II is undoubtedly his original and thrilling tracks.

John Bassett as mentioned is for us one of the UK’s most potent and stirring songwriters, let alone musicians, and II another thick slice of pleasure.

Arcade Messiah II is out now digitally as a name your price download @ via Stereohead Records and on CD from November 27th.

Pete RingMaster 23/11/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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This Year’s Ghost – Yesterday Becomes Tomorrow Today

Band_RingMaster Review

This Year’s Ghost might not be a particularly familiar name for many right now but with more releases like Yesterday Becomes Tomorrow Today, it is hard to imagine that remaining the case. The five-track EP is a rousing blaze of anthemic melodic rock woven from the varied strains of alternative rock, grunge, and melodic metal, and though in some ways it is not particularly unique there is no escaping the fresh and arousing character to the roar of sound and release.

Formed in 2012, London hailing This Year’s Ghost consists of vocalist/guitarist Paul McKenzie, bassist/backing vocalist Joe Kusionowicz, and drummer Jake Tellinghusen. Last year saw the release of the Winter Earth EP, a release recorded with producer Meyrick de la Fuente. It was the start of a year which sparked good interest the way of the band, a UK tour and numerous other shows adding to the growing awareness of their emergence. Yesterday Becomes Tomorrow Today is the next step, a release sure to increase the swell of attention crowding around the band and alone reason why those in the know keenly shout about the trio’s compelling exploits.

THIS YEAR'S GHOST - COVER _RingMaster ReviewART     Recorded with producer Matt Hyde (Slipknot/Machine Head/Funeral For A Friend/Gallows), Yesterday Becomes Tomorrow quickly stirs up ears and an eager appetite with Death Of A Gift, its entrance of fuzzy guitar and brewing intensity a potent coaxing. In no time it is into a reserved but fiery stroll with the superb tones of McKenzie strongly impressing, as too the web of grooves and sonic endeavour escaping his guitar strings. Band inspirations include the likes of Biffy Clyro, Pearl Jam, and Alter Bridge, and fair to say in the opener alone you can feel those essences colouring the song’s inviting roar, but equally This Year’s Ghost casts its own identity in the rich melodies and vocal harmonies shaping the excellent drama of the song.

The stirring start continues with December Sun, a track featuring guest vocals from Stitch D of The Defiled. Straight away as melodic persuasion gallops in on hefty beats and grouchy bass, ears and appetite are gripped, even more so as the vocals croon with expression and quality. Though not as energetic as its predecessor, dynamically the song is a rampant stallion of sound and invention, its metallic side the flaring nostrils and melodic invention the heart of one impassioned and arousing encounter.

Carry Us In Blue similarly aligns a carnivorous rhythmic enticement, especially from the bass, with harmonic and melodic flames; the union breeding the emotive intensity escaping through the pores of the track’s tempestuous but controlled bellow. Whereas the first two songs immediately stir the senses and emotions, the third is more of a smouldering persuasion but one subsequently leaving ripe pleasure and a captivation of the over time. Though Silver Tongue hits with a swifter temptation it too blossoms more over numerous plays, its inflamed seduction a success unwilling to rush things but increasingly successful whilst adding to the rich enjoyment arising from Yesterday Becomes Tomorrow.

The EP is completed by the provocative infectiousness of Black Dogs, another where bass and drums are predatory, vocals and guitar sonically radiant, and all unite to craft a fire of imaginative sonic expression and intensive lyrical reflection, something which applies to the whole of the increasingly impressing release.

Bolder originality is the only thing you could offer up as something missing within Yesterday Becomes Tomorrow Today, an essence though easy to assume will emerge as the band evolves and grows. Other than that the EP borders on the majestic; a thickly pleasing proposition which might not change your musical life but easily doffer up This Year’s Ghost as a new long term friend.

The Yesterday Becomes Tomorrow Today EP is available now via iTunes.

Pete RingMaster 22/11/2015

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Stoking the polka: talking Peace, Love & Russkaja with founder Georgij Makazaria


Austrian turbo polk metallers Russkaja is band we for one cannot fail to get perpetually excited and energised by, their fiercely eclectic and rousing sound a manic and exhilarating stomp that just hits the spot. With the release of their latest album Peace, Love & Russian Roll on Napalm records, 2015 has been a busy year for the septet, one just as full of live shows around Europe and further afield. Right now Russkaja are touring but band founder and vocalist Georgij Makazaria managed to find some time to kindly share with us as we look into the making of the new album and origins of the band.

Hello Georgij and many thanks for sharing time to talk with us.

The world has just been treated to another Russkaja stomp courtesy of new album Peace, Love & Russian Roll, the devil in a polka crafted musical skirt of temptation. For us it is your most rounded and ‘polished’ offering yet without losing the raw diversity which fuels your unique sound. How does it most differ for you from Energia!, its predecessor?

