Asylums – Killer Brain Waves

Photo by the Cool Thing Records sparkplug Kana Waiwaiku

Photo by the Cool Thing Records sparkplug Kana Waiwaiku

Amongst the most highly anticipated releases this year here in the office, maybe the most eagerly awaited was the debut album from UK sonic punksters Asylums. Having been hooked on the Southend-on-Sea hailing quartet’s frenetic and devilish jangle since being infested by Wet Dream Fanzine EP within the first throes of 2015, a more than keen and impatient appetite has been brewing and now we can say it has been well worth the hours pacing the floor waiting for Killer Brain Waves.

Taking a snap at any and everything with a mischievous smile on their creative faces, band and release is the kind of sonic devilment ears and music were evolved for. Offering twelve tracks which flirt and bite, tease and seduce, with an imagination and eccentricity found in Bedlam, Killer Brain Waves announces Asylums as one of music’s most essential and even more so irresistibly thrilling propositions. It is a collection of songs within which sarcasm and discontent are frequent visitors as too a virulent dose of humour and fun driven imagination. Musically, Asylums recall in heart and enterprise the likes of Swell Maps, The Dickies, and Supergrass. At times essences also remind of bands such as Weezer and We Are The Physics but as shown a dozen times over, all are hues in a devilry uniquely Asylums.

art_RingMasterReviewMixing a handful of treats from their previous EPs/singles with new slices of angular revelry, the foursome of vocalist/guitarist Luke Branch, guitarist Jazz Miell, drummer Henry Tyler, and bassist Michael Webster open up Killer Brain Waves with the mighty Second Class Sex. Its first breath brings a senses swamping tide of meaty rhythms and nagging riffs engaged in a toxicity of sound which simply infests the psyche. Though its spreads its body into a more expansive tempting, that energy never diminishes. Webster’s bass groans and growls in ears; a great lure matched by the swinging intent of Tyler as the swirling sonic seduction of the guitars lay their trap. With vocals just as potent and a touch of White Noise era XTC to the mix, it is a stunning start to the release, and one not losing a beat as I’ve Seen Your Face In a Music Magazine steps up next.

The second track is just as eager to invade body and thoughts, using a lower gear energy wise as a spicy wiry groove entangles ears and rhythms cast in another rousing and pulsating enticement. Melody and discord court the outstanding tone and delivery of Branch, each adding to the glorious trespass with a tangy hook just icing on the cake. New wave meets pop punk to give some clue to its ingenuity, the song departs so Joy In a Small Wage can share its ‘mellower’ charms. The track almost floats over the listener, keys washing its path though equally there is a darker edge in tone and another beguiling bassline to keep song and ears on their toes. That Weezer reference is arguably at its most potent here but again the result is, within a near perfect pop song, something belonging only to one band.

Bad Influence rumbles as it croons next, plaintive vocals and dirty riffs aligning with a heavy bass enticing to create another epidemic of swinging enterprise before the even more magnificent Wet Dream Fanzine leaps in. It is impossible not to join in with every Asylums song, and especially with this gem. Hips and instincts are grabbed straight away by the opening hook and swinging rhythms, vocal chords soon after as Branch leads a jangle of rhythmic agitation and funk infested bouncing clad in another fiercely tantalising weave of Miell’s sonic invention. A favourite since its appearance on that same named EP last year, the song continues to ignite tingles; as too the following The Death of Television. A nest of sonic vipers and stabbing beats, all with rebellious intent in their hearts, the song is one minute and twenty six seconds of creative agitation demanding similarly off kilter movement and involvement in return for its rare incitement.

The heavy punk ‘n’ roll of Monosyllabic Saliva comes next, its body a prowling beast tempered perfectly by the harmonic quality of Branch’s voice. Fuzzy with a thick feel to its atmosphere, the track is a brooding slice of pop rock veined by the ever insistent grooves and sonic tendrils escaping the guitars. Its dark tone is contrasted by the pop punk saunter of Born To Not Belong, a song which feels like it’s an already known friend as it makes its first proposal but simultaneously adds another string to the albums creative harp.

Necessary Appliances soon has ears greedy, the song twisting and turning with a more conservative sound compared to its companions but still unveiling a tapestry of imagination fuelled endeavour before Sunday Commuters and Missing Persons keep the thrills going. The first of the pair is another more controlled slice of pop rock with great sixties inspired harmonies taking the listener on a stroll of excitable rhythms and fuzz lined tempting while the second seduces with its Weezer/Supergrass hued canter around another commanding bassline and crisply landed beats.

The album closes with the outstanding punk raw challenge of Slacker Shopper, a grouchy and thickly aired proposal which as so many just hits the spot. The band’s most aggressive and irritable offering yet, it is a brilliant end to Killer Brain Waves providing a final new shade to their sound and invention, one we hope to hear more of. There is also a hidden track which we will call Butterfly just because the word is repeated most often. It too shows a fresh side to the Asylums sound; imagine the Beach Boys or Walker Brothers doing shoegaze and you get a hint of the great extra gift within the album.

We expected good things from Asylums with Killer Brain Waves but the album simply out does any expectations with ease. For fans and newcomers, Asylums and their first full-length are simply a must.

Killer Brain Waves is our now via Cool Thing Records @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/killer-brain-waves/id1105949093 and other stores.

http://www.asylumsband.com   https://www.facebook.com/asylumsuk   https://twitter.com/Asylumsband

Pete RingMaster 24/08/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Asylums – Missing Persons

asylums _RingMaster Review

There is no escaping that UK indie rockers Asylums continue to impress and excite as they reveal more aspects to their kaleidoscope of sonic contagion through their releases. Further evidence of that success is now to be found in new single Missing Persons, their mellowest hug of melodic enterprise and off-kilter prowess yet. The song is also another tenacious roar of the energy and infection soaked revelry that the Southend hailing quartet is becoming richly renowned for and a reinforcement of the eager accusation we are not alone in casting, that Asylums is one of Britain’s truly exciting bands.

artwork _RingMaster Review     The foursome of Luke Branch, Jazz Miell, Henry Tyler, and Michael Webster introduced us to their scintillating creative credentials through the exceptional Wet Dream Fanzine EP this past February. It was a three track collection of the band’s singles to date, and a slightly deranged explosion of angular noise pop to get lustful over. Released via the band’s own Cool Thing Records, the EP was an inescapable wakeup call later backed by the single Joy In A Small Wage. Play-listed by Radio One amongst thick support and attention all round, the track opened up the more seductively mellow side of the Asylums sound whilst accentuating a busy summer of success which saw the band playing a host of UK and European Festivals including Glastonbury. Now it is the turn of Missing Persons to light a fuse to swift acclaim and hungry new appetites for more; success hard to see being escaped such the persuasion of the richly dynamic song.

From its opening strand of spicy guitar, Missing Persons simply lures ears and imagination; that initial hook replaced by similarly effective bass bait as the song slips into a Weezer meets Supergrass stroll with grinning melodies aligning with matching vocals. Bounding along with restraint and eagerness simultaneously, the song is arguably the most straight forward track from Asylums yet, but a deception as essences of Dickies like devilry and Post Adolescence meets Sonic Youth melodic revelry lines its rousing seducing throughout.

The song continues to enthral and ignite, persuading the body to swing to its canter and thoughts to breed lusty praise for its warm psych pop fun. It also confirms that Asylums have many strings to their warped pop bow and a continued fusion of all will only ensure we will all have a thrilling adventure ahead with them.

Missing Persons is released November 20th via Cool Thing Records through most online stores.

http://www.asylumsband.com   https://www.facebook.com/asylumsuk  https://twitter.com/asylumsband

Upcoming Asylums live dates:

November

20th London Forum (with The Enemy)

21st Coventry Empire (with The Enemy)

22nd Portsmouth Wedgewood Rooms (with The Enemy)

December

2nd Bristol Bierkeller (with Ash)

3rd London Shepherds Bush Empire (with Ash)

5th Newcastle Riverside (with Ash)

6th Glasgow ABC (with Ash)

8th Manchester The Ritz (with Ash)

9th Wolverhampton Leadmill (with Ash)

12th Norwich Waterfront (with Ash)

13th Brighton Concorde 2 (with Ash)

14th Cardiff Uni Students Union (with Ash)

15th Dublin Olympia Theatre (with Ash)

Pete RingMaster 19/11/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Asylums – Wet Dream Fanzine EP

audioclip-1422899782

What do you get if you take a pinch of Supergrass, add it to an ounce of We Are The Physics, and then spice the mixture with a further splattering of Manic Street Preachers, Devo, and We Are Scientists? Well there is a good chance it will be something like the irresistible sound of and debut release from UK psyche poppers Asylums. There have been some startling entrances and introductions over the past months alone, but it is hard to remember many getting ears and emotions as excitable as the Wet Dream Fanzine EP manages in its three short, sharp slices of angular pop rock. The release is pure contagion but with a deranged invention and devilish imagination which reminds of a few and stands thoroughly unique in its character and temptation.

Asylums hails from Southend and have already picked at rapidly growing attention through their home made videos for the tracks making up the new EP; though having the songs bound together in one addictive package seems to make them grow in greater in persuasion and flirtation again. Live too the quartet of Luke Branch, Jazz Miell, Henry Tyler, and Michael Webster have been stirring up a buzz, a tour with The Vaselines and their own headlining enterprises luring in more and more appetites from fans and media alike. Now the Wet Dream Fanzine EP steps forward, with its title track released on the same day for the band’s new single, and there is a certainty that it is poised to shake up the UK indie rock scene for the better.

That new single opens up the release, Wet Dream Fanzine instantly laying down sonic smog of guitar enterprise which with pungent rhythms, has feet and thoughts immediately engaged and enthralled. The swing of the vocal delivery matches the warm stride and swagger of the song, everything a bouncy dance of mischievous persuasion with melodies and vocal harmonies soaked in creative devilment. There is no escaping the infectiousness of the encounter or its insatiable torrent of quirky and highly flavoursome hooks, it all unrelenting for the whole of the two and a half 10868149_320437288151046_8986672175115969600_nminutes the track takes to leap all over and inflame the passions.

There is no let-up in the devilry and quality either as the punk infused tenacity and urgency of The Death of Television takes over. An initial sonic spearing is the trigger to rebellious percussion and beats aligning to vocals just as sharply edged in their delivery. The song is soon a masterful stomp of creative agitation courted by a rhythmic and riff clad proposal which leaps around like bare feet on hot coals; the type of brilliance which made Baddies so essential when around. There is also an old school punk DIY feel to the EP and songs individually, which simply energises the second song and listener during its brief but addictive stomp.

The release closes with I’ve Seen Your Face In A Music Magazine. The third song combines the spicy grooving which lit up the first song with the more caustic attitude of the last track, merging it into a melodic and discord spiced wine of sound and invention. As the other songs, attitude exudes from every pore and note of the outstanding incitement, guitars toying with the imagination as rhythms jab with their own refined tempo on the senses and pop punk sparked vocals croon and roar with perpetual captivation.

It may be only one release but it is easy to suggest Asylums is the next big thing not only in but for British rock ‘n’ roll. The last time we were this excited was when…well privacy prevents details.

The Wet Dream Fanzine EP and single are available from February 23rd via the band’s own Cool Thing Records.

http://www.asylumsband.com/ / https://www.facebook.com/asylumsuk

RingMaster 23/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://www.thereputationlabel.today