VNDTA – Pale Glow

The moments of being truly bowled over by a release or ‘new’ band, introduction wise, seem to be far and few between right now but leave us on our backs with jaw wide open with exhilarated awe is just what British metallers VNDTA did with their debut EP, Pale Glow. With a sound which manages to caress and seduce whilst ripping out and feasting on the senses, the Hertfordshire quartet have just announced themselves as a real big deal.

Though formed in 2015, it was 2017 which saw the band really worry attention and acclaim as they shared stages with the likes of Aghast, Vanity, King Leviathan, and Confessions of a Traitor as well as a host of their own headlining shows. To be honest, Pale Glow is actually our introduction to the band and there could be no better a way to meet them and form a lustful union between music and ears.

Like a fusion of the raw aggression and spiteful trespasses of Iwrestledabearonce and Otep with the virulent catchiness of No Doubt and The Cardigans, the VNDTA (pronounced as vendetta) sound swiftly reveals itself within their latest encounter to be as unique to the band as you would wish. Tagged as alternative metal it embraces a host of other metal and punk flavours in its cauldron of intimation and intimidation. The recording of Pale Glow came within a turbulent time, vocalist Megan Targett admitting that “Recording the EP was probably the most difficult week of my life. We were broke, spent weeks living in my car; I ended an abusive relationship and lost a family member. But it didn’t stop me. We used the pain to fuel raw passion into the vocals and the music.” That passion is clear to hear as the EP’s tracks devour and arouse second by second.

From the moment the EP’s title track looms right up from its distant entrance attention was not only hooked but chained to what was to follow. Wiry tendrils of guitar wrap around ears immediately, senses slapping beats alongside and once the first track hits its voracious stride and the vocals of Targett unleash their incitement, the deal between lust and the devil’s music roaring from the speakers was done. Swiftly the singer impresses with a throat abrasing attack and venomous delivery but it is when she breaks into a glorious clean delivery that realisation at her talent is inescapable. Before then guitarists Callan Hughes and Jay Bacon gnaw at and chew on the senses, twisting and turning with grooves as their hooks pierce with imagination as the swinging rhythms of drummer Willem Mason-Geraghty infest body and spirit just as potently. The track is immense and no better way to succumb to the first abusive seduction of VNDTA.

Well we say that but the highlights just flood ears thereon in, the following Excuses a feral yet skilfully honed temptation as contagiously infectious as it is violently manipulative. Targett croons first this time, harmonically enticing as the band spin their creative web. There is of course a constant growl in the throat of singer and song, one subsequently erupting with carnal designs though still with melodic veining and atmospheric suggestion for inventive company. Involvement in voice and attitude is unavoidable as too with next up Swine, a tempest of contrasts and intensity amidst the drama of the imagination. Another as wickedly catchy as it is uncompromisingly gladiatorial, the song is another which just stirs body and spirit.

The visceral and physically twisted enterprise of Martyr is a sonic virus, getting under the skin and into the psyche within a few insidious breaths from where it burns and seduces with toxicity and beauty, again pretty much simultaneously as the sounds abound the senses with antipathy and infectiousness as Targett again simply exhilarates. The suggestive calm which bridges it and successor Rare Breed is magnetic yet soon in the past as the following creative escapade erupts. Again a tapestry of flavours and intrusion descends on ears and once more pleasure is swift and continuous. From voice to sound, melody to rhythm the song is a mercurial adventure rewarding at every twist and tempting at every turn imagination, unpredictability fuelling every moment.

Emotion and passion equally soak every breath and note, the final pair of Leeches and Virus blossoming with both. The first is carnivorous from the off, music and voice an intrusive animus but instantly as catchy as the lighter harmonics which intersperse the tempest of technical, extreme, and grooved endeavour with a fine line in progressive intuition. The track is yet one more immense moment within Pale Glow, a predator of the finest incitement pretty much matched by Virus. Straight away it gets under the skin though maybe no more than its other striking companions, but by the twist and turn it digs deeper and becomes more toxic and intoxicating but similarly graceful as it revolves its attack.