The new album has more different directions. We felt free to try everything we wanted to try and we had fun doing that.

Whereas there was a great ‘randomness’ to the sound and lyrical narrative of songs in previous your albums, Peace, Love & Russian Roll seems to have a more constant theme within the ever eclectic festival of flavours and styles?

Yes, all songs sound different; all sounds are inspired by the different moods of the songs; that was the idea of the new album.

It also feels slightly more reserved in its boldness of diversity yet fuller in the creative hues it does weave into the bodies of songs. Did you go into its writing with any specific intent and ideas or did it just organically grow?

Engel and I, we took one year to compose songs, so we met in our rehearsal room and put together the elements that influenced us during this year! I had lots of ideas that I was carrying in my phone for a long time, and Engel had some projects that he has collected in the past, so we put both sources together and the new music came out.

597_Russkaja_RingMaster ReviewMany of the songs are sung in English upon Peace, Love & Russian Roll; why that move this time around? There is an element of trying to lure stronger UK/US attention?

It was a step closer to everybody’s understanding. English is of course the most spoken language on this planet and it works great in this combination.

Do you think you will repeat this across future releases as it surely will open up a new wealth of appetites for Russkaja from those ‘prejudice’ to anything not lyrically accessible before they hear a sound?

I don´t know what I will repeat in the future, but I know one thing: On the new album I have some favourite directions and I will try to follow them again on my next travel.

Tell us about El Pueblo Unido upon the album, the first track you have sung in Spanish.

Si, yo estudiado la idioma español en la Union Sovietica. I learned Spanish in USSR, it was a special school with very intensive language teaching. I still can speak a little bit Spanish, sometimes I have practiced with my colleagues like: Tito & Tarantula, Ska-P, Panteon Rococo. I had this idea for a kind of mariachi sound in my head, and so I started to put together some Spanish words and it worked out. I am very happy about this song.

The expansive and unpredictable sound that Russkaja is renowned and acclaimed for, seems inevitable with the background and tastes of all its members. Can you tell us how you all came together and the origins of the band?

Russkaja was founded 2005 by me, Georgij Makazaria. I came from Soviet Union in the late 80-ies to Austria. Here I’ve met Dimitrij Miller from Ukraine in the year 2003. The Brass Section is two brothers from Upper Austria, Hans-Georg and Rainer Gutternigg, the Violin Girl is from Griesskirchen, a place on the landside. Drummer Mario is from Styria like Arnold, Engel the guitarist is from Lower Austria, half of us live in Vienna, the other half in Linz.

Was there anything which majorly inspired the creation of Russkaja?

It was a book written by Wladimir Kaminer, Russendisko from the year 2000. It´s a true story about a place in Berlin where the writer started to put (as a DJ) Russian music together with his friend Yuriy Gurzhy from “Rotfront“, and the small place “Cafe BURGER“ became a secret hype in town. They added a CD to the book with some of this music and I was very surprised that the people in Berlin went crazy for music I grew up with, I was inspired, I got a great idea! Later I’ve met the writer, worked with both guys together, played in this Cafe and I have always big fun performing in Berlin!

With such inspirations behind all your individual tastes and ideation, I am imagining songs come together like a puzzle at times, different parts tried in different ways until fitting. How does the Russkaja3_RingMasterReviewsongwriting generally come together in the band and is there a strong democratic process involved or its more that particular people take the lead?

It´s a free democratic process, every one of us is welcome to bring ideas, beats, rhymes, riffs, brasslines or violin melodies, and I listen to all of them. Usually, when I compose, it begins with a summing idea on the phone. Engel and I, we are collecting ideas all the time, they can come in every moment that you don´t expect, so you better be ready and have something to record in the hand, because the ideas may visit you just for a short time and then they disappear. In February of last year we started our song-development sessions. I like this part a lot; it is a creative time when things get a form and a face. Next step is the choice. Very difficult moment, what is good, what is better. After we’ve selected the Ideas we start to arrange everything around: brass, violin choir. After that, the studio work begins.

Did you approach the recording of the new album any differently to its predecessors?

Yes, this time we were working in a very well organized and perfect equipped studio called “Masters of Sounds“ in Michelhausen in Lower Austria. We started with the rhythm section by recording drums together with bass and guitars (pilot modus). A lot of basslines on the tracks were done by first take, than we recorded guitars and bass adds. At this time, our brass section started to record trumpets and potete (special instrument – mixture of trumpet and trombone) in Linz, in a studio of their friend Armin Lehner, who did a great work guiding this recording session. After a song got rhythm and brass, we recorded violins on it. In a very cool hall room, 8 m high – great acoustic, super sound. At the end I did my part singing the songs in a very relaxed and nice atmosphere! No hurry, great mics, a well sounding room with a lot of daylight and candle light in the evening.

