Attack The Day – Felons EP

Pic Michal Spigiel

Pic Michal Spigiel

Attack The Day is another of those bands with a sound which defeats exact tagging due to its nature and eagerness to weave in a host of diverse flavours. The Northern Ireland hailing quintet, though it might be that they have lost a member since recording their new release,  are generally classed as alternative metal/rock but as Felons shows, they have the snarl of punk, the rousing tenacity of raw metal, the swing of funk, and the unpredictable character of post rock in their invention. The band’s second EP is an ear pleasing, imagination sparking encounter which captivates more and more with every listen.

Formed in Enniskillen in County Fermanagh in early 2012, Attack The Day soon developed a hunger to play live and soon had their local scene won over. Inspirations come from the likes of Sum 41, Mallory Knox, Maximum The Hormone, Slipknot, The Blackout, Gob, and Korn which alone gives you a hint to the variety in their sound. Last year saw debut EP This Is How It Ends released, its singles finding play and support on various radio stations such as IUR FM and RTE 2XM. 2015 also saw the band touring Ireland and play support to Suddenly Human. Now it is Felons poised to stir up further attention, a success easy to assume with its creative step on from its predecessor.

ATD - _RingMasterReviewFrom its opener, the EP shows a new expansion and invention in the Attack The Day sound as We Are The Change grabs ears with a sonic clamour and a tide of group roars. From there the lead vocal of Dáithí Murphy steps forward within a busy hustle of riffs and firmly jabbing rhythms which is part punk, part heavy rock, and quickly infectious. There is no mistaking the appetite sparking attitude soaking the song, but a challenge bound in spicy grooves from guitarist Mark Cadden as Ciaran Fitzpatrick’s bass throatily prowls the intimidating beats of Shane McGovern. Not for the last time, the punkish hue to a song within the EP, hints at a Stiff Little Fingers like growl to add further temptation for ears to embrace.

It is fair to say that the first song is a relatively and enjoyably straight forward slice of raw rock ‘n’ roll, something its successor Bridges I Burn certainly embraces while revealing the more off kilter imagination of the band. Its relatively mellow start is soon a lively funk fest of grooves and energetic rhythms, but a revelry which in turn sparks vocal animosity and imposing metal bred intensity. It is a passage of invention which repeats with increasing potency, every round revealing a fresh essence and spice within the adventurous exploits.

Epidemic follows that compelling proposal, bringing its own creative captivation with elegant melodies and suggestive beauty, the instrumental a warm yet melancholic caress of the imagination and senses before Part To Play springs its irritable metal and post hardcore causticity on ears. The slightly dour tones of Murphy work a treat against the fiery nature of sound and the band’s bullish harmonies, but the unpredictable character of the song soon has ears and thoughts buzzing in other ways. Slips into ska seeded swings and atmospheric caresses are great moments matched by the contrasting and corrosive winds of sound and intent which also wash across the senses, each providing a fascinating and successful piece in the inventive jigsaw of the track.

The EP is concluded by the boisterous rock stomp of Who We Are, a song emulating the first in providing an anthemic punk ‘n’ roll charge which just hits the spot. It is a great end to a thoroughly enjoyable second encounter with Attack The Day. Fiercely agreeable on the ear, the release also highlights the potential within the band, a promise and quality hard not to see making a bigger impact on the British rock scene ahead.

The Felons EP is released 20th May, available @ https://attacktheday.bandcamp.com/releases

https://www.facebook.com/attackthedayband/   https://twitter.com/_AttackTheDay

Pete RingMaster 18/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Exploring the rousing roar of Maxdmyz

Maxdmyz_RingMasterReview

Maxdmyz is a London based metal quintet who has earned a potent reputation over the year as a live proposition and through their striking sound and releases. We were took the chance to find out more about the band with thanks to its members, exploring its origins, heart, and creative pulse…

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started?

Twister: So I’m Twister – I sing, write the lyrics, melodies and make the odd contribution to the tunes themselves. You’ve got Roger on guitar, A’Zedd on bass, and Vortex on keys and programming with Jay on drums and programming.

The band has taken different forms over the years – I’m the only founding member, although Jay and I have been working in the band for quite a while now. A’Zedd and Vortex joined a couple of years ago, and have each brought their own flavours to the band – A’Zedd in jazz and blues, and Vortex in goth, industrial and electronica. Roger was the brains behind German death-metallers, Apophis, and Jay has an incredible number of influences from Cardiacs to Nile and Squarepusher.

