Meshiaak – Alliance Of Thieves

Meshiaak_RingMasterReview

Formed in Melbourne, Australia and unleashing a debut that stirs up the instincts and passions like the first temptress/tempter encountered by awakening youth, Meshiaak have announced themselves as one essential proposition for all thrash metal enthusiasts. Alliance Of Thieves is one of the most formidable, exhilarating, and accomplished introductions sure to be heard this year; arguably no surprise with its line-up consisting of 4ARM’s Danny Camilleri and Teramaze’s Dean Wells alongside bassist Nick Walker and drummer Jon Dette who lists Slayer, Anthrax, Testament, and Iced Earth in his notable exploits. Together they have swooped into the heart of thrash and given it a fresh injection of imagination and creative energy; not exactly breaking its boundaries but providing the genre and more with a new compelling character to get excited over.

Recorded at the Green Day owned Jingletown Recording Studios in Oakland, California and mixed by Jacob Hansen (Volbeat, Pretty Maids, Destruction, Anvil, Aramanthe, Epica, U.D.O., Primal Fear), Alliance Of Thieves ignites ears with opener Chronicles of the Dead. Initial rhythmic stabs and a drizzle of sonic enterprise coaxes the senses, both soon part of a thumping persuasion which swiftly has ears and appetite eagerly awake. The vocals of Camilleri quickly grip attention too with the backing roars of Wells just as potent, while together their guitar endeavours create a web of inventive infectiousness around the equally gripping rhythmic thrust of Dette and Walker. The track is superb, whether winding teasingly around ears or driving through them like a ravenous juggernaut simply triggering spirit and instincts.

The first track also shows the melodic prowess and suggestiveness of grooves that Meshiaak are also able to conjure, the song a tapestry of intrigue and unpredictable invention which continues in the following It Burns at Both Ends and across the whole of Alliance Of Thieves. Whereas its predecessor has essences of Machine Head meets Testament to it, the second track quickly shares Slayer-esque hues once the listener has drifted through exotic climes into another tide of Dette’s addictive rhythmic craft as rabid riffs crowd around Camilleri’s imposing and rousing vocals. Calm and intensely hungry, the song is a beguiling mix of contrasts and energy, matching the inescapable persuasion and intensive quality of the opener.

art_RingMasterReviewThe dark and sinister I Am Among You follows, its initial lure setting the emotional scene before the band toy with the imagination with a Fear Factory/Metallica like trespass of the soul. Predatory and often demonic but from start to finish commandingly seductive, the track manages to eclipse the might of those before it, setting a new plateau within the album in pleasure and imagination before Drowning, Fading, Falling floats in on orchestral melancholy. Soon the mountainous beats of Dette and another brooding bassline from Walker are courting the sonic weave of Wells, together crafting another encounter which skilfully merges raw intensity with melodic tempers. A slow burner in relation to the earlier tracks, it grows into an easy to get greedy over threat, each listen, as with the album, revealing new layers and nuances within its storm.

Through the harmonic and emotionally plaintive At the Edge of the World, a song as musically vast as its suggested landscape, and the sonically antagonistic Last Breath Taken, band and album simply taken a tighter grip on the passions; both songs in their individual way casting lava-esque melodies amidst thrash fuelled intrusive intensity, though the first of the two is a ‘gentler’ tempting and outshone a touch by its rawer successor. The pair in turn gets outdone by the brilliance of Maniacal. Again Metallica is an open flavouring yet once more a spice to something you can only out down as unique Meshiaak.

The album’s title track careers through ears straight after, every second a ravishing crescendo of sound and creative instincts leaving bliss and exhaustion in its lingering wake. There is a hint of Anthrax/Megadeth to the impossible to resist proposal, Dette alone makes the hellacious partnership between band and ears worthwhile but mightily matched by the whole of the quartet here and across Alliance of Thieves, song and album.

The album closes on the shadowy balladry of Death of an Anthem where sultry melodies and a smouldering climate surround the again impressive tones of Camilleri. Its air and emotion though becomes more volatile with every passing minute as the track bewitches and brings easily one of the year’s finest releases to a superb end. As suggested earlier, maybe we should not be surprised the quality of Alliance Of Thieves considering its creators but any hopes and expectations you might have had for the encounter will surely be blown away with swift results.

Alliance Of Thieves is out now via Mascot Records @ http://www.mascotlabelgroup.com/meshiaak-alliance-of-thieves-cd.html and most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/meshiaak   http://www.meshiaak.com

Pete RingMaster 24/08/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Possessor – Dead By Dawn

Possessor_RingMasterReview

Still drawing new attention with their previous offerings, British metallers Possessor unleash new album Dead By Dawn, a mouth-watering threat of their rawest, most voracious sound yet. Continuing to conjure their individual fusion of old school fuelled metal embracing everything from heavy and blackened death metal through to doom/occult and stoner infused thrash the London trio cast a viciously malevolent and addictively compelling infestation of ears and instinctive pleasure with their latest offering.

