Furyon – Lost Salvation

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Anticipation for the successor to 2012 debut album Gravitas has been pretty much in top gear from almost the release day of that acclaimed success, and even more so after a four track cover mounted CD on Classic Rock Magazine UK last year, gave a very potent teaser for Furyon’s sophomore full-length. Now that Lost Salvation is upon us, it is fair to say that an already impressive and skilfully accomplished band has come of age, in sound, craft, and songwriting. Furyon is ready to stand with the big boys of classic rock and heavy metal, and show a few of them just how exciting rock ‘n’ roll is done.

Not being an instinctive fan of either heavy metal or classic rock, certainly of the more old-school styled offerings, we have demanding and probably unfair requirements and needs in order to be really impressed and even more so truly excited by a release but Furyon, as they did with their first album, succeed with ease. Again their songs upon Lost Salvation come with no excess baggage and are as hungry and at ease either forging big epic anthems or more intimately nurtured and designed propositions. This time though they feel like they come with more personal connections and inventiveness behind them; a new maturity to an already mature enterprise which is unafraid to explore broader essences of rock music within its core seeding. Produced by Rick Beato (Shinedown, Fozzy), Lost Salvation is Furyon’s aural masterpiece, but it still feels like just one more step in a continuing ascent; damn that anticipation is already kicking in again.

The album grips attention immediately, the tasty electronic infused opening of All That I Have inciting intrigue and appetite, especially once it blooms into a coaxing of riffs and firm rhythms with a delicious rich groove right through the middle. Relaxing a little as vocalist Matt Mitchell brings his fine delivery back to ears, the song seems to grow in weight and height with every subsequent chord and new flush of sound. It never explodes though, even in the chorus, just raising its temperature and intensity enough to enthral as the guitars of Luca Faraone, Tiago Rosado, and Chris Green, weave inventive designs. The song is the first anthem of the release, one as pungent and gripping as any peddle to the metal charge.

That kind of stampede comes with the album’s title track, the following Lost Salvation emerging as a thumping and contagious stomp which seamlessly blends vocal and sonic roars with predatory incitements, as well as a mystique woven solo which leaves lips licked and imagination lit. The dark tones of Alex Bowen’s bass go a long way to adding that sinister and intimidating edge to the song, backed by the sinew swung beats of Lee Farmery and a heavier growl of riffs from the guitars. This is anthem two and swiftly followed by the third in These Four Walls. To be FuryonLostSalvationhonest every song can be talked of in that way, even the more involved and exploratory tracks still holding that inescapable bait which has feet, neck muscles, and voice enlisted. The song is also partly a prowling croon, musically and vocally leaning heavily on the senses and emotions around more expressive crescendos. Maybe not as instant a persuasion as its predecessors, the song immerses ears and impresses more with every listen, leaving satisfaction brimming with pleasure.

The already in full flow invention and diversity makes another strong bow with the outstanding Scapegoat next, the track almost grouchy with heavy rock influences and grunge bred enterprise as it roams the psyche with its menacing rhythms and antagonistic riffs. Tempering its dark side though psychedelic rock like colours which ignite around the impressive tones of Mitchell, the song is a creative blaze to get happily lost within before Resurrect Me leads the listener into familiar Furyon territory with the kind of grooves and sonic adventure the band is renowned for. Flames of guitar invention are a persistent temptation to the band’s songs too and once more light up a not exactly startling, but definitely a thoroughly compelling slab of fiery rock ‘n ‘roll.

Left It with the Gods is another which maybe does not torch boundaries but definitely leaves ears and pleasure afire with its bellowing mixture of rock and metal whilst Good Sky calls in dark clouds and tempestuous intensity to leave thick pleasure in its wake. Epic in presence and tone, the track reaps some power metal tenacity with classic rock enterprise, as well as a slither of seventies metal spicing, moulding them in a potent roar which sets the appetite up for the excellent Dematerialize which casts its own dramatic shadows next. A far more intimate offering compared to its predecessor but also able to spread into a more expansive presence, the song bewitches with its blending of dark invention and sonic fire.

Lost Salvation is brought to a fine end by firstly the slowly strolling and richly grooved What You Need, a song suggesting an energy and anthemic potency to unite crowds in a live setting, and lastly the outstanding Wiseman. Again grooves and virulent riffs align to powerfully inciting rhythms and diversely delivered vocals, ensuring the album goes out on not only a bang but in a thought provoking tempest of invention.