Have you been involved in other bands before? If so has that had any impact on what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

Jay: Yeah, we’ve all been band whores ever since any of us can remember. I don’t think we consciously decided on one musical direction or another – what does mark us out though is an openness just to see where things take us. It’s a unique combination of influences and personalities and it’s that chemistry that gives us our sound, and everyone is welcome, in fact encouraged, to contribute as fully as possible to the best of their ability.

What inspired the band name?

Vortex:  Twis likes to tell a story where it was a dyslexic founding member who came up with it – I’m still not sure whether I believe him but the name at least is distinctive and, if not memorable, you remember that you can’t remember it – er, if you see what I mean!

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

A’Zedd: Wow, I’d like to say there is and that we have a sense of a specific sound and vibe that we want to create. But it would be a massive lie. It’s much less conscious than that and all the better for it. Emotional connection – that’s the beginning and the end of it, and our music is the vehicle to do it.

maxdmyz1_RingMasterReviewDo the same things still drive the band when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

Roger: What do you mean – “was” fresh-faced – I think the band has developed over time, but whether progression or regression, who knows. As for evolution, well, every time we play or rehearse, we get closer and stronger – the material improves, as do our live performances. We are all incredibly driven, and always will be – it’s just a compulsion to connect.

So since your early days, how would you say your sound has actually evolved?

Twister: We’ve become heavier and more melodic – we started out really almost as loopy drum ‘n’ bass laced with samples, goth vocals, and heavy guitars. And it’s definitely an organic thing, although this openness to see where things take us naturally has definitely led to innovation and experiment?

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations, you touched on it with Jay but are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

A’Zedd: It’s weird, you know, but almost everything you encounter and process, musically or otherwise, has an impact – either as repellent or attractant. There are certain kinds of music and artists I don’t want to emulate – and that’s as much if not more of an influence on our music, vibe and outlook as anything else. But my native discretion forbids me from naming names.

Is there a regular process to the band’s songwriting?

Jay: Each of us is a songwriter in their own right – so what generally happens is that one of us presents an idea, even at a relatively early stage of development, and we jam and refine it. We all have our areas of expertise, but we are all very open to contributions and suggestions from band mates. The songs refine and develop through practice and live performance.

Roger: If one of us doesn’t feel comfortable with something, we generally dump it as we’ve all got to be happy with the final product if we’re going to deliver it with conviction; having said that, we are all happy to compromise. This is one of the most productive and democratic bands I have ever worked in – it’s just mutual respect and everyone working towards the same goal. Publishing is always divided five ways, regardless.

Vortex: Yeah, part of the pleasure of being in this band is that everyone works to get the best possible level of creativity out of everyone else – we all see ourselves as enablers of the others’ creativity and are glad to be so. It feels so good to be working in a collaborative environment where everyone is respected and feels represented.

Where, more often than not, do you draw inspirations for the lyrical side of your songs?

Twister: I guess this is my shout – since I write the damn things. It’s from the extremes of emotional experience, more often than not – or sometimes from some ironic or sardonic take on an issue that grabs me – from anorexia to suicide bombers. They’re noises made to music in the end and they either work or don’t work.

Can you give us some background to your latest release?

Jay: It feels a little weird talking about it, as it feels a long time ago now and we will be releasing a new album later this year or early the next – The Hate Plane was released in August 2014, maxdmyz artmaxdmyz_RingMasterReviewalthough it still seems to be exciting interest and radio play etc. as if it had been released just a month or two ago; that may be a characteristic of the internet age, people come across this stuff online every day and for them it’s new and fresh. Grieve, the single off the album, is still getting a lot of radio play, especially in the States, as are All and Side with Satan.

Give us some insight to the themes and premise behind the album.

Vortex: Apocalypse, the counter culture under pressure, individual desperation in the face of personal powerlessness and alienation, anger, boredom, sex, mental illness, political injustice – you know; the usual stuff. The premise is, I guess, is that existentially you have to make a statement even if the only one listening is yourself.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

A’Zedd: The answer is yes. I think you have to be as prepared and ‘finalised’ as possible and that’s because things will always change and that’s good. We can’t afford financially or creatively to mess around composing on recording time. That’s why, when I estimate how long it’s going to take to record anything, I estimate, double the figure, then double it again.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably the favourite aspect of the band?

Roger: As a relatively new member, I can say that that’s what drew me to the band. I’d seen them in one guise or other playing live for a few years on the London circuit. It was one show in particular which I thought was electric – at the Dome in North London. Twister is a fantastic singer, and A’Zedd is such a fluent, effortless bassist. Vortex has this extraordinary presence. And Jay is one of the most phenomenal drummers I have ever seen, let alone played with. Playing with these guys is an incredible adrenaline rush and communicates that excitement to the audience, and that, in the end, is what it’s all about.

maxdmyz2_RingMasterReviewIt is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it? Are there the opportunities to make a mark if the drive is there for new bands?

Jay: London is the last place in the universe you’d want to start or be in a band. There are probably thousands of different acts all trying to climb out of the sewer that is the London music scene. Some of the great metal bands have come from the UK, but culturally there seems to be less appetite for it than you’d think. There are opportunities to make a mark for new bands of course, but there is always that element of luck – being in the right place at the right time, knowing the right people and so on. Rick Wakeman once said that any band looking for a deal doesn’t deserve one – easy for him to say, but he’s only half right. With the internet now though, it’s sometimes easier to make a mark somewhere else in the world rather than closer to home.

So how has the internet and social media impacted on you guys to date?

Vortex: It’s had a massive positive impact on getting our music out there. There is a fantastic democratizing influence that the internet has had – it kind of flattens out celebrity – everyone has a website – you can visit Slayer’s or Maxdmyz’s and the experience is much the same – you listen and you either like it or you don’t. True, it’s less easy to get rich off music if you’re an artist – well, it was never that easy, but so what! In what moral universe does Phil Collins earn millions of dollars off a song it took him three minutes to write, where the average ambulance driver or nurse earns naff all by comparison. And you don’t need any specialist skills apart from the ability to click on links and send emails, seriously.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

A’Zedd: Well, thank you for your interest. Yep, we’ve just heard we’ll be playing Club Antichrist on 11th November. See you there!

Check out Maxdmyz further @ https://www.facebook.com/maxdmyz and their music @ http://maxdmyz.bandcamp.com/

https://maxdmyz.uk/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 17/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com

Hells – Paradise EP

Hells_RingMasterReview

Corrosion is generally a gradual often unstoppable process but in the hands of US fury Hells, it is the swiftest undermining of the senses and emotions. Their attrition comes courtesy of their savage hardcore blend, a voracious sound making the band’s new debut EP, Paradise, one of the most punishing and thrilling things to hit the year so far. At the opposite end of the spectrum to the impression of its title, the six track release is aural and emotional dissonance fuelled by voracious anger and sonic spite. It is also a virulently addictive and rousing assault which asphyxiates and intoxicates the senses from start to finish.

Formed around two years ago, the Philadelphia hailing quartet of vocalist Larry Ragone, guitarist Brad Wallace, bassist Scott Signorino, and drummer Steve DiCicco, former members of bands such as Orchid, Transistor Transistor, Brain Dead, Wolves, Sore Saints, Psychic Teens, and Heathen Reign, soon earned the reputation of being one hellacious live experience. November of 2014 saw the release of a three track demo, a well-received platform for what now violates and thrills ears through Paradise.

The EP opens with its title track, Paradise an immediate wall of sonic and vocal abuse driven by vicious beats and an instinctively swinging groove. It has to be said that for all the punishing and creative antipathy conjured throughout the EP, it also has some of the most addictive and lively grooves and hooks heard in a long while. The outstanding track continues to ravage and incite as the rhythms become more imposing and tenacious with Ragone’s throat spilled scowls even more belligerent as they hang on twisted and venomous tendrils of guitar.

Paradise_RingMasterReview1-800-Shitfit shows itself just as intensive and irritable as it unleashes its emotive and creative animus next. A slab of barbarous punk ‘n’ roll, it grumbles and thrashes across two minutes of aural antipathy with the guitars as angry as the vocals and their roared words, while the bass is as anthemically pissed off as the scything trespass of DiCicco’s beats. Its savaging quickly makes way for that of Weather Report, which from its first breath again leaves nothing in the locker as it lashes into the listener. Grooves flirt and lacerate the senses as rhythms threateningly impose, Ragone’s raw squalls spilling irritancy with every ire drenched syllable; a combination which again simply ignites ears and an eager appetite for the threat.