The excellent encounter completes the outstanding release, a nationwide introduction surely leading to bigger, broader, and richer things much as their sound blossoms across its length. Once in a while a band really excites, at the time and for things ahead. VNDTA has us drooling and we can only say go see why.

Pale Glow is out now, available @ http://vndtashop.bigcartel.com/

https://www.facebook.com/VNDTA/    https://twitter.com/VNDTA_OFFICIAL

Pete RingMaster 17/04/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Godstone – Monument Of One

First impressions are not always the most accurate barometer to people and indeed bands but they can give a strong intimation when you are on to a good thing; a suggestion the debut EP from UK metallers Godstone strongly makes. Offering five tracks fuelled by a sound which is not maybe overly unique, the band’s music lying somewhere amongst the likes of Alter Bridge, Shinedown, and Stone Sour, Monument Of One hits the spot with individual enterprise and a rousing breath.

From the south west of England, Godstone linked up with John Cornfield to record their first EP and from its first moments, Monument Of One makes for one magnetic proposition with its tapestries of ear entwining grooves, imagination stoking melodies, and spirit rousing muscle.

Over the Line starts things off, the song immediately setting the scene for the release with its rapacious air, imposing touch, and create weave; a delicious groove bursting with zeal from the initial coaxing upon a swinging gait. Guitarists John Kenward and Alex Goodrich quickly have attention keen as the punchy beats of Matt Davy hungrily collude with the dark grumble of Matthew Pascoe’s bass. Once the strong tones of vocalist James McDonald rise to add further lures, nicely backed by the melodic throat of Kenward, the song is in control of ears and body whilst providing a familiar yet certainly fresh slice of metal incitement.

The following Tear It All Apart offers its own striking invitation, again a guitar making the creative beckoning before the band unites in an infectious rumble as imposing as it is magnetic. With wiry grooves and a compelling conspiracy of hooks and twists, the song soon has ears firmly locked in feeding on its cosmopolitan melodies and aggressive dynamics. As suggested earlier, there is something familiar about this and other songs yet it has a character and style to its roar which sets the band apart from most.

A gentle almost melancholic caress brings next up The Way You Are into view, McDonald soon joining the inference of guitar and sombre twang of bass. The track’s eruption into a fiery trespass is fluid and resourceful though the song still retains a leash on its aggressiveness which only enhances its temptation. Potent first time around and even more compelling by the listen, much as the EP itself, the song adds another firm hand on ears and pleasure before Breathe crafts another rich moment within the release with its grunge/groove metal natured roar. Predacious yet seductive as its body and sound reveals a mercurial nature the song makes a strong play for best track.

Swiftly showing its candidacy too is final song Full Circle, it also a composed yet raucous holler of metal and heavy rock woven with grooved enterprise and melodic dexterity. It provides a strong and indeed fine end to a release announcing Godstone a band attention is bound to be good friends with. Uniqueness may still be in the brewing stage in the band’s sound but the potential is there and with encounters like Monument Of One the wait should be rather enjoyable.

Monument Of One is out now across all digital platforms and @ https://godstone.bandcamp.com/album/monument-of-one

https://www.facebook.com/godstoneofficial/    https://twitter.com/godstone_uk

Pete RingMaster 16/04/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Basement Critters – Hurt Me With The Truth

Currently working on their debut album, Belgian metallers Basement Critters recently signed a worldwide distribution deal with Wormholedeath for their first official EP, Hurt Me With The Truth. It has given their highly praised offering, originally released in 2016, a broader voice, an invitation to a host of new ears and a sure to be fresh wealth of anticipation for that first full-length.

Thrash metal bred but coming with a richer variety of flavours, the Basement Critters’ sound is a mix of crossover adventure and thrash ferocity emerging as a beast akin to a fusion of Stuck Mojo and Testament. It is familiar yet pleasingly individual and unafraid to embrace any spicing which takes the West-Vlaanderen hailing band’s imagination. It makes for a rousing roar as evidenced within Hurt Me With The Truth, an encounter deserving of a fuller landscape to tempt.

