Saltlake – Medicate Me

As much as talent and craft helps a band step out from the crowd having a sound with distinct character to it is just as potent a weapon. On the evidence of their new EP, UK alternative rock trio Saltlake has found that key. It may not have true uniqueness yet but there is no escaping a captivating prowess and enterprise which commands attention.

One of the first things the Medicate Me EP hooks ears with is the depth and expanse of its sound, a soundscape of electronic and electric drama which belies the slim number of the band’s personnel. It comes drenched in emotional intensity and a hungry energy which again only adds to its potency. Consisting of vocalist/guitarist Henry Gottelier, bassist Liam Quinn, and drummer John Godly, Saltlake emerged from within the Sussex countryside and London suburbs in 2013. Medicate Me is our introduction to the band and takes short time in sparking an appetite to hear more.

It opens up with Badlands, keys and rhythms looming up on ears bringing a tide of riffs and melodic intrigue. The robust and enticing rhythms of Quinn and Godly probe and incite as Gottelier’s strong and alluring tones roar. As quickly familiar essences grab thoughts but only adding to the richness of the track in sound and tone as it simmers and boils with creative and emotive enterprise. Comparisons to the likes of Young Guns, Mallory Knox, and Bring Me The Horizon have been made with the threesome and it is easy to hear why through the EP opener.

The following Sympathy Apathy entices initially in a similar way to its predecessor if with less of an imposing trespass. It too casts a dramatic tapestry of sound swiftly upon ears, melodic suggestion wearing an early U2-esque hue to whet the appetite before Saltlake weaves their own individual theatre of sound and adventure. As with the first, there is a mix of the familiar and the fresh entwined to catch the imagination; creating a song which mixes unpredictable and recognisable flavours to push the release to another level.

Hourglass simmers and erupts next with melodic persuasion and emotive intensity, vocals as reflective as keys and guitars against the more formidable touch of rhythms. It is a track which just blossoms from moment to moment and listen to listen. The drama of synths and melody are matched by the prowess of voice and creative imagination fuelling a song where though there is something familiar nagging away with one of its key hooks, though still to be exposed in realisation as to why, it soon steals the limelight within Medicate Me.

The EP closes with its title track, a proposal rising from an electronic mist around a dark bass throb into an atmospheric heart bred croon prone to more volatile, ear grabbing cries of emotion and intensity. Even with its thick haunting air the song is as catchy as anything before it and brings things to a highly enjoyable conclusion.

As suggested, Medicate Me is a mix of the familiar and individual which increasingly impresses over time from a band which is heading the right way towards real attention.

Medicate Me is available through all stores now.

https://www.saltlakeuk.com/     https://www.facebook.com/SaltlakeUK     https://twitter.com/saltlakeuk

Pete RingMaster 16/11/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Witterquick – Fire & Ice

With a sound which sits rather nicely yet individually among the likes of Brand New, Young Guns, and Mallory Knox, UK outfit Witterquick has been stirring up plenty of praise carrying attention their way over the past year or so which new EP Fire & Ice can only re-energise. Offering four slices of their melody rich, emotion thick, forceful rock ‘n’ roll, the release confirms the band’s rising presence in the British music rock scene.

With success and acclaim already stoked by their debut EP, Beneath the Spinning Lights, and a sold-out UK tour with Nothing But Thieves among their own shows, Witterquick linked up with producer Romesh Dodangoda (Bring Me the Horizon, Lower Than Atlantis, Twin Atlantic) for Fire & Ice. Straight away it hints at the reasons for the increased attention upon the band, opener Shattered Suns skipping in on a summery breeze before rhythms pounce and the voice of Will Alford impressively grabs ears. The simmer of keys flirt among the tide of riffs and rhythms, guitarists Ben Chanter and Sean Davey creating a web of melody and hooks which tempt infectiously within the invitingly imposing strikes of Andy Lewis’ drums and the brooding tones of Ollie Chanter’s bass. Swiftly infectious and increasingly so as Alford impressively leads the way with his potent voice, the song grips attention and appetite.

A single which has already earned the band eager radio play, Lie To Me follows with its gentle but catchy swing and warm melodic embrace. There is a more caustic edge to the song which swarms its shadows to add further depth to its presence, but it is the emotive tide and melodic dexterity of the band and songwriting which fuels its character to great effect. Though for these ears its predecessor is a mightier lure into the EP, there is no denying the track gets under the skin and into the hips with its accomplished heat and tenacious catchiness.

Hiding Place brings a rockier swagger with its robust presence next, rhythms almost assaulting the senses with their forceful nature. It is a pleasure emulated in the fiery textures erupting from the guitars as the harmonic strengths of Alford are matched by his enterprise on keys. Emotionally and musically anthemic, the track really hits the spot in swift time, it too a perfect lure into the creative heart of Witterquick.

The release is closed up by the gentle fires of I Need A Friend Tonight, a melancholic reflection with crescendos of intensity and emotion which really blossoms over listen. It epitomises the band’s intelligent songwriting and layered sounds, over time breeding the same kind of infectiousness its rowdier companions generate more quickly.

It would be wrong to say that Fire & Ice blew us off out feet yet every moment with it has brought thick pleasure and an intrigue flooded hunger for more and there is nothing wrong with that at all.

Fire & Ice is out now and available @ http://witterquick.bigcartel.com/

http://www.witterquickband.com/    https://www.facebook.com/Witterquickband    https://twitter.com/witterquickband

Pete RingMaster 17/10/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

This Dying Hour – Resting Where No Shadows Fall

this-dying-hour-promo-shot_RingMasterReview

In many ways you could say that Resting Where No Shadows Fall, the eagerly anticipated debut album from British metallers This Dying Hour has been ten years in the making. Formed at the beginning of 2006 and swiftly impressing with their debut EP, the High Wycombe outfit has endured a decade littered with setbacks “that were just too great to overcome; everything from death and marriage to money came between the band and its members.” Now they are back and with a release which feels like it carries all the emotions and frustrations felt over that time; an album which ignites ears and imaginations with invention and passion.

That first year of the band produced the Longest Memory From The Shortest Life EP, a well-received and often praised introduction. It was accompanied by tours throughout the UK and Europe as well as shows with the likes of Young Guns, Sylosis, Bury Tomorrow, Malefice, and Exit Ten. The years since, as mentioned, brought This Dying Hour to a standstill until this year when vocalist Dave Pickup and guitarist Ash Whitelock decided to spark the band into life again with the help of “rotating members to fill the void.” Now they have made the wait for the next instalment of This Dying Hour adventure a forgotten moment as Resting Where No Shadows Fall seriously impresses ears and thoughts.

The album opens with its brief title track, an atmospheric instrumental which draws the imagination, leading it into the waiting jaws of War Drums. The second track instantly makes its point with scything riffs and beats, their imposing swipes aligned to a nagging raw melody before things all comes together in a predacious stalking of the senses. The snarling tones of Pickup are soaked in raw emotion and ire, a potency matched by Whitelock’s irritable guitar and the rhythmic antagonism of the track. It not may be the most unique proposal, references to the likes of Lamb Of God and Killswitch Engage valid, yet the song has a freshness which roars in ears and only blossoms further as a cleaner touch invades the vocal incitement.

The impressive start continues as Asleep springs its wiry grooves and vocal hostility next. Swiftly the song shows its distinct and individual character to be a diversity of intensity and energy, all soaked in venom as it seizes attention and a growing appetite for the release. Clean vocals and great dirty harmonies bring stronger drama and quality, as too the enterprising craft of Whitelock as the song bellows and challenges in equal enjoyable measure.

this-dying-hour-cover-artwork_RingMasterReviewPath Of Unknown opens with a melodic atmosphere similar to the opening intro, sunken vocals courting the initial lure before the song opens up into a striking and thrilling encounter. The mellower tones of Pickup predominantly stir the song this time around, luring with the listener alongside spicy melodies into one ridiculously infectious chorus and subsequently a great passage of calm reflection with a touch of Palms to it. One of the biggest highlights among many, the outstanding proposal is followed by the far more hostile climate and sound of Time To Die, though it too is unafraid to cast warm melodies and catchy clean vocals. A rival for best track to match its predecessor, the song completes a first half of Resting Where No Shadows Fall which simply blows most other emerging melodic/groove metallers away.

There is little loosening of attention and pleasure either as first the darker sinister realm of Underworld encloses and encroaches on the senses. Certainly the track is a touch hit and miss, moments which stir the blood and others which lie a touch flat on thoughts but arguably it is the most inventive proposition on the album as it ensnares the imagination while Alive is as accomplished as anything within Resting Where No Shadows Fall at blending the calmer and fiercer emotional and physical exploits of band and songwriting. Though both are lacking the spark of earlier songs, each leaves a real want for more which Priapism feeds with its melody rich charm and fiery temperament.

The album closes on the same kind of explosive sound and impact as it started, Room 108 a volatile and often corrosive encounter with sparkling moments of vocal invention and melodic imagination seemingly inspired by a mix of System Of A Down, Deftones, and In Flames.

It is a great end to an excellent first album from a band making up for lost time in passion and invention. With the potential of bigger and bolder to come, it is very easy to push Resting Where No Shadows Fall as something all should make an acquaintance with.

Resting Where No Shadows Fall is out in stores from Friday 30th September.

https://www.facebook.com/thisdyinghouruk/

Pete RingMaster 28/09/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Making Monsters – Bad Blood

2015 promo_RingMasterReview

We heard the buzz and now we know it is pretty much on the mark, UK band Making Monsters is one striking and seriously exciting proposition. Our evidence comes with the band’s new EP, Bad Blood. It is six tracks of highly irritable and even more contagious rock ‘n’ roll equipped with the snarl of punk and bold diversity of alternative rock; a proposal which stirs the instincts and spirit from start to finish; oh the fact that the band’s sound has a touch of Animal Alpha to it does it no harm either.

Emerging in 2011, the Derry based Making Monsters soon poked at keen attention with their self-titled debut EP the following year, that potently back by successor, Attention, two years later. Alongside that success, the quartet has developed and honed their sound and live presence, impressing and luring new flocks of fans while sharing stages with the likes of Young Guns, Silverstein, We Came As Romans, Max Raptor, and Skindred amongst many. A clutch of singles have increasingly stirred the blood and ears these past couple of years while a full UK tour with Fightstar and Arcane Roots last October cemented the band’s growing reputation. With Bad Blood though, it is easy to expect the band stepping into new spotlights and strength of acclaim, the EP holding all the creative cards to be a game changer in the ascent of the band as it is in their sound.

Straight away the EP suggests there is a new maturity and even bolder adventure to the Making Monsters sound, a thought confirmed song by song across Bad Blood. It opens up with its mighty title track, a slab of punk ‘n’ roll straight away teasing with spicy hooks as the instantly impressing roar of Emma Gallagher takes on all challengers in attitude and quality. Guitars and boisterous rhythms continue to entice and intimidate across the excellent encounter, Gallagher’s emotive fire backed by male scowls as Brian Doherty’s drum sticks beat out an addictive pattern.

MM - Better _RingMasterReviewIt is a glorious start with, as suggested at the start, a great Animal Alpha hue to its tempest; an imagination and appetite inciting beginning to the release quickly and potently backed up by Call Me Out. A kinder affair on the senses for the main but with an imposing volatility, the dark stroll of Gary Todd’s throaty bass at first holds court with the provocative tones of Gallagher, who is already showing much more of her versatility; the pair soon colluding with the fiery enterprise of guitarist Paul Monk and heftily swung beats to stir up an already keen appetite.

Latest single Better comes in next; its entrance also less intrusive but taking a quickly unshakeable firm grip on ears as shimmering melodies and senses piercing hooks lay their bait into the rhythmically virulent swing of the song. There are moments throughout it where thoughts wonder if Distillers were fused with Stolen Babies, would they sound like and as riveting as this. They are essences which continue to flavour a song which has the energies breathless and hunger greedier by its end, so luckily We Aren’t Living is next to eagerly share its melodic pop ‘n’ roll with a growl and a tenacious will. Like those around it, the track offers plenty of unpredictable twists and moments of fascinating imagination, neither ever disrupting the flow and impact.

Rose seduces next, Gallagher caressing ears with her warm yet snarly tones as sultry tendrils of guitar sway. It is a mesmeric coaxing soon over run by a torrent of spiky riffs and busy rhythms providing a just as enticing invitation. As now expected things are soon turning down new avenues and offering a variety of twists woven into a blaze of a song as raucous as it is emotively inflamed and intimate.

Bad Blood ends on our favourite track, a rampaging beast of attitude and invention going by the name of Noodle Sync. Noise and garage rock meets punk metal infused rock ‘n’ roll, the track is a blistering assault and trespass on ears and the senses. It is a cauldron of raw riffs and invasive hooks driven by the diverse drama and emotion of Gallagher’s explosive voice and presence, her ability and invention more than matched in sound and imagination by the rest of the band.

It is a stunning end to a quite exhilarating release; an EP which just might be the making of Making Monsters and certainly another step towards major things for the band one suspects.

The Bad Blood EP is out now digitally @ http://makingmonsters.bandcamp.com/ with physical copies available @ http://makingmonsters.bigcartel.com/product/bad-blood-ep

http://www.makingmonsters.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/makingmonsters   https://twitter.com/makingmonsters1

Pete RingMaster 16/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com

City Of Ashes – Rise

City Of Ashes_RingMasterReview

Making a big impression with their well-received debut album back in 2013, UK alternative rock band City Of Ashes now release its successor Rise; an encounter easy to imagine finding an equal if not bigger success. Consisting of eleven heart bred and melodically provocative tracks, the album confirms and pushes on the promise of predecessor All We Left Behind. In some ways, the band’s sound has not made any major leaps from the last album, or the EP before it, yet there is an open new maturity to songwriting and the bolder emotive imagination involved which alone grabs attention.

Since forming in 2009 and releasing the Then There Was A Hand In The Darkness EP, with All We Left Behind swiftly following, City Of Ashes has played all across the UK, sharing stages with the likes of Skindred, Exit Ten, Polar, Shadows Chasing Ghosts, Fei Comodo, Hildamay, and Young Guns along the way. Subsequent performances on their tour with Trapt only enhanced a reputation already ripe through their first album. Now it is the self-released Rise about to lure fresh attention the way of the Eastbourne quartet; an aim, as suggested earlier, easy to see succeeding to some potent degree.

Uprising is first up and swiftly lays an evocative melodic caress on ears as darker hues bring just as alluring shadows. The impressive vocals of Orion Powell quickly add their prowess backed by great band harmonies. The track is only a brief lure into the album but an attention grabbing one setting up the appetite for the following Vipers Nest. A sonic web of hooks and riffs descend on the senses first as the firm beats of Dan Russell make a thick impact with the brooding bass line of Dan Frederick in close attention. Soon bound in the melodic enterprise of James Macdonald and coloured by the expressive tones of Powell, the song easily catches the imagination with a touch of Placebo meets Manic Street Preachers to its broader alternative rock character.

RISE Artwork_RingMasterReviewBoth Battles Of My Youth and Walk Away keep the strong start going; the first with its anthemic roar and intimate tone amidst vocal and melodic suggestiveness whilst the second shares even more intensive angst in its melancholic cry. Again Powell impresses; the drama of his delivery an emotive flame within the more subdued but no less enticing rhythms and the creative adventure of Macdonald’s fingers on strings.

A delicious brooding bassline and core riff marks out Bittersweet next, that and a climatic feel to its emotional and sonic intensity, whilst Save Me carries a lively simmer to its bubbly melodies and crisp beats to equally grip ears and appetite. Whether there are any major surprises within the songs and indeed album can be argued, but each offering has something fresh and imaginative to its character and invention which draws attention easily as here or greedily as by the outstanding Iliad. Unstoppably emerging the album’s favourite track, it is a haunted and darkly lit proposal with a slow prowl as portentous as it is inviting. Matching his surroundings, Powell’s voice also ebbs and flows in raw emotion as rhythms and riffs border on stalking the senses. Provocative theatre in the ears, the song simply steals the show.

Bloodlust has a similarly hued nature to its canvas but a far lighter and vivacious air to its emotive outpouring and subsequent fiery expulsions whilst Sometimes provides a croon fuelled by apprehensive words and emotions cradled in orchestral like melodic sensitivity. Both songs keep enjoyment high before Confessions raises the album’s game again with its earnest roar.

Closing with the sober but potent sharing of the heart that is We Own The Night, band and album leaves pleasure a strong reaction to its imaginative and tenacious endeavours. Rise is a strong continuation of the band’s previous releases, if not a dramatic leap forward. As suggested earlier though, it is a more rounded and mature adventure embracing all the already recognised City Of Ashes qualities and more; and their most impressive outing yet.

Rise is out now @ http://cityofashes.bigcartel.com/

https://www.facebook.com/cityofashesband   http://www.twitter.com/cityofashes

Pete RingMaster 25/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Seasons – Self Titled EP

SEASONS_RingMasterReview

Their Facebook page suggests that alternative rock band Seasons were formed just a few weeks back in mid-February. Listening to their self-titled debut EP, you get the feeling the band might have stepped into the open then but its members have been working on their music for a touch or two longer. The four track introduction is a potent and lively affair, and sure to be one of the most accomplished debuts heard on the UK rock scene this year. You would not say it startles but everything about the band’s proposition is imaginatively crafted, confident, and boldly captures the imagination enough to spark the want to know much more.

Formed by vocalist Grant Tuffs, guitarist/vocalist Matt Turnbull, and bassist Brad Beech, Seasons recorded a couple of tracks before seeing its line-up completed with the addition of drummer/vocalist Antony Cardinal and guitarist/vocalist Steve Watts. Recording their EP with producer Dan J Lambert at Valhalla Studios, Seasons are now poised to launch themselves fully with its release with opener video/single Sailed Ships as its potent lead.

Saesons-Cover_RingMasterReviewSailed Ships instantly grabs ears with its opening infectious riff against the just as swiftly impressing tones of Tuffs. In no time rhythms are jabbing with open eagerness too as melodies and hooks unite for a web of sonic enterprise as vibrant as the union of vocals from across the band. Continuing to entice and offer great twists with spicy grooves, anthemically roaming rhythms, and emotional angst to the fore, the track is a mighty start and first taste of the band.

To be honest, the track is the pinnacle of the release, the star of the show but closely challenged by second track Rumours. It has a leaner body of sound but the same zeal in its imagination and rousing emotions as its predecessor, as well as the adventurous air to songwriting and delivery. Scything riffs and robust rhythms unite with evocative melodies and harmonies throughout, holding ears and satisfaction tight before making way for Seven Years and its gentler and equally emotive hug. Tuffs again excels, impressing with his expressive voice, as too the guitar craft of Turnbull and Watts as they shape a song breeding more volatility and tenacious energy over time. Driven by the magnetic beats of Cardinal, the song has a strongly familiar character to its pleasing presence but comes wrapped in the band’s own inventive touch to only leave satisfied thoughts

The EP is completed by The Runaway; a song as boisterous as it is melodically mellow and flourishing on the suggestive tones of Beech’s bass and more ear catching harmonies and vocal dexterity from Tuffs and band. It is a fiery end to a thoroughly enjoyable first encounter with Seasons. From the release alone, it seems that the Bedford hailing band has all the qualities and ideas to become a potent presence, especially if they can hone real distinctiveness in a sound already luring comparisons to band such as Young Guns and Mallory Knox.

The Seasons EP is released as a free download March 25th.

https://www.facebook.com/seasonsbanduk    https://twitter.com/seasonsukband

Pete Ringmaster 23/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Story – Hopeless But Hoping

Story_RingMasterReview

With a sound living up to their name; music and songs which tell a tale for ears and imagination to get wrapped up in, UK band Story release their second EP, Hopeless But Hoping this month. Carrying six tracks fusing melodic metalcore with post hardcore amidst rock scented infectiousness, the release is a captivating and accomplished encounter which is as much at ease brawling with the senses as caressing them with suggestive melodies.

Formed in 2014, the Sheffield hailing band seeded their sound in the inspirations of bands such as Memphis May Fire, Of Mice & Men, Mallory Knox, and Young Guns. They quickly earned a potent reputation for their live show, sharing stages with the likes of Tek-One, Qemists, ACODA, Shields, Silent Screams, The Call Back Academy, and Summerlin over time whilst the release of their first EP and debut single Father Forgotten, nudged a broader attention. Now they are unveiling Hopeless But Hoping to stir things up again and to greater heights, a success not too difficult to contemplate.

Produced from within the band, Hopeless But Hoping opens with Story’s new single/video Article 10. It lays a gentle melodic touch upon ears initially, evocative guitar charm stroking ears and imagination before a bigger rumble brews and escapes the band. It soon relaxes as the impressive vocals of Bill Hobson step forward with the narrative, the guitars of Liam Gratton and Matt Baxter almost dancing around him with their enterprise. Equally, between them the pair uncage some feisty and imposing riffs to match the throbbing rhythms of bassist Tom Walker and drummer Chris Ogden as Hobson shows his fluid switch to angst fuelled aggression is equal to his harmonic delivery.

Story Artwork_RingMasterReviewThe track is a fiery and eventful encounter with a nice line in unpredictability, not a trait which every song exploits as well but when they do as in the following Push Me Away, the imagination cannot help but get involved. The second track swings in on a lure of tenacious rock ‘n roll, calming down again as vocals join the bubbling affair before rising up with energy into an emotive snarl. Great backing roars and keen spirals of sonic endeavour add to the contagious tempting and presence of the song; it as its predecessor offering plenty of textures and twists to be forcibly enticed by.

Community flares up next, its emotive and volatile blaze catching attention if without finding the same individuality and success as the songs before it. With open craft from the band in sound and songwriting as well as a strong anthemic feel to it, the song certainly keeps enjoyment high before Letting Go serenades ears as an emotive turbulence shares its ire in the background. Melodies and vocals gently and impressively hug the senses, proceeding to reveal their tormented side as in time provocative flames of sound and emotion erupt in a thick engulfing of the senses. It is a slow burner compared to the first pair of songs, but grows to be another highly agreeable moment in the adventure of the EP.

The release’s busily textured and energetic title track sizzles within ears next, Hopeless But Hoping a song which is as riveting as it is a touch frustrating. It leaps in with an irresistible turbulence of grooves and rhythms aligned to raw vocals but then lets the strength of its thrilling start wane as its intensity and drama drops. It saves itself though with some fascinating turns into atmospheric and melody fuelled resourcefulness to add a great element of surprise to an encounter which, as great as it turns out, just feels like it could have been even bigger and bolder.

Carry Me Home finishes the release, its rousing air and boisterous enterprising alone a blend to grab attention. It might not be a song ripe with uniqueness, something you could say about the EP generally, but as Hopeless But Hoping, it has a wealth of invention and drama, as well as the band’s undeniable skills, to leave ears and emotions healthily satisfied. The potential of their sound also makes a lingering impact suggesting that Story has a potent time ahead of them.

The Hopeless But Hoping EP is released March 4th, details @ http://storyofficial.bigcartel.com/product/hopeless-but-hoping-ep-pre-order

https://www.facebook.com/StoryOfficialUK  https://twitter.com/storyofficialuk

Pete RingMaster 04/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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