Raw Fun – Won’t Be Told

Raw Fun_RingMaster Review

December is as good a time as any, maybe the best time with all the festive shenanigans, to get your teeth into something particularly tasty, and that is definitely what you get from Raw Fun. Their three track single Won’t Be Told gets its full release this month through Dirty Water Records/WTF, and fair to say it is a bracing and virulent slab of garage rock ‘n’ roll which strongly entices on the first bite, breeds intoxication with its second morsel, and tightens the grip on the taste buds with a third helping of contagion; it all living up to the band’s name.

Raw Fun Sleeve _RingMaster Review     Formed in the September of 2014, Raw Fun is a London based trio with a potent pedigree between them. Vocalist/guitarist/songwriter Patrice Picard also plays in garage revival band The Cannibals, a band which since the early eighties has uncaged ten albums and a stock load of keenly devoured singles whilst live thrilling audiences all over Europe and further afield when touring Japan twice. Bassist Joaquín Gonzalez has been the guitarist in Las Aspiradoras, fronted low-fi garage band Dedrines, and currently also plays in the reformed Johnny Throttle whilst drummer Manuel Santos has been part of Thee Tombitas and punk band Michael Jackson. Drawing on inspirations from the likes of The Stooges, Link Wray, Wilko Johnson, Johnny Thunders, and Stiv Bators, the threesome upon uniting quickly found and nurtured their own sound, playing their first gig three weeks after their first rehearsal. Just as swiftly Raw Deal also set about recording their first release, Won’t Be Told recorded on an eight-track tape machine with its mixing done by Jim Diamond, formerly of The Dirtbombs who had heard the band on Facebook and offered his help. With shows across the UK, France, and Spain, it has been a busy twelve months for Raw Deal, culminating in the spotlight grabbing release of Won’t Be Told.

The single’s title track comes first, Won’t Be Told releasing an immediately alluring clang with its guitars aligned to just as enticing melodic bait. Rhythms are soon jabbing with relish as the voice of Picard swaggers into view, each colluding with the bass of Gonzalez which prowls the song with its deliciously throaty but welcoming tempting. Those punk and garage rock spices are a swift hue to the song, not necessarily providing anything majorly unique but certainly stirring up a keen appetite for the unpolished and mischievous revelry holding attention.

The best track on the release comes next, Shades a bewitching incitement merging fifties and sixties rock ‘n’ roll with garage punk/psychobilly devilment. The track has a prime irresistible hook which works away right from the song’s first breath, a coaxing which only increases in success with its Bone Orchard meets The Cramps like incitement. Around it though, garage rock spicing colludes with a dirtier punk air as sultry surf rock flirtation seduces and enthrals ears and imagination. The song is superb, easily the pinnacle of the single though more than backed by the other two protagonists of pleasure.

Til the End of the Song is an instant eruption of punk ‘n’ roll devilry with pop infectiousness to its swing and attitude to its rough and ready character. As its predecessor, there are plenty of flavours enrolled in the fiery body of the song, many slim and often subtle hues adding up to one easily accessible but equally uncompromising slice of, well raw fun to be honest.

There is really no better time to treat yourselves than now and if it is to be with some rousing rock ‘n’ roll then Raw Fun gives a very satisfying option.

Won’t Be Told is available from December 14th via Dirty Water Records/WTF @ http://www.dirtywaterrecords.co.uk/shop/#!/Raw-Fun-Raw-Fun-EP-+-download/p/56898794/category=2749844 on 7” vinyl or download.

https://www.facebook.com/rawfunwontbetoldwhattodo   http://www.dirtywaterrecords.co.uk/rawfun/

Pete RingMaster 14/12/2015

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David Sinclair Four – 4

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The fourth album from David Sinclair and the first with his band as a quartet, 4 is one of those encounters which makes a decent first proposal and then with increasing tenacity continues to endear itself to ears and thoughts over time. The David Sinclair Four release contains ten varied and highly flavoursome slices of rock ‘n’ roll which spring from a blues rock seeding but never restrict their enterprise to any single musical colour. Equally there is a feel good factor which fuels songs looking at and springing from the diverse culture of the artist’s home, London; the result of all essences together being one enjoyable proposition.

The current band line-up came together in 2013, bassist Jos Mendoza and guitarist Geoff Peel linking up with vocalist/guitarist Sinclair and his drummer son Jack, their addition turning the David Sinclair Trio into the David Sinclair Four. Before this the band had already released a trio of acclaimed albums in the shape of Hey (2006), Threewheeling (2008), and Take Me There (2013). Live too the band has been a greedily devoured proposal and list playing with the likes of Wilko Johnson, the Oli Brown Band, Marcus Bonfanti, Johnny Dowd, Graham Bonnet, and Willie Nile amongst many on their CV. Now the four-piece are setting about bringing the summer a healthy stroll of rock to swagger along through their new album, a release easy to see following its predecessors in drawing the plaudits.

The album opens with Sick Of Being Good and an initial potent caress of guitar to awaken ears. Imagination is swiftly stirred too by a subsequent sturdier stroll of energy and sound led by an infectiously enticing hook. The song continues to lure in appetite and attention with its blues hued catchiness and David’s vocals, backed well by the band. There are few surprises in the song but plenty to get hungry teeth into with an expressive guitar invention, warm harmonies, and colourful enterprise shaping every twist of the song.

The strong start is matched by the following treat of The Click-Clack Man. The tale about a character on the search to meet I am led to believe Tom Waits; the song has a seductive swing and resourceful adventure to its quickly enslaving presence. Hooks and grooves create an inescapable web to which a deliciously roving darkly toned bassline and crisply swung beats add further drama and temptation. The song is irresistible to feet and emotions, the biggest highlight on the album though often rivalled.

The sultry blues climate of next up Life Gone Cold brings further variety to the album, its slow saunter equipped with fiery flames of guitar and emotive intensity. It does not have the spark of the first two songs though but with again mouth-watering guitar craft and potent rhythmic bait alongside straight-forward and easily accessible lyrics, ears held easily before being excited again by Crude Emotion. Rhythmically muscular and casting a heavy stride from its first breath, the song is another unveiling of contagion posing as grooves and hooks. The swing of its body is an incitement to physical participation and the funk infused chorus bait to a vocal union, as band and track create another major moment within 4.

The excellent Down By The Canal comes next, and swiftly transfixes as the excellent guest vocals of Maxi Priest flirt with ears alongside the tones of David. The song’s reggae hued scenery is just as magnetic, drawing a swift smile with its engaging revelry before making way for the blues smoulder of World Turns Around. The harmonica of Paul Jones, another guest on the album, is a spicy flirtation matched by the fiery craft and sounds uncaged by Peel as the song swerves with the persuasion of a temptress within ears. Both tracks entice and reward enjoyably whilst providing further fresh textures and creative ventures within the album.

The remainder of the album for personal tastes does not quite match up to what comes before, though songs like The Illness & The Cure and Give Me A Rose which follow, only provide easy to consume and enjoy offerings with their individual blues rock spiced ventures. They just do not have the extra ingredient to ignite these particular ears, feeling a little flat against the quality sounds earlier in the release. It will obviously not be the same for everyone though and there is nothing less than enjoyment gained from the tracks or the closing pair of Coming Out Of The Rain and Coming Off The Rails, they also strong and enjoyable encounters but again just do not have that extra ingredient found in other songs upon the album. The penultimate song sees David dueting with Lorna Reid, who also co-wrote the song, their union another flavoursome delight, whilst the closing song again embraces the vibrant flair of Paul Jones.

The bottom-line though is that 4 is one highly satisfying and at times addictive encounter, David Sinclair and co’s finest moment yet and a definite recommendation for blues rock ‘n’ roll fans with an appetite for others like Paul Weller, The Rolling Stones, The Kinks and especially on the guitar and blues side, Seasick Steve.

4 is available now via IRL @ http://irl.bigcartel.com/product/david-sinclair-four-4 and on most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/DavidSinclairFour   http://www.davidsinclairfour.com/

RingMaster 12/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Mobbs – Garage Punk For Boys

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Ever wondered what would happen when you mixed ’77 bred punk rock with garage rock? UK rockers The Mobbs obviously did and with additional doses of sixties beat and R&B have crafted a sound which insatiably infests body and soul. In the mischievous shape of their third album Garage Punk For Boys, this adventure it is fair to say also provides one of the releases of the year. The accompanying promo sheet for the album suggests that “The Mobbs play a Wilko Johnson infused Billy Childish explosion”, an accurately pungent description of their sound but to that we would add the unreserved devilry of Radio Stars, the raw charm of Television Personalities, and the bracing fever of Thee Exciters in its armoury. The concoction is a riveting and exhilarating stomp with a hunger as shown by Garage Punk For Boys, which infects the listener from head to toe.

Formed in 2008, the trio from Northampton has persistently lit up stages, earning a rich reputation for energy strewn live performances, a stirring presence backed up and spread further by their greedily received full-length It’s… The Mobbs of 2011 and its acclaimed successor Stiff Upper Lip & Trousers To Match last year. With a couple of singles equally stirring the passions, the band has been a live spark in the European garage rock scene, though it is easy to expect Garage Punk For Boys being the trigger to a far more ferocious spotlight upon the inimitable uniqueness of The Mobbs.

The trio of vocalist/guitarist Joe B. Humbled, drummer Cheadle, and bassist The Bishop, who is making his recording debut with the band on the album, unleash an instantly grabbing eighteen second punk brawl through Gpfb to set GPFB-FRONT-COVERthings off, following it with the magnetic grooving of Get Your Hair Cut. Bass and guitar cast the first spicy lure on the second track, before snipping scissors unlock a feisty stomp littered with a wholly seductive bassline and similarly alluring hooks. Matching the devilment of the sounds, Humbled incites ears and imagination with his raw and unfussy delivery, a boisterous and infectious enticing to misbehave or conform depending how you want to take the exceptional track.

Its bewitching bounce is followed by the tangy presence of I Am the Anticlimax, clanging riffs an easy enslavement from the first breath. With The Bishop adding another delicious velvety tempting on the bass within the crisp rhythms of Cheadle, the track entwines beat and vintage punk rock, kind of like The Rockin’ Vickers meets Leyton Buzzards. Striding with attitude and sonic enterprise, the song is an instant anthem, as so much of the album, an almost concussive and certainly inescapable treat whipped up by scything guitar and punchy rhythmic enterprise, everything lorded over by the compelling tones of Humbled.

Do the Bishop! comes next and is just the wickedest instrumental baiting possible. The skills of The Bishop seduce and rumble throughout whilst Humbled’s guitar launches its own virulent seducing as Cheadle smashes anything in arms-length resourcefully. With a tang of blues sweetness to its epidemic waltz, the song sets up further hunger in the appetite for the album before making way for the melodic causticity and intriguing narrative of Demobbed. The track is primarily garage rock but at times you can almost swear there is an element of The Undertones in its slim but impossibly potent sonic endeavour.

The hungrily vivacious ride of the album is taken to another level with We Don’t Need a God, a brilliant furnace of searing grooves and greedy hooks ridden by the punk honesty of the vocals. It is pure addictiveness, every twist and tenacious slither of bait soaked in infectiousness and anthemic irreverence, leaving feet, body, and soul blissfully exhausted and thoughts rebellious. Imagine The Masonics flirting voraciously with The Adicts and you get not only the heart of the song but arguably of the whole release.

The title track is next, romping with ears and nostalgia through jabbing beats and jangly hooks, its title summing up song, sound, and the whole garage premise which fuelled punk and garage rock at their outsets. It also has thrilling melodic warmth to its gentle uprising, everything aligning for an irresistible rousing of pleasure, taken on again by the blink and you miss shortness of second instrumental Chicken Run. Its enticing strut is swiftly pushed aside by the exceptional sonic commentary of Where’s the Punk Rock!?, angst and fury as much a part of its gripping clang and garage punk fever as creative relish.

Photo 1   It is not exaggerating to say that every song on Garage Punk for Boys is devious rascality, all instinctively and simultaneously appealing to the styles it weaves its propositions from, One Erotic Thought another fine example with its sixties spawned beat infused garage rock tromp. As here, they all keep feet and limbs as busy as ears and imagination, and whilst thoughts may not be erotic as the song reveals of itself, they are nevertheless keen to indulge in knavish practices after each encounter.

Put It in Your Pipe clunks and swings in next, riffs bulky lures courted by compelling bass craft and vocal devilment, everything framed by precise and eagerly wicked beats. Stepping out with a punk seeded swagger, the track also wears the mischief breeding charm and adventure of King Salami and the Cumberland 3 and the aforementioned Billy Childish, drawing out more lust for the album from the passions.

The final stretch sees the blues rock induced R&B stamp of Just as Bad as You light up air and ears first before the exotic swing of Mk II immerses senses and imagination in a sultry dance of the seven salacious temptresses, well in my dreams anyway. Both songs leave appetite as greedy as ever whilst closing riot of Mad! is an aggressively spirited and ferociously contagious garage punk assault, and oh so scintillating.

It is impossible not to drool from start to finish over Garage Punk for Boys, a release which if anything from punk to garage rock, beat to flirty rock ‘n’ roll gets the juices flowing, is a must. The thing with The Mobbs is they not only create sensational stomps but do it with a presence and flavour like no other, this simply makes them one of the UKs seriously exciting and innovative bands.

Garage Punk for Boys is available digitally and on CD now via Cravat Records @ http://themobbsuk.bandcamp.com/album/garage-punk-for-boys

http://www.themobbs.co.uk/

RingMaster 21/11/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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