Do you find reactions and the passion for your individual sound differs majorly between audiences from different countries within Europe?

Only the best reactions! Most of the people like it; it is a fresh, positive music, that works everywhere we go. Every show is a booster for the band! We give everything at every concert and pick up the people of every age, nationality and taste!

pic Jörg Fischer_

pic Jörg Fischer_

The band is renowned for its festival of energy and adventure on stage, what have you got lined up for the rest of 2015?

Now we are on our Germany/Austria/Netherlands tour, then we go to Italy, and in December to Spain!

Once again big thanks for sparing time for us; is there anything you would like to add?

You are very welcome! Peace to your home, health to your body, love to your heart!

Read our review of Peace, Love & Russian Roll @


Pete Ringmaster

The RingMaster Review 11/11/2015

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Dorje – Catalyst

Dorje _RingMaster Review

Catalyst is the perfect name for the new EP from UK rockers Dorje, its sound and songs the sure spark to major attention and a greedy appetite in a great many for the band’s inventively fiery sound. It is an offering lying somewhere sound wise between Soundgarden, Audio Slave, Alter Bridge, and Tool but with a freshness and invention which across its five tracks shows exactly why there is a rich buzz around the quartet.

Technically impressive and captivating with a sound built on rousing grooves and inflame melodic imagination, Dorje imaginatively draw on varied flavours from the likes of blues, jazz, metal, and a diverse mix of muscular rock ‘n’ roll. What emerges is a rich and enjoyable persuasion that is unafraid to merge recognisable hues and flavours into the band’s own skilful textures and magnetically resourceful enterprise. Catalyst roars with this impassioned recipe, and though it may not blow ears and the passions away, it certainly leaves a hungry appetite and intrigue for more in its wake.

DoejeCover-Bright_RingMaster Review   Written is first up upon the band’s second EP and straight away a guitar stirs up attention with its raw and slightly grizzled coaxing. In a swift breath or two, the dark throaty bass lures cast by Dave Hollingworth join the expanding flames springing from the of guitars of Rabea Massaad and Rob Chapman, with the latter’s vocals make an equally strong impression as they join the captivating sinew driven mix. The beats of Ben Minal cage it all in a restrained but potent frame as Hollingworth’s craft continues to be a dark magnet in a song blossoming an off-kilter and delicious passage of imagination soaked avant-garde adventure. It is a moment reinforcing early recognition of the great unpredictability which also lurks within the band’s potent tempting, a twist turning a strong track into something special especially as it continues to add riveting spice to the remainder of the impressive song.

The potent start continues with the EP’s title track, the song as its predecessor, making a controlled and alluring start but soon, once it has found its creative feet, brewing into and expanding into an imagination fuelled exploration. Admittedly the track never ventures as boldly as the opener but entangling familiar and fresh enterprise in a technically sculpted web of enticement only leaves ears and pleasure full; a hungry satisfaction wanting more and duly fed by Aeromancy. Encircling the senses in another maze of technical prowess and heavy rock predation as emotive as it is rapacious, the song blazes away as it takes the listener through its multitude of layers and robustly dynamic textures.

A more relaxed embrace and enticement comes with the excellent All next, the band creating an enthralling croon as provocative as it is progressively charming and holding a touch of UAE band Absolace and Porcupine Tree to its enticing flavouring. As expected, the song carries an attitude to its breath and predatory air to its invention which invigorates the warmer side of its infectious character, both sides closely colluding as the track works its way to a tempestuously compelling and exhilarating climax.

Closing track White Dove is a more formula heavy rock bait of sound which personally did not whip up the same excitement as those before it yet leaves only fill satisfaction behind with its old school meets grunge feel. It is an eager slice of the kind of rock ‘n roll which never fails to go down well though, an inflamed storm ensuring Catalyst leaves a potent last impression.

Dorje are cultivating something very flavoursome and indeed striking as the Catalyst EP powerfully reveals but equally there is open potential of broader and bolder things to come which means current rich enjoyment is leading to keen anticipation for what comes next, a reaction as ripe as the pleasure found in this new roar.

The Catalyst EP is out now via most online stores.

Pete RingMaster 10/11/2015

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Demons Of Old Metal – Dominion

DOOM 2_RingMaster Review

We all know rock ‘n’ roll is spawned in hell and eager through hordes of bands to spread its glory, an infestation proven over the decades to only thrill especially in the hands of bands like Demons Of Old Metal. Theirs is a forcibly vocal and thrilling stomp consuming the senses which is in full roar within the glorious shape of new album Dominion. The UK band has been around a little while, working away at trying to “win back the souls of those that have turned their back on sex, drugs and rock ‘n’ roll!” From the fact that their new release is our and a great many others introduction to them suggests it has been a slow battle to date but things are about to get hot and dirty we suggest once their outstanding album uncages its contagion.

