Hogslayer – Defacer

hogslayer-promo-02-b

photo Mei Lewis of Mission Photographic

 

As primal and consuming as any physical grudge the earth expels, the sound of Welsh fury Hogslayer is an inescapable savaging but equally a predatory incitement which sparks only a greedy appetite for more. Certainly that is the success found in the band’s first album, and taken to new heights in their new and second full-length Defacer. The release is a brutal monolithic tide of sludge rich, tar thick sonic malevolence, a proposition as oppressively destructive as it is perversely invigorating and ultimately fiercely compelling.

The Cardiff quintet first emerged in 2012, rising from the ashes of Shaped By Fate and Zonderhoof. Instantly there was no mercy given by their crawling toxic blend of sludge, doom, and every rabid essence of noise to be found, a heavily persuasive confrontation evidenced by the band’s 2013 self-titled debut album. Now they have intensified every aspect of sound and emotional turbulence within their invention to create and unleash Defacer, as magnetic a violation as you are likely to meet this year.

The first trespass of senses and psyche comes with Slowhawk, a raw vocal rant from Lord Bastard the trigger to a tsunami of bestial bass predation and equally vicious guitar stalking, it all punctuated by the slow uncompromising swings of drummer Max Von Beek. The creeping groove of the assault is as immediate in its lure too, the primitive growls of bass cast by Grym Av Skugga and Damek Ômsk irresistible intimidation loaded with an instinctively seductive swagger. The guitar of Barron Drakk provides its own incendiary tempting to add to the mix, entwining the dark imposing incitement alongside with a mix of caustic riffs and piercingly spicy hooks. The track is an unrelenting mass of uncompromising contagion; raw rock ‘n’ roll at its hellacious best setting the album off to a mighty start.

11025783_788660491214134_3070821753561557583_n   The album’s following title track reveals an even more barbarous presence and intent from its first few breaths, riffs and grooves almost Neanderthal in tone yet quickly showing they are prepared to twist in infectious enterprise and sonic unpredictability too as they potently colour the almost hypnotic repetitious core of the song. Throat scarring vocals spill furiously from the front man, providing a potent abrasion from within the smothering web of sound and hostility around him. Once again an addictive essence is at large before the ruinous presence of the song makes way for the similarly intensive and vehement Wülfbaanger. Its body of central riffs and rhythmic prowling is not far removed from that of its predecessor, a comment which can be raised across the album as a minor niggle with some grooves and heavy riffery often showing a lack of distinction from others though it is usually compensated by the sonic invention and unpredictable adventure also revealed, if at times understated.

Bludgeon is as its name implies a heavy-duty and antagonistic confrontation of noise and energy as viscous and black hearted as it is groove catchy whilst next up Burn Them Out sets down another pinnacle to match the opening pair. It is sonically fairer than previous songs but still offering a syrupy toxicity through the senses lapping grooves. It is the hardcore essences though which rage within vocals and the twisted imagination of the guitars that gives something extra to take a great song to the plateau of major incitement. Rhythmically too there is a fresh impetus, an anthemic quality to Von Beek’s enterprise courting grooves and hooks which flirt back with fiery stoner-esque hues. The track is still as inhospitable as anything else upon Defacer but tapping into an open diversity which is not always as keen as elsewhere.

The truculent Warcries is as gladiatorial as you would imagine but within its argumentative brawl of sound and intent, Hogslayer explore an out of the blue and thrilling melodic detour which only adds to and emphasises the overall intensity and impact of the song. Once more bolder imagination and invention is freed to impressive results and without defusing the weight and force of sound around it.