Formed in 2013, Possessor teased and tempted with the Wings of Fire demo in 2014 before making a far greater impression with their self-titled debut album later that year. Hellacious and demonic in equal enterprise, the band’s reputation and acclaim garnering stature was given another injection of energy with last year’s Stay Dead EP. Its four tracks breached a new level in sound and adventure by the threesome of vocalist/guitarist Graham Bywater, bassist Marc Brereton, and drummer Matthew Radford; one now pushed again by Dead By Dawn.

The album opens with Afterburner and its sinister, cinematic intro. As shadows collude with aural drama, it fades into the ravenous jaws of the opener, a mesh of riffs and rhythms which go straight for the jugular. The meatiest groove aligns to a primal energy and intensity, they soon entwined in a sonic twine of guitar and the effect cloaked tones of Bywater. Previous releases hinted at a Nurse/Troublegum era Therapy? essence in the band’s sound; the first song shows it has become an even more intense flavouring but still without diluting the distinctive tone and invention of the Possessor sound.

Predatory and inescapably infectious with Sabbath meets Electric Wizard overtones also to its body; the excellent start makes way for the similarly immense and thrilling Scorpion Swamp. Straight away the grievous growl of Brereton’s bass has ears gripped and lips licked, the appetite enflamed further by the sorcerous grooves and rabid hooks joining the mix. Again echoes of the Northern Ireland trio are a vibrant spicing as Possessor and track rumble and grumble upon the senses and imagination, the song an ever twisting web of thrash driven, multi-flavoured metal.

art_RingMasterReviewBeneath the Chapel takes over next, an encounter growing in ears with a less forceful character compared to its predecessors but one soon sharing its own captivating net of flesh whipping beats and rapacious grooves to seriously please. Again within an ever tempestuous nature irresistible hooks taunt and tempt, providing rich bait within the rawest roar of sound to come from the band in any offering yet and the same template seeds the following Without Warning, a design breeding another individual treat within the album. A tempest of grooves and antagonistic ferocity it simply blossoms into a psyche infesting avalanche of predacious animosity to leave a hunger for more.

Things take a breath just a touch as Slaughter High enters next upon another evocative bassline from Brereton, its suggestive twang absorbing bait deviously leading the listener into another waiting beast of sound. Arguably the most old school sounding song on the release, it gnaws at the senses as riffs venomously prowl and the swinging beats of Radford flail flesh with rapier like effect. More destructive and gripping with every passing minute the brute of a proposition departs in a cold storm to let Terror Tripping step forward with its own cantankerous and primal rock ‘n’ roll. Taking a touch more time to thickly persuade compared to the other songs before it, the track is soon seeing swinging bodies and eager satisfaction in its rip tide, especially when it shares another ear exciting hook.

A pair of instrumentals comes next, The Creeps another cinematic scene setting piece parading a glorious and voodoo-esque rhythmic enticement before Midnight devours the body and imagination with its blackened heavy metal and feverishly stomping aural necromancy. Both tracks has ears enslaved and thoughts conjuring before the closing drama of The Curse of the Hearse revels in the individual skills and craft of all three Possessor members, aspects uniting in an incendiary provocation bringing Dead By Dawn to an almighty end.

Possessor get bigger, better, and more creatively barbarous with every release and indeed more irresistible. A treat for fans and a thrilling introduction to Possessor for newcomers, Dead By Dawn and its creators are the kind of propositions metal probably does not appreciate or notice enough but would be a much blander place without.

Dead By Dawn is out now @ http://possessor.bandcamp.com/album/dead-by-dawn

https://www.facebook.com/possessorband

Pete RingMaster 21/08/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The beating of shadowed wings and inflamed hearts: introducing Darkstone Crows

Darkstone Crows_RingMasterReview

Hailing from Mississauga, Ontario, Darkstone Crows is a fresh metal bred fire on the Toronto music scene with a sound which simply demands attention. Now as they prepare their debut album for release later in the year, the quintet is beginning to poke at ears and spotlights further afield. With thanks to the band, we take a look into the heart and creative passion of alternative metallers…

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started and what brought you all together?

Chanel Martins-lead vocals, Nick Sawicki and Jiv Marshall-guitars, Russ Shipman-bass and backing vocals, Matt Skypas-drums.