The last growl of Lost Salvation is another of its loftier peaks, whilst the album itself is destined to be one of the classic rock pinnacles of 2015. It will take some special offerings to surpass it and convince our testing demands that is for sure.

Lost Salvation is available now on CD and digitally via Dream Records/Cargo Records

http://www.furyon.net http://www.facebook.com/furyon

RingMaster 25/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @  http://www.thereputationlabel.today

 

 

Sacred Wind – Sacred Wind

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Having had our pleasures goosed by Odin’s wind courtesy of Metal and Curry, the recent single from Welsh Viking bred rockers Sacred Wind; there was no option but to check out the album from which it comes. Released towards the rear of 2014, the thirteen track adventure, also going under the name of Sacred Wind, reveals the full landscape and creative emprise hinted at by our first introduction to the band.

The album is a tale of bold knights, even bolder flatulence, and a rampant hunger for cheese, not forgetting a few buxom women draped around a curry or two. Even more potently the album is bulging with glorious heavy metal and classic rock psalms of heroic deeds and Norse seeded challenges. From its first moments there is no doubting that Lord of the Rings/ Game of Thrones have found a richly mischievous companion in Sacred Wind, an alternative reality comparison, but that cannot hide or devalue the impressive craft and roaring sonic might of band and album.

Opener A Time of Magic is a vocal introduction between grandfather and child, be it a kid with the squeak of an adolescent aged forty plus with one ball dropped and one hovering. Questions from the latter bring an unveiling of the scenery and drama behind the album’s premise from the former, a telling of the background to the quest undertaken by the noble warriors regaled through the songs. These brave souls are called Sacred Wind and the following album title track, their opening scene. Hefty rhythms and fiery riffs make an immediate impression upon ears; the guitar hooks an almost predacious lure matched by the heavily throated bassline courting their attitude. Subsequently keys and raw melodies add to the canvas upon which Memphis bred Viking and vocalist/guitarist Olaf the Berserker reveals the narrative. It is a pungent offering, old school and swiftly anthemic.

The impressive opening song is matched straight away by Metal and Curry, the track similarly an inescapable anthem but with a lighter swagger to its gait and harmonic roar. Whilst meaty hooks and melodic tenacity from Olaf and Grundi the Windy are thrust through ears to seduce the senses, a rhythmic stomp provided by bassist Smid the Merciless and drummer Agnar the Hammered ensures neck muscles and imagination are flush with an appetite to devour the song’s tremendous contagion.

Already Sacred Wind is lighting body and emotions like a mix of Gwar meets Green Jelly meets Judas Priest, though that only narrows down what is a much broader flavour to the album. The band’s humour is just as open and ripe too but only in the lyrical and thematic adventure, their sounds a blaze of creativity and exciting endeavour which has plenty for all metallers, let along those just honed in with just a taste for classic rock ‘n’ metal. It is fair to say though that Hurricane Ass next is purely steeped in seventies metal bred in a bed of similarly aged classic rock. Begging for the power of a certain bodily function to help woo a prospective love, the song flames with sonic enterprise and vocal harmonies, transfixing ears as it heads towards to a firework like display of a finale, beats exploding across its melodramatic sky.

The combative character of Warriors of Asgard takes the success of its predecessor to new heights next, the track sinew and ferocity as the warriors take arms to rescue damsels in distress. Equally though it is unafraid to light their way with beacons of melodic ingenuity through the guitars and the symphonic yawn and soar of keys. The track is a delicious cinematic like escapade, not only a potent visual offering for the imagination to run with but simply an infectious slice of melodic metal.

Both the eighties kissed Sail with Me and the climactic bellow that is Rock, Rock, Rock, Rock Ragnarok keeps things on appealing and satisfying course, though neither can rival the some of the previous encounters. The first covers an emotional realisation brought by romance and the other an apocalyptic incitement to the Gods. Each brings new diversity and intrigue to the album leaving thoughts engaged and enjoyment contented is without setting a fire in their attention, something the power ballad Frigg certainly manages with its dark grouchy shadows and sonic balladry of vocal and melodic expression. Strong the first time and increasing its lure thereafter, the track is a slow burner which as quite a few songs upon Sacred Wind has the ability and persistence to flirt with the memory whenever it wishes.

