Zedi Forder – Isolation

The musical journey of the members of UK outfit Zedi Forder has left behind a legacy of metal and rock induced captivation under the guises of Tricore, An Entire Legion, and Rind Skank; an adventure we caught upon from its early days and have lustfully devoured thereon in, their previous escapades in Zedi Forder no exception. May sees the trio unleash their second album and yes the slavery of our ears, instincts, and imagination continues through Isolation.

In fact there is not just Isolation to consider as the band has also unveiled twinned project Zedi Forder Superium with its first release, Judgement. Consistently the band’s songs feel like they are itching to venture to other places whilst relishing the landscape they thrill, this alter-ego of sorts pure fascination just as a thought before a sound was heard and which you can explore with us in a separate review on the site. As for Isolation; it is a release not bred by the current challenge upon the whole world, though it feels a perfect soundtrack for current times, but one borne “out of a sense of feeling separate and apart from the various communities and industry elements that dominate most of the music world.” From their first days as Zedi Forder the threesome of guitarist Mark Carstairs, drummer/vocalist and primary song writer Chris Kerley, and bassist Rich Tomsett have musically stood outside of the crowd and too often the richness of attention deserved but with a so what defiance which fuels their invention, power, and imagination. It is a situation and attitude which has wrapped Carstairs and Kerley across their decade long creative union also embracing those previous bands though you can only feel it has also been incitement to their true uniqueness and one of the UK’s finest if yet to be truly recognised songwriters in Kerley.

With Carstairs departing after the release of the Woking band’s first album in 2017, being firstly replaced by April Cox, the band’s current line-up was completed by Wayne Clifford last year, a seamless change which has seen the band spring some of their finest moments yet within Isolation. The instantly intriguing One Hundred Exactly starts things up, gently caressing ears with guitar and bass as breath bred sighs shimmer. Kerley’s distinctive tones and melodic touch is already feeding a waiting appetite which became only greedier once the song erupts in a charge of hungry riffs and carnivorously swung rhythms. Zedi Forder have a wholly unique sound which is as pungent within Isolation but as the opener swiftly insists it does not stop each track caging new and fresh adventures and trespasses. The opener continues to flourish as metal and heavy rock essences collude, again in a sound which defies true tagging as it teases in variety and diversity.

The outstanding start continues through Partaay, waspish grooves instantly seducing our imagination and imagination as the band proceed to harass and encroach on the senses. As with all songs though, things twist in an instant, change in a moment of mischief as unpredictability seeds virulent captivation found within the mercurial encounter before JoJo conjures its own magnetic field of electronic and sonic contemplation around the expressive and animated vocals of Kerley. As it bites it seduces, rhythms skilfully plundering the senses as grooves prove infernal flirtation in another enslaving moment within Isolation.

Through the metal forged and infectious dare we say almost electro poppy antics of The Herder, a glorious slice of viral addictiveness, and Messy Mechanical with its electronicore scented, infection loaded multi-flavoured rock stroll there was an escalation in attention and pleasure which No Taint stalked and added to with its mix of rhythmic predation and melodic seduction. As within all songs, there is plenty more going on to hungrily court the imagination, electronic and alternative textures as prevalent as other funk and metal nurtured aspects.

Shallow Black provides an epic and atmospheric excursion next but as you may now expect one which challenges as it entices, dark almost apocalyptic enterprise merging with invigorating melodic and sonic temptation while straight after Anonymoose springs a web of cosmopolitan temptation and insular trespass as virulent and rousing as anything within this and any album heard so far this year.

The trio continue to devour expectations and grip ears through the diverse combination of Try Your Luck, a track as funky as it is rapacious, the electronically infested cauldron of metal provocation that is We’re All Coloured, and the similarly bred and equally unique Alterway; the trio providing maelstroms of flawed emotion and intimacy aligned to riveting manipulation.

Wake Up is the final track, as in the last Kerley’s rhythms shaping the attack as potently as his tones and here prowling through the darkest shadows and intense emotions as wiry grooves wrap around the senses alongside the tenebrific crawl of the bass. It is a superb end to the release, an almost claustrophobic pleasure and another major highlight among so many within Isolation.