As gripping and invigorating as things have been to date, the EP hits another plateau of tempting with firstly Tribute. The track is a cauldron of emotional and sonic animosity bound in the most salaciously catchy acidic grooving aligned to predatory riffs with matching rhythms.  It nags and badgers with a venomous glint in its creative eye, living up to its threat yet creating a maelstrom which is littered with the most addictive bait.

It is no different with Bad Apple, the track creating its own individual breakdown of the senses with a fluid blend of intensively assaultive and scavenging tempos around an equally unpredictable rhythmic gait stalking the listener from beginning to end. There is no escaping the hate of the song, or a wish to, though it is soon overshadowed by the brilliant EP closing enmity of Night Creeps. From its initial drone nagging of the senses, the track is rancorous alchemy, a bad-blooded proposal to brew thick lust for. Within that initial sonic niggle, DiCicco’s sticks rise to create a rousing shuffle before settling a touch as short grooves and melodic toxicity joins Ragone at his least hostile on the EP, though there is no mistaking the bitterness lining his prowling delivery. The song is hypnotic, a stylish yet bestial challenge which grinds down the defences while creating webs of contagious enterprise. At the time, it is also brewing a boldly simmering in intensity and jaundice, that growing into a fiercer rabid beast by its close.

The track is a brilliant end to a seriously arousing encounter from a band placing themselves aside certainly the likes of Pigs, Sofy Major, and Brutal Truth in one foul swoop. A must for all hardcore/noise abuse fans.

The Paradise EP is out now via Seeing Red Records @ https://hells-band.bandcamp.com/album/paradise or https://seeingredrecords.bandcamp.com/album/paradise-ep

https://www.facebook.com/givethemhells/

Pete RingMaster 17/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Devildriver – Trust No One

pic by ben hoffmann

pic by ben hoffmann

There is no mistaking Trust No One as a Devildriver incitement. From the recognisable throat scarring vocals squalls of Dez Fafara to the anthemic rhythmic antagonism of bassist Diego Ibarra and drummer Austin D’Amond, through the grooved and sonically caustic imagination of guitarists Mike Spreitzer and Neal Tiemann to the pure carnivorous roar of the groove metaller’s sound, the Californian’s seventh album is familiar Devildriver animosity. Yet there is something different to the beast; its body slimmer, almost stripped back to the core elements of the band’s sound whilst its contagion of venomous grooves has become even more creatively vocal and more virulently compelling. Whether Trust No One in this state is the band’s best proposal to date is under debate but it is fair to say that the album might just be the most physically and emotionally enjoyable encounter with Devildriver yet.

Linking up with producer Mark Lewis again at the Audio Hammer Studios, Devildriver show their intent from the first seconds of opener Testimony Of Truth, the want to savage the senses with hellacious rock ‘n’ roll. An inviting groove winds around the initial hefty jabs of D’Amond first with already the climate of the song a fiery challenge which only imposes further as the song evolves and Fafara’s raw tones further fire up the spirit of the song. It is prime Devildriver incitement but already devilish designs of melody and grooving is gripping the imagination, bringing individual character to each twist and turn here and in due course, to each subsequent proposal within Trust No One.

The thick and potent start is quickly surpassed by the barbarous exploits of Bad Deeds. The torrential assault of the invasive beats and the ear accosting rapping nature of the vocals aligns perfectly with a sultry melodic weave spun by the guitars within their own corrosive tide of predacious riffs. It is gripping stuff, irresistible hostility fuelled by a drama and imagination individual to that of the band’s previous outings. The track’s impressive success is soon matched by that of the even more grievous My Night Sky, though its own animus of emotion and intensity is tempered by the equally potent magnetism colouring the web of sonic invention and suggestiveness.

Devildriver_CMYK_RingMasterReviewThree tracks in and already the senses are numbing and energies breathless such the force and creative weight of the tempests. No respite is given though as This Deception, from a waspish coaxing round melancholic keys, tears into the listener with nostrils flared over a rabid rhythmically jagged ire spewing jaw and in turn, Above It All crawls all over the senses and into the psyche with what can be best described as a swarming surge of ravenous belligerence and aural irritability. Both tracks are not short on their own array of expectations defusing and imagination sparking essences either, the first through seductively flirtatious grooves and the latter with exotically hued strings and melodies which entice and bewitch even within the raging storm of the outstanding ravishment.