 The EP opens up with Brain Bleach and instantly prowls the listener with predacious riffs and rhythms. Guitarists Sven Caes and Glenn Labie wind their bait and emerging grooves around ears as drummer Frederik Vanwijmelbeke pounds with controlled but voracious intent. In the midst of the sizing up vocalist Thomas Marijsse brings a raw agitation which in turn is courted by the heavy grumble of Frederik Declercq’s bass. The song continues to stalk and tenderise the senses, going up a gear or two but never going for the jugular. Instead it springs a virulent groove which had the body bouncing as a swift appetite for the band’s sound erupted. That cycle repeats with greater tenacity and intensity, the track making for a tremendous start with a vocal self-diagnosis adding to its instinctive contagion.

The following Storm similarly circles its target, guitars driving its intentions before inciting a voracious assault. Again the band twists and turns in its attack, urgency varying with unpredictable adventure as the song’s ferociousness ever deviates. The vocals of Marijsse epitomise that adventure, fluidly moving through a variation of dexterity in tandem with the sounds before Nature Strikes Back raids the senses with a more expected thrash offense but one lined with irresistible hooks and anthemic tendencies. The track is superb, a galvanic incitement mixing up the old and new with fresh boisterousness and craft. Declercq’s bass unleashes a delicious rabid growl throughout the EP, though sometimes seems a touch hidden by the exploits around him, and is in full rumbling voice here as it prowls the blaze of the guitars.

Hurt Me With The Truth concludes with the pair of Book and 39:16. The first saunters through ears with an almost doom laden gait, vocals reflecting their emotional tone and defiance within the song’s own thick voracity and predatory nature while its successor is thrash savagery and heavy metal flirtation rolled up in a multi-flavoured nagging of ears and spirit. It also slips into tantalising calm as the progressive instincts of the guitars conjure, rhythms rumbling alongside before sparking a further anthemic arousal.

It is a fine end to a release which we are so glad has been given a new chance to introduce the thrash adventure of Basement Critters. Like those things in the dark corners of the lowest depths, the band’s sound lurks and prowls, often teasing before lashing out with a delicious feral bite.

The Hurt Me With The Truth EP is out on all digital stores via Wormholedeath / The Orchard.

https://www.basementcritters.be/    https://www.facebook.com/BasementCritters/

Pete RingMaster 04/04/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Nale – Death, Skulls, Satan

Driven by infection loaded scowls, hungrily rousing sounds, and rock ‘n’ roll roars, Death, Skulls, Satan is one of those encounters you not only want but need to set the day swinging. The second album from Swedish outfit Nale, it is a rowdily explosive, physically manipulative stomp echoing by all accounts the band’s renowned live energy and prowess.

Formed in 2007, Stockholm hailing Nale released their self-titled debut EP that first year with its successor, From Shit to Salvation uncaged two years later. Critical acclaim met the band’s first album in 2012, Ghost Road Blues recorded with producer Lawrence Mackrory (F.K.Ü, Darkane). The Zombieland EP since has only pushed their growing reputation as too a potent live presence which has seen the band playing the likes of the Getaway Rock Festival, Sabaton Open Air Festival, and Wacken Open Air as well as headlining their own tour in India. Death, Skulls, Satan is Nale’s fusion of rock and metal in full holler and at a whole new level of adventure and persuasion, one of those encounters you just cannot tuck away and move away from.

Slither kicks things off, immediately gnawing and inflaming the senses with its instinctive swing and prowl. Voracious rock and grooved metal unite, riffs harrying and rhythms biting as the track rips through ears. There is a great Static X essence to the Pantera meets King Hiss like song, more so from the vocal contagion of Mathias Blom and a flavouring which pursues the appetite across the multi-hued release. The track continued to writhe and trespass, quickly getting under the skin and thereon worming itself deeper by the second.