Jiv and Elle started the band back in 2014 and went through a bunch of line-up shuffles. Russ joined in July 2014, Matt was February 2015. Nick replaced our last guitarist in January 2016. We’re just a group of friends making metal music, we want to do it the best we can and not cut corners, really make a work that we can be proud of, that means something.

Have you been/are involved in other bands before? If so has that had any impact on what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

Russ, Matt and Nick have been involved with bands before, and Chanel has been singing since she was four years old. We all bring something from our experiences to the table but we’re learning a lot as well so our personal style has evolved with the music we’re making.

Russ: I’ve been in a ton of bands before Darkstone Crows, but I would have to say that my first real band (Get!Wise punk-metal, 2008-2013) was very influential on my ethics and approach to songwriting. I learned to jam and to listen to the other players in the band, to build and to lock into groove. I wouldn’t say that any other band I’ve played in before had any direct impact on what I’m doing now.

Elle: No bands, but I’ve been heavily involved with a lot of contemporary music and lessons since I was four years old. Discovering metal definitely made my previous training and experience have an impact on my current endeavours, in a backwards way.

Jiv: Nothing really.

Nick: Prior to the band I was just working out in the gym and studying hard in school. I write and produce a lot of my own music as well, so I was into that before this.

Matt: I was involved in a small band before, nothing too serious, but it set my mind on where I wanted to go and led to where I am now.

Any particular story or inspiration behind the band’s name?

The shared inability to utter a complete sentence without stumbling over our swollen tongues…The name was discovered by accident. Jiv stumbled over her words while saying the original idea “Dark Storm Crows” and said “Darkstone Crows” and we all liked it.

Photo by Carey Costa

Photo by Carey Costa

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

As the initial birth of the band was Jiv’s brainchild, her original concept follows:

Jiv: Initially we were called “Pariah”, and the meaning behind the name was to represent a band that wrote songs for people who felt like social outcasts. Even though Darkstone Crows still speaks of injustices lyrically, we identify with a broader collection of movements and issues with many varying opinions. For me, I was very engrossed by the female punk movement of the 1970’s, so I wanted to create an all-girl punk band. My musical approach was very raw and simplistic. But obviously, as musicians grow and change the music changes with them, especially when all the different members offer their own influences. As we grew together, our exposure to different music exploded, even as our vision, direction and music did too.

Do the same things still drive the band when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

The same things still drive us and many more things as well, we’re constantly finding inspiration around us, and there’s a real drive to succeed and explore, to push boundaries that keeps driving us forward.

[Equally, things have] definitely evolved, but not to the point that we lost sight of what the end goal was. We want to travel the world, bring our music to as many people as we can, make our mark too, and have fun doing it.

How would you say your sound has evolved since starting out?

Our sound was very raw and stripped down, influenced by a lot of older rock and metal; from bluesy rock/metal in the early days to the pseudo-progressive alt-metal it is now, though we haven’t removed many elements of our early sound, but sculpted around them and experienced different types of rock and metal and how they can meld together tastefully.

Has it been an organic movement of sound or more the band deliberately wanting to try new things?

A bit of both inherent in the evolutionary process; we’ve become better musicians and writers so that was a very organic growth and a natural evolution. We naturally started writing differently as we expanded our playing, but there was a definite wish to push in different directions that we acted on. The better we got, the more comfortable we got, the more our music grew in complexity. Of late, since our initial guitarist left and Nick joined, we have been deliberately shaping our sound. He’s especially good at listening to ideas and improvising, so that has been a big step forward.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approaches and ideas to creating and playing music?

Lamb of God, Disturbed, and Periphery definitely cap the list, to a lesser extent Halestorm, Slipknot, System of a Down, and Tool have been big influences on our sound.

Definitely Halestorm, Slipknot, and Periphery, all those bands are wild performers and incredible musicians as well, truly inspirational.

Is there a process to the songwriting which generally guides the writing of songs?

Just try not to think too hard, and keep our minds open and concentrated simultaneously. Gold nuggets of music could come from the strangest things and at the weirdest moment. It could be an elbow knocking the strings a certain way that produces unique feedback that kicks off a whole song, you never know.

Usually we start with a riff and build around it, adding other parts that fit nicely and connecting the different parts afterwards. Once we establish parts and the vocal melody is written lyrics are drafted and we start fine-tuning.

Where are inspirations to the lyrical side of your predominantly songs drawn?

 Photo by Rachel Carys Gosling

Photo by Rachel Carys Gosling

Anything around us, in our world, any thought, any emotion, cause and effect, pertinent global issues like the environment, war, famine, and poverty. Personal struggles with alcoholism, drug abuse, homelessness, ire, rage, depression, euphoria, and victory. Our songs are very dark in mood, however not necessarily darkly worded (although more often than not darkly worded).

