High Down – Moving On

Suggesting they might be the ones to give the British pop punk scene an invigorating new breath, Portsmouth hailing High Down have just released their first EP. Moving On offers five slices of ear pleasing infection carrying punk rock, each bearing a sound with a spikiness which alone commands attention and further investigation.

Emerging last year, High Down made a potent mark with debut single Family & Fiends, the track recorded with producer Matt O’Grady (You Me At Six/Deaf Havana). Its impact was followed by the band playing slots at the likes of Seasick Fest, Butserfest, and Teddy Rocks Festival as well as share stages with bands such as WSTR, Roam, and Like Pacific. It is fair to say that things are beginning to stir for the quartet, a motion sure to gain momentum through Moving On.

The EP opens up with new single Life Lessons, guitars instantly luring ears with their catchy invitation. It is an infectiousness which is as instinctive in the vocal prowess of Luke Smithson and the rhythmic stroll of bassist Tim Hoolahan and drummer James Grinter who it appears has since left the band. The energy of the song is bold but with an enterprising restraint, it constantly pulling on the reins throughout but blossoming from that same reflective control. Feet and ears are soon lost to its temptation, appetite to its mix of harmonic warmth and again reserved but open irritability.

Making History backs up the fine start with its own line in melodic suggestion and rhythmic persuasion, it too keeping a hold on its boisterousness but giving enough of a rein to stir the spirit especially within another rousing chorus. The guitars of Darrell Ellis and Joe Soar weave a captivating web of sonic adventure with the former’s vocals potently backing the lead tones and expression of Luke Smithson. There are no big surprises yet each moment of accomplished endeavour increases the song’s draw, a quality just as inescapable in next up All On You. High Down has been given comparisons to artists such as Blink 182 and New Found Glory, the third track with its high kicking beats and nagging riffs a contagious example of why. There is a greater fire in its belly than in its predecessors and similarly an even more imposing catchiness that commands attention and response as smart hooks and harmonic dexterity relentlessly tempt.

The acoustic seduction of Rescue Me follows with vocals and guitar crooning knowingly with thought and emotion. The song features the guest tones of Nottinghamshire singer Christina Rotondo, her vocal beauty a striking essence in the union with the similarly impressing presence of Smithson. With a rawer edge to its gritty finale, the track grows in intensity and emotion to truly hit the spot before making way for the pinnacle of the release. The best track on offer for these ears, Against The Tide instantly winds wiry tendrils of guitar around ears, their steely touch alone a keen lure but only tightening their invitation with their niggling prowess, one matched in dexterity and persuasive trespass by the muscular swings of Grinter and the growling bass of Hoolahan. It is a dynamic and imposing yet again seriously infectious proposal to bring the highly enjoyable encounter to a fierce close.

In many ways there is nothing overly remarkable about Moving On yet every moment it shares is rich in enterprise and energy whilst being backed by a potential which suggests High Down can have a big presence on the UK if not European pop punk theatre.

Moving On is out now and available @ http://highdownuk.bigcartel.com/

https://www.facebook.com/highdownuk    https://twitter.com/highdownuk

Pete RingMaster 05/09/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

First Signs Of Frost – The Shape Of Things To Come

Pic Ben Ashton

The Shape Of Things To Come is the first EP since British rock band First Signs Of Frost emerged from a hiatus a couple of years back; its title as much a declaration of the fresh blossoming sound and creative chapter within the band as the themes it explores across five absorbing tracks.

Formed in 2004, the quartet of guitarist/vocalist Owen Hughes-Holland, guitarist Adam Mason, drummer Will Gates, and bassist Dan Oehlman grabbed keen attention with their debut EP, In Our Final Chapter. 2007 saw Daniel Tompkins join up as lead vocalist before the acclaimed release of first album Atlantic and a period see the band play alongside the likes of Deaf Havana, Enter Shikari, Architects, You Me At Six, We Are The Ocean, Senses Fail, Devil Sold His Soul and many more. Before the fuss had settled around the release, Tompkins left to join TesseracT. His departure left a gap the band struggled to fill; thus their hiatus until Hughes-Holland resurrected the band in 2015. Linking up with Mason again as well as bassist Andy C Saxton (ex-Cry For Silence), vocalist Daniel Lawrence (ex-Kenai / All Forgotten), and drummer Alex Harford, the London quintet immediately sought to explore and push their sound to new imaginative heights with The Shape Of Things To Come the first glimpse of their success.

Immersing inspirations from the likes of Deftones, Tool, Further Seems Forever, and Glassjaw into their invention, First Signs Of Frost swiftly lures ears with opener Meat Week. Its atmospheric calm is a quick enticement, the gentle caress of guitar a matching lure before the brooding air also there sparks a bolder expulsion of sound. Lawrence’s vocals immediately impress, his melodic expression matched by the colluding warm and wiry textures of the sounds around him. An infectious energy is equally as persuasive within the song, every element bold without being forceful but making a strongly emotive and technically alluring temptation on ears and imagination.

The following White Flag potently backs up the great start; its enterprise similarly resourceful and ear catching without making over aggressive trespasses upon the senses. There is elegance to the First Signs Of Frost sound which charms as the craft of the individuals captivates; again making for a gentle almost smouldering seduction carried in a contagious and skilfully conjured proposal.

Latest single Look Alive Sunshine is next up with its own individual melodic rock venture veined by djent scented progressive metal intricacies. There is jaggedness which bites as the vocals and melodies hug the senses; a union which grips and lingers even if the song just fails to touch the plateau of its predecessors before the evocative climate and atmospheric ambience of Atlantis drifts in with the superb vocals of Lawrence and keys to the fore. An instinctive emotional intensity rises within the song, simmering down again before repeating its cycle within the graceful serenade.

The EP closes with Sharks; it too an initially serene coaxing but one soon revealing its djent nurtured teeth and creative volatility within a subsequent sea of melodic and technical but emotionally inflamed tranquillity. It is a fine end to a fascinating and thoroughly enjoyable release. The Shape Of Things To Come feels like the first step towards something bigger and bolder but is a full pleasure in its own right; a mix which makes First Signs Of Frost a band which just has to be followed closely.

The Shape Of Things To Come is out now via Basick Records and available @ https://basick.supplies/collections/first-signs-of-frost or http://music.basickrecords.com/album/the-shape-of-things-to-come

https://www.facebook.com/FSOFofficial/

Pete RingMaster 15/08/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Maypine – In The Back Of My Mind

Providing a rather strong introduction to themselves, British pop-punks Maypine release their debut EP this month. In The Back Of My Mind offers five tracks of infectious melodic punk bursting with potential and an already revealing potent craft in songwriting and enterprise. It is not jaw dropping or particularly unique but certainly commands eager attention with ease, success in anyone’s book.

Formed around the middle of last year and rising from the ever vibrant Brighton music scene, Maypine soon showed their strengths and lures on the local live scene, continuing to draw support and acclaim thereon in leading up to the imminent release of their first EP. Recorded with producer Ian Sadler (ROAM/Homebound), it opens up with recent single A Little Sooner which soon has ears cupped in a weave of melodic guitars speared by striking rhythms. From their midst, a strolling gait loaded with instinctive catchiness breaks, vocalist Jason Payne backed by the equally alluring tones of rhythm guitarist Dan Jarvis, magnetic at the fore. It is hard not to be swept up in the song’s infectious nature and exploits, lead guitarist Becky East weaving a captivating web of melodic and enterprise to seal the deal.

The great start is keenly backed by new video/single North South Divide which too needs little time to have ears lured and bodies bouncing. The swinging beats of drummer James Holdsworth make a great driving impetus to its exploits, the heavier tone of Tommy Roberts’ bass bringing a fine tempering to the fiery flames of guitar which again firmly hold ears and appetite as vocals share the song’s emotive heart. Calmer moments only add to its strength, revealing bolder aspects in the band’s imagination before Inside Out jumps in with its just as keen energy and tenacity. Though it lacks some of the more unpredictable twists of its predecessors, the track is a contagious proposal leaving enjoyment full and giving plenty of clues to the band’s success as a live proposition.

Never Far Apart calms things down with its acoustic croon, guitar and voice sharing real magnetism before things eventually boil up with the rest of the band adding their flames to the increasingly volatile smoulder. A slow burner in some ways compared to other tracks, it rises to be a compelling part of the impressing release.

Closing track Day After Day brings things to a strong conclusion though it too misses out on making the more striking impression of other tracks on the EP. Nevertheless tapping feet and pleasured ears endorses its catchy potency and its part in ensuring In The Back Of My Mind leaves a strong appetite for more of the Maypine sound.

With numerous essences which should appeal to those with a liking for bands such as ROAM, Blink-182, and You Me At Six, the EP suggests Maypine is a rather promising new addition to British pop punk.

In The Back Of My Mind is released August 4th through Disconnect Records.

MAYPINE August tour:

Friday 04 – Hope & Ruin, Brighton

Saturday 05 – Mulberry Tavern, Sheffield

 Sunday 06 – Creepy Wee Pub, Dunfermline (Acoustic/afternoon set)

Sunday 06 – The Attic/The Garage, Glasgow***

Tuesday 08 – Retro Bar, Manchester***

Thursday 10 – The Shed, Leicester**

Friday 11 – The Thunderbolt, Bristol**

Saturday 12 – The Attic, Torquay**

Sunday 13 – The Joiners, Southampton**

Monday 14 – The Black Heart, Camden**

Tuesday 15 – The Attic, Ashford**

Wednesday 16th – TJ’s, Eastbourne

**w/ Better Than Never | *** w/ Coast To Coast

http://facebook.com/maypineuk   http://twitter.com/maypineuk   http://instagram.com/maypineuk

Pete RingMaster 02/08/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Elasea – Lesson Learnt

Having impressed in sound and potential with their debut EP two years back, British alternative rockers Elasea have just unveiled its successor Lesson Learnt. With a new addition to the Reading hailing band’s ranks, the EP quickly shows a new maturity and creative elegance in their songwriting and music. It is a magnetic affair for ears with plenty of reasons to suggest that Elasea are going places within the UK rock scene.

Emerging in 2013, Elasea potently poked attention with the Where I Belong EP, the release swiftly drawing praise the way of the quartet. Their growing reputation was also supported by a live presence seeing the band share stages with the likes of Funeral For A Friend, AllUsOnDrugs, Veridian, and Echoic. That time between releases has seen Elasea’s four strong line-up extended to five with the incoming Braydie Haskell adding prowess on keys. It is a notable essence certainly going some way to sparking the new rounded and inventive growth in the band’s sound but across all members, individual craft and imagination has openly blossomed.

Lesson Learnt opens up with Breathe, a sombre yet bright melody caressed by wistful keys initially coaxing ears, leading them into the waiting tide of rapacious riffs and rhythms. Their controlled but obvious urgency is accompanied by an emotive intensity which is even bolder in the strong vocal presence and expression of rhythm guitarist Andy Bradford. With bassist Liv Jones adding plenty of captivating vocal presence too, along with the muscular strains of sound, there is a Sick Puppies like essence to the song which only accentuates its appeal and imaginative character. On top, the keys are a well of emotive suggestion, a poetic glaze to the rawer texture of guitar and the meaty rhythms shaping the excellent track.

The following Time Stops is a similar fusion of metallic strength and melodic beauty; keys and the melody courting guitar of Calum Radmore weaving melancholic grace and sentiment as the lively beats of Ashley Haskell probe and incite the senses. With Jones’ bass grumble emotionally vocal, the track is a croon of shadow and open hearted yearning led by the vocal potency of Bradford again magnetically supported by Jones.