The excellent start is forcibly backed by the raw and concussive antics of Filth, the track a predacious confrontation crawling across the senses with ill-intent in its devilry. A touch of Devildriver lines the beast, the song almost leering and drooling over the listener with its nagging riffs and salacious grooves; guitarist Tomas Åkvik laying down sonic pheromones. Its primal temptation moves over for the blues lilted, stoner dusted Dead Man’s Song. As its predecessors, it is a web of grooved and rhythmic tenacity merging the familiar with wholly fresh imagination and invention. It did feel the least original proposition within the album yet it certainly emerged as one of the most captivating.

The album’s title track is contagion, feral rock ‘n’ roll as irritable as it is virulent with Blom a rascal ringleader to the inescapable rhythmic swing of drummer Anders Ljung and the snarling mischievous bassline of Johan Risberg. With Åkvik similarly whipping up spirit and imagination, the track is superb leaving the body breathless and spirit elevated ready for the heavy weighted arousal cast by Exit. Ljung pounds the senses like there is no tomorrow but with purpose and craft whilst Risberg’s bass growls with carnivorous intent. Riffs in turn match its antipathy as Blom crawls over the damage caused; the united proposition another fiercely catchy intrusion with a tinge of Powerman 5000.

Blues and muscle strung hard rock colour the following No Escape, it another adrenaline driven, inventively woven escapade while for fifty odd seconds Drive power drills into the senses with punk discontent and grooved metal toxicity. It is a glorious assault just far too short though its lack of length is more than compensated by the ear entangling, groove twisting seduction of The Black. Dark and sinister, the track writhes over the listener fingering every weak spot until submission like a flirtatious grim reaper.

Hell’s Wrath has the body back bouncing within seconds after, rhythms and grooves alone enough to spark eager participation with Smasher after leading the imagination into dark contemplation. The first just barrels through ears with its voracious rock ‘n’ roll whilst the second takes a more considered attack weaving an array of flavours into its tapestry of temptation.

Final track Pigs mixes both assaults, flying at the senses at times and stalking ears in between but all the time teasing and inflaming an appetite for bruising rock ‘n’ roll. It is a fiery conclusion to an album which ok maybe lacks true uniqueness at times but excites ears and ignites the spirit from start to finish.

Death, Skulls, Satan is out now via Black Lodge.

http://www.naleband.com/   https://www.facebook.com/naleofficial/   https://twitter.com/naleofficial/

Pete RingMaster 29/03/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Coilguns – Millennials

For all their striking projects and releases, of which there have been numerous, it is as Coilguns that the trio of vocalist/guitarist Louis Jucker, guitarist Jona Nido, and drummer Luc Hess has most lit our personal fires and inspired further our love for instinctive sounds and creativity. Their new album Millennials, with synth player Donatien Thiévent in the fold shows exactly why; the ten track exploration of manipulative noise and physical intimation a beautiful predacious trespass.

Written and recorded at the beginning of 2016, the self-engineered sonic invasion instantly overwhelms with the senses ravishing Anchorite. Guitars entwine ears in a devious, corrosive web as the rhythmic ingenuity of Hess stirs and ignites body and spirit. As arousing as his boldly thrown beats are the Jucker and Nido spawned grooves and noise bleeding tendrils are corrosive, all uniting in a hellacious virulence which strings the imagination and senses like a feral puppeteer; a manipulator simultaneously venting through the vocal squalls of Jucker. The track is immense, a visceral seduction which had us cowering as much as we were welcoming its abuse with greedy open arms.

The following Deletionism manages to breed an even more carnal tone and air; its carnivorous jaws littered with biting beats and caustic toxicity but just as infectiously persuasive as its predecessor in temptation and energy. The throaty bassline echoes in the senses as it courts the mercurial but ever invasive stroll of guitar; it all coming together with concussive majesty alongside the rapier swings of Hess and the throat and word scaring roar of Jucker.

The album’s title track is next, a sense charring blaze of rock ‘n’ roll with sonic lava in its breath and inescapable virulence in its rhythms. Hess is simply superb, stirring the track’s intent with ravenous dexterity allowing the calm in its midst to challenge before stirring up a confrontation as violent as it is invigorating. From pure infection the track leaves as a toxic raping of ears and wow did it excite. From start to finish, there are compelling suggestions of best track on the album, and maybe that from Coilguns in general, this one of the most persuasive.

Spectrogram takes the listener into a sonically incinerated landscape, its shadows and scenery a lure of white noise-esque suggestion before a suffocating wave of sound and intensity thickens the drama and the increasingly haunting and haunted climate. Thiévent’s synth flows over the incitement like melancholic mist but with a surf like teasing which captivates, ears moths to its flame in the oppressively infectious dark of the track.

For one minute and a handful of imposing seconds, Music Circus Clown Care has the senses harassed and swinging as if on a barb lined trapeze before cavernous jaws drag them into the torturously arousing grip of Ménière’s. Once again, Hess had us bouncing as the sonic trespass of his companions infested ears and psyche, the track a murderous swagger of craft and contemplation borne of the darkest deeds and times and moulded into one irresistible breathless incursion.

The brief, inhospitable and again inescapably addictive blast of Wind Machines For Company emulates its title in a typhoon of sonic voracity while Self Employment Scheme is an investigation cynical in tone and air niggling at and sucking on the senses like an argumentative tick; never relenting in its harassment but ebbing and flowing in its severity. Both tracks simply brought our lust levels higher as too the grievously writhing antics of Blackboxing, the glorious track ducking and diving with quick footed rhythms and tenaciously swerving noise until delivering a brutally blistering concussion.

The release ends with The Screening, a fascination examination carrying intrigue, captivation, and threat in every note, syllable, and rhythm cast over the senses. Its initial temptation loaded coaxing with Hess once more shaping the bait, grows and intensifies by the moment, simultaneously becoming a harsher imposition and addiction to leave by its departure its victim on their knees breathless and lusting for more.

There is no one like Coilguns and nothing in even their own repertoire to match the noise alchemy of Millennials. It is far too early to declare an album of the year but believe us when we say it will not be straying from those most vocal nominations come late December.

Millennials is available now via Hummus Records and through https://coilguns.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/coilguns    https://twitter.com/COILGUNS

Pete RingMaster 27/03/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Blacktones – The Day We Shut Down The Sun

If a band name was ever perfect for the music it represents, The Blacktones is at the head of the field. The Italian outfit create a fusion of alternative/melodic metal and sludge thick stoner rock awash with the heaviest darkest shadows and emotions. It is invasive yet inescapably infectious as it snarls and ruggedly seduces in equal measure and especially magnetic within the band’s latest album, The Day We Shut Down The Sun.

Though in some ways feeling like a concept album, the band says The Day We Shut Down The Sun is “not a true concept, but every song represents a step by step journey to the losing of all the qualities of a human being. Following the tarots (starting with the pope, the fifth card) we represent the losing of faith, wisdom, genius, knowledge and finally, trough the Mage, we become the Fool, embracing the primordial chaos.” It is an alluring feel across the release bound in a thick collusion of hungry riffs, muscular rhythms, and melodic and vocal dexterity. Not always boldly unique, it is perpetually a proposition with individual character and enterprise which grabbed keen attention.

The band itself hails from Cagliari, formed in 2011 as an instrumental encounter by guitarist Sergio Boi and bassist Gianni Farci. Subsequently the line-up and creative intent evolved with the addition of drummer Maurizio Mura and vocalist Simone Utzeri, debut EP Distorted Reality arriving in 2012 before Aaron Tolu replaced Utzeri as frontman two years later. Their well-received self-titled debut album with guitarist Paolo Mulas bringing the band to a quintet drew potent interest with its release, as now its successor, via Sliptrick Records in 2015.It sowed the seeds for the richer and more rounded proposition of The Day We Shut Down The Sun and its more individual escapades.

Throughout the album, there are experimental darkly atmospheric intros, each counting down to the end of existence; the first in V – The Pope drawing ears and imagination into the waiting jaws of The Upside Down. Immediately a tide of sonic and vocal ferocity launches at ears, an instincts sparking groove infesting body and appetite within as rhythms pounce. Tolu’s vocals are just as rousing as the sounds around him, riffs adding a swing to their rapacity to match the tenacious endeavour of the increasingly contagious groove. Adventure and unpredictability blossoms as the song continues, bold sound and voice shaping one striking incendiary slab of metal.