Predominantly Jiv, and Russ write lyrics, Jiv takes ideas from injustices she see in the world around her, the media, while Russ’ lyrics hit closer to home and tend to be more metaphoric in content.

Give us some background to your latest release.

Our newest release, our first full length album, is going to be available later this year (we’re aiming to release it in October). We’re currently recording and producing the album ourselves and it’s going to be massive. This album is very different from our debut EP (Darkstone Crows, June 2015), it’s much sleeker, the songs are more complex, and we’re incorporating far more instruments, as well as some feature performances. You’ll experience a more broad sonic adventure that delves into many facets of rock and metal. Our first EP, which was recorded and mixed by Dr. Sean at TRH Studios in Scarborough, CA, is much more raw; recorded stripped down and very loud. There is a punk aesthetic to this EP, hiding behind the pounding rock beats and shredding guitar solos. Definitely an honest, solid debut, perfectly illustrating the drive and hunger we were feeling at the time.

Would you give us some insight to the themes and premise behind it and its songs.

The album’s themes are directed at injustices around the globe, from the environment to civil rights, as well as a couple that delve into the human mind and touch on addiction or mental illness.

[In regard to the first EP] Hell To Pay was written in opposition to police brutality (this was written back in 2014, before any major organizations like BLM were even founded). Easily the darkest song on the record, and still one we play today. Sidewinder, so named after the missile and the desert snake. An apt title, as this song was written near the conclusion of the coalition occupation of Afghanistan that began with the World Trade Center attacks in 2001, loosely referencing 9/11 conspiracy theories but more importantly expressing outrage at a protracted military occupation. Deadhead is an ode to street kids and the homeless struggling to scrape a living and fight their demons every day. Fathoms is our salute to the men and woman who come out to our shows, who we’ve met and befriended, partied and laughed with. It’s about the feeling of hitting the stage and having really awesome people love what you’re doing, and scream the words back at you over the PA system.

Do you enter the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

For the most part we write before the studio. Only recently, with a home studio being acquired, were we able to implement recording into the writing process. It has many benefits, not the least of which is it’s now almost impossible to forget parts! It’s worked both ways for this record, plenty of trial and error, but with such high costs to record in studio we like to be prepared to nail those takes.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably the favourite aspect of the band?

Our live shows are full of energy, we try to project our excitement onto the crowd, even joining them in the pit occasionally. We’re constantly in motion and want to turn up and just go for it. If you come to our shows, expect to meet at least one of us in the crowd. We aren’t afraid to get close to our audience, mosh with our guitars, whatever it takes to get everyone having a good time. We try to put on a bombastic show, something memorable and huge. Showmanship isn’t out-dated yet, right?

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods? Are there the opportunities to make a mark if the drive is there for new bands?

Every scene has an opportunity for a band, the trick is making your mark and being able to leave for a bit, tour around, and come back to find your mark still there. You have to make an impression on people, really work the excitement out of your audience.

Toronto has exploded recently, not on the metal front, but in the general vein of music, so that’s generated a kind of Mecca for producers and label reps. That being said, these guys aren’t necessarily looking for a metal band, which is cool because we have more to offer than just grinding riffage and double bass. We definitely have our foot in the door, but we’re still growing as a unit and brighter horizons await.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date? Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as the band grows and hopefully gets increasing success or is it more that bands struggling with it are lacking the knowledge and desire to keep it working to their advantage?

It can definitely be a tedious task, continuously having to type updates and promote shows, mail out merch, upload photos/songs, the list goes on. But, if you love something, you’ll deal with the boring and the crap times because it will come back to you in the end. Social media is definitely helping us at the moment, not only are we diligent about it but we have the right people for the job. Matt is a brilliant graphic artist and designer and Elle is a promoter and Event Management student. All things good must come to an end, but global reach on social media hasn’t gone bad just yet. Bands these days should definitely invest the time into learning how to mould social media, it is invaluable. Anything has the possibility to become negative if overused or utilised improperly, the trick is the learn all you can about using social media and keep your content professional.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

We’ve had it under wraps for a couple months now, but we are featuring the amazing Lindsay Schoolcraft, keyboardist/vocalist of UK metal band Cradle of Filth, on two tracks from our upcoming release. So we’re pretty excited about that. Beyond that just more music and we’re beginning to shoot more videos as well, so following our YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiJ2zCXgHfsnUurrge-UyoQ ) and Instagram (@darkstonecrows) will keep you up to date on that stuff.