Fart for Odin, by title alone, needs no help in explaining its narrative to the imagination, it a bar room ode and mead fuelled anthem within a tempestuous sonic and rhythmic turbulence. It is another thumping antagonist to body and fun though soon surpassed by the outstanding Dragon Ships and Women’s Hips. Impossibly virulent from its first sweep of vocals and initial tease of melody, the song brings rock pop from the late seventies, glam metal from the eighties, and nineties folk metal in one irresistible catchy croon. Think Alestorm meets Duran Duran and you get an inkling of the majestic lure of the pinnacle of Sacred Wind.

The battlefield brings the background to My Sword is my Sword firmly into thoughts, the power metal offering soon expanding its tale with horn like calls of the keys and predatory rhythms around the vocal roar of Olaf, all courted by the cantering invention of the guitars. Its spicy persuasion is followed by the celestial instrumental hymn of The Sheep’s Lament, which in turn makes way for the closing celebration of The Power of Cheese, though why anyone would want to crow so favourably about the mouldy stuff beats us. The song, as the previous track is a bonus offering on the album, and brings the release to a riotous yet melodically sizzling end.

It would be wrong to think of Sacred Wind as a one off good time to file away as you might a Green Jelly or in some ways a Steel Panther offering. Lyrically yes it is a roaring laugh but musically album and band stand side by side with any power metal, classic rock offering, just with an extra dose of mischief. Produced and arranged by Andy Coffey, who has a much bigger hand in things then you might suspect, including writing the excellent books which accompany the album’s story, the album is recommended to anyone with an appetite for strong, accomplished, and most of all enjoyable full fat metal.

Sacred Wind is available now via iTunes, Amazon etc. and the Scared Wind books @ http://www.amazon.co.uk/Andy-Coffey/e/B00LXLNW64/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_1

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Sacred-Wind/136135083263791

RingMaster 18/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://www.thereputationlabel.today

Sacred Wind – Metal and Curry

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The Vikings came, rampaged, and going by Sacred Wind, left some berserker seed to breed and bide its time before invading the classic metal timeline. The band from the hill sculpted landscape of Llangollen in Wales is the embodiment of Tolkien like mischievous adventure, heroic wrongdoings, and salacious revelry. They also create a classic metal incitement which sears and excite body and soul, as proven by new single Metal and Curry.

Taken from the band’s acclaimed self-titled debut album, itself an invigorating march of anthemic riffs, fiery melodies, and soaring hair wilting vocals, the new single tells you all you need to know about Sacred Wind and its dynamic sound. Like a Terry Pratchett inspired Friday night out narrated by firm tongue in cheek lyrics and a similar rascality in presence, Metal and Curry leads the listener by the hand into dens of liquor running devilment.

With the band members going by the name of Olaf the Berserker (lead vocals/lead guitars), Grundi the Windy (lead guitars/backing vocals), Smid the Merciless (bass guitar/backing vocals), and Agnar the Hammered (drums and percussion), newcomers to Sacred Wind might expect something like Gwar meets Green Jelly or Spinal Tap. The band though swiftly evades those thoughts taking firm hold by unleashing a sound which is as skilfully accomplished as it is dramatically fiery and an energetic presence which makes Alestorm seem reserved. The band’s album is all the evidence needed to suggest Sacred Wind is one of the UK’s brightest heavy metal protagonists, Metal and Curry even swifter proof.

Its first breath is a stomping invasion of heavy footed beats courted by a predatory bassline and swiftly bound in sonic enterprise. The potent start relaxes a whisper to open up the way for the rich vocals of Olaf to harmonically roar, his entrance accompanied by meaty hooks and melodic tenacity from the guitars. As maybe you would expect from the band and its creative backgrounds, there is a swagger to the song which translates to every swing of a drum stick and forceful plucking of strings, not forgetting a raucously anthemic chorus expelled by the band. The core of the track is not startlingly original you could argue but with a glorious flame of craft and enterprise from guitars which includes a highly magnetic solo, it soon establishes a unique and ridiculously contagious presence.

It is a beast of a song but more inviting than barbarous and an irresistible recruitment of neck muscles and voice. The song is a wonderfully rowdy doorway into the heart of the band’s album but also sums up the character and devilish presence of Sacred Wind as a complete proposition. Accompanied by a trilogy of books written by Andy Coffey, who might just be involved even deeper in the band we say in a whisper, Sacred Wind is a Norse bred Sláine corrupted Game of Thrones theatre in many ways but with a musical creativity and rich blaze of a sound which puts many established classic metal bands to shame.