As mentioned we have been hooked on the band’s sound since day one but that brings a greedier and harsher demand for innovation and surprise with every release; once again Zedi Forder has delivered and how…

Isolation is exclusively released May 15th @ https://tricore.bandcamp.com/ with a “PAY WHAT YOU LIKE” pricing.

https://www.zediforder.com/   https://www.facebook.com/zediforder  https://twitter.com/ZediForder

Pete RingMaster 14/05/2020

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

Zedi Forder Superium – Judgement

As if one Zedi Forder album was not enough to be excited over, the trio has a second to grip attention in the shape of Judgement; though this is an entirely different proposition to explore, a twin project going by the name of Zedi Forder Superium. Self-described as “The sledgehammer to Zedi Forder’s scalpel; two sides of the same coin,” this openly unique alter-ego is a far fiercer trespass on the senses and imagination, a fury of sound and thought which soon proved just as striking and compelling as its counterpart.

Whereas the second Zedi Forder album, Isolation, exposed and explored “a sense of feeling separate and apart from the various communities and industry elements that dominate most of the music world”, Zedi Forder Superium takes on the whole world and its corruptions and toxicity which the Woking, UK hailing trio of drummer/vocalist and primary song writer Chris Kerley, guitarist Wayne Clifford, and bassist Rich Tomsett describe as “a fury from the voice of a calculating arbiter that looks to right the wrongs of the world, of all scopes and sizes, one at a time”.

As a mechanical toned voice casts accusations and lyrical reprisals across Judgement, there is something of The Day the Earth Stood Still meets V for Vendetta to the character of the album while musically it is bred in the varied metal and raw rock instincts of the band. As the opening Anthem Of Justice reveals it is an inclination which does not deter melodic enterprise and bold imagination. Instantly the track is buzzing around ears, its hornet like riffs harrying the senses and a quickly formed appetite as beats jab and its bassline weaves. That machine-like vocal incitement is swiftly in the centre of the creative dispute, staggering its potent challenge as Kerley’s predacious rhythms dance. Equally bass and guitar share certain rapacity in their touch and enterprise, the combination as varied in flavour as it is barbarous in touch.

Wherefore Art Thou follows, its initial attack Skindred like but soon stalking the listener with its own bold intensity, style, and a swing which had us bouncing. Alongside the mechanical proclamation, Kerley aligns his own distinctive melodic tones; that seemingly the spark to increased imagination and diversity within the song which by now bears at times a bit of an Anti-Clone like hue.

Next up is Knock Knock and immediately it nags ears with riff wired temptation, an accompanying trespass tempered by floating harmonies and melody bred grooves though they in turn are preyed upon by a virulence of voracious rhythms and the sonic toxicity of the guitar. The track is as irresistible as those before it, proving even easier to be greedy over while Fight Evil With Intolerance is almost sermon like in its rise and injurious in its intent yet, as within all tracks, proves a supportive and rousing incitement physically and provocatively.

As Slippery Slope entangles ears and imagination in its remorseless intimation and implacable dynamics, only tightening its grip across striking twists and devious turns, and Noisy pushes all the right buttons with barbarous and ruthless prowess, Judgement only confirmed its impressive and addictive presence, Awake backing both up in creative kind. It too prowls and stalks the listener, a sonic predator embroiled in the voracious instincts of groove and alternative metal but wrapped in a progressive veil of fertility.

Completed by the melodic melancholy and shadow escaping sure hand of Quell My Beating Heart, beauty shimmering off every surface it bears, Judgement was total captivation. Easily fans will know its source from the craft and songwriting behind it and Kerley’s distinct tones yet the album and indeed Zedi Forder Superium itself has risen to find uniqueness amidst inescapable dominance.

Judgement exclusively released May 11th @ https://tricore.bandcamp.com/ with a “PAY WHAT YOU LIKE” pricing.

https://www.zediforder.com/   https://www.facebook.com/zediforder  https://twitter.com/ZediForder

Pete RingMaster 14/05/2020

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

Dark Stares – The Lightning Echo

Darkly haunting and persistently mesmeric, The Lightning Echo is the new album from UK rockers Dark Stares. The successor to their acclaimed debut, Darker Days Are Here to Stay, the new release provides twelve tracks which lure the listener and imagination into the realm between warm and portentous dreams; each a siren of intimation and reflection which enjoyably proved rather hard to escape.

St Albans hailing, Dark Stares has been a persistent captivation from their early tracks and EPs such as Octopon and Soul Contract through to that creatively potent first full-length of last year. Looking back to Darker Days Are Here to Stay, there is no doubt that The Lightning Echo is the natural progression to its predecessor but equally it has evolved its own fascination and unique character of sound; a nagging seduction which wraps the senses like a crepuscular animal.