Formed around the time 2010 turned into its successor, Demons of Old Metal emerged as four veterans of the UK metal scene united to play “what got them into music in the first place – classic metal.” Casting a sound, presence, and stage show coloured by schlock horror inspiration, the band released their debut offering on the Halloween of 2012, in the riot of mini-album, The Demonic Chronicles Vol. I. It as a well-received and praised proposal followed by the band creating metal havoc across the country live and the subsequent releases of Vol. 2 and 3 of The Demonic Chronicles over the next couple of years.

The Torbay hailing band’s sound is mutant rock ‘n’ roll rising with creative bloodlust from a twisted blend of Pantera, Them County Bastardz, Hell Yeah, Steel Panther, and Machine Head, to give its hellacious voice some description. And as Dominion swiftly reveals, it is an infestation of ears and imagination refusing to take no for an answer with its virulent hostility.

Dominion Artwork -_RingMaster Review   The album announces itself with the brief theatrical Domintroduction before launching itself at the senses, with nostrils flared, through the outstanding Fakeskin. Riffs and rhythms quickly build a wall of spite and enticement, already badgering and welcoming a just as instant appetite for the provocation. As the expressive punkish tones of vocalist Tombstone Cowboy leap into the brewing tempest, electronic slithers and teases play, a side-helping of temptation to the full meal of a voracious onslaught luring away as the guitars of Tombstone Cowboy and Psycho Wing continue to rampage and flirt with the throaty toxicity spread by bassist Babyface Stephens s. With the scything violence of drummer Dr Doom simply nasty and gripping, a rich Slipknot essence can be added to the suggested breeding of song and album, but all flavours here and ahead stretched and mutated into a web of metal distinct to the demons.

You Version 2.0 leaps on the listener next, its physical and emotional agitated an open toxicity within another storm of merciless rhythms and riffs bound in nagging grooves and confronting vocals. The electronic sparks of the first song is replaced by a more industrial metal predation, thoughts of Pitchshifter teasing throughout whilst heavy and more classically honed spices venomously soak the pores of the track and senses. It’s addictive quality is emulated by both Dance of the Damned and Open wide and Scream, the first stalking its victim with rugged textures and the electronic toxins woven by Digital Death whilst growing into its spite with an increasing weave of flavours and inhospitable but gripping enterprise. The successor to this Devildriver like animus of a song, stomps with a dirty rock ‘n’ roll swing and theatrical snarl, its lure smothered by a sonic climate of intensity and rancor. The band seamlessly fuses the contrasting yet similarly belligerent winds of that invention, creating a hellish primal nursery rhyme as catchy as it is intimidating.

There is a ‘mellower’ trespass next with The Quiet Ones, its southern rock flames and dirt lined grooves locked into a thick turbulence of riffs and rhythms, neither outweighing the other but mutually leading to a moment of groove heaven and an increasingly explosive and vicious outpouring of sonic rabidity. A borrowing of a Rage Against The Machine tempting only adds to the fun, and as much as the album bruises and devours it also offers a rich tongue in cheek layer through lyrics and mischief.

Grind was a little ‘disappointing’, though only in the fact with its title hopes were it would burrow into flesh and psyche like a drill bit. Instead it spun a wiry web of grooves and sonic tenacity amongst a threat of rhythms and riffs; the result being another inescapably persuasive and seriously enjoyable intrusion before making way for the writhing and relentless nagging of Behind the Mask. With a ripple of rap metal to its persistent niggle of riffs, the song demands attention, evolving new strains of melodic and cantankerous imagination in return. Longer to hit the same rapturous reactions as most of its predecessors, the song easily succeeds in leaving satisfaction full before being over shadowed by the excellent The Star of your Nightmare. Its electronic coaxing amidst prowling riffs is almost Marilyn Mansion like but in no time a cancerous violation unique to Demons Of Old Metal with the track emerging as a theatre of cinematic mayhem and sonic ingenuity.

Cast around a fiery acidic groove, See How They Die seduces and menaces before overpowering its initial rich flame to dominate through bearish riffs and ill-tempered rhythms, the vocals bridging both emotions with open relish. Like The Union Underground with anger problems, the song is a grizzly treat leaving Get Outa Dodge to provide one last growl of insatiable and uncompromising rock ‘n’ roll, and ending the album on another big high.

British metal/rock ‘n’ roll is building towards a new heyday going by releases over the past few months, and when it erupts in full voice, there is no way Demons Of Old Metal will not be there leading the thrilling riot.

Dominion is out December 1st with pre-ordering available now @

Pete RingMaster 05/11/2015

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