Explore the whole world of Sacred Wind @ http://www.sacredwind.co.uk

RingMaster 20/01/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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The Sick Side – Born to Kill

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Bracingly raw and with an attitude and character as mischievous as it is antagonistic, Born To Kill the debut album from Spanish rockers The Sick Side, is like one of those companions you know you should not hang out with as they will only get you into trouble but you just cannot resist the anarchic and brazen seduction. A brawl of hard rock and heavy metal with a very healthy fuelling of punk rock, the release is a potential soaked riot of fun, unclean rock ‘n’ roll from a band which breeding a keen appetite for is very easy.

Storming out of Montblanc, a town in the Catalonian province of Tarragona, the quartet of Xavi Granados (vocals /guitar), Xavi Nuez (vocals /guitar), Sergio Martinez (bass), and Joan Pérez (drums) equip their album with a middle finger driven sound and adventure which demands and commands attention. Formed in 2012 and conducting their first rehearsals and song writing exploits in a garage right next to a cemetery, the perfect landscape for the creation of their devilish brew of sound it is easy to suggest, The Sick Side spent the following year working towards and on Born to Kill. Recorded at the Más Allá Studios in Valls, the album is an instant ear grabbing and furious incitement of energy and tenacity. As mentioned it is a raw and rough around the gills encounter but one we suggest fans of filthy punk and rock ‘n’ roll will get a real kick out of.

The album’s first track Looking For quickly lays down a tasty indication of what is in store within Born to Kill. Though not the strongest track on the release, its snarling vocal led weave of sonic enterprise and thumping rhythms within a caustic wall of riffs is a flavoursome appetiser for bigger things. Essences of Judas Priest like metal, Motorhead bred antagonism, and melodic toxicity collude from within the song to add further bait to the not remarkable but solid opening, an entrance backed forcibly by the Turbonegro like She Is A Whore which follows. As the first song, the craft and imagination of the band is captivating bait within the caustic rock ’n’ roll shaping the proposition, but there is a brighter spark of energy to it which sets up ears and appetite perfectly for the next step forward which comes in the fiery shape of Hanging Around.

The album’s third track has feet and emotions hooked from its opening lure of bass and a swiftly aligning roll of beats. Both Granados and Nuez share the vocal lead across the album, a mix and variety which only adds to the unpredictable nature and adventure of songs, and as shown here when those vocals come in hand in hand with a spicy blaze of guitar sculpted sonic design it works a treat. The hints of punk which whisper in the opening pair of songs is a broader and louder anthemic roar here too giving a great simplistic balance to the skilled and inventive veining of guitar endeavour alongside. Ramones meets Crashdiet; the track is a contagious stomp pushing the album up yet another notch with ease.

Both the heavy rhythmic stride and imposing presence of Jenny and the tangy blues shading of Alice hold ears and appetite firmly bound in catchy intriguing persuasion. The first of the two has a more serious nature to its character, parading a less rebellious and slightly more composed weight to its presence whilst its successor toys the senses with a blues garage rock spicing, both adding variety and fresh adventure to the album. Each also has glimpses of a more Billy Idol like glam punk spicing at their hearts, just whispers but proving more colouring to their resourceful and pleasing offerings.

Things continue to grip body and thoughts as Lights Are Always Bright romps with pop punk devilment, well pop punk caked in scowling vocals and riffs which collude with unpolished barbed littered hooks. It results in a tightly grabbing contagion which is emulated by a song called Track 1, where again heavy rock and melodic punk unite to create an abrasing confrontation with searing heavy metal veining alongside attention holding craft from the band. Both tracks keep things moving along enjoyably before the devilry of A Crime Against Humanity with its distinctive vocal delivery and addictive rhythms, steps up to forge another peak in the presence of Born To Kill, a new level reinforced by the album’s title track and the outstanding War. With a touch of hardcore punk teasing in the first, and heavy metal rabidity colouring the brilliance of the second of the three, the band leave the third to add the juiciest onslaught of the album. War is a belligerence of riffs and rapier like beats from its first breath, the band uniting them and the subsequent roar of vocals and bass predation in a thrash inspired stalking of the senses with a nice feel of Testament to its voracious heavy rock tempest.

   The final two songs of Lady Pheromon and The Sick Side impressively and easily ensures Born To Kill ends of a high. The first is an addiction forging slice of punk rock with another chorus to swiftly succumb to whilst the latter stomps around with stirring attitude and a punk metal swagger helped along by another excellent dark bassline courting a potent weave of riffs, hooks, and acidic grooves.

The two tracks make an enjoyable and ruggedly persuasive end to an outstanding introduction to The Sick Side. The album is unpolished and hostile, organic and ready to tear your head off, exactly as all dirt smothered rock ‘n’ roll should be from a band which can only grow and develop an even more striking and dangerous nature…something to eagerly anticipate on the evidence of Born to Kill.

Born To Kill is available now as a name your price download @ http://thesickside.bandcamp.com/releases

https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Sick-Side/535224796532994

RingMaster 19/01/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.thereputationlabel.today

 

 

 

 

Atlas Losing Grip – Currents

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Ten years in and unleashing their third album this very week, Swedish melodic punks Atlas Losing Grip just get better and musically broader. Currents is a treat of a confrontation and muscular seduction, a release bulging with explosive songs bred in imaginative songwriting and bound in just as magnetically resourceful sounds. As striking and highly persuasive as it is from the first listen, it grows into an even more rigorously compelling adventure over time, revealing new nuances and depths from play to play. Atlas Losing Grip has had no lacking of acclaim coming their way with their reputation growing show by show, release by release, but Currents is a new plateau of enterprise and maturity from the band, a certain game changer in attention and stature.

Hailing from Lund, Atlas Losing Grip upon forming swiftly stirred up appetites in the city’s renowned punk scene which had also spawned the likes of Satanic Surfers and Astream. Debut album Shut The World Out was unveiled to strong responses in 2008, its success followed by the recruitment of Satanic Surfers vocalist Rodrigo Alfaro into the line-up. The next year was marked by the release of Watching The Horizon on mini-cd and 10” vinyl record, an immediate indication of a potent growth in the band’s craft and metal infused punk sound and now with a striking voice to match. With shows with bands such as Bad Religion and the undertaking of many tours under their belts, Atlas Losing Grip uncaged their second album State Of Unrest in 2011. It revealed yet another open evolution and growth, a striking leap forward which has been repeated again between Currents and its predecessor. Driven by an even deeper and creative blend of heavy metal and the band’s distinct style of melodic punk, the fourteen track new proposition is a tapestry of spellbinding and explosive sonic colours around just as gripping and dramatic structures.

Lapping waves bring opener Sinking Ship into view and an instantly inviting weave of melodic endeavour from guitarists Gustav Burn and Max Huddén. Their evocative enticement is a thoughtful and melancholic coaxing behind which a brewing tempest builds before opening its thick arms to welcome pungent beats from drummer Julian Guedj and thick bass sounds from Stefan Bratt. Sonically too the song has grown more tempestuous by this point, but still with some restraint as the walls of the song loom higher and more provocatively over the senses. It is soon a feistily striding march of metal bred tenacity and punk energy though, subsequently coloured by the outstanding tones of Alfaro. A cauldron of passion and craft with an intensity and melodic enterprise to match, the song stirs up ears and appetite with consummate ease whilst proving just an appetiser for bigger things to come.

The following charm and fire of The Curse keeps the vivacious start of the album constant, the at times Greg Graffin like tones of Alfaro roaring over a canvas of sound just as hungrily alg_currents_CD_digipak.inddsimmering and at times boiling. Though the song arguably lacks the final spark to match the first, it ignites the imagination with anthemic ease before Cynosure flexes sinews and sculpts an aggressive melodic theatre. The song is somewhere between a romance and a brawl on the senses and virulently captivating. It also shows the ability to seamless slip between unbridled charges driven expertly by Guedj and an increasingly impressive bass sound and enterprise from Bratt, and mellow reflective calm superbly caressed by Alfaro.