Daybreak spins some bluesy grooves into its maelstrom next, they colluding with addictively heavier cousins as riffs and vocals unite for some savaging with the backing of infectiously mercurial rhythms. Spreitzer and Tiemann simply shine throughout Trust No One, here especially as they conjure a landscape as unpredictable and fascinating as it is blistering, while in the album’s title track, they help shape a tempest as sonically elegant as it is uncomfortably threatening.

Arguably the nastiest and most uncomfortable track on the release is Feeling Ungodly, though it too is unafraid to spring some of the catchiest grooves and hooks across the whole of Trust No One while devouring the senses in body and emotion. Again, it is hard not to be swept up by the spiteful air and invasively infectious nature of the excellent track before Retribution grows from a melodically alluring proposal into one which nags and growls like a rabid dog infested with the inescapable irritancy of niggly grooves and the biting incessancy of beats and riffs. It is an irresistible incursion followed with equal ferocity and compelling adventure by For What Its Worth and an adversarial and merciless sonic malefaction which might not quite live up to many of its predecessors but leaves only a craving for more.

As we said at the start, whether Trust No One is Devildriver’s final hour we cannot say yet, even after a dozen listens, but it is hard to remember many encounters with them bringing as much raw enjoyment and the same kind of urge to go straight back into the turbulence as their new album.

Trust No One is out now via Napalm Records on CD @ http://devildrivertrustnoone.com/  and digitally @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/trust-no-one/id1091651702?app=music&ign-mpt=uo%3D4

http://www.devildriver.com/   https://www.facebook.com/devildriver

Pete Ringmaster 13/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Peekaboo Primate – Misanthropical

PP_RingMasterReview

Bedlam suggests an element of chaos to its madness, an uncontrolled essence which certainly does not fit the character of Misanthropical, the new album from Finnish alternative metallers Peekaboo Primate. Yet in every other way the word best describes the creative diversity and inventive loco of the band’s irresistible incitement. The release holds ten tracks which twist and turn like a kinetically sonic kaleidoscope weaving an eclectic array of flavours into their own distinct imagination fuelled escapades.

Peekaboo Primate is like the joker in the pack of modern metal; not the fool playing with a lunatic demeanour just for attention, though mischief is never far from their imagination and songs, but the bold protagonist using unpredictable exploits to ignite the senses and inspire thoughts towards, in the case of Misanthropical, a world where “as ugly, brutal and harsh but sometimes also beautiful as it is – everybody wants to be part of the greatest party of our time before our species go extinct solely by our own hand.

Hailing from Tampere, and originally under the name of Airhead, Peekaboo Primate was formed in 2004 by vocalist Lauri Lepokorpi and drummer Riku Airisto. The original line-up also included Hannu Kumpula and Tuomas Kumpula up to the release of the band debut album Peek-a-boo Primates in 2011. Following its release, the band changed its name to Peekaboo Primate with its personnel subsequently completed by the addition of guitarist Matti Auerkallio and bassist Juhani Rytkönen.

The time between albums has seen the band’s sound evolve and become even more defined in its real uniqueness, though if looking for a hint to what band and Misanthropical offer, imagine a mix of Dog Fashion Disco, American Head Charge, and Five Star Prison Cell with a touch of 6:33 to it. From its first heartbeat the album has ears and attention gripped; Spray Tan opening things up with an assault of tenaciously unpredictable rhythms and hungry riffs as wiry grooves wind around their thick bait. The vocals of Lepokorpi are just as dynamic and impressive, carrying an air of Chad Gray to their rousing presence at times as keys and guitars create a masterfully tempestuous and exotically dramatic theatre of sound

PP_Cover_RingMasterReviewIt is a thumping start matched in quality and irresistibility by the psychotically cultured Ha Ha. Sonic and rhythmic stabs court vocal shenanigans from the start with heftier beats soon adding their instable intent to the quickly compelling mix. Slithers of jazz and groove metal flirt with avant-garde psychosis as the track grows and writhes as well as anthemically incites in equal measure before allowing Nothing the opportunity to prey on an already submissive appetite and imagination for the release. The song saunters along with flirtatious and intimidating hues to the fore, Lepokorpi like the ringleader in its midst as his narrative challenges and highlights the issues theming the magnetic proposal.

