XUL – Extinction Necromance

Photo Credit – Jenna Hindley, Midnyte-Sun Photography

Photo Credit – Jenna Hindley, Midnyte-Sun Photography

Extinction Necromance is a release which wholly captivates whilst hitting the listener with a tsunami of malevolent sound and intent. Consisting of four tracks covering thirty minutes, the EP is a barbarous affair which at times defuses or certainly overshadows the invention and diverse textures within its depths through a continual tirade of vocal and emotional hostility. There is no hiding place from the encounter either, except the off button, but its creators Canadian metallers XUL, ensure that is never an option with their craft and fascinating enterprise.

XUL hails from Vernon, British Columbia and cast a merciless trespass of blackened death metal upon the senses. Influences to their intent include the likes of Behemoth, Dissection, Immortal, Emperor, and Watain, strong flavours noticeable in the band’s sound but without leaping miles away from such inspirations XUL has woven the spices into a sonic narrative built on the sole character of their imagination. Formed in 2008, the quintet released debut album Malignance four years later, a well-received encounter stirring up Canadian extreme metal especially across the Western side of the scene country, a recognition reinforced forcibly by the band’s live presence which has seen them share stages with the likes of Obscura, Exhumed, Vreid, Kampfar, Woods of Ypres, Macabre, Withered, Cephalic Carnage, Archspire, and 3 Inches of Blood. New EP Extinction Necromance sees the band explore their darkest depths and most malevolent emotions, filtering all into intensive examinations of ears and psyche.

It begins with Frozen, We Drown, an immediate consumption of the senses through prowling riffs and grooves punctuated by lurking rhythms. There is also an underlying swing to the opening baiting of ears, a trait which is regular bait whether in a gentle melodic persuasion, a rugged rampage, or an unbridled savaging. There is also thrash bred virulence at the start which with the rabid sonic intensity subsequently evolves into a melodically scenic landscape of constantly developing climates and unpredictable intent. The track continues to shift and switch its attack and sound, merging murderous sonic and rhythmic affairs with almost seductive hugs of calm and evocative suggestiveness. XUL’s sound, as each song upon the EP, is not suitable for a lightweight consumption. It is with continual examination that the busy terrains and almost insidious nature of the aural tapestries unravel for increasingly dramatic and impressive proposals. That is not to say it is not a potent first introduction made, just a matter of almost too much to digest and get a handle on initially.

Album Artwork done by Remy C. of Headsplit Design

Album Artwork done by Remy C. of Headsplit Design

It does ensure every listen is a slightly different and fresh adventure too, epitomised by the following Orbit of Nemesis. It rises from the release with a heralding fanfare of horns and celestial harmonies, the epic air suggested in the orchestral hints of its predecessor in full regalia here. Like a majestic bird soaring into an expansive and thickly coloured atmosphere the track sparks the imagination but like the same being swallowed by the jaws of a violent storm, the expressive opening of the track is devoured by a bestial sonic explosion. The band surges over the senses from within that assault; volleys of violent beats from Lowell Winters the spearhead of a hellacious onslaught brought by the bass predation of Marlow Deiter and rabid guitar causticity from Wallace Huffman and Bill Ferguson. With the raw primal tones of vocalist Levi Meyers leaving their own inhospitable residues in ears too, it is a gripping fury taken to greater heights by the toxic but sonically invigorating grooves and shards of melodic imagination spilled by the fingers of Huffman.

As the first track, though maybe not as openly tangible, there is an evolving aspect to the raging and another swing to its vicious stroll, an ingredient which marks each song in varying ways and degrees as shown by third song Chaos Requiem. Rolling in on a ‘gentler’ gait and intent than its excellent predecessor, the song is soon sledgehammering the senses as guitars weave a tempting lure of melodic intrigue and expression. The turmoil is exhausting, ensuring that the brief respites when they emerge feel like oases in the merciless storm. It is increasingly gripping and an intensive incitement which as mentioned needs time to fully explore but more than rewards the effort.

Final track Summon the Swarm coaxes with the calm of water and a reflective melody before unleashing sonic and rhythmic carnage, but a tempest openly and precisely sculpted by each element of the band. It also delivers a thick anthemic lure alongside its punishing tirade of sound and voice, the track at times as intoxicating as it is corrosive as it frees a maelstrom of emotion and musical drama, especially in the closing ravishing of ears.

The more time Extinction Necromance is given the more it impresses, an undeniable success which marks XUL out as a band to watch closely as they surely start luring in a more global attention, starting right here. It might not quite be the best blackened death metal protagonist you will meet this year but it will be the one of those enticing the most repeats plays.

Extinction Necromance is available from May 19th @ https://xulmetal.bandcamp.com/album/extinction-necromance

http://xulofficial.ca/   https://www.facebook.com/Xulband

RingMaster 19/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Fiends At Feast /Tragic Death – Purgatory Rites Split

frontcover

Purgatory Rites is a split release bringing together the distinctly different but similarly cast brew of blackened death metal of US metallers Fiends At Feast and Tragic Death. It is not a union or release for the faint hearted, its chilling textures and rapacious appetite permeating and imposing on senses and psyche with uncompromising ferocity. For all the vicious rabidity though there is also a rich vein of melodic expression and resourceful temperance to the Horror Pain Gore Death Productionsencounter which makes both sides of the proposition compelling provocateurs and something different from the norm which subsequently makes the release itself a formidable and riveting proposition.

Providing four pestilential tempests upon the release is Santa Cruz quintet Fiends At Feast, a band formed in 2008 by guitarists Sammer and David. Within weeks the line-up expanded with vocalist Loki and bassist Nathan Nunes, before after going through a couple of drummers, Marloc was added to the band in 2009. Debut EP Shadows Of Extinction two years later made an attention striking mark before first album Towards the Baphomet’s Throne of 2012 placed a keener spotlight upon the band. Merging sweat and blood with a tumultuous blend of black and death metal, Fiends At Feast take little time on the split to reinforce their reputation and stir up the imagination.

A spoken declaration opens up the vault to a torrent of destructive rhythms and scourging riffs all under the guttural malevolence of the gutturally rasping vocals. Four Winds of Destruction is a corrosive encounter straight away but one with bewitching melodic enterprise within the predation of the guitars which ensures predictability is scarcer than a comforting caress. Production wise it is a little hit and miss, the guitars surprisingly submerged within the welcome prowess and stalking of the bass and the demanding endeavour of the drums. It is not a major issue but does defuse some of their sharpness as they stand behind instead of alongside the vocal lead.

Through Immortal Gates is a similarly layered and malicious incitement though the alignment of each aspect is better in the overall assault of the track. Ravenous in its heart and rivetingly imaginative in its tenacity and adventurous landscape, the song makes for a gripping black hearted emprise, grooves and rhythms especially warrior like in pride and creative rabidity. It is a mouthwatering examination for thoughts and emotions to explore, an intimidating yet seductive playground for their running with the song’s narrative, something which is especially easy with the following instrumental Spectral Passageway. Soaked in emotive ambience and the stark breath of haunted pastures, the piece is a well for the imagination to paint with, the satanic breath of its companions keeping to the shadows as it casts beauty and poetic reflection. It also allows a breath to be swallowed before the serpentine and increasingly ferocious hunger of Into the Darkness envelops and immerses the listener in its noxious climate. Though not as impressive as certainly the previous pair of tracks it again reveals the potential of Fiends at Feast and their increasingly agreeable enslaving of the senses to complete a strong offering from a band easy to suggest to fans of the likes of Dissection, Immolation, and Watain.

     Tragic Death is a trio from Madison, Wisconsin which like its companion here shows little mercy in its consuming of ears and beyond with destructive mix of back and death extremes with a thrash bred voracity. Self-penned as Apocalyptic Metal, the band’s sound has earned the 2009 formed band, a potent reputation through their debut album Apocalyptic Metal of 2012 and live performances. Purgatory Rites finds the band at its most inventively creative yet, opening track Suffer the Salvation alone visually descriptive through its melodic conjuring and aurally incendiary with passion chaining grooves and sonic mesmerism. Compared to Fiends At Feast there is a deeper atmospheric essence permeating their similarly predatory and malevolent presence and whereas the Californian four piece goes for the jugular before asking questions more often than not, Tragic Death take a murderous scenic route which is soaked in provocative imagery and emotive elegance within a venomous landscape.

Their remaining tracks, Withering Youth and The Dissolution of the Clay Children continue the impressive showing of the band, helping them steal the show from their equally impressive counterparts. The first of the two flirts and savages simultaneously, the guitars of Steven M. blistering and seductive within the tempestuous journey whilst his vocal rasps, as the rhythmic challenge of drummer Cody S. and bassist Joe D., leave sore yet blissful residues which linger and intensify the weight and lure of the song. Its successor is an epic fall through merciless and brutal scenic malignancy but again with twists of melodic and atmospheric colour which enthrals from within the tortuous air and oppression, a crafting as within all songs with elements of bands such as Rotting Christ, Enslaved, and Deathspell Omega to its bait.

   The track brings the release to a powerful and dramatic end, and though not as gripping as the other pair of tracks from Tragic Death it reaffirms them as a band to keep a close attentive eye upon, just as to be fair Fiends At Feast achieve with their contributions also. The Purgatory Rites Split is a worthy investigation for blackened death metal fans and extreme metal adventurers everywhere and another potent step in the emergence of both bands.

Purgatory Rites Split is available now via Horror Pain Gore Death Productions @ hpgd.bandcamp.com/album/purgatory-rites-split-cd

https://www.facebook.com/FiendsAtFeastBand

https://www.facebook.com/218tragicdeath

8/10

RingMaster 17/06/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com

 

 

 

Stoneburner – Life Drawing

Stoneburner

A compelling destructive seduction, Life Drawing the new album from US metallers Stoneburner, casts no doubts on the suggestion that the Portland quartet is one of the most exciting prospects in aural consumption out there.  Creating a scintillating weave of doom and sludge metal with atmospheric ingenuity and melodically sculpted temptation, the band escorts and very often drags a willing imagination across intensive and fiercely enveloping landscapes under tempestuously climactic sonic skies. The album enthrals and intimidates, inciting heavily emotive reactions to its own intimately emotional yet broadly applicable investigations of the “struggle to be a decent person in a world that keeps doing its best to cause you not to be.”

Formed in 2008 by drummer Jesse McKinnon (ex-Buried Blood) and guitarist Jason Depew (Buried At Sea), who had played together in many incarnations previously, and guitarist Elijah Boland, Stoneburner unleashed their first forage of the senses with the demo V.​L.​A. the following year. The band was soon making an impacting presence and noise within the Oregon underground scene, a proposition taken to greater attention and strength by the release of debut album Sickness Will Pass in 2012 as well as over the years the band’s acclaimed live performances which have seen them play with the likes of Yob, Sleep, EYEHATEGOD, Neurosis, Buzzov-en, Weedeater, Saint Vitus, Watain, Tragedy, Noothgrush, Graves At Sea, Lord Dying, Drop Dead, Whitehorse, Wind Hand, Bastard Noise and many more. Completed by bassist Damon Kelly (also Heathen Shrine and the son of Scott Kelly of Neurosis/ Shrinebuilder fame), Stoneburner now uncages their latest infestation of the senses and psyche, an encounter which leaves the listener simultaneously suffocated and invigorated.

Opening track Some Can smothers ears and senses from its first breath, a sonic breeze pulling in a thick and thuggishly textured collapse of NR088_STONEBURNER_frontcover_hi-res (1)antagonistic rhythms and prowling lumbering riffery. The track continues to slowly ravage air and recipient until the entrance of the vocals sparks a spurt of adrenaline and urgency to the persistently uncomfortable and demanding intent of the song. A masterful groove swings its bait openly and irresistibly across the dark bulk of the track whilst McKinnon offers slaps which simply send the body reeling and the appetite into greedier hunger. It is a dramatic and absorbing start where everything from the rapacious rhythms and carnivorous bass tone to the flesh scorching sonic designs of the guitars and the exhaustive vocals of Kelly, or possibly McKinnon with both providing  raw delivery across the release, outstanding alone and viciously majestic united.

The noir cloaked almost sinister and wholly magnetic initial coaxing of the following Caged Bird instantly has thoughts and attention gripped tighter. It is an imposingly provocative lure with the darkest irresistible shades of temptation, its destination a broad hint which you cannot anticipate with the piece at times offering the garage punk realms of say The Cramps as a possibility or the ravenous scenery of a Mastodon as an option to give just two examples. Where it does lead is into a corrosive tempest of sonic abrasion and virulent hostility wrapped in a doom drenched maelstrom of spite and malevolence. As its predecessor, the track finds a spark which injects an eager rabidity and raucous energy into the heart of the pestilential stalking and further on a bewitching melodic elegance as the song evolves and twists within its tortured stance.

The beautiful Drift brings a mellow respite next, the short acoustic guitar sculpted instrumental a safe peace before the savage tsunami of An Apology To A Friend In Need falls upon the ears. The track merges a melodic acidity and venomous intensity into a thunderously eventful and unpredictable adventure, rhythms and bass courting the uncompromising vocals for a merciless predation whilst the guitars seduce and carve up senses and imagination with a skill and ingenious ideation that is impossible not to be fully consumed and submissive for. The song is a beauty and the beast endeavour which is already in control of the passions before its turbulent mid-point.

Both the atmospherically enthralling Pale New Eyes and the Giver Of Birth immerse the listener into soundscapes which leave no room for outside interference. The first exploring a progressive essence to its scenic exploration before walking into a mouthwatering storm of sonic violation and rhythmic punishment, an oppressive brutality which only serves to ignite the imagination and exploit further. It is a riveting canvas of guitar invention and vocal ravishment around a frame of barbarous rhythms which ensures the short instrumental beauty of its successor with a haunting ambience is a psyche soothing godsend.

The next up Done is quite mesmeric and sensational, taking best song honours with ease despite the triumphs around it. Opening on a cinematic and again sinister entanglement for the imagination, it develops an eager stroll which continues to invite dark visions of a more filmic nature before striding through an intensive sludge fuelled narrative and infectiously incendiary drama in sound before the abrasing vocals add their strangled syllables and malice coated words. It is a brilliant tease and masterful persuasion and the perfect way to enter the immensely dangerous sonic world of Stone burner for newcomers.

You Are The Worst provides a colossal towering adventure to lose yourself within, every soar and fall within its antagonistic passage voraciously damaging and unrelentingly absorbing to almost match the plateau of the previous track. It turns into the most savage and bruising incitement on the album and in many ways the most satisfying before the closing epic persuasion of The Phoenix unveils its hypnotic journey. As good as eighteen minutes in length, the song emerges from a tightly enveloping almost claustrophobic birth within deep atmospheric waters. The song floats towards a crystalline light, heading up to a beckoning surface of escape and hope, its warmth realised by sultry guitar craft and caressing melodies. Initially intangible, malevolent intensity is also worming its way into the hues of the adventure, niggling away until erupting and soaking every twist and turn to become an inescapable cloud. It is a glorious technically impressive and narratively thrilling journey which never relaxes as the battle between light and dark rages within its imposing confines until the very end.

Life Drawing is a must for all with a keen appetite for masterful sludge and doom premises and those with a hunger for aggressive progressive explorations. It is not an easy listen at times but one of the most rewarding likely to be heard this year.

Life Drawing is available through Neurot Recordings now!

https://www.facebook.com/Stoneburner.PDX

9/10

RingMaster 15/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com

Invidious – In Death

I2

As December drew 2013 to a close it saw the CD release of the In Death EP from Swedish death metallers Invidious, a release which had already worked its spiteful caustic charms on a great many with a digital appearance in 2011 via Imperium Productions. The four track slab of sonic brutality and unrestrained malevolence is a merciless cruel confrontation but one which deceptively infests the imagination to offer solace within the corrupting vicious storms. Raw and punishing the release and its sound is ripe for the death metal purists but equally ventures with plenty for more varied extreme metal tastes to find an appetite for and though it is not exactly a release to ignite the genre and new fans to feverish proportions, In Death is definitely a venomous encounter which warrants full attention.

Emerging in 2007 from the fallout of Katalysator founded two years earlier, the band changing its name to all extend and purposes, Invidious consists of vocalist Pelle Ahmann (Katalysator and ex-Katalysator), guitarists Hampe Death ( Degial / Unpure / Malign (live) and ex- Katalysator/Watain (live)/Degial Of Embos) and Andreas Meisingseth (ex-Katalysator / Graveless / Vindicate), bassist Gottfrid Ahmann ( In Solitude / Repugnant  and ex- Katalysator, ex-Immaculate/Obscene Infinity), and drummer J. K. (Ensnared and ex-Gravehammer). Through their first EP as Invidious the band rampages across the senses, the Sepulchral Voice Records released CD at times a muggy consumption which literally mugs the ears and senses but there is that something about In Death which makes you simply want and welcome the violation time and time again.

The release opens with a distant setting and sound which creates a menacing ambience aided by sonic squalls across its scenery. As Coversoon as the vocal squalls of Pelle Ahmann sends the introduction into the shadows Black Blood and band erupt in a torrential scourge of exhaustive riffing, bone splintering rhythms, and a melodically honed sonic tempting which niggles and seduces as potently as the emerging  infectious groove. Into its full height the track stomps and prowls with predacious mastery whilst switching with adrenaline lit charges which easily enlist a growing taste for the track. The bass of Gottfrid Ahmann is a constant threat and treat throughout the song, its dangerous rabidity adding extra menace to the already rapacious brute of an encounter.

The following Dead Salvation Spawn accosts the ears with spirals of sonic abrasion; flumes of venom which enjoyably reappear across the length of the track within the thunderous and malicious maelstrom savaging the senses. Again bass and guitars recruit a hunger for their intensive presence and sculpting, whilst drums and vocals bludgeon the listener with a nastiness and confidence which you can only eagerly indulge in. Like the opener the song twists and lurches into magnetic endeavour though as across the whole EP it often takes focused ears thrust deep into its toxic chasm to reveal all the impressive turns in place.

Throne of Death is a tsunami of acidic hostility which without quite finding the same appeal as its predecessors still corrodes the air with inciting bitterness musically and lyrically whilst some of the guitar invention and classically bred melodies are virulently enthralling. Its climax is slightly messy and dare one say slightly indulgent before the final thrilling scurrilous assault from the track, but it still leaves you breathless and hungry for more which the closing Visions provides with unbridled severity, if pleasingly speared by kinder grooves and melodic imagination which explore and stretch the track to greater heights.

Hopefully the CD release of In Death implies new material from the Uppsala quintet is on its way, something the EP certainly raises a hunger for. Invidious may not have created a classic with their EP, though each deep fall into its mordancy does make you rethink that a little, but you sense they have that triumph in them and if not plenty more releases like In Death will not be unappreciated.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Invidious/182505538468462

8/10

RingMaster 08/01/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com

Revelation’s Hammer – Self Titled

Revelation's Hammer pic 1

It may have pure sonic venom coursing through its veins but there is something irresistibly inviting about the arts and crafts of the self –titled debut album from Norwegian metallers Revelation’s Hammer. Skilfully sculpted and ravenous in its hunger driven energy and invention, the release is wholly enthralling despite its spiteful air and offers certain reasons as to why the band is being talked of as the next big thing in Scandinavian black metal. Six tracks of compelling aural drama and rapacious antagonism, Revelation’s Hammer is an exhausting, thrilling confrontation.

Created by Accuser (vocals, strings, and concept) in 2007 for his musical ideas, the project was joined by drummer Bergh. His departure saw the recruitment of Myrvoll from Nidingr with the beginning of the creation of the album began January 2010. The recordings expanded over ten months due to several setbacks, with the album being mixed by Børge Finstad at infamous Toproom Studio (Mayhem, Borknagar), mastered by legendary Peter In de Betou (Watain, Dark Funeral), and additionally featuring a guest appearance from Exilis from Troll on some tracks. March of this year saw the Oslo based band sign with Italian dark metal label My Kingdom Music and as its seditious charms stalk the world one suspects the album will set Revelation’s Hammer to the fore of and ignite the current stance of black metal.

     Obsessed Onslaught slowly crawls before the ear to start things off, its yawning sonic stretch and melodic call soon swept within Revelation's Hammer coveran avalanche of destructive rhythms and equally ravenous riffs. As the intimidating guttural squalls of Accuser stare eye to eye with the listener and unleash their propaganda of malevolence, devious grooves strike out to seduce the senses whilst being still ravished by the vocal and lyrical grazing. It is a weapon the band and album uses frequently and persistently it persuades defences to relax allowing the annihilatory breath and intent of tracks to win their cause. Across its expansive length there is never time to catch breath before the next shift and evolution in direction and persuasion is ridden, that relentlessness only adding to the epic feel of the sound. As intriguing and eventful as it is barbaric, with blast beats pummelling the senses throughout and the excellently varied vocals holding a satanic compulsion in whatever guise they use, it is a striking and scintillating start.

The title track opens with another riveting grooved temptation before the vocals assault with a bedlamic hatred, their malice opening up the song for its corrosive and towering intensity to douse the senses in primal sonic filth. As its predecessor the track twists and flays within its invention, every corner of its course opening another rage of further blistering energy and captivating imagination. The savagery steps back as the climax approaches to allow its nightmare to unveil a sampled stark scenario before returning with a furnace of a finale which scorches ears and sears emotions.

The outstanding Den Blåøyde dances on the already wasted nerves and senses next, though its waltz is one of viciousness and sonic manipulation honed into a brutality which again across a varied gait has only full greed guiding its purpose. Within its immense appetite of violence the track has a web of melodic temptation and insidious beauty which secures honest ardour towards its just as threatening epic breath and virulently creative alchemy. The best moment of the album it offers all the evidence as to why the band is being harped over.

Both Buried as Filth and Avgudsdyrkelse continue to openly impress, the first seemingly bred from a warzone wasteland, sonic teasing skipping over its grave to offer further insanity whilst welcoming hostile futures crafted from the rhythmic maelstrom and riff loaded wall of intensity, The second of the two saunters in with a confrontational attitude and determined will to exploit all, which with further excellent senses examining rhythms from Myrvoll and the kaleidoscope of apocalyptic sonic enterprise from Accuser, it does with ease, senses and thoughts willing victims.

The thrash courting The Crown Of Malice which evolves into a blackened vat of serpentine degenerate toxicity you can taste on the lips, closes off the album with impressive and invigorating power. From start to finish the album only challenges and tests the listener but most of all rewards with one of the most striking and exhilarating genre debuts in a long time. Dare you face the Revelation’s Hammer?

www.facebook.com/revelationshammer

9/10

RingMaster 05/06/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com

 

Aosoth – IV: Arrow In Heart

AntaeuspromobandpictureIV copy

An invidious black consumption to ravage and douse any well -lit emotional template and hope fuelled presence, IV: Arrow In Heart the new album from French metallers Aosoth is a threatening and deeply rewarding violation. Viciously intimidating and at times almost too much of a challenge to listen to, the caustic and vengeful nineties death metal cored sounds of the band leave no sense, emotion, or synapse free of brutal provocation, and a thoroughly pleasing and rewarding experience it is.

The band was formed in 2002 as a side project of black metal grinders Antaeus, which took on stronger purpose when the main band stepped back from performing live. Through their  previous three albums the band has earned an immense recognition and acclaim for their invasive sounds and within the previous year has played selected shows with the likes of Watain, Shining, Ondskapt, Nehëmah, Farsot, Enthroned, Hell Militia, Blacklodge, Heretic, and more, their fourth album now stepping forth via Agonia Records to lay waste to senses and emotive bodies. It is a darker more virulent malevolence from Aosoth which the band itself commented on with “We’ve spent such a huge amount of time on defining a darker identity, yet open to a wider range of influences. Those tracks still haunt us, as delivering them was a painful and excruciating experience, and left some of us even physically wounded… which gives that album even more of a spiritual value, as it involved a form of sacrifice. This fourth full-length release is without a doubt a great step forward for us in term of music writing, and sound.” Listening to its hateful beauty it is ready to receive the same sacrifice from the listener, something which is deserved and more than generous in return.

An Arrow in Heart erodes the senses from its first insidious note, the track alone raising the threshold of endurance and passion. Aosoth_IV_artwork copyIt is a visceral encounter, though that applies across the whole release, which twists the senses into a wasted defenceless recipient of the decayed breath and light extinguishing punishment. The sonic veining is a groove to ignite ardour and sear flesh whilst the roaming soon ravaging black course of the song, is a torrent of aural spite and crafted violent invention.

Through the following One With The Prince With A Thousand Enemies and Temple of Knowledge, the band increase the desolation overwhelming the emotions with an intrusive air whilst mutually igniting greater ardour and addictive appetite for their contagious rabid grooves and acid coated melodic maliciousness. The first of the pair shifts and exposes every weakness in the psyche and emotions through continually twisting intensity and gait whilst the second finds a further furnace of intense ferocity and invention to crave and obliterate the senses with. Each song on the album, is rife with riveting imagination and equally mesmeric enterprise but Aosoth make you work and suffer for it with only numerous journeys through its mordant intent the only way to devour it all.

    Under The Nails and Fingertips continues the testing nasty transgressions with again the guitars and bass painting a plaintive narrative to extinguish any lingering corner of light or peace whilst the two parts of Broken Dialogue offer an individual confrontation which is cinematic in their make-up and carnally greedy in their creativity. The first part sets a debris strewn emotive collapse whilst the second is a toxic corruption, the droning and exhausting severity placed upon the ear permanently scarring.

     Ritual Marks Of Penitence closes off the album with its finest moment, the again drone driven sounds and chaining rhythms demanding subservience whilst they feed and suck senses and passions dry yet leave them desperate for much more of the insurgent beauty and magnetic invention. With a production as throughout the album, which allows the skilled craft of the members to stake their claim on the listener within the ferocious intensity, song and album is a masterful piece of mental and physical cruelty and very deeply satisfying.

Whether you can actually truly enjoy an album like IV: Arrow In Heart is debatable but the desire to frequently allow its blistering hellacious touch upon the body is undoubted.

http://www.aosoth.fr/

https://www.facebook.com/aosoth

8.5/10

RingMaster 18/04/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com

Gorath: The Chronicles of Khiliasmos

Gorath

All good things have to come to an end, the course of even the greatest glories finding finality and so it is with Belgian post black metallers Gorath as they depart leaving in place their sixth and final album The Chronicles of Khiliasmos. The band over the years has made a major impressive and acclaimed mark on the genre with their progressive blackened experimental explorations and the new release is no different. It arguably is not the final massive adventure one might have expected for a farewell, an explosive and dramatic statement, but as a fully enveloping funereal outpouring the album impacts firmly on thought and imagination to be ultimately rewarding.

Formed as a one man project back in the nineties by Filip Dupont, the band found a real presence with their released demos in 2003 which led to the release of debut album Elite in 2005 with Black Owl Records. The following year saw The Fourth Era appear through Descent Productions, the cosmological themed release finding strong acclaim for its Mayan based concept. It was at that point that the band became a quartet and ventured out live to over the subsequent years, share stages with the likes of Foscor, Watain, Graven, Darkspace,  Mayhem, Dark Funeral, Shining, Dark Fortress, Nazxul, Gallhammer, Primordial to name a few. Misotheism came next in 2008 to again impressive responses which grew stronger still when MXCII was released two years later. The Chronicles Of Khiliasmos follows last year’s Apokálypsis – Unveiling The Age That is not to Come and finds Dupont alongside guitarist Bart Put, bassist Raf Meukens, and drummer Bart Vanderheyden, bringing band and overall concept to a conclusion timed with the prophesised end…

The ConSouling Sounds released album is made up of three chapters, a trio of doom soaked tracks which complete a legacy which wykrojnik  (3)will impact black metal for time to come. Khiliasmos I begins with a dawning stir of guitar and seemingly random sonic pulses, the track taking its time to extend to its full height. It is a teasing presence at first toying with expectations that are waiting for the track to unleash something, Soon the scowling growls of Dupont enter to rile up the air though still the track resists offering mere fluctuations of energy within its prowling doom lit engagement, the song remaining relatively subdued and content to provoke and evoke reactions through intelligently inciting craft and imagination. It is the little incursions which invite the imagination to play within the track, the distant vocal sirenesque harmonies and insidious tones of Dupont within the exhausting repetition of riffs and intensity, distracting whilst igniting further responses to fine effect. The track possibly out stays its welcome before its ten minutes finishes with the senses, though the last couple do evolve into an acidic melodic stance which fires up the intrigue.

Khiliasmos II is a hungrier and more aggressive encounter, vocals and sounds bringing a surer thicker intensity and malice to their gait. The emerging groove brings an infectious lure to the song which within its first moments already has a stronger grip than its predecessor. The barbs of the track in hooks, grooves, and vocal additions, ensures a welcome compliance to its demands with the drums of Vanderheyden and guitar invention of Dupont and Put a magnetic pleasure. The track is easily the best on the album making a thrilling bridge between the opening and closing blankets of doom driven atmosphere. It at times makes for an uncomfortable listen as one immerses within with relish, but at the same time contrasts the vast and in comparison underwhelming pieces surrounding it perfectly.

Closing the album, Khiliasmos III is a massive soundscape of sonic clouds and vocal storms again brought with a labouring but compelling presence. At twenty minutes long, the track like the first maybe pushes its limits but does make every second of its encounter an impacting yet magnetic weight on the ear. There are small offerings of melodic respite for some alleviation from the incessant and oppressive blackened heart of the release but like the opener has its own emotive and imaginative aspects which makes it never less than provocative and like the album as a whole ultimately rewarding.

The Chronicles of Khiliasmos is a strong and satisfying release though it falls short of certainly the previous two albums from the band. It is still a worthy farewell from a band which has pushed black metal to strong levels over the years and will ensure whatever the members do next there will be an eager audience waiting.

https://www.facebook.com/gorathblackmetal

RingMaster 30/11/2012

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright