Grumpynators – City Of Sin

People talk of “the difficult second album”, especially after a debut which leaves a trail of lustful fans and critical acclaim in its wake, something the first from Danish band Grumpynators certainly did. If it has been a tough period for the Copenhagen quartet it does not show within City Of Sin, their second album a seriously rousing and accomplished slab of muscular rock ‘n’ roll, or as the band calls it motorbilly. As impressive as Wonderland was, its successor outshines it in every way, from songwriting to sound, energy to contagion; it is a mouth-watering and exhilarating incitement leaving a deep and greedy hunger for more.

Formed in 2011, Grumpynators’ ever escalating reputation and rock ‘n’ roll prowess has been unmissable from day one, the band tearing up venues at a rate of knots while their first two EPs were no slouches in waking up ears beyond their already eagerly receptive homeland. It was Wonderland which truly caught broad attention though, something City Of Sin can and will only open the floodgates for. Grumpynators’ sound sits somewhere between metal and hard rock, psycho/rockabilly and punk; distinctive from day one it has only honed a uniqueness which fuels the beauty and triumph of City Of Sin today. Quite simply rock ‘n’ roll is the best way to describe it; the most arousing, devilishly aggressive, and irresistible kind making their new album essential stomping.

Produced by the renowned Jacob Hansen and featuring Volbeat guitarist Rob Caggiano, City Of Sin has ears and admittedly an already eager appetite because of past successes reeling from its first breath as opener Tears Of Whiskey bursts upon the senses. Straight away the driving beats of Per Fisker whip up hungry energy, the slapping incitement of Jakob Oelund’s double bass just as insatiable and matched by riffs and inflamed grooves. Feet and spirit are a quick submission to the bait; Grumpynators continuing to grip both with their Motorhead meets Volbeat scented charge led by the inciting vocal growl of Emil Oelund.

It is an outstanding start still managing to be eclipsed by the following pair of roars. First up is Hotel 2nd Age which needs barely seconds to hook allegiance with its initial melodic line. Christian Noergaard is a master at spinning the most addictive hook lined lures and webs, they often seemingly simple but always honed to instinctive temptation as here. As the initial tendril continues to wind around ears, a just as potent rally from Per joins in, riffs gathering behind before initiating one boisterous canter. If that was not enough to tempt the devil, Jakob uncages a deliciously throbbing bassline, raw seduction which is unrelenting from hereon in to add to the virulent and bold tango. With each hook seeming to intensify in taunting the passions as exotic hues tease from within Christian’s enterprise as Emil’s vocals and riffs further stir things up, the track is just glorious and quickly matched by its successor.

New praise gathering single Take The Last Dance With Me launches at ears with a zeal and energy again impossible not to be caught up in, riffs and rhythms colluding in tenacity as they lead to a chorus which simply demands participation. A song to ensure blossoming romances within any mosh pit it stomps and pumps its sinews like The Pirates meeting Misfits in many ways, but as all stands as something uniquely Grumpynators while preying on the weakness for heart bred rock ‘n’ roll.

Things relax a touch as the swinging throes of Then We Cried takes over, sharing its regrets and wishes borne from lost love. Jakob alone has the body bouncing, the heart yearning with the melancholic melody as Emil’s words which court self-reflection. As inherently and persuasively catchy as anything on the release; it’s tempting is full and multi-faceted ensuring thick involvement of the listener though that last lure applies to all songs as proven straight after again by Pretty Little Devil. Musically as tempting and darkly seductive as the temptress at its heart, the song croons and roars with that bass again instant slavery from within nothing but addictive temptation.

Through the heavy metal toned Far Away with its exhausting sonic gasoline and the rockabilly swinging Now I Know, the album shows even more of the diversity and adventure flowing through the Grumpynators release and imagination. The irresistible sing-a-long potency of the latter is just as persuasive in the psychobilly hued Fame, a spellbinding proposal with something of The Peacocks and Danzig about it, and indeed within St. Elvis Day after that; a song which you would expect is pure rock ‘n’ roll, a multi-flavoured romping stomping celebration.

The album’s title track sets another vertigo inducing peak in the lofty landscape of City Of Sin, the track managing to be the dirtiest most insatiably infectious slice of rock possible, almost poppy in its vocal chords stoking chorus. With rhythms relentlessly probing and sparking movement as Emil roars, the track is a bone shaking, spirit infesting uproar.

The album concludes with firstly the punk ‘n’ roll stand of We Are The Outcasts, anthemic defiance to hook and unite personal grievances with, and lastly the horror punk lit, blood strewn warning of Werewolf; together a thrilling end to an exceptional creative howl.

After Wonderland we will admit we wondered if Grumpynators could better it. Little did we know; better it? They have smashed it.

City Of Sin is released March 24th through Mighty Music.

Upcoming Live shows

24/3 Drafthouse, Hamburg (DE)

25/3 High Voltage, Copenhagen (DK).

7/4 Tante Olga, Randers (DK)

8/4 Paletten, Viborg (DK)

22/4 Sønderborghus, Sønderborg (DK)

http://www.grumpynators.dk/   https://www.facebook.com/grumpynators

Pete RingMaster 17/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Grumpynators – Wonderland

Grumpynators_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

Two years can seem like a very long time when you are excitedly anticipating something. Certainly the wait for the debut album from Grumpynators has felt like a life time after being hooked by their previous releases. Once arrived and there waiting to explode from the speakers, thoughts turn to pondering if it will now live up to probably over demanding expectations and hopes. The Danish quartet’s self-titled motorbilly has been one of the few fresh sounds to really ignite ears and emotions over recent years and yes the band has forged another landmark in their ascent with Wonderland. The band’s mix of hard rock, psychobilly, punk, metal, and old school rock ‘n’ roll is maybe not over fuelled with major originality yet the way the band hone and twist the blend, it emerges as something distinct and specific to Grumpynators whilst providing a healthy and rousing option for fans of anyone from Motorhead to Metallica, The Damned to Volbeat, Mad Sin to Tiger Army. So it is again with Wonderland, a slab of ferocious rock ‘n’ roll pushing the band’s voracious sound and our passions to new heights.

The Copenhagen band was formed in 2011 by former band members and crew from Taggy Tones and Volbeat. Their first rampage on stage came that year at the Danish underground festival Barnyard Rumble in Denmark, the opening riot in an ever increasing and feverish attention following the band thereon in. Across the years the band has on shows and tours shared stages with the likes of Magtens Korridorer and Volbeat amongst a great many. A self-titled demo EP in 2011 just as potently awoke ears and appetites, though arguably it was the 666 RPM EP two years later which was the major spark to trigger a much further spread awareness. Wonderland is a bigger, bolder beast standing before us all now with the potential to break the band into the keenest spotlight possible.

The album opens up with its title track, and instantly has ears and imagination intrigued and enthralled by a thirty second kaleidoscope of haunting sounds and evocative textures. From its sinister coaxing, a flash of guitar opens the door for a predatory lure from the double bass of Jakob Øelund to immediately seduce an appetite always open to that kind of bait. Scything beats from Per Fisker equally adds to the brewing drama of the song whilst the guitars of Christian Nørgaard and Emil Øelund stir up air and senses with their belligerent persuasions. It is a fiery mix only increasing in energy and intensity as the song expands to its full height, the at times Lemmy like tones of Emil a magnetic roar in the midst of the infectious tempest. The encounter is equipped with the distinctive Grumpynators sound but already show a new adventure and creative theatre in the band’s invention and tenacity, hooks and swinging rhythms as mischievous as they are predatory whilst a guitar solo simply sizzles on the senses.

Wonderland cover _Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review   The stunning start is matched by both Walking in the Night and Burning in the Snow, the first dangling before the listener a spicy groove from its first breath, subsequently wheeling it in and using it to core the spinning of a feisty web of psychobilly contagion and hard rock devilry. The stomp just increases its attraction as vocals and another incendiary bass tempting fills its rampant prowl. Like a flirtation happy to brawl at any given moment, the track has ears and body leaping to its puppetry before making way for the similarly irresistible lures of its successor. The third track is a more even tempered stroll with restraint to its energy but even more virulence to its rockabilly meets punk ‘n’ roll devilment. Things do get over excited in its chorus but the band always pulls it back for a pungent croon of a seduction around the verses, led by Emil who is as ever impressively backed by calls across the band.

Walked Away winks with a dulled country twang initially before launching its own individual and tenaciously striding heavy rock persuasion. Of course as with all songs, it is a maelstrom of flavours colouring its anthemic canvas and tearing through ears, a thick flavoursome mix of rock infusing varied textures and spices soon emulated in The Calling. The track is a predator, prowling ears with an intimidating bassline and imposing grooves carolled by the excellently switching twin attack of the vocals. Track and band show you do not have to go hell for leather to create an inescapable anthem with the song, its character and potency a lingering thrilling threat. The short number of tracks in previous EPs generally meant each song bordered on a major highlight, the cream of that crop of songs so to speak, and it is easy to say that Wonderland follows suit, this point in the album already offering five dead on Grumpynator classics.

The Stalker steps forward next, this a lighter hued cantor despite its title but lock ‘n’ loaded with more addiction forging grooves and nagging hooks cast with a swagger and smiling contagion. As all offerings, it defies the listener not to join in with its epidemic of persuasion, poking the thought does rock ‘n’ roll get any better? Maybe not but it can be equalled as shown by Speeding #2, a reworking/recording of a track from their demo EP. It is does not venture too far from its first outing but provides a fresh and magnetic nature to an already established fan favourite.

The carnivorous This Is My Life growls next, its grouchy presence delving into more metallic scenery whilst laying down one pure rock ‘n’ roll groove through the forever masterful string plucks of Jakob. The guitars of Emil and Christian spread sultry strands of sonic endeavour around the instinctive catchiness of the proposal too, and driven by the forceful commanding swings of Per, yet another highlight is forged and soon matched by the voracious Pray For Your Life. It is a bruising antagonistic affair that, with its sterner caustic attitude, only captivates as its spreads its heavy and hard rock invention.

Both songs though are outshone by the steamy Mama No, probably the most diverse track on the album in that every strain of sound found on Wonderland is embroiled in the hectic and irresistible punk metal ‘n’ roll rampaging. Every riff and groove comes with a thick splattering of those flavours to their colour, an impressive feat and success driven by rabid rhythms and the rousing tones of Emil. The track is the perfect end to the album but the band knows better and closes things off with A Life Without You, an acoustic seducing of guitar and vocals embraced in the melancholic beauty of cello provided by Richard Krug. The song is a dark romance in ears, one sparking a tingle in the senses and a sigh of satisfaction by its, and Wonderland’s end.

It is fair to say that Grumpynators had a head start on raising the passions thanks to their excellent previous EPs but that also led to greater, greedier demands on Wonderland, something tossed aside with ease. As declared a little earlier, rock ‘n’ roll does not get much better than this.

Wonderland is out now via Target through most online stores

http://www.grumpynators.dk/ https://www.facebook.com/grumpynators

RingMaster 21/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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