From its initial intriguing low key start, The Unleashed soon unveils a pulsating and sinister body of synth bred sound as exotic and sultry hues in female voice and melodic suggestiveness add an alluring invitation. The challenging words of Lepokorpi probe and echo in the background before with unpredictability as enjoyable and prominent as ever, the track slips into a reggae cultured shade of character, though it is just one moment in the revolving journey of the encounter.

An addictive dose of pop ‘n’ roll grips next in the outstanding shape of Heroine, its catchy colour led by the great guest vocals of Noora Louhimo from Battle Beast. The rest of the song is a predacious prowl with the again effect coated tones of Lepokorpi stirring up riffs and rhythms between the flames of pop temptation. Within moments, it is sure to have bodies bouncing and voices fully involved, as ours, before Mama Earth rumbles as sonic spices zoom in and out across its growling tone and nature; that American Head Charge reference coming to the fore here, across a wonderfully grouchy yet fiercely inviting proposition.

As its predecessor, Star has a more ‘straight forward’ adventure to its body, though as the last treat too, there are plenty of unexpected and seamlessly woven together twists to catch out expectations and enthral the imagination, especially when uncaging some creative aberration midway. It’s more composed sanity and boldness is contrasted by the delicious raw frenzy of Peekaboo Primate, the track a demented slice of noise rock infested avant-garde/nu metal mania and quite irresistible as it stalks and bruises the senses.

Some of its punkiness survives in the cantankerous luring of ears by Follow My Lead, though the song is unafraid to bring some pop seeded melody and contagion into its imposing metal shuffle between even more irritable and aggressive trespasses.

Ending with the melodic caress of 291112, an emotively suggestive instrumental which fits easier into the scheme of the album with each full listen, Misanthropical is ripe pickings for the imagination and enjoyment. It offers a canvas and adventure which persistently provides fresh twists and surprises even after numerous listens. We will admit, we had not heard of Peekaboo Primate previously, a band which right now it is hard with their music to get out of our heads.

Misanthropical is released on CD and digitally May 12th via Inverse Records.

http://www.peekabooprimate.com/   https://www.facebook.com/peekabooprimate  https://twitter.com/peekabooprimate

Pete RingMaster 12/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Age Of Menace – Venom EP

 

art_RingMasterReview

It has been around three years since Australian metallers Age Of Menace enticed and aroused ears their All Seeing Lie EP, a release which saw the band expanding their sound whilst finding a new creative ferocity to match it. Now the busy band has returned with its successor, the Venom EP; a release with the bite of a cobra and the nagging persistent of a rattler bound up in the band’s richest array of fiercely flavoursome incitement yet.

Formed in 2010, the Sydney quartet quickly whipped up local attention with their sound and live presence. A self-titled debut EP backed up their potent emergence the following year with its tracks soon catching ears and support of online radio shows and stations around the globe. All Seeing Lie turned the heat up further on the band’s growing reputation as their metal based sound revealed even bolder essences of heavy and varied rock ‘n’ roll in its character and imagination. Again fans and media at home and afar quickly caught on to its release and qualities whilst the band continued to forge a potent reputation with their explosive live shows. Now it seems it is time for the band to broadly whip things up again; something easy to imagine the band’s most varied and mature offering succeeding with in quick time.

Venom opens up with its title track, and the band’s new video/single. Immediately a spicy groove entangles ears, being quickly joined by jabbing beats and the dusty tones of vocalist Rob Smith. With a great spiky hook soon added, the song has ears and appetite swiftly involved; proceeding to weave a heavy rock hued metallic incitement with an essence of Perfect Circle meets Stone Temple Pilots to it. Smith’s voice and expression continues to lure the heart of the song and imagination of the listener out as the guitar of Pete Ross almost dances on the rhythmic frame around fiery melodic enterprise and ever alluring grooves. A great melodic calm adds to the unpredictable and eventful landscape of the song too, another twist to surprise and enthral within the excellent start to the EP.