The following Ghosts unveils a less imposing introduction but just as compelling with its suggestive intrigue and musical temptation. Down like grooves spread their lures from within the growing incitement, more aggressive traits emerging in all aspects but equally a tantalising melodic suggestiveness in guitar and harmonics which lures the imagination deeper into the ever present shadows.

The album’s title track makes an equally ear grabbing entrance, a predacious one as it prowls the senses with doom loaded rhythms amidst a slow tenebrific groove. Deep in its clutches you feel the lack of light, its thick weave a suffocating enveloping of the senses yet everything about it is contagious starting with Tolu’s ever enticing vocals. There is something certainly familiar about the excellent track yet plenty more fresh aspects in its trespass to demand praise carrying attention before Not The End backs its power up with its own pleasure brewing tempest. With a tinge of One Minutes Silence to it at times, the song twists and turns with an irritability in tone and sound as much a threat as it is a tempestuous seduction with stoner bred grooves and carnivorous basslines entwining for an even bigger lure.

Alone Together crawls over the senses, lumbering grooves and primal riffs enticing before dissipating for the melodic heart of the track to coax even closer attention. When they return with even greater weight and intensity as well as imagination, a lustful appetite was reeled in and only increased by the expressive and inventive journey taken while I.D.I.O.T.S. creates a web of stoner veins around metal antipathy to keep enjoyment just as intensive. Infectious and corrosive, the track is a great blend resembling Corrosion of Conformity meets Clutch and another highlight of the increasingly enjoyable album.

The Day We Shut Down The Sun is brought to a just as potent and mercurial conclusion by Nowhere Man and Broken Dove, the first a scorched and searing proposition as virulent in its calm predacious stroll as in its senses broiling blaze with its successor a more restrained but no less volatile collusion of sonic and emotional dissonance aligned to its own sonic furies. Both songs leave ears and pleasure entangled in their creative roars and each reinforces greater keenness in The Blacktones growth.

With a final pair of cards leaving the listener lost in the void, The Day We Shut Down The Sun is a release which should be checked out. It certainly grabbed attention first time around but really blossomed as an experience and pleasure thereon in.

The Day We Shut Down The Sun is available now through Sliptrick Records and @ https://theblacktonesband.bandcamp.com/album/the-day-we-shut-down-the-sun

https://www.facebook.com/TheBlacktonesBand   https://www.twitter.com/BlacktonesBand   https://www.instagram.com/theblacktonesband/

Pete RingMaster 14/03/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Men That Will Not Be Blamed For Nothing – Double Negative

The Men That Will Not Be Blamed For Nothing are indeed guilty as charged; charged by us of unleashing one of the most incorrigible, darkly mischievous, punk ‘n’ roll gems of this and many other years maybe going back to the Victorian times and arcane deeds  theming their sound and glorious new outing, Double Negative. Irresistibly addictive, deviously manipulative, the British outfit’s fourth album is a coming of age of sorts but you can be assured just the beginning of richer shenanigans as they nudge on much greater attention.

Suitably, the band was birthed in the surrounds and history of Old London Town, springing from the new friendship and creative coming together of guitarist/vocalist Andrew O’Neill (SunStarvedDay/Plague Of Zoltan) and vocalist Gerhard ‘Andy’ Heintz (Creaming Jesus). The former was breaking into a successful stand-up comedy career around the time and soon invited the latter to help write and perform some daft songs and play musical saw to enhance his act. The beginnings of The Men That Will Not Be Blamed For Nothing were sown, subsequently seeing bassist Marc Burrows (The Pittstops), also a comedian and writer, joining the band  with drummer Ben Dawson (Million Dead/ SunStarvedDay) completing the line-up. This was a decade ago and since then the quartet has seen multi-instrumentalist/drummer Jez Miller (Lords Of The New Church)replace Dawson and release three increasingly well-received albums.