The more skittish air and intensive weight of On My Own shows another aspect to EP and the Elasea sound, the song more akin to the likes of You Me At Six and Bring Me The Horizon though still that early hint of the aforementioned Australian rockers prevails at times. They are flavours though adding to the growing uniqueness in Elasea’s music rather than shaping it, and enjoyable hues in the irritable character and tempestuous adventure of the third richly enjoyable song.

These Secrets is an instrumental interlude evocatively drifting over the imagination, its atmospheric presence maybe more pleasurable padding then essential to Walls, the final song adding infectious bounce and plaintive heart to the already impressing release. The electronic shimmer of synths cradles another great vocal union between rhythms guitarist and bassist, their harmonic contrasts and unity accentuated by the fiery ear charming nature of the sounds around them.

Elasea have made a big step in moving away from the crowd with Lesson learnt, the growth in their sound highly appetising. There is still room for true uniqueness to evolve and that is as exciting a prospect as the EP is for ears right now.

Lesson Learnt is out now through all platforms and @ https://elasea.bandcamp.com/album/lesson-learnt-ep or http://www.elasea.bigcartel.com/

https://www.facebook.com/elaseauk   https://twitter.com/elaseauk

Pete RingMaster 22/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Beaumont – Nothing

Beaumont_RingMasterReview

Creating alternative rock with a nice line in pop punk to it, Beaumont is a newly emerging proposal for the British rock scene to contemplate. The beginning of May saw the Birmingham-based quintet release their debut EP, Nothing; a five-track romp of infectious energy and melodic tenacity which quite simply commands attention. That is not to say that Beaumont have come across major uniqueness in their sound yet but with strong potential fuelling its presence, it certainly is something easy to take a real shine to.

Taking their name from a character in Shakespeare’s Henry V, Beaumont is a creative union of friends mixing the melancholic heart of their lyrical exploration with the vibrant catchiness of a melody rich sound. 2015 was a busy year for the band with shows alongside the likes of Light You Up and WSTR a particular highlight to add to individual experiences seeing members touring and playing with bands such as Four Year Strong, ROAM, State Champs, and A Loss For Words over the last few years. Produced by John Mitchell (Lower Than Atlantis, You Me At Six), Nothing is the band’s introduction to a broader national spotlight, and such its vivacity alone, easy to see an invitation rewarded with new fans and keen praise.

With songs which in the words of vocalist Spencer Edmonds, “…cover a range of emotions from hatred and greed to loneliness,” adding “It’s a snapshot of how we were feeling at specific times over the last two years…” , Nothing swiftly entices and pleases with opener Cheapside. An initial melody coaxes ears before thumping beats and spicier melodies join its welcome in league with an already throatily potent bassline. Edmonds’ vocals complete the creative scenery, quickly impressing in quality and expression as he shares the melancholic angst of the song. As mentioned previously, the solemn reflection of word and voice comes bound in lively sounds around a swinging gait driven by the contagious bassline of Reece Aleksander and Mitchell Dornan’s scything beats. It is a web, with guitarists Jake Murray and Chris Inston tenacious in riffs and grooves, which refuses to be ignored as it provides a potent start to the EP soon matched by the excellent Boys & Girls.

BEAUMONT NOTHING EP COVER_RingMasterReviewThe second song makes a bolder entrance, keeping its boisterous character going as it slips into a pop punk infused stroll with nagging riffs and eagerly prowling rhythms. Edmonds again impresses as great harmonies soar around him at times, it all gaining greater energy in the track’s rousing chorus which just tops the thrilling encounter perfectly before it hands ears over to the emotively shadowed and musically vibrant Miserable. Riffs and hooks have a bite to them, backed by the rapier swings of Dornan, which accentuates and gives greater character to the melodic endeavour surrounding them. With its predecessor, the song provides the pinnacle of the EP, though the ‘step down’ is barely noticeable as Art School manages to simultaneously croon with emotive flame while whipping up a feisty physical involvement. It might lack the extra spark of adventure of the previous pair, but in no time it tempts with throbbing riffs from bass and guitar amidst the contagious nature of hooks and group vocals, and a blaze of a chorus.

The Springsteen referencing E Street brings Nothing to a strong close, it too missing that final piece of the jigsaw yet has ears and enjoyment hungry for more whilst showing fresh aspects to the songwriting and sound of Beaumont. As catchy as anything on the EP, it makes a fine end to a thoroughly engaging and satisfying first look at and listen to a band with promise and imagination which alone could see them make great strides ahead.

The Nothing EP is out now via Reclaim Music through most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/beaumontuk   http://www.twitter.com/beaumontuk   http://reclaimmusicgroup.com/artists/beaumont/

Pete RingMaster 06/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com

Elessar – Reflections EP

Elessar_RingMasterReview

With a spring tour around the UK mere days away, British alternative/pop punk band Elessar set the scene and tone with their debut EP, Reflections. It offers five tracks of infectiously appetising and thoroughly enjoyable rock ‘n’ roll which might not be bursting with major originality but certainly gives the listener a fun and rousing time; a success never to be sniffed at.

Formed last year, the Gloucestershire-based Elessar soon invited attention with video/single Arrogance that May. Its line-up consists of school friends in Ricky Powell (vocals/guitar), Alex Evans (guitar/vocals), Jack Gambling (bass) and Dan James (drums), and it is fair to say that the quartet took little time to hit and earn a potent reputation on the local live scene swiftly expanding outwards from their first steps as a band. The Reflections EP is the outcome from the band working and recording last year with Romesh Dodangoda (Funeral For A Friend, The Blackout, Kids In Glass Houses), a release seemingly a long time in the unveiling from that first single but soon revealing the rich potential of Elessar.

art_RingMasterReviewIt opens with that first single, and straight away Arrogance has ears welcoming a sturdy wall of hungry riffs and swinging rhythms. Things relax a touch as the vocals step forward though grooves still engagingly flicker and hooks bite through the guitars as those initial rhythms continue to command attention with their tenacious and weighty persuasion.  Hitting its stride in no time, the song soon offers a contagiously rousing chorus and an enticing mix of varying intensity and eventful twists; all fine elements in the anthemic proposal that body and voice cannot resist getting involved in. It is a great start and easy to see why the track made people look up last year, and a success potently backed by the following likes of My Skin and Holding Back.

The first of the two shares a more melodically tempting lead into its proposition though again bass and drums unite to create a formidable spine and thumping drive for what becomes an increasingly fiery encounter unafraid to ebb and flow in attack and raw energy. Holding Back, in comparison to the almost imposing drama of the previous track, unveils a pop catchy character to its vivacious dance with ears and imagination. Hooks and melodies leap and lure like flames in the track’s robust fire, licking at the senses rather than burning them but asking and earning attention with every enjoyable twist and turn.

On the surface a casual listen finds a similarity between the songs on the EP, but deserved focus provides the window to some stylish and emotively fired individuality. Empty Frames is a song though which needs no extra effort to see its uniqueness; punchy beats and a brooding bassline the lure into inflamed melodic enterprise and spirit arousing energy accentuated by a subsequent drop into minimalistic moments of vocal caresses within an evocative ambience.

Goodwill completes the EP with its strong and captivating presence, though it does not have the same kind of effect on personal tastes or the same level of creative drama as its predecessors even in a certainly dynamic body. All the same, the song is a fine end to a release which suggests that Elessar warrants real attention, certainly if bands such as Taking Back Sunday, You Me At Six, and Lower Than Atlantis ring your bell.

The self-released Reflections EP is out on CD and Digital Download April 22nd via iTunes and other stores.