The album immediately strides through ears with You Know Me, the track’s high kneed beats stamping authority on attention as the fuzz bred grooves of Harry Collins wind around them and the equally magnetic tones of vocalist Miles Kristian Howell. From the single song alone it is easy to hear why Queens Of The Stone Age is often used as a comparison though there is no escaping the singular identity of the Dark Stares sound either.

The highly rousing start is prolonged by the similarly anthemic Dance, a tenacious command on the body bound in the dark climes of surf/desert rock. Again the imposing yet contagious lure of Brett Harland Howell’s bass and Taylor Howell’s spirited beats manipulate song and listener, the Middle Eastern lures cast by Collin’s guitar quite irresistible in one of the album’s major peaks.

Next up Spell You’ve Cast is a similarly beguiling temptress if a slightly sinistrous one, its body a writhing tease of grooves and enticing vocals across almost predatory rhythms while the following Crusader brings a dustier desert rock landscaped croon with volatility in its rich fertile earth. Each made for a riveting proposition if the first with fiercer temptation as too Mr Midnight with its rapacious crawl and tantalising menace. As those around it, the magnificent encounter spins a web of flavour and suggestion sparking imagination and appetite for its tenebrific charm and bait.

There is something of a Doors meets Muse shimmer to The Shadows and Faceless Man, the first with its mercurial climate and compelling sonic grumble breeding sheer dark captivation and through the second wrapping an emotive melodic shroud around ears before breaking out into its pensive musing. Sandwiched between them is Today, a song edging more firmly to the sixties psychedelia of Morison and co. and though it does not quite match up to those alongside one that only grips attention and enjoyment.

After them, In My Pocket initially shimmers before catching flame, repeating its persuasive melodic cycle with greater intensity as Zedi Forder-esque hues bring earnest breath to the increasingly compelling encounter while in turn intrigue soaked and with disquieting glamour Misty Lanes makes its potent play for best track honours.

The album concludes with the radiantly rapacious saunter of Dead and Gone and lastly the hearty rock ‘n’ roll of Rebel Angel. Both tracks hit the spot with the first another simply adding to the numerous reasons as to why The Lightning Echo should not be ignored.

Easily The Lightning Echo is the finest moment with Dark Stares to date, one which for us only gets more thrilling and addictive by the listen.

The Lightning Echo is out across most stores May 31st.

https://www.darkstares.com/   https://www.facebook.com/DarkStares/   https://twitter.com/dark_stares

Pete RingMaster 30/05/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Zedi Forder – I Don’t Want To Set The World On Fire/Ditties 1 EP

For us one of music’s best adventures over the past decade has been the creative emprise of songwriter/vocalist/drummer Chris Kerley; an escapade taking in acclaimed releases from bands such as Tricore, An Entire Legion, Rind Skank, Kid Golhum and now Zedi Forder. It has been a journey Kerley has for the main taken with guitarist Mark Carstairs but is now just the songwriter with new creative mischiefs on board for the latest encounters from the latter of that long line of great projects.

Ahead of a new single released this December, Zedi Forder recently unveiled the Ditties 1 EP, a collection of tracks which did not quite fit the alt metal/rock palette of the band but more than deserved a full airing. It is fair to say that each has the inimitable touch and character of a Kerley song, his distinctive tones and melodic prowess unmistakable as too the devilish humour which always lurks around his compositions and often takes over the driving seat, but just fall outside the palette of the band’s previous offerings.

With guitarist April Cox and bassist Rich Tomsett alongside Kerley and more of an indie pop/rock sound to its contents, Ditties 1 opens up with Fine Wine. It is a song which as soon as its initial bass lure is joined by a similarly enticing guitar hook has the body swaying, a bolder bounced incited by its lively and increasingly bold, defiant and tongue in cheek stroll. With a Queen-esque hue to its captivation and imagination, the track needed barely a play to get under the skin and have mutual participation involved.

Teasing hooks and sultry shimmers accompany the entrance of Forget about me next, one of a couple of songs which would not have glaringly been out of place within the bands outstanding debut album of last year we would suggest but certainly have their own particular flavour. It too swiftly and easily had attention and involvement hooked, Kerley just as adept at breeding pop songs as more predacious encounters.