http://darkstonecrows.wixsite.com/darkstone-crows   https://twitter.com/darkstonecrows   https://www.facebook.com/darkstonecrows

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 19/08/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Raging Speedhorn – Lost Ritual

Lost Ritual Artwork_RingMasterReview

Eagerly awaited, the fifth album from British metallers Raging Speedhorn, and the first since their return around two years ago, rips into ears and senses looking to make up for lost time. Lost Ritual has all the venom, spite, and intensity that the Corby in Northamptonshire hailing sextet is renowned for, and the quality, but all honed into their most potent and savagely stylish proposition yet. As expected Raging Speedhorn is a beast on the album, their sound an uncompromising trespass, and Lost Ritual simply the most invigorating tempest.

The past couple of years have seen the band prove themselves a live encounter no metaller should miss, continuing where they left off eight years earlier whether destroying smaller intimate venue audiences or mass crowds at festivals such as Sonisphere, Bloodstock, and Damnation. The successor to 2007 album Before The Sea Was Built, the crowd funded Lost Ritual is the first album to feature guitarist Jim Palmer and also sees vocalist Frank Regan returning nine years after his last appearance on 2005 album How the Great Have Fallen.

An anticipation feeding teaser to the Russ Russell recorded album was offered earlier this year as part of a DesertFest split with Monster Magnet via H42 Records. Fair to say, Halfway To Hell grabbed the throat and ravaged the senses to get the juices flowing for Lost Ritual and the album swiftly shows it is not a lone highlight with opener Bring Out Your Dead. Instantly a plaintive groove winds around ears, its lure quickly joined by the meaty grizzle of Dave Thompson’s bass and the mighty swipe of Gordon Morison’s sticks on skin. Right there too are nagging riffs, their tempting courting the ever gripping grooves; guitarists Jamie Thompson and Palmer casting an inescapable web. Completed by the contrasting spite loaded growls of John Loughlin and Regan, song and band devours the senses and spirit, sparking each to new heights of pleasure simultaneously. The track is a debilitating anthem, a rousing roar as contagious as it is violent and Raging Speedhorn at their very best.

Halfway To Hell takes over and now a familiar companion to ears because of its previous release again only ignites body and appetite with ease. Again riffs and rhythms unite and collide as grooves wind and vocals blaze. The band has never been low key in creating the most essential hooks in their encounters and the second song is one has some of their ripest yet, addictive twists and turns inescapable even in the passage of slow predatory enterprise stalked by bestial throat grazing snarls which emerges.

There is no let-up in force, temptation, and virulence as Motorhead erupts in ears next, the track living up to its namesake in tone and sonic dirt while as ever reaping the unique Raging Speedhorn character to big success. A brutal treat, the track makes way for the rapacious prowl of Evil Or Mental. Again the listener is quickly entangled in intrusive grooves and bruising rhythms as vocals crawl over the senses with open ill-will. They are just part of its skilfully woven net of sonic malignancy and enterprise, the encounter rocking like an antagonistic bear before its closing sonic lancing leads into the imposing and thrilling seduction of Ten Of Swords. This is no sweet talking temptress though, the song a lumbering concentrated invasion of tenebrific sound and provocative craft fuelled by a rancorous heart and appetite feeding ingenuity.

It glorious scorn gives may to the raw punk ‘n’ roll of Dogshit Blues, the track an exhausting and exhilarating stirring of body and spirit, and in turn the thick aural incitement of The Hangman. In tone alone, the song is a dark and murderous affair, voice and emotion only adding to its cancerous impact and though musically, it maybe lacks the cache of hooks and twists found in many of its companions, the track cannot help offering another lofty peak within Lost Ritual.

The next up Shit Outta Luck is pure belligerent and inflammatory rock ‘n’ roll, a chest beating incitement for body and soul that will leave all out of breath in energy and bliss. With swinging grooves, lethal beats, and fiery intent, the track is magnificent and swiftly equalled in success by the compelling toxicity and invasive invention of Comin’ Home.

Completed by the enthralling Unleash The Serpent, the darkest and most imaginative track on the album, Lost Ritual shows Raging Speedhorn bigger, bolder, and more creatively belligerent than ever. It is also one of the year’s mightiest rewards from a band world metal needs more than ever.

Lost Ritual is out now digitally and on CD and vinyl @ https://ragingspeedhorn.bandcamp.com/album/lost-ritual and other stores.

https://www.facebook.com/ragingspeedhorn

Pete RingMaster 12/08/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Syren City – Paradise In The Dirt

Syren City Promo Shot_RingMasterReview

Almost two years ago, UK rockers Syren City laid a hefty punch on attention with the Escape EP, five tracks of multi-flavoured rock ‘n’ roll which was as compelling as it was thrilling. Now the Bristol quintet returns with its successor Paradise In The Dirt and three more encounters which leave ears ringing with pleasure and an appetite for more simply greedier.