Through the similarly melodically and vocally voracious Shallow and the creatively snarling Nemesis, Atlas Losing Grip kicks up another stunning gear, the first of the pair an uncompromising and thoughtful blast of contagious heavy weight pop punk. Its successor equally twists and erupts with an infectiousness to bait body and passions but with a raw and more imposing texture to its inventiveness and blistering sounds. Both though fall into the shadow of the brilliant Closure, an acoustically sculpted ballad showing, as if we needed any more proof, the strength and quality of Alfaro’s voice. Backed as impressively by the band his delivery is embraced in just as evocative melodic scenery woven by the guitars. Adding emotive strokes of strings to seduce ears further, the track fascinates with its mesmeric impassioned presence.

Both the rock pop catchiness of Kings and Fools, which has a slight feel of Living End to it, and the punk storm of Cast Anchor rouse ears and emotions in their individual and similarly tenacious ways whilst Unknown Waters follows with a contemplation of vocal and melodic design which provokes feet and thoughts equally to greedily embrace its fiery elegance and rhythmic incitement. Anthemic vocals and another irresistible predacious bassline stands out before the song stands aside for the drama of The End where bass and drums again steal early attention before sharing attention it with, as expected, the voice of Alfaro and the dynamic energy of the guitars.

One pinnacle of Currents makes way for another in Downwind, as potent a punk and heavy metal anthem as you are likely to hear this year, which applies to the album as a whole too to be fair. The song stomps with heavy booted beats and wiry grooves whilst vigorously rippling with addictive emotion and infectiousness. It is an epidemic of a persuasion and alongside Closure firmly taking top honours. Its might shadows the next up Through the Distance a touch though it cannot diminish the thrilling maze of thrilling imagination and electro whispers nor the turbulent lure of industrious and feverish rock ‘n’ roll shaping the track.

Variety is not absent for long at any point on Currents, the sheer atmospheric and melodic drama of Cold Dirt sending ears and release down new avenues with its harmonic poetry and epic orchestral bred heart. Another big highlight it leaves Ithaka to bring the album to a close with its tribal seeded percussion and sultry melodic climate. Eleven minutes in length, the song never outstays the attention span, only revealing further depths and originality to band and release.

Currents is a gem, one shining brighter with every listen. There is a surprise that not as many songs return in thoughts to nag attention whilst away from the album but this has no impact, not even a whisper, on the weight and glory of the album. As suggested at the start Atlas Losing Grip just get better and better, and even the news that Alfaro has left the band just before the album’s release cannot deflate the band’s certain ascent into the strongest spotlights, especially with a song featuring his placement Niklas Olsson sounding like the vocal department is in safe and accomplished hands.

Currents is available worldwide from 16th January

http://www.atlaslosinggrip.com/

RingMaster 16/01/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Convent Guilt – Guns for Hire

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Described as ‘Heavy Metal Warriors’ yet with a sound at times as punkish as it is metal, Australian band Convent Guilt unleash their debut album on Shadow Kingdom Records this month. Consisting of eight tracks of highly agreeable persuasion, Guns For Hire is a potent introduction to the Sydney quartet; not an encounter to cause major ripples but a promise ridden proposition providing an enjoyable stomp to get the teeth into.

   Guns for Hire makes a solid start though the first two tracks only warm the appetite and emotions with their decent if underwhelming presence. Opener Angels in Black Leather initially lures attention through a great dark bassline within a strain of juicy riffs. The track is soon expanding its persuasion with heavy metal enterprise and a punchy rhythmic enticement but it also lacks the spark its start hints at, especially when the vocals of bassist Iron Belshaw enter the mix. Technically the track is potent and a solo impressively flavours the offering, but from voice to sound it avoids truly exciting ears and thoughts. The following Don’t Close Your Eyes is similar, the healthy web of enterprise cast by guitarists Dario Lastro and Matty making an accomplished and colourful temptation against the firm swings of drummer Brent. Yet there is an unsurprising and unadventurous feel to the Maiden-esque song which prevents it finding the power you sense is lying at its heart. Both songs we know are favourites amongst a great many so it is more a personal taste thing but it is when third track Perverse Altar steps forward that for us band and album comes alive.

The track opens on a firm ridge of alluring riffs which makes an edgy canvas for the swiftly joining and fiery solo. It is a captivating start which finds another edge and intensity once the much a0046099024_2more impressing vocals of Belshaw stamp their authority on the song. He is never a threatening presence, but with the punk tone which lends its temptation to his delivery and the music itself coming through, the track whilst still firmly seeded in a classic metal spawning, reveals a compelling punk ‘n’ roll character.

That new adventurous tenacity continues its appearance across the rest of Guns For Hire, Convent Guilt aligning a Celtic folk whisper to the intrigue soaked They Took Her Away. Its initial balladry is soon encased in a muscular cage of heavy rhythmic jabs and a similarly forceful bassline whilst the guitars snarl with riffs and seduce through spicy melodic expression almost simultaneously. The song is outstanding, a strong glimpse at the variety in songwriting and sound certainly within the band and an imagination not as forceful on other tracks.

Both the aggressive roars of the album’s title track and Desert Brat keep ears and appetite eagerly keen, the first another punk urged slice of raw heavy metal blessed with a tasty bass tone from Belshaw. His vocals also find a punk breeding, excelling within the causticity of the sounds around him. By now the album’s songs are as much punk as heavy metal and certainly the better for it; the latter style providing strong and tempting colour to the rawer attitude of the songs as evidenced by its excellent successor. That bass of Belshaw persistently prowls with compelling tempting, his riff again irresistible and the spring board for antagonistic riffs and magnetic enterprise from the guitars. Like The Damned meets Motorhead, and Judas Priest, the track provides a strong and resourceful mark in the persuasion of the album.

Convict at Arms does not quite match up to the strength of the previous pair of songs but is soon an anthemic slab of pleasing metal catching feet and neck muscles up in its enticement before making way for the closing sonic carnage of Stockade. Once more metal and punk collide in a bust up of sonic dust and rhythmic confrontation, and again a thoroughly enjoyable encounter is bred. It is a riotous and infectious end to an album deserving keen attention.

As suggested Guns For Hire will not send shockwaves across the metal world but it will breed, as for us, a strong interest and anticipation for the band’s next move. Something coming with a rich dose of punk to its metal we hope.

Guns for Hire is available now via Shadow Kingdom Records @ http://shadowkingdomrecords.bandcamp.com/album/guns-for-hire

https://www.facebook.com/ConventGuilt/

RingMaster 13/01/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.thereputationlabel.today

 

Iron riffs and heavy passions: Introducing Wölfrider Interview

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Hailing from Wrocław, Polish heavy metal band Wölfrider drew outside attention to match that at home with the release earlier this year of their self-titled debut EP via Goetic Records. Packed with four tracks which charge ears with tsunami like strength and sonic voracity, the release was a sign post to the broader emergence of the band. Grabbing the chance to find out more about the band we had the pleasure to chat with vocalist Rafał ‘Rambo’ Gębicki and drummer Bartek Dolewski.

Hi guys and thank you for talking with us.

Can you tell us about the beginnings of the band?

Rambo: The core of the band came out from previous project called Clairvoyant. Guys wanted to play something new under new name. This was the beginning of 2012 when I joined them. After a month of rehearsals we played the first show. A few months later with ready material we entered the studio to record our Wölfrider EP. Everything has happened in leaps and bounds.

You sculpt your songs with an energy and passion which recalls traditional heavy metal at its purest. What are the major inspirations to band and its members?

Rambo: Most of our influences come from Western Europe, Heavy Metal Gods like Running Wild, Grave Digger, Accept, Judas Priest, but you can hear also some of the ‘epic’ ones – Bathory, Manilla Road. Each of us draws from other sources, for example, it may be Iron Maiden, Exodus, Iced Earth and even Death.

What are the backgrounds and experiences Wölfrider members brings to the band?

Bartek: We’ve got quite big experience during our activity as Clairvoyant…lots of gigs, developing songwriting, improving process of managing a band, and so on. As we progress we started the new band with a blank card so to speak yet locked and loaded. Rambo comes from Deversor and he had lots of work to do, because his singing style and technique had to be changed to the new material. Since only vocalist changed we all knew each other very well and there were no surprises – just going further in music.

There is a great metal scene in Poland it seems from the outside but hard to find that wider recognition for bands there. How have you found it?

Bartek: Well you have to remember that most of metal musicians in Poland have normal regular jobs and it’s hard to focus on your job, paying attention to your musicianship, and any promotional actions at once. So you have to have really organised way of doing your things. The second important factor is of course money. And currency exchange. If someone wants to be recognised outside his/hers country most probably has to pay for publishers – in Euro, USD or GBP. That could be very expensive due to rate of exchange and that money could be spent on something else for band, like a good audio equipment to practice better etc.