Their sound began with a certain air of and was embraced by the steampunk scene but has moved away from that style in heart and music by the release as now boldly proven by Double Negative. The album is pure punk rock yet has so much more to its depths; essences of metal, noise, and rock ‘n’ roll embroiled in its inimitable holler as too a devilish air akin to bands like The Cardiacs draped in that tenebrific and so often grisly Victorian drama and the brazen but never overpowering humour expected of exponents of stand-up.

It is a perfectly balanced and rousing mix which instantly fuels album opener Supply And Demand; a Burke & Hare inspired stomp bringing the listener to their feet from its first breath. Riffs and hooks collude with an inescapable rhythmic swing, the track recalling the heart of seventies punk before spreading its own theatre of enterprise within its cadaver littered tale. It had us bouncing and vocally roaring within a few swift moments, a sign of great rock ‘n roll in anyone’s book.

The following Baby Farmer is just as virulent its temptation and effect as Amelia Dyer goes about drowning unwanted babies in the Thames. The dark nagging bassline had its claws in instincts straight away, Heintz’s vocal snarl adding to the lure as the slim but potent lure of riffs, hooks, and beats. O’Neill’s even rawer backing cries only add to the overpowering persuasion before Hidden entices the listener not only into the broader depths of the band’s sound but its arcane shadows, O’Neill performing a rite called The Bornless Ritual within the song’s infectious prowl. With threads of heavy metal and gothic/psych rock entwining its punk core, the song just enthrals as it infests.

Disease Control is next, the track sparked by “John Snow’s discovery that the Soho cholera epidemic of 1854 was waterborne”. It harries and bustles around ears, its almost carnal climate a dirty punk ‘n’ roll infestation with another hip stirring groove and rhythmic teasing while Obscene Fucking Machine simply seduces from start to finish with its Dead Kennedy’s esque grumble. A damning look at Queen Victoria’s ”big, fat fucking machine” of a son,  Prince Bertie, the track is aural addiction in the waiting with its own healthy line in punk twists and rock turns.

Through the Jack The Ripper instigated Occam’s Razor, or rather the money breeding, conspiracy guessing industry grown up in its historical wake, and the raw metal punk scourge of God Is In The Bottom Line, closer attention is only enslaved even if neither quite sparked the level of lust of their predecessors. Each though fingered the wants and desires in our punk appetites which There She Glows and its ‘romancing’ of Marie Curie further rummaged with its Steve Ignorant & Paranoid Visions meets The Ghost Of A Thousand styled boisterous croon.

The album concludes with There’s Going To Be A Revolution, the only fictional track within Double Negative yet certainly one incited by the poverty, injustices, and oppression of the modern world, of any era. It is a raw and imposing tempest of sound and discontent which rubs vociferously on the senses, gnaws on ears, and gives the album a stark and sonically rapacious curtain closer to get the teeth into.

Punk rock always need a new fresh breath to keep it ahead of the game and always seems to find it. Double Negative and The Men That Will Not Be Blamed For Nothing is the next wind to arouse and inspire even if a roar soaked in previous centuries and their nefarious adventures. We for one just cannot wait for its companion in the two album cycle started by this real gem.

Double Negative is out now on CD, Cassette, Vinyl and Digital Download via Leather Apron Records across most stores and @ https://blamedfornothing.bandcamp.com

Dates on The Men That Will Not Be Blamed For Nothing’s current UK tour:

SAT 17 MAR – York, Fulford Arms

SUN 18 MAR – Milton Keynes, Craufurd Arms

MON 19 MAR – Cardiff, Globe

TUE 20 MAR – Chester, The Live Rooms

WED 21 MAR – Leicester, The Shed

THU 22 MAR – Exeter, The Cavern

FRI 23 MAR – London, The Dome

SAT 24 MAR – Southampton, Joiners

SUN 25 MAR – Bristol, The Exchange

TUE 17 JUL – Detroit US, Motor City Steamcon

http://www.blamedfornothing.com/   https://www.facebook.com/blamedfornothing   https://twitter.com/blamed4nothing

 Pete RingMaster 14/03/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright