Unbridled arousals and stomps: exploring The Conniption Fits.

The Conniption Fits_RingMasterReview

Formed in 2004, The Conniption Fits create their own ear catching mix of alternative, progressive, and indie pop; rock ‘n’ roll which rouses the senses and imagination and has so across a host of releases. Drawing comparisons to the likes of Jimmy Eat World, Green Day, Foo Fighters, Silversun Pickups, U2, The Police, and David Bowie and having shared stages with artists such as Weezer, Panic at the Disco, Kings Of Leon, Train, 3 Doors Down, Fastball, Mighty Bosstones, 7 Mary Three, Blue Oyster Cult, Mountain, Warrant, and Cinderella among many over time, the New Hampshire hailing trio make a noise which easily sparks the appetite. Grabbing the chance to learn more about the band, we had the pleasure of chatting with member and The Conniption Fits co-founder Stevens.

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started and what brought you all together?

That’s a long story.  I’m Stevens Blanchard, lead singer guitar player for The Conniption Fits.  The drummer, Shawn Snyder and I met back when we were kids.  My current band needed a drummer and he was a friend of a friend, not to mention a fantastic drummer with tons of attitude.  When that band broke up, we founded The Conniption Fits.  Jamie Hosley, or bass player, came along when we were looking for a new bassist.  Again, he had a reputation as being “the man” when it comes to bass, naturally we had to have him.

So The Conniption Fits is not the first band for you? Has previous projects had any impact on what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

I think I just answered that above, but yes.  We had a previous band, Motorplant, which did quite well for about 8 years.  You can still find all of the music that Motorplant produced all over the web including iTunes and Spotify.  When Motorplant disbanded, we wanted to head in a slightly more alternative direction.

What inspired the band name?

If the conniption fits, wear it.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

Far from it…We just enjoy playing and entertaining.  As far as the sound goes, I just want to create ear candy.  Songs with depth sonically and lyrically that are accessible and a bit unpredictable at the same time.

Do the same things still drive the band when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

Always evolving…You can tell album to album.  Every record seems to represent where our minds were at musically at that period of time.  I’m always hearing new bands that are doing really cool things that we want to incorporate into our own stuff.  I’d say we listen as much, or more, than we play.

TCF2Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

We deliberately try new things.  Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn’t.  On our second album, A Heaping Helping of Perspective the guys thought it would be cool if we recorded live without a click track.  I hated the idea, being a stickler for tempo.  It led to a different album and different songs for sure.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

Too many to mention, from Jazz to Metal…Speaking for myself I’d say bands like Nothing But Thieves, The Shins, Bear Hands, Coldplay, Eve6, Green Day, Foo Fighters, Kongos…  I love creative rock/pop/alternative songs that still have a hook, but avoid the same four chords and progressions that are so typical.

Is there a particular process to the band’s songwriting?

I am usually the idea man then we flush it out as a group.  Sometimes I’ll record the whole song then we will replace the drums and bass later. I’m into results; I don’t care how we get there.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

Life; I’ll sing lyric variations to a demo while I’m out for a run.  I usually find cool ideas that way.  I also hear the parts that suck and need to be changed.

Can you give us some background to your latest release?

I Need You (Ay-O) is an old relate that became new again when it started treating on-line. We’ve always loved the song and are happy to have it finally breaking through the “clutter”.

Give us some insight to its theme.

I need you is about wanting to leave a relationship, but continuing to be drawn back in; then dealing with the fact that needing somebody can be for very different reasons.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

I own the studio we record in.  It’s an amazing luxury because we are not “on the clock” burning money.  So we just show up with nothing and play.  Often I’ll have scraps of ideas ready to jump off from.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably the favourite aspect of the band?

Yeah, live is where we bring it.  We entertain.  We always have a great time and that usually transfers to the audience.  It’s also the only real way we’ve made any money.  So we play live to survive, and we love it.

It is not easy for any band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods? Are there the opportunities to make a mark if the drive is there for new bands?TCF_RingMasterReview

Not easy, but work hard and offer something great.  It doesn’t even have to be unique, just great.  Make people say “holy shit!”, and you’ll do fine.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date?

The internet grants everyone access, even the garbage.  I think we handle it well, but there is that constant drive needed to stand out in all the noise.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Check out our website, http://www.conniptionfits.com/ to listen to all of our songs for free and look for our new EP this summer!

https://www.facebook.com/conniptionfits/  https://twitter.com/conniption_fits

Pete RingMaster

The Ringmaster Review 01/07/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Gavin Chappell-Bates – We Are The Ones

GCB_RingMasterReview

The beginning of the year saw British singer songwriter/guitarist, Gavin Chappell-Bates unveil the video for new track Refugees. It was an ear catching offering also providing a teaser for the Cambridge musician’s forthcoming debut album. Now the release of We Are The Ones is upon us and fair to say if that earlier proposition spiced up the tastes buds there is plenty more highly flavoursome goodness to be found and feasted upon in the thoroughly enjoyable album.

The musical desire and devotion of Chappell-Bates is said to go back to the age of eleven and being inspired by Sgt. Pepper, an ‘awakening’ backed by “ his musical friends and a few early lessons by Ezio’s Booga.” Learning his craft playing in various local bands  which included Bokaata, The Deadlines, We Are Godzilla, and Up & Atom , Chappell-Bates decided to pursue a solo career in 2014, drawing on influences listed as The Beatles, Feeder, Aerosmith, Buddy Holly, The Bee Gees, Smashing Pumpkins, Our Lady Peace, and majorly Manic Street Preachers for his own creative adventures. The following year saw first EP, Black Holes released. Its attention provoking presence was followed by the singles 95 and We Are The Ones, each luring more eager ears the way of his emergence. Equally live he has been sparking strong praise and support around the UK, playing venues such as Bury St. Edmunds’ The Hunter Club, The Rescue Rooms in Nottingham, and in London the likes of Hoxton Bar and Sebright Arms.

Already earning strong radios play on BBC Introducing, BBC 6 Music, and XFM among many others and being was nominated for Best Male Solo Artist in the 2015 NMG Awards, Chappell-Bates is looking to now spark national awareness, something We Are The Ones certainly has the potential to give a potent nudge to. Produced by James Coppolaro, who with drummer Rob Gibiaqui (Sergey Lazarev, The Pinker Tones) plays alongside Chappell-Bates on the release, the album swiftly has ears keenly attentive with opener Church Of Rock ‘N’ Roll. A rousing and contagious slice of sound boisterously living up to its title, the song springs punk riffs and spicy hooks on ears as Chappell-Bates’ vocals lead its lively anthemic pull. It is a punchy and infectious start setting up an eagerness to hear more which the following All Ways more than satisfies.

Art_RingMasterReviewThe second song equally has an infectious swing to its presence whilst pursuing a more melodic/alternative rock imagination in its energetic persuasion. As with many songs there is a familiarity to the sound and nature of the song but equally a fresh essence that highlights Chappell-Bates’ own invention, the following 95 another example. It carries an air of the decade of rock spawning its title yet casts a vibrant pop ‘n’ roll flavouring which has the catchiness of modern rock pop flirtation. Its pleasing presence is matched in success by Refugee next, its initial gentle melodic caress growing in weight and intensity as keys shimmer in the background. Soon that brewing intent erupts in a fiery crescendo and chorus before repeating the cycle to engaging effect with Chappell-Bates’ vocals again a potent hue to his songwriting and its colourful realisation. A more subtle but increasingly provocative texture is provided by guest violinist Prue Ward and cellist Anna Scott, their evocative and here melancholic imagination a great spicing colouring a handful of tracks hereon in.

The album’s title track is another; its melodically reflective balladry evolving into a warm and inescapably catchy rock pop canter framed and steered by a robust and tenacious web of beats before making way for the acoustic tempting of Writing In The Sand and in turn the delicious spirit sparking incitement of Black Holes. The first of the songs has a sunny air to its infectious gait and a smouldering intimacy to its vocal and lyrical embrace whilst the second immediately has ears and imagination gripped with its opening throaty bassline and subsequent tone. A Nirvana-esque feel coats the beginning of the song whilst its emerging virulent stroll lies somewhere between Weezer and The Presidents of the United States of America, all essences combining to colour an encounter whipping hips and voice into eager involvement as it takes favourite song accolades on the album.

Dead End Disco Streets brings a great electronic spicing to its magnetic and physically buoyant temptation, indie and electro pop flavours uniting to embrace and dance with the equally spirited vocals before Follow The Light unveils its own animated serenade which dances with ears rather than laying sentimentally upon them though it is certainly emotively shaped and fuelled. As if any more proof was needed, the song is further evidence that Chappell-Bates knows how to write pop and rock songs which simply stir attention, proof swiftly backed by The Finest Hour and its Big Country like landscape of melodic and folkish hues.

The album concludes with firstly Last Angel, an emotionally intense country spiced ballad featuring the guest vocals of Kathryn James and keys of Jamie Brooks, and finally the acoustic/folk pop sparkle of Starlight. Both songs have brightness to their sentiment loaded proposals, especially the last which with a hug of strings is edgy and provocative as the best pop ballads always are.

Certainly some songs ignited more lusty reactions than others, but from its first note to last syllable, We Are The Ones is a proposition that can only be enjoyed from an artist with the potential to made big strides in the UK rock/pop scene.

