Sinnergod – Self Titled

sinnergod-online-promo-shot_RingMasterReview

For quite a while now and across a handful of releases, British alternative/gothic rockers Sinnergod has suggested they are in line to seize the British rock scene with their dramatic and ever growing sound. With their new self-titled offering the Manchester hailing outfit has come to that day, their second album a compelling and increasingly irresistible theatre of dark rock and metal announcing the band ready to help lead British rock.

Formed by twin brothers Mark and Chris Hampson in 2007, Sinnergod quickly grabbed attention and plaudits. Within months of hitting their stride live, the quintet earned a slot playing Bloodstock Open Air Festival. A trio of EPs followed, Two Thousand and Never in 2009, A World in Grey three years later with Behind Every Corner uncaged the following year. Each provided an ear and imagination pleasing proposal, each showing fresh evolution and adventure in the band’s sound leading up to the well-received and impressive debut album Seven Deadly Sinphonies in 2014, a release featuring special guests Bill Moseley (Devil’s Rejects, Texas Chainsaw Massacre) and Tobias Keast (Esoterica). Live too, the band has continued to establish themselves as one of Britain’s finest propositions, sharing stages with the likes of Misfits, Deathstars, Orgy, KMFDM, Sarah Jezebel Deva, Voodoo Six, and Blaze Bayley along the way.

This has now all been eclipsed by their self-titled offering. The new album is a monster of an adventure; a collection of songs which roar and resonate in ears and imagination. Sinnergod draw on the catchiest of eighties hooks and electronic seducing to light the darkest portrayals of emotion amidst an enjoyably invasive sound. It is music which at first appears familiar in some way but needs mere moments to reveal its own distinct and magnetic character.

It opens up with Dead Of The Night, its intro a shadowy and suggestive symphony drawing the listener into the subsequent and swiftly addictive mix of choppy riffs and melodic reflection. As the swiping beats of Chris Hampson land the guitars of Mark Hampson and Sam Saint collude with the keys of Paul Swindells to cast a transfixing weave of emotive sound. Mark’s impressive vocals soon share their heart; lying melancholically upon the blossoming landscape of enterprise as a dark edge is provided by James Dunn’s bass, its shadows in turn prowling the infectiousness of the track’s rousing chorus.

The impressive start is quickly outshone by Burn. The track is glorious, slipping in on the mist of keys as slightly deranged vocals tempt. Once in full heavy motion, riffs and rhythms march masterfully across the senses, vocals and steely melodies combining to further trap the listener. The song is a creative predator, challenging and seducing with every imaginative stride growing into something akin to Nine Inch Nails meets Poets Of The Fall but unique in its own skin.

As the last track is different to the first, The Endless with its symphonic hues offers yet another shade of adventure to the album. As unapologetically catchy as it is muscularly voracious, the song ebbs and flows like a sonic storm, moments of relative emotion packed calm instantly hit by surges of tempestuous energy and sound for another plateau of craft and enjoyment within the release, a success matched by the electronic stomp of I Never Had a Gun. Creating a tapestry of essences found in the likes of Abandon All Ships, Fear Factory, and Silent Descent, the track simmers and bubbles over as it strides relentlessly through ears and into the psyche before making way for the crystalline opening of 1000 Sins. Pretty soon though, its sinew swung rhythms and pulsating theatre of sounds swamps ears; eighties electronic flavouring hinting at bands such as Depeche Mode and Gene Loves Jezebel in tandem with Sinnergod’s own creative might. Addictive and fiercely persuasive, the listener will find themselves quickly emotionally and physically involved, certainly going by the effect song and album had on the office here.

sinnergod_album_cover_artwork-jpg_RingMasterReview There is also an element of early synthpop fuelled Ministry to the track, before Al Jourgensen dived head first into metal, and a flavouring which soaks the next up serenade of The Watched. Another which sonically simmers but with a liveliness which infects hips and feet, the song is a hug of melodic and harmonic expression and beauty.

Across the gothic electronic and keys shaped dance of Joshua’s Day and the engrossing darklight of Supernatural, a seducing with the open scent of Dave Gahan and co to it, band and album simply flow over the senses, like poetic fog laying heavy but welcomingly before We’ve Been Expecting You rises from a single evocative melody with gothic and orchestral majesty to stand god like over ears while casting its magnanimous musings. As with many songs, it feels like something you may already know yet every note and twist is a new and fresh exploration to album and the dark rock world Sinnergod are poised to take in their creative palms.

The thickly satisfying Johnny Sits Perfectly Still is arguably the least adventurous track upon the album yet needs little time to have ears and participation secured before We Don’t Have Anything looms from portentous shadows and erupts into a Korn/Machine Head spiced foray into ears and passions. The song epitomises the Sinnergod sound; meaty and dark, heavy and melodically aflame with an unrelenting intensity and energy to tempt and lift the spirit. It is an explosive and thrilling end to the album, though the minute long desolate and forlorn soundscape of instrumental XII actually brings the album to a close but it is its predecessor which leaves the last lingering imprint.

Sinnergod is a band on the march and heading to the frontline of British rock/metal, though to be honest their new album suggests they are already there.

The self-titled Sinnergod album is out now through all platforms.

https://www.facebook.com/sinnergod/  http://www.sinnergod.com/  https://twitter.com/sinnergodUK

Pete RingMaster 15/09/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

I.C.O.N – The Blacklist

I.C.O.N_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

Six years on from their well-received and acclaimed debut album, UK’s I.C.O.N make another noticeable and even more potent imprint on the British metal scene with its successor The Blacklist. It is a brute of an encounter yet jammed with stirring melodies and sonic enterprise to temper and complement its muscular aggression. The album is not one to seriously tear up the metal/heavy rock landscape but in giving it an invigorating stirring, The Blacklist does a massive job.

From the release of their first album New Born Lie in 2009, I.C.O.N has continued to reinforce their potent reputation and increase a loyal fan base through a live presence taking in stage sharing with the likes of Breed 77, Blaze Bayley, Warrior Soul, Diamond Head, Furyon, Zico Chain, Witchfynde, and Voodoo Six amongst many others. Numerous festival appearances have only enhanced their growing stature too, with the release of The Blacklist now carrying the broadest potential to awaken major spotlights. Produced by Pete Troughton, the album is a tapestry of hostile exploits and melodic temptation cast in an array of individual proposals. Some tracks outshine others but from its first atmospheric breath to its final roar, the release provides one rugged, raw, and rousing enjoyment.

The album opens with A Room In Hell, a short instrumental gently and evocatively luring the listener into the heart and turbulence of The Blacklist. Guitars cast an enticing web of expression and craft whilst rhythms rumble like an encroaching storm, their shadows colluding with sonic persuasion in a potent intro to the release and the sinew stretched swagger of Feeding The Negative. Instantly riffs from guitar and bass are a gripping coaxing matched by the increasingly aggressive and agitated assault of beats. The growling tone of Reece Bevan’s bass additionally provides a great accompaniment to the equally gravelly vocals of Mark Sagar and a predatory contrast to the acidic and scorching endeavour of Scott Knowles’s guitar. In full stride and attitude, ground-breaking the song is not but like the album, in prime and inventive metal spawned rock ‘n’ roll, the track is a storming incitement and pleasure.

i-c-o-n-the-blacklist-1400_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review     The following Grindin’ Wheel, though appearing less confrontational, is a matching beast of provocation. As the keen swipes of Larry Paterson’s drum sticks hit skin and senses, a spicy groove is cast by Knowles, its revelry sparking a similar swing to riffs and subsequent rhythms whilst band vocal calls add an anthemic tempting to around increasingly imposing and impressing tones of Sagar. The song does its big part in the continuing strong and gripping start to The Blacklist and is instantly backed by the thrash seeded I’m The Venom, a song with a hint of bands like Metallica and Testament but flinging those flavours around like a baker with dough to create its own recipe of melodic/heavy rock infused antagonism. There is that familiarity though but it only makes things spicier around the uniqueness fuelling the incendiary solo which breaks free and the bracing vocal/rhythm collusion shaping all tracks.

Both Welcome To My War, with its deliciously barbarous bass insurgence and uncompromising drums swings, and Speak To Your God keep ears and appetite fully fed. The first of the two is just breath-taking at its start, an inescapable consuming of the senses and imagination which then loses its fullest potency once it settles into a more reserved and restrained prowl. The song still impresses and ignites full satisfaction to be fair but such its glorious opening, it feels a little like a missed opportunity unlike its successor which brawls and rages from its first breath. With a hint of a southern twang to its air, the track reveals its whole weight and weaponry straight away, simply increasing its richness with nagging riffs, riveting grooves, and a fiery solo, not forgetting virulent rhythms.

The slower, more controlled Devil’s Blacklist walks through ears with emotional expression and descriptive sonic hues, and though it maybe lacks the spark of its predecessors, it hangs a creative arm around attention to keep it fully involved before Wrong Way Back turns in a heavy and forceful stomp equipped with raw contagion spun by the skilled exploits of each member of the band. There is no avoiding the technical and accomplished craft from I.C.O.N, and how individually and united its members know how to write and deliver a fully rounded and attention grabbing storm of an encounter, no better proof coming than with Man of the North. From a cold and lonely canvas the instrumental builds an evocative landscape of solitude and beauty, its range of minimalistic textures to full blown tempestuous endeavour and ideation a relentless suggestiveness for the imagination.

The outstanding rampage of Deconverted descends on ears and air next, another thickly persuasive bass lead stirring up body and emotions for the song to bruise and ignite further, though it is another which maybe does not realise the potential hinted at throughout. It is still an excellent encounter though leaving the closing and tenacious sonic might of Drowning In Their Screams to bring this thoroughly enjoyable and invigorating album to a close.

For honest and uncluttered, as well as seriously accomplished heavy metal, it will be hard to find anything much better than The Blacklist this year we suggest. It is not flawless and as mentioned it does not fulfil all the promise hinted at, but you can only feel that there is a major classic lurking inside I.C.O.N as they evolve and grown further whilst this release persistently shows itself to be one powerful and seriously tasty encounter all metallers should take time to devour.

The Blacklist is available now via Metalbox Recordings digitally and on CD @ http://www.iconukonline.com/webshop

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RingMaster 16/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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RESIN debut ‘Embrace The Fall’ released 5th August‏

Resin Online Promo Shot

ECLECTIC UK ALTERNATIVE CREW RESIN REBOOT DEBUT ALBUM THIS SUMMER!

Brit riff beasts ‘Resin’ stake their claim as rising alternative rock newcomers, armed with their new album ‘Embrace the Fall’, out in stores from Monday 5th August.
Channelling from acts such as Seether, A Perfect Circle and Alice In Chains, UK alt-rockers ‘Resin’ pack a formidable punch and are blessed with thoughtful song-writing abilities and a range of musicianship and diversity that is rarely seen amongst today’s current glut of metal/metalcore bands. Expansive, eclectic and brooding, Resin will rise to the surface this year.
Formed in Hinckley, Leicestershire, the early beginnings of Resin can be traced back to a happenstance meeting in a bar between Guitarists Mark ‘Chez’ Roseby and Sime Yarwood. Soon after the duo crossed paths with vocalist James Botha, who had just moved to the area from South Africa. The trio started to rattle out cover versions and hunted for a suitable drummer and bassist to fulfil their true potential. After a relentless search, the three piece finally uncovered Dave ‘Sev’ Seville on Bass and Mark Abbott who plays Drums, Cajon, and Cello. With a full line-up in tow, Resin were unleashed to the general public at the tail end of 2010. A constant bout of shows throughout the heart of England followed, as well as numerous successful festival appearances throughout 2010. And during the last twelve months, the band have stepped it up even further, snaring a series of shows supporting everyone from Voodoo Six, Fearless Vampire Killers and I am Giant, to Dr and the Medics.
At the end of 2012, Resin turned their attention towards recording, and the quintet marched into the recording studio to work on their debut album. After a series of intense recording sessions and another six months of writing and re-shaping, the band emerged from the studios with their debut record, ‘Embrace The Fall’, and it’s a triumphant record that is not bound by fashion. The beautifully bleak ‘Entropy’ opens proceedings and clearly lays out the band’s manifesto amidst grinding hard riffs balanced with subtle acoustic tendencies and capped with pertinent strains of nihilism. As the record moves on, the quintet tip their caps to Cornnell and Co with the Soundgarden-esque drive of ‘Fake’. The album then swings back with the acoustic laden “Beskadig’, which, sung in Afrikaans, is a homage to Botha’s native South African roots. The record continues its sweeping journey with the majestic and flowingly anthemic ‘Poison’. Now, armed with a growing fan-base and their debut album set for a re-launch, the scene is set for the band to kick on and break out to the nation.
Resin Cover Artwork

Cry Havoc: New Life EP

Some band names just invite intrigue and eagerness to learn more. Such is the case with British metal band Cry Havoc, their name inspiring thoughts and impressions which one only hoped their sounds could live up to. Their debut release the New Life EP easily matched and exceeded those wishes, its muscular presence standing tall with music to fire up deep enthusiasm and satisfaction.

A band still in it informative years, Cry Havoc has been exploding stages with high octane live shows which has seen performances alongside the likes of Malefice, Revoker, The Defiled, Voodoo Six, Jettblack, Romeo Must Die, The Dirty Youth, and Guns 2 Roses as well as their own gigs and festival appearances such as Hammerfest III in 2011. They were also invited to contribute to the Ozzy Osbourne tribute CD No More Tears alongside artists such as Vince Neil from Motley Crue, Alice Cooper, and Kiss. Things were definitely on a rapid rise as the band entered Nott-In-Pill studio in the closing weeks of last year to record New Life alongside producer Martyn “Ginge” Ford and Matthew Bond, who have previously worked with the likes of Bullet For My Valentine, Slipknot, Trivium, Skindred, The Dirty Youth and Revoker. With its release this September one can only assume a full and eager hunger for the band and their furious blend of thrash and hard/classic rock, or as they call it thrash n roll, will follow.

Losing Everything is the first rampage through the ear, a ferocious and hungry fury of crippling artillery driven rhythms and ravenous riffs. The song is an immediate thrust of pleasure and power to ignite all the demands of a great metal song, the passion and energy as resourceful and striking as the outstanding guitar imagination alongside openly impressive vocals. It would be wrong to say the song, and EP as a whole has anything new to say or bring to the mosh pit but undoubtedly it sparks all the fires one could wish from a release of immense quality. The track has a Mudvayne flavour to its sound to add another spice and depth to its crushing presence and by its end the result is an explosive and outstanding start to the EP.

The following Ignition starts mesmerising the senses within seconds with a tightly woven groove and again unrelenting rhythms. Into its stride the song is a charged and thrilling ride, the riffs squeezing the ear tightly so that groove and the flaming guitar solos which strike can singe its flesh. Like the opener it is an infectious and highly memorable rampant slab of metal, originality compromised for a stirring and magnetic Metallica/Slayer/American Death Charge like mix.

The malevolent Alone swamps the ear next with further thrash and metal barracking to devour greedily. Thumping drums bludgeon the senses whilst the guitars continue their skilful and inventive pursuit of the heart, whether a riff or melodic enterprise there is only imaginative and greatly crafted play.

The release closes with the title track and of course again it is a uncompromising assault of thrash n roll, a raw and abrasive sound which leaves one wanting more by its final note. The song shifts its pace from top gear aggression to melodic ‘catch a breather’ asides at times but all is seamless and sculpted to leave a lingering burn of satisfaction behind.

The New Life EP is not the most unique in sound but one of the most enjoyable and riotous thrash driven releases sure to pass your way. Cry Havoc is a band with a big horizon ahead of them and sooner rather than later one suspects.

www.facebook.com/cryhavocuk

RingMaster 18/09/2012

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