The following Waiting To Strike shows an edge and volatility in its initial riffs alone, carrying an air of intimidation which then fuels the thicker wall of the same as an acidic veining of grooves grows. The bass of Adam Barns borders on carnivorous as it grumbles and prowls an already contagious encounter whilst the scything and tenacious beats of Adam Breakspear are as anthemic as they are disorientating. As impressive as its predecessor was, the track needs little time to eclipse it as heavy metal spicing breathes further invention into guitar imagination as a raw punk attitude and energy drives everything else.

With next single written all over it, the track takes best song honours upon Venom, though it is quickly rivalled by the rhythmically irritable and sonically adventurous Around The Sun. Lying somewhere between Korn and Dream Theater, the song springs from a spidery groove into a web of melodic and sonic invention, all crossing each other lattice style to fascinate as bold rhythms and a more aggressive virulence grabs body and spirit. It grumbles and seduces, trespasses and invites, from every angle and second in the course of creating another highly addictive and memorable proposition.

Where Are You brings the EP to a close; solemn keys laying down its first tempting as again a darker element lines their elegance before the band as one erupts in a tempest of hungry riffs, sturdy rhythms, and hearty vocal roars. With a progressive air to its thunderous climate and a reflective intimacy to its melodic and vocal melancholy, the track is arguably the EP’s boldest venture into new pastures but never compromises the renowned Age Of Menace snarl and raw power.

To be fair, every song within Venom casts a new direction and as suggested earlier, shows fresh maturity in sound through its array of striking proposals. Like so many others, we are always overjoyed to find something new from the boys from down under, Venom epitomising why whilst suggesting it is time that Age Of Menace was thrust into the biggest spotlights.

The Venom EP is out now via iTunes.

https://www.facebook.com/ageofmenace    http://www.ageofmenace.com/

Pete RingMaster 10/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.c

The Passion and the Roar: Talking Rising Dark

Rising Dark_RingMasterReview

Formed in 2005, Italian metallers Rising Dark have just began their second decade as one of the underground’s striking and rousing thrash metal propositions. Earlier this year they released second album A World In Ruin via White Tower Records; a thumping and resourceful encounter from the quartet of vocalist/guitarist Michael Crimson, lead guitarist Stanley Bleese, vocalist/bassist Dan Ross, and drummer Balzael, as surprising as it was inescapably anthemic. With thanks to Balzael we now have the chance to explore the heart and depths of Rising Dark…

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Hi from Balzael and Rising Dark, thank you for the opportunity.

Can you first introduce yourselves and give us some background to how it all started and what brought you together?

It all started in 2005 from an idea of me (Balzael) and Michael Crimson; we just wanted to have some fun dreaming about being rock stars and stuff like that. We started with some covers and things like that. The funny thing is that I was not able to play any instrument and I chose drum just because I was inspired by some famous drummer of that time. In a couple of years we tried to produce our own music and here we are with more than 10 years of career and two albums around the world.

So Rising Dark is your first musical venture?

When we started, Rising Dark was the first band for every one of us but during this year we had a lot of side projects. I have always some active side projects to play with, now I’m touring with Angerdome. From a musical point of view I would not say that our side projects affect our genre but it definitely affects the way we play and grow in music ambient. For example with Angerdome, due to the nature of the genre, I’m forced to play a “static drumming” that follows everything the guitarist plays; for sure in rising dark we do not have that strict need but this is for sure something to learn from.

What inspired the band name?

We were 15 at the time, we just picked up a “dark” name; today we still love our name so we were not so foolish at the time ahah.

Rising Dark vid shot_RingMasterReviewWas there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

We did not plan anything in our career but for sure we wanted to propose something rude but also catchy; for sure Metallica inspired us a lot in creating our own music too but we definitely never took by choice anything defined or played from other bands.

Does the same initial spark still drive the band from when it was fresh-faced or has that first wind of creativity evolved over time?

Well, we are still rude and catchy and we still compose thrash metal with no bounds and limits, we take elements from Death, Thrash and Prog music. I would even say that we take something from rock because we often compose ballads that are quite strange for a thrash metal band.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

Our sound is still rude and catchy but I would say that our approach at composition has changed since we learned to be at the service of music and not the opposite. During the composition of our first release, Apocalyptic, we composed with no bounds and regardless of the “final listener’s effect”. That worked but to create tracks with an average duration of 7 minutes is not always a pro. Today we are learning the best way to communicate to people with our music which means you cannot simply walk into the jam room and start to play everything you want when you want and how you want; you have always to keep in mind that you are a performer and an artist and that your final goal is to reach people hearts and let people have fun. You are not producing music only for yourself.