We Are The Ones is released April 8th through R*E*P*E*A*T Records and @ https://gavinchappellbates.bandcamp.com/album/we-are-the-ones

http://gavinchappellbates.com/   https://www.facebook.com/GavinChappellBates   https://twitter.com/GChappellBates

Pete RingMaster 07/04/2016

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Eureka California – Versus

EC _RingMasterReview

With songs as sonically dysfunctional as the lives in their themes, flavours and attitude at times bordering on dissonant, Versus is one of those albums which nags and pesters until it has attention involved in its mischievous challenge. The release is the new and third album from US garage rock/pop duo Eureka California, a band from Athens, Georgia who over the past three years or so has increasingly stirred up eager fuss for their sonic psychosis around an intimate and self-referential lyrical devilry.

Consisting of guitarist/vocalist Jake Ward and drummer Marie A. Uhler, Eureka California made its first mark with the Modern Times EP in 2011, the band at that point a trio. The following year saw the release of debut album Big Cats Can Swim; its awareness stoking success then potently built on by firstly a 7” split with Good Grief in 2013 but more so by well-received second album Crunch a year later. The pair of encounters also saw the band as the duo now luring fresh spotlights with Versus, their first offering recorded in a studio.

It opens with Eureka California’s Night In, a pop jangle with thumping beats and a hungry horde of riffs around the expressive tones of Ward. There is a seventies power pop/punk feel to the track and a raucous feistiness which sets the theme and tone for the album. Like The Undertones/Only Ones meets The Hives whilst spaced out on toxic pizza, the song is a rousing start to the album swiftly backed up by the just as addictive Sign My Name With An X. It too has rebellion in its creative belly and belligerence in its touch as it engineers another slice of bracing garage punk pop. Imagining Melvins and The Replacements colluding with The Super Happy Fun Club gives a hint at the spirit raising, imagination inciting exploit. As all tracks bar two, the song is a swift, psyche infesting shot of creative adrenaline barely touching two let alone three minutes; just diving in, rushing out, and leaving greed loaded exhaustion in its wake.

The fuzzy pop ‘n’ roll of Another Song About TV strolls in next, its initial lure a scuzzy blaze which settles down for a hook stocked flirtation of guitar and voice. Uhler’s rhythms have a less imposing nature to their swings this time around but certainly have meat to their jabs and devilment in their invention across the brief and contagiously sweet incitement before it disappears in an instant to be replaced by the dirtier and more sonically irritable Sober Sister. The track soon has ears bristling in pleasure and thoughts grabbing the lyrical prowess and tenacity which swings through digs and humour at the turn of a syllable whilst spotlighting moments and experiences seemingly twisted from the listener’s own.

art _RingMasterReviewThrough the grouchy bounce of Ghosts, growling sounds and vibrant vocals uniting to seriously captivate, and the acoustic off-kilter charm of Fear and Loathing in the Classic City, band and album just tighten their grip on ears and appetite. The following Cobwebs on the Wind then sees them uncage more rapacious riffs and chords within a muggy and forcibly enticing invitation to body and spirit before Caffeine lays its raw balladry on ears with initially melancholic causticity which brews up into a raucous tempest of noise and emotion.

Surf rock meets post punk is one aspect of the compelling Realizing Your Actuality which steps up next, its early sultry coaxing over steely rhythms irresistible and only reinforced by the corrosive crescendos which erupt then fall before taking over the track’s thick and inescapable persuasion for extended periods. Weezer-esque in its calm, Black Rebel Motorcycle Club toned in its predacious exploits, the track adds another big peak to the successes of Versus.

Another acoustic incitement in the reflective shape of Everybody Had a Hard Year steers eager ears the way of album closer I Will Write Mine Over Potomac and its own melodic caress leading to ravenous sonic and rhythmic ferocity. A song about “loneliness and fraying nerves”; the track ebbs and flows in intensity with thoughtful calms and a raw agitation which almost grinds on the senses. Though finding it a slow burner compared to others within Versus, it is an enthralling proposal which just gets under the skin as deeply as the album succeeds as a whole.

It might be pushing it to say that Versus is going to be the most unique album you hear this year yet everything about it is fresh and seeps Eureka California distinctiveness. Plus it rocks like a bitch and that is more than good enough for us.

Versus is out now via HHBTM Records and @ https://eurekacalifornia.bandcamp.com/album/versus

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Pete RingMaster 06/04/2016

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Mellor – Damage/ Joy

Mellor_RingMasterReview

Formed in 2011, British quartet Mellor has earned some high praise and interest from fans and media alike, and there are plenty of reasons to expect things to continue and get busier around the band with the release of new EP Damage/ Joy. Four tracks which leap and bound into the imagination, the EP is a rousing slice of kinetic indie pop easy to get a healthy taste for.

The band itself calls their sound “Pop Smack”, but it can be best described as raucous Brit pop with an arsenal of twists. On the EP, it is like a galvanic stomp woven from the indie adventure of The Jackals, the punkishness of a Top Buzzer, the eighties fervour of a Purple Hearts or Secret Affair, and the transatlantic mischief of Weezer. It is a sound which has already lured potent attention through a trio of singles and a debut EP to date as well as a highly praised live presence which has seen the band share stages with bands such as The Milk, Carl Barat, and The Kooks. Now it is the turn of the Mo Hausler (Babyshambles, Everything Everything) produced Damage/ Joy to whip up fresh ears and appetites the way of Reading quartet Gary, Josh, Evert, and Sam.

The release gets straight down to it too with opener Win Me Over. Punchy rhythms and a fine clash of guitar swiftly springs a hook lined swagger which soon has hips and ears locked into it’s a seriously catchy and flirtatious stroll. Bursts of feisty energy and aggression add to the spicy drama on offer whilst its melodic infectiousness and rhythmic shuffle is not too far removed from sixties beat bands like Herman’s Hermits.

logo_RingMasterReviewIt is a gripping and eventful proposal entangling a host of flavours across the decades into its bouncing body; a treat of imagination emulated again in Dolly Daydream. A slower but no less enticing proposal which gets increasingly compelling with every minute, the song is a serenade of emotive keys and vocal prowess within rhythmic shadows and an underlying but restrained urgency. It is an energy which gets more of an escape in the riveting Going Nowhere, a track which from its delicious opening groan of bass has ears and appetite on board. Sultry caresses of guitar and melodic seducing need little time to captivate the listener either whilst fiery grooves and the ever potent vocals, as well as that persistent dark lure of rhythms, ensures enjoyment is full to the rim.

The EP closes with Schadenfreude; a rip-roaring romp of indie rock ‘n’ roll with again a breeding in each of the past five decades via various strains of galvanic sound. If reading all the references to times and flavours past triggers thoughts that the band may have missed their time in musical history, be rest assured that Mellor, certainly going by Damage/Joy, is very much a band of the now and one of those with the potential to eventually steer the adventure of the British indie rock ‘n’ pop scene.

Damage/Joy is available from 11th March 2016 via iTunes and other stores.

http://www.mellorsounds.com   https://www.facebook.com/melloruk   https://www.twitter.com/melloruk

Upcoming Live Dates:

Saturday 12th March – Oakford Social Club – Reading (READING EP RELEASE SHOW)

Friday 25th March – The Railway – Winchester

Friday 8th April – Sebright Arms – London

Pete RingMaster 10/03/2016

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Astral Cloud Ashes -Too Close To The Noise Floor

ACA_RingMasterReview

Antony Walker is one half of the Channel Islands hailing Select All Delete Save As, a band we have taken a shine to especially after the release of their 2014 album Ultra Cultura. The Jersey bred musician has also created music under the name ALPA, amongst other monikers. Now though he has unveiled a new project and a debut single which suggests he is tapping into a new vein of fascinating adventure in songwriting and sound.

The band is called Astral Cloud Ashes; predominantly a one man project though it occasionally features Jason Neil also. Musically tagged as future-core, the band’s sound on the evidence of the new single is an imaginative weave of indie and alternative rock but equally involves elements of noise and pop rock. To be honest, Too Close To The Noise Floor enjoyably makes it hard to pin down the music but if a mix of The Pixies, Swell Maps, Weezer, Bloc Party, and early Cure appeals, then it is a song to seriously explore.

Mastered by Tim Turan, Too Close To The Noise Floor takes the imagination into the intimacy and adventure of cosmonautics but equally involves “family values and unwanted first-world paranoia” in its energetically hugged theme. Guitars and rhythms descend on ears from its first breath, creating a hazy breeze which relaxes as Walker’s warm tones lay engagingly across songs and ears with some great vocal backing adding to the appeal.

There is punchiness to the song too, beats and bass jabbing and prowling respectively alongside the spicy melodies and vibrant hooks that entice. There is raw feel of XTC to the song in particular moments, maybe a whiff of Melvins too, all going to provide a refreshing hip flirting and pleasure inciting proposition.

With a debut album scheduled for later in the year to be anticipation wrapped from hereon in, Too Close To The Noise Floor is a thoroughly enjoyable and attention grabbing introduction to Astral Cloud Ashes, and potentially what could be Walker’s most successful project yet.

Too Close To The Noise Floor is released March 7th across all major online distributors.

https://www.facebook.com/astralcloudashes/

Pete RingMaster 29/02/2016

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Universal Thee – All Watched Over by Machines of Loving Grace

Universal Thee_RingMaster Review

All Watched Over by Machines of Loving Grace is a flirtation which, whilst seducing ears with its pop charm, has the body bouncing and worming around like a slinky. The second album from Scottish alternative popsters Universal Thee brings a smile to the spirit and infectious revelry to the day and whereas their critically acclaimed debut album had ears and voices seriously enticed its potential has simply been blossomed to new refreshing heights in its successor.

Formed in 2010 as a trio with “a faulty Macbook for a drummer”, Edinburgh hailing Universal Thee first took their live steps two years later with an actual drummer. It was a show which had a low-key attendance to say the least but within two years the band was sparking really sparking eager attention, with first album Back to Earth at the forefront of the new thrust in their emergence. Since then their stature has only ascended, shows supporting the likes of Ded Rabbit and an appearance on the pyramid stage at the Kelburn Garden Party potent successes enhancing further their live reputation. Such the magnetic and contagious prowess of All Watched Over by Machines of Loving Grace, 2016 is looking like being another successful time, possibly the moment when the band’s individual sound and presence is grabbed by new and broader spotlights.

Led by the united vocal enticement of husband and wife, James and Lisa Russell, the Universal Thee has drawn references to the likes of Ash, Pixies, Weezer, and Queens of the Stone Age; they amongst many inspirations to the band as a whole and individually. There is also, by coincidence one suspects, an eighties new wave/indie pop scent to their music which reminds of bands like The Chefs, Girls At Our Best, and maybe to a lesser extent The Passions and The Chesterfields. As shown straight away with opener Why, they are all just hues to something distinct to Universal Thee.

art_RingMaster ReviewThe first song swiftly jangles in ears with alluring elegance as the beats of drummer Matt Grieve provide a feistier touch. The song soon strolls along with a fuzzy air to the melodies of guitarists Robin Spivey and James Russell whilst the bass of Andrew Perrie brings a delicious almost groaning temper to the radiance around it. The blend of James and Lisa Russell is another key element in its persuasion, their union carrying a great essence of discord which just seals the deal for ears.

Unashamedly catchy, the great start provided by the first song is continued and surpassed a little by the second. Keep Falling adds a grungy texture to its enticement whilst the bass courts a post punk appeal within a quickly captivating Weezer-esque saunter. Its hooks are as keen and inescapable as its melodic romancing and boisterous energy, a creative weave more than matched by the band’s brilliant latest single Speaker. The mellow but lively vocals from both the Russells, leads a swinging almost mischievous tempting that instantly seduces ears and feet. That earlier mentioned eighties new wave pop colouring is a rich essence to songwriting which also openly draws on the influence of Frank Black, creating a proposition easy to suspect that the Pixies man would be proud to claim as his own.

Xang is a mellower but still energetic proposal next, its shadow lined air and character a slightly melancholic and evocative caress framed by more forceful rhythms whilst Lost at Sea glides through ears with a heavier and grittier breath to its punk infused pop. Both songs keep an already happy appetite fulfilled if without, and maybe expectantly, matching their glorious predecessors, a success definitely achieved by the outstanding Hey. With tenaciously anthemic rhythms and a fiery glaze to its pop ‘n’ roll, the song is certain single material with all the addictive hooks and qualities needed. Quaint and ballsy simultaneously, the track has the body leaping to its compelling creative throes before Hamlet 3 hits the same sweet spot with its own unique Teenage Fanclub does pop punk like canter. The song simply epitomises the growth in the band’s craft and sound without any lessening of their invasive pop ingenuity and it is impossible not to be fully involved in voice and hips with the increasingly rousing encounter.

A calmer climate washes over the senses as Sail Away floats into view, though rhythmically it offers great agitated bait around which vocals and melodies provide a familiar yet indefinable lure. A romancing which breeds more volatile moments within its persistent smooch, the enthralling hug makes way for more galvanic pop ‘n’ roll in the irresistible shape of Hounds, it in turn leaving ears to the pop fascination of closing track Light On, two tracks ensuring album and emotions are left on the same high they started with through song one.

Universal Thee have the great knack of creating something you feel you already know but then you only come across exciting surprise after surprise whilst being infested with pop music to get greedy over. All Watched Over By Machines of Loving Grace is the sign of a band ready to step into the intensive recognition of national awareness and more; a success hard to see evading the quintet for much longer.

All Watched Over By Machines of Loving Grace is available from February 19th whilst the single Speaker is out now, both via Eventual Heirs Records.

https://www.facebook.com/universalthee  https://twitter.com/universalthee   http://universalthee.com

Pete RingMaster 18/02/2016

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Daylight – One More Fight

Daylight_RingMaster Review

Though released back home a year ago, One More Fight gets its own UK release this month on the eve of Spanish pop punks Daylight’s UK tour. Such its storming collection of contagious anthems it would be no surprise if a great many of British genre fans have already a copy of their highly persuasive release in their collection, but if not, the time has come to grab some, not ground-breaking but inescapably rousing, pop punk either for the speakers or live.

Formed in 2004, the Barcelona hailing quartet has over the years toured through Europe, Russia, China, and Japan, as well as successfully play Groezrock, headline The X-Games, and shared stages with the likes of MXPX, McFly, Reel Big Fish, Zebrahead, and The Ataris. Their imminent tour around the UK is their first though and as mentioned marked by the release of One More Fight. Produced and mixed by Andrea Fusini (Upon This Downing, Ms. White, Ready Set Fall) alongside Andrew Wade (A Day to Remember, The Ghost Inside, A Loss for Words), the album instantly leaps on ears igniting body and appetite with boisterous ease.

Opener Anthem Of The Broken lives up to the first part of its title immediately, vocal harmonies and roars within tenacious riffs igniting ears as punchy rhythms give them a healthy examination. There is nothing flawed musically in the song either, the heavy wiry tone of Olek Burek’s bass irresistible whilst the guitars of Wojtek Burek and Albert Domenech almost dance on the senses as they cast magnetic aggression and fiery enterprise. The combined vocal persuasion of the Burek brothers is just as impressive too, the track strolling with lively attitude and physical prowess into waiting imagination and enjoyment.

cover_RingMaster Review     The following Kickbacks is a touch more reserved in its assault but still a thumping encounter built on the voracious swipes of Victor Vera’s muscle on drum skin. With the body soon bouncing as eagerly as the song’s, rich satisfaction is alive without a care for the kind of general familiarity which seems to come with pop punk releases as a whole. As the track shows, The Daylight touch and impassioned energy brings an ingredient which makes already strong songwriting standout from the masses too, that and an ability to create instinctive hooks and melodies which seem to know what tastes like and want.

The forcibly catchy Consequences takes over with its own easy going and rigorously infectious stomp next, guitars and bass a busy maelstrom of enterprise pierced by again heftily swung beats and wrapped in the captivation of the vocals. It also continues the imagination which brings resourceful and unexpected twists in certain moments, an invention even more open in the sonic shimmer of Now Or Never. The song entwines elegant melodies around expected catchiness, vocals leading the gentle but anthemic roar as in its lining, a great glimpse of discord and shadowed contrast comes and goes to further entice.

We Are Strong has a Jimmy Eat World spicing to its tempting, the electro winking of its predecessor again pulsating in the enthused hug of the song. With a New Found Glory scented air brewing up and subsequently soaking the heart of the track, its more than agreeable presence swaps with the equally alluring loud croon of Another Day. Though neither proposition incites the same energy of responses as those before them, each leaves ears with a smile and pleasure strong before being eclipsed by the Good Charlotte meets Weezer meets McFly like Best Days of Our Lifes. There is a touch of Green Day to the song too, and a wealth of imagination from Hammond-esque keys to rap shaped vocals which ensure it is a proposition which, without major originality on show, offers a fresh and bewitching weave of eclectic contagion.

The song should be the closing track to One More Fight, its feel good factor the perfect way to end the album. In fact it could even be as the track line-up is marked two ways on the promo sent to us and on the band’s Bandcamp different again, so do not take our line-up as read, just that it is true to the quality of the great release.

The thrilling Revolution is next in our schedule, from a grouchy bassline and confrontational incitement from drums and guitars, the song challenges and enlists full involvement in its aggressive anthem of a roar. Green Day again springs to mind as the track rivals the starters for best track honours, its defiance in word and emotion the griping fuel to the sound igniting fresh greed.

The final two songs on the album keep things rolling along with joyful energy, End Of The World releasing its Living End spiced rock ‘n’ roll first leaving Crazy Youth Gone Wild to bring a thoroughly enjoyable romp of a release to a rewarding close. As suggested One More Fight is not Daylight breaking down walls or reshaping the pop punk scene but it is them proving they are one of the genre’s most potent if for many still secret pleasures.

Britain time to get on those feet and romp…

One More Fight is released in the UK on 23rd October.

Daylight’s UK tour dates:

27 Oct – London, Boston Music Room

28 Oct – Edinburgh, Opium

29 Oct – Ayr, West Of The Moon

30 Oct – Dundee, Drouthys

31 Oct – Glasgow, Nice And Sleazy

01 Nov – Sheffield, The Hop

02 Nov – Derby, The Vic Inn

03 Nov – Frome, Cheese And Grain

04 Nov – Swansea, The Scene

http://www.daylightband.com http://www.facebook.com/daylight http://www.twitter.com/daylightband

Pete RingMaster 23/10/2015

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My Cruel Goro – Self Titled EP

My Cruel Goro_RingMaster Review

Since its emergence a couple of weeks or so back, the debut EP from My Cruel Goro and its sound, has lured comparisons to bands as varied as The Clash, The Stranglers, and The Jam to the likes of Ash, Arctic Monkeys, The Fratellis, The Hives, the Libertines, Dinosaur Jr., and Weezer. For us the self-titled release brings a weave of Asylums meets Birdland meets New Bomb Turks to the table. That diversity across all references though is because primarily it is hard to pin down the My Cruel Goro sound; it seems bred from varied decades and through a vat of inspirations but with no particularly defined evidence to support any claim, everything just teasing whispers in something quite original.

cover_RingMaster Review     Hailing from Italy, My Cruel Goro is a currently Reykjavík in Iceland based trio which formed in 2014. Vocalist/guitarist Andrea Maraschi and bassist Andrea Marcellini had already been making music together for the previous nine or so years, meeting through a mutual friend, before My Cruel Goro rose from the ashes of their previous project, its demise according to Marcellini because “We couldn’t find reliable musicians to form a proper group with a stable line-up.” Then they met and linked up with drummer Tommaso Adanti, from whence My Cruel Goro stepped forward with now their new EP an introduction to broader awaiting appetites for their raw and virulent rock ‘n’ roll.

It opens with Clash and an instant blaze of enticing riffs and probing beats. A single breath of a ‘pause’ brings the throbbing tones of the bass in before the band strolls and swaggers with indie revelry, thick guitar incitement, and mischievous electronic enterprise. The song is a tapestry of fuzzy hues and blustery flavours colluding in a punk ‘n’ roll roar which is as creatively unpredictable and agitated as it is contagiously rousing.

Next up is Crapford, a song quickly endearing itself to ears and appetite with a wonderful opening melodic hook which is as Buzzcocks like as you can get without a touch of stealing. With tangy bass bait and crisp beats alongside, it is a gripping start which only gets stronger as warmer flowing vocals and pop punk hues add to the texture and richness of the song. As its predecessor, if without the final raucous spark, the track is an addictive anthem to get fully involved in before Glue Buzz takes over with its new wave meets garage rock devilry. A perpetual bounce with seventies punk attitude and tone, as well as a horde of spiky hooks, infectious swings, and a noise rock centre which simply transfixes as it meanders and evolves towards its scuzzy atmospheric climax, the song is a glorious end to a striking and thoroughly enjoyable stomp.

It is of course early days but if their first EP is the sign of things to come, My Cruel Goro could be making a hefty impact on rock ‘n’ roll ahead.

The My Cruel Goro EP is out now via Rebel Waltz Records as a free download at the My Cruel Goro Bandcamp.

https://www.facebook.com/mycruelgoro

Pete RingMaster 05/10/2105

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Skellums – Clarion Call EP

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Like a union between Weezer and Arctic Monkeys but sticking a middle finger up at any expectations that thought might breed, UK band Skellums quickly stir up ears and a greedy appetite with their new EP Clarion Call. A festival of alternative and indie rock ‘n’ roll across four mischievously captivating songs, the what we are assuming debut release from the band, marks the Liverpool quartet out as one potential soaked and new exciting adventure.

There is very little we can tell you about the foursome of Roberts, Watson, Crichton, and Courtney, except that, according to their press release and all forms of info for them , Skellums began because “there was nothing else left to do” and that the band formed their own record label, Rent & Debt Records to bring forth their flavoursome endeavours. Creatively fragrant their songs certainly are too on the evidence of Clarion Call, musically and lyrically where the band weaves tales of the streets, lives, and experiences most can relate to in some moment or form.

Picture 14_RingMaster ReviewThe EP opens with the outstanding We Are One, a song bounding in on a flood of gripping riffs and rolling rhythms, all weighty and dramatic, before slipping in to a mellower but no less compelling energy for the entrance of the expression loaded vocals. As the narrative spills word by word, guitars relax into a spicy, almost ska bred gait aligned to a great throaty bassline and crisp beats. Band vocals erupt as the chorus bears down on the passions, their anthemic call matched by the infectious swing of the song at that moment and the great lead vocal delivery. The track just grows and incites further with every passing minute of its magnetic rock ‘n’ roll, ending on a blaze of a finale and creating a storming start to the EP.

The Avenue comes next, an initial shimmer of melodies eventually leading to another catchy stroll around a vocal and lyrical social play. Brass shed rays of melodic sun across the song throughout too, their warmth matched by again great variety to the vocals and the inventive shuffle of flirtatious hooks and sparkling grooves. As its predecessor, the song is a riveting seduction, showing more of the diversity already obvious in the sound and songwriting of the band, whilst spellbinding ears and imagination with a success emulated by the irresistible Monsters right after. As the song gets into its virulent stride, it should be admitted that the thought of ‘if The Monkees had been scousers this is the sound they would have held the world with’ surfaced, both they and Skellums sharing a seemingly instinctive pop ingenuity equipped with great underlying shadows.

Clarion Call is completed by the gentle but open swagger of Growing Old, another song flirting with a ska/reggae seeded canter wrapped in melodic enterprise and unpredictable revelry. Though not quite matching the success of the first three songs, it is a fascinating and thoroughly enjoyable end to the EP whilst providing more provocative and mesmeric lyrical theatre.

Over time we will all come to learn and know more about Skellums, though their music does all the talking needed right now, and even if they stay a mystery no one will really care if they keep coming up with the kind of creative fun rippling brilliantly within Clarion Call.

The Clarion Call EP is available from August 10th on Rent & Debt Records.

https://www.facebook.com/skellums    http://www.skellums.com

Upcoming Skellums shows:

Friday 21st August – Zanzibar, Liverpool

Saturday 29th August – Eric’s, Liverpool

Sunday 30th August – The Corner Flag, Sunderland

RingMaster 05/08/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Heyrocco – Teenage Movie Soundtrack

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With the release of recent single Elsewhere a sparkling lure to its impending arrival, Teenage Movie Soundtrack has answered the suggestiveness of its lead song and shows itself as an even greater enticement of the promise soaking that lone song of a few weeks back. The debut album from US angst poppers Heyrocco, the ten track encounter is a diverse and magnetic party for ears which weaves the teen angst sounds and emotions of the nineties, the guitar jangle of early Cure, and the dirtier tones of grunge into something unique from the imagination of the band. This still only scratches the surface really but the ultimate result is a release which sounds familiar, nostalgic, and thoroughly fresh, not forgetting highly enjoyable.

Hailing from Charleston, N. Carolina, Heyrocco consists of vocalist/guitarist Nate Merli, bassist Chris Cool, and drummer Tanner Cooper, a trio who has been constantly and increasingly stirring up attention on both sides of the pond since forming around five years ago. Teenage Movie Soundtrack is the band’s largest and strongest nudge on ears and appetites since forming and it starts with a bang through opener Loser Denial.

Guitar and vocals immediately pour their rich expression on ears, the pairing already hinting at the hues of a Weezer which only gets intensified as the song slips into a ripe stroll of rumbling bass, eager beats, and a spicy guitar clang. It is also instantly wrapped in pure infectiousness, a trait invading the whole of the album from hereon in. Virulently increasing in energy and captivating endeavour as it heads towards its riotous finale, the track is an exhilarating start to the release, leaving the listener in an agitated state eager for more, which comes courtesy of the heavier but no less compelling Melt. The air and presence of the song is thicker in emotional intensity but still retains the alluring catchiness of its predecessor, and indeed that same seeding of alternative rock/power pop for its own tempestuously inventive and at times perfectly imposing presence.

Heyroccocover_RingMaster Review     The grunge fuelled Virgin comes next, its opening minimalistic croon leading to thick and voracious Nirvana-esque explosions. It is an alluring cycle which is on repeat across a track which dramatically seduces and enslaves ears and emotions. There is no escaping the decade and bands inspiring the invention of Heyrocco or the ability of the threesome to twist them into ravenous incitements of raw and incendiary pop, as proven again by the lighter revelry of Elsewhere. Its opening jangle of hooks and invitational vocals is irresistible bait especially with its whisper of discord, a success eclipsed once the dark tones of bass and subsequent scythes of guitar court the potent variety of vocals across the band. Spiralling melodies and welcoming harmonies continue to exploit the submission given to the song’s charms, even as the outstanding encounter stirs up its creative intensity and volatile shadows to grow into an even bolder and muscular proposal.

A calm of sorts arrives next with the warm caress and enterprise of Mom Jeans, its rhythmic tempting and swinging pop gait a reserved but energetic festival of smouldering reflection and vivacious light locking ears and thoughts into eager attention. The almost sultry embrace of the song is replicated in many ways by First Song, though its tenacious balladry made up with livelier energy and melodies has more of a Costello/Petty-esque feel to it. Compared to previous tracks it takes longer to tempt and never quite manages to spark the same thrills whilst casting its pleasurable persuasion, but it certainly reveals more to the potential soaked depth and diversity in songwriting and sound within Heyrocco.

Alison brings a fiery blaze to ears next; its fuzzy textures and sizzling air colouring a cauldron of angst laden expression and melodic infectiousness bound in searing psych pop enterprise which in turn is equipped with pleasure gripping hooks. The track sizzles on the senses but is soon outshine by the even greater temptation of Jake Miller’s House Party. From its initial blast of spicy grooves and anthemic rhythms aligned to a thick lure of a bassline, imagination casts images of being bound in the throes of heaving bodies bouncing to the song’s puppeteer like tempting. You can picture a video for it straight away, energies and limbs moving in tandem even as the song relaxes a touch from its kinetic start for the great tones of Merli. A stomp of grunge hued rock ‘n’ roll, the song’s seamless flow through controlled and frantic crescendos is as magnetic as the web of invention and flavoursome hooks running incessantly through what proves to be the best track on the album.

The skilful Cure like hug of Santa Fe (Stupid Lovesong) is another which takes it’s time to convince, but eventually its laid back melody cast serenade simply leaves ears smiling whilst closing track Happy with its heavier rock croon ensures the release closes as potently as it began.

As so many, the band’s last single was our introduction to Heyrocco and there is no doubting they thrilled. Now Teenage Movie Soundtrack shows that it was no a flash in the pan but even more that it was just one strong essence in the band’s full sound and inventive presence. The additional excitement bred by the album is that you get the feeling this it only the beginning in their creative journey, just a scratching of the surface.

Teenage Movie Soundtrack is released on July 10th via Vital Music Group

https://www.facebook.com/Heyrocco    http://www.heyrocco.co.uk/

RingMaster 01/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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