Elessar Spring Tour:

 27.04 – Manchester, Factory

28.04 – York, Fulford Arms

29.04 – Newcastle, Space Bar

30.04 – Leeds, Eiger Studios

01.05 – Stoke, Underground

02.05 – London, Nambucca

05.05 – Cheltenham, 2 Pigs

06.05 – Cardiff, Undertone

07.05 – Truro, Charlies Bar

08.05 – Exeter, Cavern

09.05 – Birmingham, The Rainbow

10.05 – Bristol – The Louisiana

https://www.facebook.com/ElessarBandUK   http://www.twitter.com/ElessarUK  https://elessaruk.bandcamp.com

Pete RingMaster 22/10/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com

Silver Coast – Seasons

SC_RingMasterReview

Breeding a loyal fan-base and earning a potent reputation for their sound and live presence in their home city of Inverness and beyond, Scottish quartet Silver Coast is now getting to grips with stirring up broader attention across the UK. Latest mini album Seasons is leading the persuasion, the release an emotive roar of alternative and melodic rock with an invitation for ears which commands to be taken notice of. It is an introduction to a wider spread audience which will certainly not stir any real surprise if and when it sparks a new flood of eager ears the way of Silver Coast.

Formed late 2012, Silver Coast was soon lighting up appetites on the local live scene with highlights including supporting the likes of Fatherson, lostAlone, and King Charles in the city. Over time they began sharing their presence and sound further afield, backed by the release of the highly praised 2014 single Believe. Last year saw the foursome of vocalist/guitarist/keyboardist Aaron Murray, guitarist Andrew Thomas, bassist Jason Simpson, and drummer Michael Cappie playing the main stage at Belladrum and end 2015 with a show at Glasgow’s King Tuts, and with Seasons already beginning to stir things up, this year looks like following suit in success and raising attention.

art_RingMasterReviewAs Seasons opens with Pictures, there is an immediate lure of popping guitar strings as a seductive melody wraps around ears. It is a swiftly engaging entrance to release and song reinforced by the strong melodic tones of Murray and subsequently the darker heavy hues of bass amidst crisp beats. As things evolve, a sultry country tinged twang escapes guitars, sparking brightly against the sombre yet warm atmospheric sky of the song. As it continues, ears are lured deeper into the song’s creative heart, every passing minute a discovery of subtle but openly inventive twists and elements which have laid in wait for their moment to please and intrigue. The band has cited inspirations as coming from bands such as Feeder, You Me at Six, and Twin Atlantic, and similar spices, if not direct comparisons, certainly colour the opener and its following companions.

Needing You Needing Me slips in next and instantly builds upon the great start with its magnetic coaxing of sonic enterprise and vocal prowess. Through never nearing an explosion of energy, the track is as catchy as hell, even in its quietest moments, and even more compelling when it raises its creative and emotional temperature. Again without exactly sounding like them, the song brings thoughts of The Mighty Lemon Drops to the fore and also frees a scent of Orange Juice to its jangling resourcefulness before making way for the similarly infectious Wake Up. Enticing ears into following its title, the song saunters along with a melodic smile and emotive edge; further feeding an already keen appetite for the band’s highly engaging rock ‘n’ roll.

A beefier intensity is uncaged by Taking Chances next, its tempestuous air thick drama around the emerging melodic and harmonic contagiousness of the song. Rhythms add a punch and imposing shadowing whilst Thomas spins a web of sonic expression with his fingers as Murray potently croons. It is fair to say that each Silver Coast song is a kaleidoscope of flavour and textures, here light and dark colliding and colluding for another arousal of air and ears before parting for the album’s title track. A calmer hug of emotive sound, the final song is a reflective serenade of voice and piano wrapped in the expressive arms of guitar. It too bares new sides to its inventive and emotive soul with rhythms building up a brooding atmosphere which becomes subsequently laced with the provocative romancing of keys and melodies.

It is a fine end to a release which is certainly thoroughly enjoyable on the first listen or two but really comes into its own over time and with further exploration. At times it feels like Silver Coast pull back on their boldness, hinting at losing any creative restraints but in the end keeping that final spark which anticipations wants under wraps. Nevertheless Seasons is a potent first look for a great many at a band really beginning to creatively blossom.

Seasons is out now @ http://silvercoast.bigcartel.com/product/seasons-ep-pre-order-now

http://www.silvercoastmusic.com/   https://www.facebook.com/silvercoastmusic   https://twitter.com/silvercoastband

Pete RingMaster 15/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/