FRCTRD – Fractured

 

As so many others who missed it first time around, the recent re-release of debut EP Fractured has been a wake-up call to a band in FRCTRD who truly have exciting potential and already impressive attributes to their music. The release is a six track savaging of the senses and sparking of the imagination offering invasive deathcore with a technical and progressive bent. It is a mix which feels simultaneously familiar and new, its nature increasingly carnal and rewarding to quickly stand out from the crowd.

The Paris hailing quintet weave inspirations from the likes of Structures, Reflections, and Breakdown of Sanity into their own invention and instantly hooked attention within the French underground with debut single Burden. Its success and their aggressive prowess on their country’s live scene subsequently saw FRCTRD booked to play UK Tech-Fest, this within their first year of existence. Originally released last year, the rebooting of the Fractured EP through We Are Triumphant is already drawing ears and attention beyond their strong reputation on the French deathcore scene; no surprise once it’s raw and imposing virulence takes hold in a single listen alone.

The EP opens with instrumental Act. Zero, a piece which slowly rises from dark depths with apocalyptic hues to spin melodic suggestion and industrial espionage before the band fully uncages its arsenal of bone splitting beats, fearsomely nagging riffs, and crystalline beauty. It all colludes in a ravaging trespass full of instinctive threats and technical clues to what is to follow, realisation of its hints starting with the immediate involvement of Negative.

The second track instantly ensnares ears in a web of acidic sonic bait, its spicy textures soon evolving into a heavier predatory persistence as guitarists Filip Stanic and Clément Barea unite to infest and devour the senses. That weight of touch and intensity is further accentuated and driven by the carnivorous tones of Maxime Rodrigues’ bass and the violently swinging rhythm of drummer Manu DLB. It is a raw breath-taking assault given extra venomous bite by the varied cancerous tones of vocalist Vincent Hanulak, his words not always intelligible but their spite and emotion inescapable. Within all this, melodic enterprise blossoms and electronic captivation shimmers as technical imagination flourishes without ever defusing the force of the tempest or its primal intent.

The band’s latest single Crow is next, the song written after and inspired by the terrorist attacks at Bataclan, Paris in 2015. It makes a slightly kinder approach than its predecessor but still has the listener engulfed in a cyclone of invasive rhythms and sonic dexterity as riffs again burrow into the psyche while invasive grooves taunt. Its climate is a blend of warm encouragement and rousing defiance translated into the magnet melodies and synth seduction glowing within the compelling senses scavenging musical and physical brutality. The track is mercurial and eventful, a template working just as potently behind the imposing and rousing tapestry of Fortress and the virulent causticity of Breathless. The first of the two incites and stalks the senses, its tenacious and boisterous energy never kind but constantly invigorating while its slow lumbering moments are like staring in the eyes and jaws of a bestial invader. As in all songs, melodic beauty is just as ripe, suggestive, and skilfully brought to the corrosive surface. Its successor is possibly the most addictive and crippling thing of the EP, and one of the most irresistible moments with its violent sonic rapacity and technical rancor simply bewitching and scarring the senses.

Closing track Cloud is no lightweight in all aspects either, its malignant physical barbarity and bloodthirsty craft striking and its melodic oasis beguiling, the latter sublimely prowled by Rodrigues’ mutable bass before being woven into the inclement fabric of the track.

It is a powerful end to a truly stirring introduction to FRCTRD. As they develop and their sound evolves, and given the strength and potential of Fractures, it is easy to anticipate the band turning into something as unique in the deathcore scene as anything out there today. Only time will tell but the adventure will definitely be enjoyably challenging on the journey.

The Fractures EP is out now through We Are Triumphant across most online stores and @ http://frctrd.bigcartel.com/

https://www.facebook.com/wearefrctrd/     https://twitter.com/wearefrctrd   https://frctrd.bandcamp.com/releases

Pete RingMaster 21/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Omaha – Chapters EP

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Creating an emotive weave of melodic and alternative rock with at times a loudly whispering underbelly of post hardcore/metalcore courtesy of the initial sound the band emerged with in2012, UK band Omaha powerfully show they are one fascinating and potential fuelled proposition through debut EP Chapters. It is a vibrant and invigorating encounter which swiftly and with little difficulty grips ears and attention. It also reveals a persuasion which only grows and impresses with greater intrigue and potency over every venture of its provocative textures and intimate passion; so much so that even if Chapters does not quite light the fire in individual passions it will most likely still instil a want to check out the band and their next release without reservation.

As mentioned formed around two years ago, the Leicester quintet has been honing and evolving their sound over the past couple of years, and in tandem continuing to draw and impress fans as well as the music industry along the way. 2014 though was a year where the band’s presence and sound made a potent break through, Omaha signing with American label We Are Triumphant after impressing them on a UK tour and also linking up with Monument Music on a management deal. It is fair to say that things are moving for the British band, a potent step forward which Chapters only reinforces whilst suggesting is just the first step to stronger and broader spotlights.

Thumping beats open up the EP as first track Devilish Acts instantly stakes its claim on ears, an initial bait which with scythes of tangy guitar strikes, has little difficulty raising full attention. This potency only increases and blossoms to greater persuasion as the heavy dark shadows of bass from Arron Bailey and the following vocals of Jack Voss link up with richly enticing acidic guitar swipes and the just as insistent beats of Jake Clark. Relaxing around the full emergence of Voss’ swiftly impressive tones, the music becomes a gentle caress but only for a brief moment before erupting again with emotion and intensity to match the vocals. The track seamlessly slips through inventive scenery of ideation and sonic expression across its appealing canvas, the guitars of Ben Corbett and Freddie Goli showing as much drama as they do craft and adding to an emotive theatre coloured to vibrant effect by the rest of the band.

The impressive start is backed by the weighty presence of Stranger’s Embrace. Throwing a reserved but potently anthemic chorus at the listener amidst an almost prowling landscape of gallery_7_2_42683melodic reflection and emotional angst soon after its start, the song straight away opens another character to the sound and songwriting of the band. Linking pungent and imposing intensity with melodic caresses, it does not quite live up to its predecessor but with a great rhythmic enterprise and open adventure across the whole band, the song only leaves a hunger for more of the same, which Homebound shows little reserve in offering. Making a slower but no less dramatic entrance to the first pair of songs, Voss stretches his impressing qualities yet again whilst the track again without finding that final spark, easily leaves appetite full and thoughts keen to explore more.

It is an urge rewarded in fine style by the outstanding G N D, a song bursting in on a rhythmic swing and soon dancing with a charming melody crooned over by Voss. A slight clarity dousing effect grasps his tones for a great piece of thought in the production, the smothering touch over his energy producing an almost angst ridden urgency from the singer which simultaneously conflicts against and compliments the sparkle of the guitar. The veil is washed away once the song expels its energetic breath, a vivacious landscape of harmonies and melodic expression bonding with Voss and the shadow kissed rhythms thereafter. It is a gem of a track taking top dog honours in the EP but challenged from then on by firstly the impassioned vocal and sonic roar of There’s No Room For Doubt. At times Omaha brings for no more reason than their ability to craft emotional anthems which are as contagious as they are dramatic, thoughts of former UK band Always The Quiet Ones; this song especially spicy in that suggestiveness and quiet captivating.

Chapters closes with the excellent embrace of The Final Scene which features guest vocals from Rebecca Need Menear. The song is a gentle emotion soaked temptation which carries an intimate drama and a tapestry of creative invention in the riveting rhythms of Bailey and Clark and the tantalising web of sonic colour crafted by Corbett and Goli, and the stirring tones of Voss and Need Menear do it no harm either.

Chapters is an exciting and potential walled next step for Omaha, with only the fact that not as many songs make a lingering persuasion away from their company than maybe expected. It is a minor comment though in a thoroughly engaging and engrossing proposition from a band badgering a new stature and bigger success.

The Chapters EP is available via We Are Triumphant from January 20th @ http://omahaofficial.bigcartel.com/

https://www.facebook.com/OmahaOfficial

RingMaster 19/01/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Life and Death Experiences: an interview with Corey Skowronski of American Standards

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Things are starting to happen for US hardcore band American Standards in awareness and stature, though the Arizona quartet have been brewing up a fine reputation ever since forming a few years back. Their Still Life EP pulled strong attention towards the band with its exciting blend of punk and noise rock within the hardcore intensity whilst their live performances have made the four piece one of the most talked about and thrilling proposition emerging from the US rock underground. Recently signed to Victory Records we thought we should learn more about the band, their music, and their promising to be explosive future. Thankfully bassist Corey Skowronski was more than happy to help our exploration of American Standards and let us in on a secret or two.

Hi Corey and thanks for sparing time to let us find out more about yourselves and the band.

First of all simply introduce the band for us and tell us about the origins of American Standards.

American standards started a few years back in 2010 and in the course of two and a half years we’ve really come along way.

How did you all meet?

With the new line-up we’ve all met through mutual friends and playing shows together.

Was punk and hardcore the music which you grew up to or did you have a wider ‘soundtrack’ to your informative years which your music does suggest?

Growing up punk was a genre of music I was heavily into and other than that just old metal but for the most part I listened to a little bit of everything. If it sounded good to me I’d listen to it.

What was the spark to actually decide to start the band?

For me personally it was always something I wanted to do, to play in a band. I had quit the job I was working at the time in 2010 and was ready for something new that’s when I decided that I would commit to the idea and the dream and begin looking for people to start a band with, and here we are now

You come from Phoenix, Arizonia, apart from the obvious names coming from the city like Jimmy Eat World, The Bled, and Job For A Cowboy, is there a vibrant bed of punk and rock talent in the more underground scene?

Everyone that I know of in bands from here has talent that needs to be heard. There’s all the band that we help with and are close to like Your Young, Sleepwalker, The Last March Of The Ents. Then there’s the old Column III dudes and Lariats of course.

Many bands say their home town/city has influenced or made a big impact on their music, is it the same for American Standards?AS2

Honestly I don’t feel that at all. We write music that we like to play and as far as actually playing here, yeah there are people that are in the scene and care but for the most part it ain’t what it used to be…

Last year you released your excellent Still Life EP how did you find the recording process and what did you learn from it which will impact on future recordings?

Me personally I like to write the song, record it, listen to it, then add or take things out that don’t fit. That’s the time to kind of experiment, in my eyes, with all the ideas you have for that song that you have accumulated over the whole process.

I feel that we did do that for the Still Life EP and with J & M they were totally cool with that. The one thing I think we will try now with the new stuff is to get everyone involved in the experimenting with ideas stage so every song has something from everyone and it shows.

Talking of recordings you are working on your debut album I believe?

Sort of…Geoff and Brennen our drummer and guitarist are stepping down but we are having Mike Cook of Your Young drum and Craig Burch of The Last March of the Ents play bass. I’ll be swinging over from bass to guitar and am very stoked. The songs we have recorded right now are going to be released as an EP titled The Death of Rhythm and Blues and after that we’ll then start on the all new full length.

You are known as a DIY band so how did the link up with Victory Records who will release your next release come about?

We were at a point where we felt ready to take the plunge into looking at possibly teaming up with a label and at the time we had many offers and we decided that Victory and the sub label We Are Triumphant was the most promising.

946270_660704840625239_2035397775_nCan you give us some ideas as what the EP will hold and does Still Life give a good indication of what to expect, more diversity and sonic/noise exploration?

The way I look at it, The Death of Rhythm and Blues is the second half of Still Life.

Have you approached the new songs and EP differently to how Still Life was created?

A little…We definitely worked together more in writing the songs and took our time with it. We didn’t want to pump a song out and call it a day.

When can we expect the EP?

The 14th of September is the date.

Tell us more about the it and what you have developed further in the new songs from those on Still Life.

New songs are great we have worked on a few things in them to give them that cherry on top and their own character and like I mention I feel this is the second half to Still Life. It feels that way at least to me.

How does the writing process within the band work?

We all come together with either a riff, half of a song, or just a little idea and we give it some structure. We jam it out and more ideas come to mind and we try and incorporate those as well.

So it is a democratic process within the band for songs and stuff?

Definitely democratic, we want to give everyone in the band their voice. Every one of us has ideas for songs and good or bad we want to hear them cause who knows what can come from them.

You have a great reputation for your live show, any particularly memorable moments or shows to date?as3

The show we just played in Tucson, InFest, that was a great show. We had a lot of fun. For me a long time ago we played a show in Tucson again, at the old Skrappys. We were getting down and playing and somehow I smashed the head of my bass into my own head and I just started pouring blood. I kept playing, can’t stop the good ole’ boys in American Standards. That story has never been shared with the outside world until now. You are all free now to make fun of me for hitting myself in the face.

Is the live aspect of the band the most thrilling for you or more the creation of new songs and records?

Writing, recording, and hearing the new songs matter. With all the songs we’ve done, once we finish them I’m stoked on them, and when I can play a song that I get stoked on, the energy I pull from it just kicks in and that’s when we can go crazy and let it all out.

Once released the energy from those songs just takes over and that’s what I love. When a song can take you from one point, one mind set and in the course of two and a half minutes it carries you to a completely different one.

Once more thank you to talking with us, anything else you would like to add?

September 14th get the new EP and let us know what you all think.

Lastly would you like to give us the five most influential records on you personally?

The Fall of Troy – Manipulator

Pantera – Reinventing the Steel

Phil Collins – No Jacket Required

Norma Jean – Oh God the Aftermath

Smashing Pumpkins – Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness.

https://www.facebook.com/AmericanStandards

Read the Still Life review @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2013/06/27/american-standards-still-life/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 25/07/2017

 

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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American Standards – Still Life

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With a debut album planned for the latter part of the year we thought it was worth checking out the Still Life EP from US hardcore band American Standards. It may have been out a while but as possibly many, like us, missed its initial unveiling and it is so damn good there is no better time to catch up and fire up a hunger for the forthcoming full length release.

From Phoenix, Arizona, the quartet of vocalist Brandon Kellum, guitarist Brennen Westermeyer, bassist Corey Skowronski, and drummer Geoff Gittleson, has earned a strong reputation for their live performances and sound which though we called them a hardcore band takes in many more potent essences such as punk and noise rock. It is a riveting confrontation and at times borders unleashing disorientation with its passion bred intensity and creative maelstrom. The unpredictable and diverse imagination to its invention though is an easy capture of the imagination with band and sound having the depth and flavours to ignite the appetite of all fans from the likes of Cancer Bats and Every Time I Die through to those of Dead Kennedys and on to devourers of the kind of noise the likes of Coilguns, Retox, and Blood Brothers conjure. Since forming the band has toured extensively across the US especially through 2012, playing with bands such as Sick Of It All, Trial, Touché Amore, and Joyce Manor and making successful appearances at numerous festivals including Within These Walls, The Punk Rock Picnic, and inFEST. Since the release of Still Life, American Standards has signed with Victory Records for the new album and continued to explode stages with their devastating sound.

Released via indie label We Are Triumphant, the EP opens with the brief and irresistibly caustic Self (En)titled, the track coverinstantly attacking the ear with vocal venom and soon joined by an emerging rhythmic and sonic provocation. It is the perfect introduction to open up attention and set the wheels of intimidation and incitement in motion as it boils up into the following Raised By Wolves. Again the coarse vocals of Kellum seize the opening seconds, his delivery a harsh but excellent rub on the senses immediately wrapped in another fury of sonic and rhythmic challenge. There is an earthy groove soon in place to start a deeper contagion aided by group scowls and the enslaving beats of Gittleson but it is just the appetiser as the track explores veins of infectious alternative rock alongside rapacious riff greed to ignite greater flames of passion for its confrontation.

The close of the track also sees the bass of Skowronski develop a predatory throat to its growl which is scintillating and across subsequent tracks prowls and chews the senses and emotions with greater and more carnivorous glory starting with Bottom Feeder. A sonic tease comes with drum foot stomps to open up the fury, and is soon led into a jugular ripping primal assault, vocals and the guitar of Westermeyer scything through the air with acidic malevolence. The unexpected offering of clean vocals is another rewarding and pleasing element and tempers the sonic fire and bass/drum barbarity which threatens throughout.

Both Paradigm-Alt-Shift-Delete and Harvester continue drawing stronger impressed reactions to the release. The first is a tempest of metallic vengeance crafted by again excellent bass and drum vehemence further fuelled by the twisting guitar grooves and varied vocals which switch from seduction to antagonism note by note. With flames of noise rock and discord taunts, the song is a thrilling adventure of predacious design, senses and thoughts lured and exploited by the excellent enterprise and insidious invention of every element of song and band, especially that bass. Its successor is equally corrosive and eager to offload its sonic rabidity onto nerves and synapses, a ferocity driven by arcs of guitar sonically honed imagination, flesh searing vocals, and steel jawed basslines gnawing away from start to finish. Not for the first time American Standards take exciting detours from the assault, here vocal harmonies allowing breaths to be taken and passions to leap before the returning savagery brings a triumphant climax.

The release is completed by the fearsome punk goading of The Red Queen and the crawling intrusive primal chaos that is the title track, its opening lumbering gait evolving through oppressive washes of intensive rage vocally and musically and varying unpredictable pace changes. Again there is a constant flood of ideas and variations all successfully and seamlessly infused into the emotive furnace. The two tracks leave the richest impressions and satisfaction to confirm the release as something quite immense.

Rather than wait for, what on the evidence of the EP, will be an album to bring another striking and exciting provocation, we suggest the Still Life EP should be confronted right away and allowed to feast on thoughts and passions, and as a name your own price offer on their Bandcamp profile, American Standards have given an invitation impossible to refuse, especially when it one of the best hardcore releases to come along in the past year.

http://americanstndrds.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/AmericanStandards

9/10

RingMaster 27/06/2013

 

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Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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