Has it been an organic movement in your sound or do you deliberately try new things?

Everything came naturally and not planned in any way, we just communicate with our music and our fans; our natural enhancement process is to go where our music takes us. When you see that your fans appreciate what you do and understand it, well, you are on the right way.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your own personal approach and ideas?

Well, regarding other bands, we definitely are inspired by Metallica, Slayer, Testament, and the great “fathers of metal music” like Ozzy or Judas Priest but we don’t want to emulate anyone. In fact, what we propose is really a personal interpretation of our genre (that is my opinion). For sure we are also inspired by society, religion, books and films regarding our themes.

Is there a particular process to the songwriting in the band?

Yeah, Michael Crimson usually starts with an idea more or less complete; we jam on it and try to define the shape of the new track while trying some lyric approach. Once done, we focus on lyrics and solos. I finally take care of the arrangements and all the production process.

You have already touched on it but where, more often than not, do inspirations to the lyrical side come from?

For sure society, books, films, videogames are source of inspiration. We usually compose tracks inspired by Lovecraft’s tales; that is definitely a great source of inspiration for us.

Give us some background to your latest release.

It has been a difficult and long process because while we were composing the tracks we also were searching for a new bass player. Fortunately we found Dan Ross only a month before the recording started who gave his final touch to our tracks. For this album I wanted to obtain a more “live sound”; I’m so sick of listening to perfect albums that are completely different from what a band can propose in a live situation. I don’t want to go back to recordings of ’60 or ’70 but I think that an album is more personal if you do not use too much triggers or fantastic presets. If the music is great you do not need a massive production. Nowadays even a band that started jamming yesterday can have an album that sounds like Meshuggah (obviously I am exasperating the concept) but it’s not so easy to find a personal album. That is our direction.

Please give us some insight to the themes and premise behind your release?Rising Dark art_RingMasterReview

Well you can find post-apocalypse worlds, fantastic tales of creatures from Lovecraft’s mind as you can find our personal view of criminality, or war in its emotional aspect or in it’ violent habits.

You enter the studio with songs pretty much in their final state?

When we enter the studio our tracks are totally completed; just in order to give you an example, drum’s recording took 5 hours which means that you play “one-shot” at the tracks.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably the favourite aspect of the band?

We definitely believe in SHOW. For us it means not only that you must play in a professional way but that you have to bring a real metal show made of blood, masks and stuff like that. We want to communicate with people in any possible way just in order to see them have fun. We don’t give a fuck about being famous or stuff like that, we want to see people have fun with our music; if that causes us to sell our products well it’s obviously good for us but our goal is to give people a moment to remember, and this vision applies also to the band member. We don’t want to grow old and have nothing to tell to our sons…… yeah… we usually exaggerate a little bit in our shows haha.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it where you come from? Are there the opportunities to make a mark if a band wants it?

Yeah, SACRIFICE and PROFESSIONALITY, these are the keywords. You must always work hard. I also see a lot of bands totally concentrated in what they are playing, watching strings during live [performances] or looking at the stage floor; if you want to reach people you have to communicate with them. If you are doing this for the money well you’d better pack your shit and go gardening, if you are doing it because you want to hear “Oh thank you so much Rising Dark for that show and for your music” well achieve that by playing with people and not only with your instruments.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date? Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive or only a good thing if worked properly?

Well social networks nowadays are a great way to promote you music, but if you are only a social network hero and at the first gig you are a piece of wood, I grant you that you will remain a social network hero. Social network can increase you success but it will work only if there is some “substance”. Social networks also increased the concurrence between the bands because everyone can reach anyone in any moment so if you want them to have you next, you have to offer something real and personal so people can remember you.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Yeah Dan Ross put mayonnaise on the fucking pizza. No, seriously, thank everyone for reading this. You can find our single Plague on YouTube, take a look at it and give a chance to our album if you like thrash metal; support underground artists and STAY FUCKING METAL.

Find out more about Rising Dark and their music @ https://www.facebook.com/Rising-Dark-169181442638

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 08/05/2016

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