Formed in 2011, Syren City swiftly bred a sound from essences drawn across the likes of post hardcore, punk, metal and alternative rock. The 2014 Escape EP quickly showed it was a formidable and striking mix, echoing the band’s live reputation earned through festival appearances and shows with the likes of Turbowolf, The Alarm, Mallory Knox, Max Raptor, The Hell, Roam, Black Foxxes, Futures, Young Legionnaire, Attack Attack, and Blitz Kids. The release of their new proposition shows that the band’s sound has continued to expand and indulge in greater adventurous traits, increasing in magnetism with equal measure. The first in a series of EPs which have a conceptual thread and link, Paradise In The Dirt captures ears and imagination with swift deftness of enterprise and a rousing boisterousness, never relenting upon or releasing the listener until its final note has shared its mighty bait.

Syren City Cover Artwork_RingMasterReviewIt opens up with It’s Morphine Time, a song which descends on the senses like a tempestuous challenge from its first breath, but a threat just as quickly seducing ears and appetite as riffs and rhythms launch their hungry persuasion. In no times wiry grooves are entangling song and listener while anthemic vocal roars across the band find a great Beastie Boys feel to them. As it proceeds, the scent of bands such as Rage Against The Machine and Refused also colour the encounter, with frontman Simon Roach taking vocal charge as the barbarous rhythms of bassist Sam Leworthy and drummer Mat Capper badger and incite. It is a virulent infectious affair with the enterprise and fiery grooves of guitarists Ian Chadderton and Josh Mortazavi arousing, aiding and shaping the songs twists and turns as its metal/heavy rock antagonism and inescapable catchiness fuels pleasure, the song alone surely ensuring the EP’s certain success.

It is quickly backed up by its companions though, Danielle coming next and opening on a melodic caress which inspires the following vocals and flirtatious gait of the song. Little time passes before again a volcanic quality and energy erupts, its theatre creating a My Chemical Romance like attraction before things slip back into the captivating calm and the repeat of the galvanic cycle. As within its predecessor, there is a kind of tempestuousness to ideas and intensity which only adds to the riveting drama provided before 10,000 Knives steps forward to grab its share of the plaudits. Initial riffs and lures have a slight Therapy? feel before the punk heart of band and song grips and adds a Reuben meets Taking Back Sunday hue to the outstanding encounter.

All three tracks are uniquely distinct to each other but fuelled by a sound with a character all Syren City’s. The band impressed with their last release and have only made a bigger impact with Paradise In The Dirt, a release sure to be the favourite EP of 2016 for a great many.

The Paradise In The Dirt EP is out now through all stores-

https://www.facebook.com/SyrenCity  https://twitter.com/SyrenCity  http://instagram.com/syrencitymusic

Pete RingMaster 30/06/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Attack The Day – Felons EP

Pic Michal Spigiel

Pic Michal Spigiel

Attack The Day is another of those bands with a sound which defeats exact tagging due to its nature and eagerness to weave in a host of diverse flavours. The Northern Ireland hailing quintet, though it might be that they have lost a member since recording their new release,  are generally classed as alternative metal/rock but as Felons shows, they have the snarl of punk, the rousing tenacity of raw metal, the swing of funk, and the unpredictable character of post rock in their invention. The band’s second EP is an ear pleasing, imagination sparking encounter which captivates more and more with every listen.

Formed in Enniskillen in County Fermanagh in early 2012, Attack The Day soon developed a hunger to play live and soon had their local scene won over. Inspirations come from the likes of Sum 41, Mallory Knox, Maximum The Hormone, Slipknot, The Blackout, Gob, and Korn which alone gives you a hint to the variety in their sound. Last year saw debut EP This Is How It Ends released, its singles finding play and support on various radio stations such as IUR FM and RTE 2XM. 2015 also saw the band touring Ireland and play support to Suddenly Human. Now it is Felons poised to stir up further attention, a success easy to assume with its creative step on from its predecessor.

ATD - _RingMasterReviewFrom its opener, the EP shows a new expansion and invention in the Attack The Day sound as We Are The Change grabs ears with a sonic clamour and a tide of group roars. From there the lead vocal of Dáithí Murphy steps forward within a busy hustle of riffs and firmly jabbing rhythms which is part punk, part heavy rock, and quickly infectious. There is no mistaking the appetite sparking attitude soaking the song, but a challenge bound in spicy grooves from guitarist Mark Cadden as Ciaran Fitzpatrick’s bass throatily prowls the intimidating beats of Shane McGovern. Not for the last time, the punkish hue to a song within the EP, hints at a Stiff Little Fingers like growl to add further temptation for ears to embrace.

It is fair to say that the first song is a relatively and enjoyably straight forward slice of raw rock ‘n’ roll, something its successor Bridges I Burn certainly embraces while revealing the more off kilter imagination of the band. Its relatively mellow start is soon a lively funk fest of grooves and energetic rhythms, but a revelry which in turn sparks vocal animosity and imposing metal bred intensity. It is a passage of invention which repeats with increasing potency, every round revealing a fresh essence and spice within the adventurous exploits.

Epidemic follows that compelling proposal, bringing its own creative captivation with elegant melodies and suggestive beauty, the instrumental a warm yet melancholic caress of the imagination and senses before Part To Play springs its irritable metal and post hardcore causticity on ears. The slightly dour tones of Murphy work a treat against the fiery nature of sound and the band’s bullish harmonies, but the unpredictable character of the song soon has ears and thoughts buzzing in other ways. Slips into ska seeded swings and atmospheric caresses are great moments matched by the contrasting and corrosive winds of sound and intent which also wash across the senses, each providing a fascinating and successful piece in the inventive jigsaw of the track.

The EP is concluded by the boisterous rock stomp of Who We Are, a song emulating the first in providing an anthemic punk ‘n’ roll charge which just hits the spot. It is a great end to a thoroughly enjoyable second encounter with Attack The Day. Fiercely agreeable on the ear, the release also highlights the potential within the band, a promise and quality hard not to see making a bigger impact on the British rock scene ahead.

The Felons EP is released 20th May, available @ https://attacktheday.bandcamp.com/releases

https://www.facebook.com/attackthedayband/   https://twitter.com/_AttackTheDay

Pete RingMaster 18/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com

Exploring the rousing roar of Maxdmyz

Maxdmyz_RingMasterReview

Maxdmyz is a London based metal quintet who has earned a potent reputation over the year as a live proposition and through their striking sound and releases. We were took the chance to find out more about the band with thanks to its members, exploring its origins, heart, and creative pulse…

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started?

Twister: So I’m Twister – I sing, write the lyrics, melodies and make the odd contribution to the tunes themselves. You’ve got Roger on guitar, A’Zedd on bass, and Vortex on keys and programming with Jay on drums and programming.

The band has taken different forms over the years – I’m the only founding member, although Jay and I have been working in the band for quite a while now. A’Zedd and Vortex joined a couple of years ago, and have each brought their own flavours to the band – A’Zedd in jazz and blues, and Vortex in goth, industrial and electronica. Roger was the brains behind German death-metallers, Apophis, and Jay has an incredible number of influences from Cardiacs to Nile and Squarepusher.

Have you been involved in other bands before? If so has that had any impact on what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

Jay: Yeah, we’ve all been band whores ever since any of us can remember. I don’t think we consciously decided on one musical direction or another – what does mark us out though is an openness just to see where things take us. It’s a unique combination of influences and personalities and it’s that chemistry that gives us our sound, and everyone is welcome, in fact encouraged, to contribute as fully as possible to the best of their ability.

What inspired the band name?

Vortex:  Twis likes to tell a story where it was a dyslexic founding member who came up with it – I’m still not sure whether I believe him but the name at least is distinctive and, if not memorable, you remember that you can’t remember it – er, if you see what I mean!

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

A’Zedd: Wow, I’d like to say there is and that we have a sense of a specific sound and vibe that we want to create. But it would be a massive lie. It’s much less conscious than that and all the better for it. Emotional connection – that’s the beginning and the end of it, and our music is the vehicle to do it.

maxdmyz1_RingMasterReviewDo the same things still drive the band when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

Roger: What do you mean – “was” fresh-faced – I think the band has developed over time, but whether progression or regression, who knows. As for evolution, well, every time we play or rehearse, we get closer and stronger – the material improves, as do our live performances. We are all incredibly driven, and always will be – it’s just a compulsion to connect.

So since your early days, how would you say your sound has actually evolved?

Twister: We’ve become heavier and more melodic – we started out really almost as loopy drum ‘n’ bass laced with samples, goth vocals, and heavy guitars. And it’s definitely an organic thing, although this openness to see where things take us naturally has definitely led to innovation and experiment?

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations, you touched on it with Jay but are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

A’Zedd: It’s weird, you know, but almost everything you encounter and process, musically or otherwise, has an impact – either as repellent or attractant. There are certain kinds of music and artists I don’t want to emulate – and that’s as much if not more of an influence on our music, vibe and outlook as anything else. But my native discretion forbids me from naming names.

Is there a regular process to the band’s songwriting?

Jay: Each of us is a songwriter in their own right – so what generally happens is that one of us presents an idea, even at a relatively early stage of development, and we jam and refine it. We all have our areas of expertise, but we are all very open to contributions and suggestions from band mates. The songs refine and develop through practice and live performance.

Roger: If one of us doesn’t feel comfortable with something, we generally dump it as we’ve all got to be happy with the final product if we’re going to deliver it with conviction; having said that, we are all happy to compromise. This is one of the most productive and democratic bands I have ever worked in – it’s just mutual respect and everyone working towards the same goal. Publishing is always divided five ways, regardless.

Vortex: Yeah, part of the pleasure of being in this band is that everyone works to get the best possible level of creativity out of everyone else – we all see ourselves as enablers of the others’ creativity and are glad to be so. It feels so good to be working in a collaborative environment where everyone is respected and feels represented.

Where, more often than not, do you draw inspirations for the lyrical side of your songs?

Twister: I guess this is my shout – since I write the damn things. It’s from the extremes of emotional experience, more often than not – or sometimes from some ironic or sardonic take on an issue that grabs me – from anorexia to suicide bombers. They’re noises made to music in the end and they either work or don’t work.

Can you give us some background to your latest release?

Jay: It feels a little weird talking about it, as it feels a long time ago now and we will be releasing a new album later this year or early the next – The Hate Plane was released in August 2014, maxdmyz artmaxdmyz_RingMasterReviewalthough it still seems to be exciting interest and radio play etc. as if it had been released just a month or two ago; that may be a characteristic of the internet age, people come across this stuff online every day and for them it’s new and fresh. Grieve, the single off the album, is still getting a lot of radio play, especially in the States, as are All and Side with Satan.

Give us some insight to the themes and premise behind the album.

Vortex: Apocalypse, the counter culture under pressure, individual desperation in the face of personal powerlessness and alienation, anger, boredom, sex, mental illness, political injustice – you know; the usual stuff. The premise is, I guess, is that existentially you have to make a statement even if the only one listening is yourself.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

A’Zedd: The answer is yes. I think you have to be as prepared and ‘finalised’ as possible and that’s because things will always change and that’s good. We can’t afford financially or creatively to mess around composing on recording time. That’s why, when I estimate how long it’s going to take to record anything, I estimate, double the figure, then double it again.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably the favourite aspect of the band?

Roger: As a relatively new member, I can say that that’s what drew me to the band. I’d seen them in one guise or other playing live for a few years on the London circuit. It was one show in particular which I thought was electric – at the Dome in North London. Twister is a fantastic singer, and A’Zedd is such a fluent, effortless bassist. Vortex has this extraordinary presence. And Jay is one of the most phenomenal drummers I have ever seen, let alone played with. Playing with these guys is an incredible adrenaline rush and communicates that excitement to the audience, and that, in the end, is what it’s all about.

maxdmyz2_RingMasterReviewIt is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it? Are there the opportunities to make a mark if the drive is there for new bands?

Jay: London is the last place in the universe you’d want to start or be in a band. There are probably thousands of different acts all trying to climb out of the sewer that is the London music scene. Some of the great metal bands have come from the UK, but culturally there seems to be less appetite for it than you’d think. There are opportunities to make a mark for new bands of course, but there is always that element of luck – being in the right place at the right time, knowing the right people and so on. Rick Wakeman once said that any band looking for a deal doesn’t deserve one – easy for him to say, but he’s only half right. With the internet now though, it’s sometimes easier to make a mark somewhere else in the world rather than closer to home.

So how has the internet and social media impacted on you guys to date?

Vortex: It’s had a massive positive impact on getting our music out there. There is a fantastic democratizing influence that the internet has had – it kind of flattens out celebrity – everyone has a website – you can visit Slayer’s or Maxdmyz’s and the experience is much the same – you listen and you either like it or you don’t. True, it’s less easy to get rich off music if you’re an artist – well, it was never that easy, but so what! In what moral universe does Phil Collins earn millions of dollars off a song it took him three minutes to write, where the average ambulance driver or nurse earns naff all by comparison. And you don’t need any specialist skills apart from the ability to click on links and send emails, seriously.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

A’Zedd: Well, thank you for your interest. Yep, we’ve just heard we’ll be playing Club Antichrist on 11th November. See you there!

Check out Maxdmyz further @ https://www.facebook.com/maxdmyz and their music @ http://maxdmyz.bandcamp.com/

https://maxdmyz.uk/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 17/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com