I Am with its piano elegance and intimation as well as Cox’s great harmonic backing tones simply beguiled especially as its opening arms brought a virulent rock ‘n’ roll saunter while Sit and Wait provides an relatable intimate croon which again had body and thoughts swaying in pleasure and recognition before Something Else shines with its crystalline balladry and emotive charm.

The EP also features two bonus tracks in Football in the park and Spookums though the latter is not listed, songs which share the same reggae/folk devilment and indeed tune as too Reeves and Mortimer like humour and released previously during the World Cup and Halloween periods respectively; tracks which dare you not to join in with the biggest knowing grin.

As mentioned the EP was released ahead of a single; that track being a cover of The Inkspots classic I don’t want to set the world on fire. Embracing the forties nostalgia of the original with their own particular misbehaviour, the track bewitched ears and vocal chords, again rather quickly and enjoyably. It is a track which makes the perfect Christmas song if you have no appetite for the infernal creative clichés and bells most have to come with.

With a highly anticipated new album slated for next year, both Ditties 1 and I don’t want to set the world on fire make for a great appetite pleasing slice of Zedi Forder; a one of a kind treat few can emulate.

The Ditties 1 EP is out now as a pay what you want purchase via https://tricore.bandcamp.com/album/zedi-forder-ditties-1-indie-rock-punk-ep with I don’t want to set the world on fire released December 7th.

https://www.facebook.com/zediforder

Pete RingMaster 01/12/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Icarus Dive – Among The Thorns

Radiating out from their home town of Guildford, there is a buzz around British alternative rock outfit Icarus Dive that simply teases attention. It is suggestiveness though which will become a demand if they continue to offer and grow even more potent from new release, Among The Thorns. Four tracks of creative adventure aligned to mischievous imagination, the EP is a joy to ears and unpredictability providing plenty to be truly excited by.

The release is headed in order and irresistibility by Hydra, a track which is pure creative theatre. Zooming in on a sonic wave as a vocal barker announces its and the band’s arrival, the song swiftly strolls through ears with a gait as much a sinister prowl as a celebratory saunter. Grooves immediately wrap around ears, seducing as the rapier swings of drummer Louis Nanke-Mannell slice through the moody lines cast by Harry Crowe’s bass. The equally captivating lead vocals of guitarist Joe Crook trigger a new swagger of sound flooded with drama as too is its accompanying harmonic backing. There is a definite Muse like spicing to the moment but as throughout the track, Icarus Dive breeds their own individuality to lure ears and appetite like a moth to a seductive beacon. The track is superb, twisting and turning with zeal to perpetually surprise and captivate.

Such its dynamic craft the following trio of tracks are simply eclipsed for personal tastes but starting with Murder and Lies, each offers their own fiercely enjoyable and compelling adventure. The second track coaxes ears with a simple niggle of guitar which is quickly joined by the ever alluring tones of Crook. It is a low key but gripping coaxing that escalates in animation to entice darker hues from the bass alongside the crisp dancing beats of Nanke-Mannell. As within its predecessor, melodic craft and rhythmic verve sparks expectations squashing vitality, the track constantly a fire of adventure and imagination further ablaze with almost vaudeville like drama aligned to boisterous energy and fun.

Mesmerised is next revealing harsher wiring in its initial encroachment before springing into an emotive glide with a whiff of bands like KingBathmat and Zedi Forder to it. Whereas the first pair of songs made an immediate compulsion for ears and lust, their successor took its time to truly blossom but time which only ensured success as the band’s ideation and individual prowess united in another flame of aural temptation.

The EP ends with The New Gods, another relative slow burner in comparison to those before it but quickly a web of magnetic enticement nurtured by the snare of guitar wires alongside inviting but almost predatory rhythms. Crook’s vocals just escalate the trap of fascination and contagion as the song completes a thoroughly striking and richly enjoyable encounter.

 Among The Thorns is the introduction of one thickly promising and already strongly impressing band to national attention though it is easy to think recognition and praise is not going to stop there.

Among The Thorns is out now across most major stores and @ https://icarusdive.bandcamp.com/

 https://www.icarusdive.com/    https://www.facebook.com/icarusdive/   https://twitter.com/IcarusDiveUK

Pete RingMaster 24/09/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Zedi Forder – Self Titled

Some bands and artists just click with ears and imagination from their introduction and for us one was definitely UK trio Zedi Forder. Maybe it is more accurate to say the creative force behind the band crafted the connection because previous adventures for the duo of vocalist/drummer/primary songwriter Chris Kerley and guitarist Mark Carstairs have equally seriously enticed and stoked the passions. They are also the creators of Tricore, An Entire Legion, and Rind Skank; all distinctly individual bands releasing some of the most exciting and imaginative adventures in recent years though each being sadly missed or ignored by a tide of major attention. Zedi Forder is their latest project, with bassist Richard Tomsett alongside, creating a bold and multi-flavoured mix of alternative metal and voracious rock ‘n’ roll which fuels a self-titled debut album that quite simply deserves greed driven recognition.

In some ways because of previous seductions of our passions, Zedi Forder get a head start in a want, or should that be need, to hear its exploits and an assumption of having some level of appetite for what may be on offer. Equally though, it makes expectations much more demanding and triggers the question of can the band create something unique and fresh enough to be truly new from past endeavours as much as those around them. Many bands or musicians struggle in one guise but across a few it is a rare success. The release of an also self-titled EP in 2015 suggested the Woking hailing outfit could and would, their first album now a striking confirmation going well beyond simply bearing out that proposal though understandably it also gives delicious slithers teasing at earlier explorations which adds to rather than defuses the originality.

The Zedi Forder bio says it is a band with a split personality. “One side is driven by the musical aim of being bold and ever hopeful. The other side is fearless and judgmental, with music that reflects this.” The album certainly reflects this suggestion, its songs, sometimes within themselves, twisting from creatively free-swinging and swashbuckling to imaginatively mischievous on to proposals forceful and emotionally edgy and cutting but all crafted with an instinct for rousing sounds, manipulative rhythms, and daring diversity.

The album opens up with Killakarta and instantly consumes ears with rapacious riffs and jabbing beats as a bass growl courts a thick wiry groove. Kerley’s distinctive and ever magnetic vocals are soon in the heart of the mix, steering the song’s muscular stroll with expression and flair. That initial groove, carrying a growl far more vocal in the bass of Tomsett, winds around the imagination; it trespass enjoyably toxic and addictively refreshing. A slip into a mellow climate is just as tempting, accentuating the song’s unpredictability before being overwhelmed by a more primal expulsion of sound and intensity, reclaiming its moment as a great jazzy lilt infests the bass.

Seductive and predatory in equal measure, the track is a glorious start to an emprise of imagination and craft backed by the arguably less mercurial Machines though it is no slouch in raising its temperature and dynamics across a persistently eventful body. Kerley’s beats bite as Carstairs’ melodies spin a web of suggestion; his trap of enterprise further ignited by possibly the most virulent and catchy hook lined groove you will hear this year.

Dark Mook is a kaleidoscope of sound and texture, its opening noisy glaze slipping into a funky pop tinged stroll of melody and harmony before grungier flames escape guitars and bass as Kerley consistently croons with his never wavering melodic dexterity before I’m the one offers its own individual tempting for an already aroused and on the brink of lustful appetite. The fourth track also opens with a bracing surge of raw sound but is soon entangling the listener in a flirtatiously earthy bassline with funk in its genes and as quickly catchy vocals and beats with a sense of devilry in their gait. Carstairs’ weave of melodic teasing is a riveting net to get caught up in, ensnaring the senses before things get dirty and feisty though Kerley is still keeping the instinctive catchiness flowing in touch as the track to re-establishes its unbridled virulence. The song is another early pinnacle; an irresistible treat with a great 12 Stone Toddler meets KingBathmat scent to its revelry.

Darker shadows wrap the melodic beauty and volatile turbulence of next up My Moon, the song drawing on electronic tenacity to colour its variable and perpetually alluring atmosphere above a rugged terrain of invention. Across its roar, thoughts pluck at comparisons to the likes of Sick Puppies, Voyager, and Soundgarden; all slightly inaccurate but potent hints to the great track.

The grin loaded Nachoman comes next, the song a compelling tongue in cheek but earnest tease of social commentary. It has voice and hips hooked within its opening Red Hot Chili Peppers smoked swerve and only proceeds to tighten its vice like grip through heavier spices and inventive condiments of sound while Open Wide grabs attention with a bullish tirade of sound before flirtatiously dancing in ears with its Jane’s Addiction like funk metal meets System Of A Down seeded versatility. Melodies and emotions fluctuate in character and intensity across the song, as too vocals and rhythms with the latter an evolving torrent of enticement and aggression.

They love it more is a cyclone of sound and energy within an oasis of reflection and melody, never truly settling but always in control of its volcanic fusion of rock and metal while successor Smooch is a predator of hips and imagination with its boisterous shuffle courted by barbarous rhythms and emerging sonic hostility again spurned on by the spiky beats of Kerley and the irritable tone of Tomsett’s bass. With an infection loaded and at times psychotic groove sharing lures with an inherent catchiness, the track as its predecessor hits the spot dead centre, burrowing deeper with every listen, as quite simply does the album.

The growling Time after time leaves no stone of temptation unturned, its grunge/metal snarl maybe the most creatively untwisted track on the release but as bold and naturally infectious as any others such as the following On the run, a slab of classic metal and heavy rock with a nod to the likes of Zeppelin and Sabbath in its heart infused with the progressive and melody conjuring imagination of Zedi Forder.

Though not the actual final song, Lonely One closes things off with its melodically haunting, sonically searing, and rhythmically imposing blaze which alone shares all you need to know to hear why its creators warrant unbridled attention.

With a bonus quartet of mesmeric acoustic tracks which alone prove why we rate Kerley as a vocalist so much, each also unveiling a new drama and shade to the original’s aspects, the album is manna for body and soul and a real bargain as it seems it is being released as a name your own price download. Covering their first EP we said “it would be rude not to go off and discover its majesty “, for the album substitute ‘rude’ for ‘stupid’ because you will surely not hear anything more gripping and exciting than what Zedi Forder have in lying wait.

The Zedi Forder album is released June 10th wit pre-ordering available now @ https://tricore.bandcamp.com/album/zedi-forder-the-album-out-10th-june-pre-order-to-get-4-tracks-entire-flame-wiz-album-now

http://www.zediforder.com/     https://www.facebook.com/zediforder/   https://twitter.com/ZediForder

Pete RingMaster 02/06/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Seduction of Noise: Twenty punk/alternative releases which ignited The RingMaster Review in 2015.

In another year of creative drama, sonic adventure, and melodic mastery across the broad sphere of sound, The RingMaster Review selects those EPs/albums covered by the site which most turned ears and imagination lustful.

TSPSI_RingMaster Review

The St Pierre Snake Invasion – A Hundred Years A Day
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/11/04/the-st-pierre-snake-invasion-a-hundred-years-a-day/

Oh! Gunquit – Eat Yuppies and Dance
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/05/02/oh-gunquit-eat-yuppies-and-dance/

Zedi Forder – Self Titled EP
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/09/03/zedi-forder-self-titled-ep/

Mr. Strange – The Bible of Electric Pornography
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/11/05/mr-strange-the-bible-of-electric-pornography/

Mr. Strange EP album cover _RingMaster Review

Billy Momo – Drunktalk
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/02/02/billy-momo-drunktalk-album/

Black – Blind Faith
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/06/01/black-blind-faith/

Los Bengala – Festivos Incluso
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/08/25/los-bengala-festivos-incluso/

The Dropper’s Neck – Nineteen|Sixteen
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/07/10/the-droppers-neck-nineteensixteen/

The Dropper's neck Cover Artwork_RingMaster Review

The Slow Readers Club – Cavalcade
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/04/14/the-slow-readers-club-cavalcade/

Los and the Deadlines – Perfect Holiday EP
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/07/13/los-and-the-deadlines-perfect-holiday-ep/

Le Butcherettes – A Raw Youth
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/09/18/le-butcherettes-a-raw-youth/

Le Butcherettes A Raw Youth Cover_RingMaster Review

Asylums – Wet Dream Fanzine EP
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/02/23/asylums-wet-dream-fanzine-ep/

Inca Babies – The Stereo Plan
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/03/11/inca-babies-the-stereo-plan/

The Barnum Meserve – Self Titled
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/04/06/the-barnum-meserve-self-titled/

Deepshade – Everything Popular Is Wrong
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/09/24/deepshade-everything-popular-is-wrong/
Deepshade Cover Artwork_RingMaster Review

Kobadelta – Open Visions
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/04/27/kobadelta-open-visions/

Dirt Box Disco – Only in it For the Money
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/04/16/dirt-box-disco-only-in-it-for-the-money/

The Migrant – Flood
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2016/01/08/the-migrant-flood/

Dick Venom & the Terrortones – SnakeOil for Snakes
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/11/09/dick-venom-the-terrortones-snakeoil-for-snakes/

cover_RingMaster Review

Practical Lovers – Agony
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/11/28/practical-lovers-agony/

The RingMaster Review 01/01/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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