Tell us about your debut EP which recently came out via Goetic Records.Wölfrider2

Rambo: Okay, so long story short. We recorded, mixed and mastered our EP in DIY style. Later on some kind of distribution was needed and we mailed to couple of indie record labels (major ones didn’t give a fuck about us). Goetic Records from Canada owned and ruled with pride by awesome guy – Kosta Bayss – he helped us with promotion and digital distribution. I guess we are the only one non-black metal band over there but it’s not a big deal for us – it’s more like an underground family. Back in the day – yeah, a couple of months ago, fucking ancient times – Goetic Records had nothing to do with releasing physical CDs due to some limitations. Now Kosta can sell his bands like a boss over the Internet on classic CD packs, you have to check it out.

Though all track stand out Hearts of Iron steals its extra share of the glory for us. Give us some background to the song.

Rambo: Our music mastermind – Kamil – is a huge fan of strategy PC games so guess where the name comes from. You can Google it. This one particular song was written by him, we just got music sheet, changed almost nothing at all – somehow it started to have its drive and vibe. Most of our stuff is done after many trials and errors on rehearsal room. Not this one. Maybe we shoot jackpot with Hearts of Iron.

Does the EP sum up your sound or are there already new surprises waiting to be unleashed in your next release?

Rambo: EP is just an introduction to Wölfrider’s realm. In the next album we’ll include a couple of licks for fans, not exactly new material – you can hear it already at gigs. First of all – we got our sound tuned way lower than typical Heavy Metal band…mostly due to Deceiver Of The Gods by Amon Amarth. So that’s quite unique for our type of music – tuning in B-Standard is common among extreme metal bands. On the other hand my singing style has changed – it’s much more modulated. Some ideas have to be re-visited and full album release needs more brainstorming but don’t worry, it’s gonna be shitting thunders and blasting metal – pure heavy as Polish vodka. You know, we are trying to be as honest in our music as possible. We have nothing to lose anyway.

What is the live scene like for you and metal in general in Poland?

Bartek: I think it’s about the other countries. There are really few people from seriously pro bands signed to major record labels that are making living from the metal music. Average, casual guys like us have to be as much accountants as musicians to make everything works. About metal scene in Poland? I may be wrong and controversial but I think that extreme metal bands and thrash metal guys have way more attention. Lots of independent indie record labels are interested in death/black metal bands and looks like there are more shows for that kind of metal. And thrash metal has its own renaissance – but it’s just mine opinion based on my observations. Hopefully most of metal heads aren’t strictly bounded to one kind of metal and you can see Cannibal Corpse fans at some classic heavy metal gig.

There is roar and power to the EP which suggests the songs live are real wall shakers. On stage is where the real magic happens for the band?

Wölfrider3Bartek: First of all thank you for really cool opinion about our music. It’s always pleasure to have that kind of description about the EP, this is what we intended you and other fans to feel.

We try to do our best on stage and work on our presence as much as on technical and musician skills. We play for quite a time and definitely can hear and feel band mates playing, correct something messed up – you know – and just have great time showing people that we love to play metal and have fun on stage. We work really hard to not just be another boring band with bunch of dudes that’s stay the entire show in one spot and not even look at the audience. Metal used to be – and still is – about aggression and playing loud. Most of all about raw energy, this is the root, the foundation of rock ’n’ roll music. If there is no Ultimate Power Armageddon on stage (in positive way) then you’re doing it wrong, son.

What is coming up for Wölfrider in 2015 and from you for fans?

Rambo: We plan to play as many shows as possible. Your band cannot be real and serious without gigging for real fans – world is not limited to Internet. We have booked a couple of events related to “tribute to Bathory” since we are huge Quorthon fans. More details should be soon. That’s about performing live. We would love to present just a little sneak-peak of our upcoming full album by releasing a single – maybe along with video clip. That would be a real killin’ teaser that will show just a little the way that we’re heading with our music.

Once again thanks for the interview, anything you would like to add?

Bartek: Yeah, whoring for views, subscriptions and likes on social media websites. Check us out on:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/wolfrider.band

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/wolfriderofficial

Bandcamp: https://wolfriderband.bandcamp.com/

Goetic Records: http://www.goeticrecords.com/

I want to add that we know that there are bunch of our fans outside Poland, even outside Europe. For those people and many others we have an idea to live stream our gigs on YouTube or other platform – so please, wait for news!

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 15/12/2014

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