Bastards Of Reality comes next, its doom fuelled carriage of malicious sound and emotion taking the listener into dark, suffocating, and cavernous depths where more striking and riveting strands of sonic endeavour lights up ears and imagination. For seven minutes the track excites as it roams and infests the senses, spilling sonic venom and grievous animosity musically and emotionally, before being emulated in length and impact by This Spiteful Cycle. The new song is simultaneously tortuous and deliciously hypnotic, though its addictive character allows no chance of an easy ride. A favourite element of the band’s sound is the entangled hostility and creativity of guitar and bass, both ripe with their volatile natures, and arguably they are at their most psychotic in the closing song driven on by ever merciless drum provocation. Probably the most testing listen on the album it is a richly satisfying final challenge, though not the last song as there is the hidden bonus of Mealworm for the patient to enjoy, an outstanding slab of psychotic sludge bred, senses corroding rock ‘n’ roll.

Hogslayer has risen to a new level and stature with Despiser, but with the potential for even bigger, fiercer things ahead you feel. The album is excellent but with room for its ideas to be taken further meaning pleasure is rich now but excitement for the future easily as potent.

Despiser is available now via Undergroove Records on CD @ http://undergroove.bigcartel.com/product/hogslayer-defacer-cd and digitally at most online stores.

http://www.hogslayer.co.uk/     https://www.facebook.com/hogslayerband

RingMaster 07/05/20145

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Weight of The Tide – Epilogue

WOTT1

The debut album from US heavy hard rockers Weight of the Tide is a seven track foray into a landscape of mountainous rhythms, thunderous riffs, and thick emotive intensity; an encounter which bristles with inventive songwriting and openly impressive craft. There is so much to recommend about Epilogue and its powerful contents but despite that it just does not light a fire in thoughts or emotions with its presence. It is certain to be different for individual ears and tastes yet you cannot help feeling that there is a beast of an incitement lurking inside an album lacking the incendiary spark to bring it to life and grab the attention plenty of its qualities deserve.

The Nevada quartet is the creation of vocalist/guitarist Mark Moots and drummer Jason Thomas, two musicians whose history together embraces the success and impressive sounds of December and individually The Swamp Donkey and Cranium respectively. Formed in 2012, Weight Of The Tide is completed by former Knightfall/Beard The Lion guitarist Jestin Phipps and ex-Red Cel bassist Marcus Mayhall. The band has already sparked strong ripples of attention through their live shows, where they have shared stages with the likes of Eyehategod, Diamond Head, A Pale Horse Named Death, Raven, Volture, Skinlab, 36 Crazyfists, and Gypsyhawk since emerging. Now the band is poised to awaken broader climes with their SpiralArms vocalist Tim Narducci and Drag Me Under guitarist Jeromy Ainsworth recorded and mixed album. As the band’s name suggests, Epilogue and its sound is an imposing and heavy immersive proposition which leaves a healthy appetite for the band ahead in its wake, just not the lustful excitement it could have.

With tracks bred in an exploration of “Love, loss, betrayal and, hopefully, perseverance”, in the words of Moots, Epilogue descends on ears and thoughts firstly with the crushing energy and 4PAN1Tcreative intrigue of Ireland. Its sonic opening is soon drawn into a web of mightily swung beats and sonic resourcefulness, subsequently relaxing into a formidable and inventive examination of the senses. The guitars chug and flame with their varied resourcefulness whilst bass and drums create a barrage of bait and provocation, this around the strong tones of Moots. It is heavily enticing bait which manages to loosen its grip and adventure in places as potent melodies act as a temper to the riveting roar of the song. It is not a big deflation and only satisfaction and praise comes to the persistence of rich ideas and imaginative enterprise still tempting within the song, but it is enough for it to simply smoulder rather than blaze in personal tastes.

The open craft and skills of band and songs, as well as their adventure, is undeniable and just as prominent in the more gripping Proper Goodbye. A tapestry of guitar endeavour and great vocals embraces the listener first, its attraction an emotive enticing within sinew driven rhythms and a rawer provocation of riffs. There is also a sludgy atmosphere to the song which blossoms when the song slips into the dark shadows of increasingly intensive and predatory sounds. Without doubt the song and album is at its best and most inspiring when the band explores these ravenous twists and passages, welcome intrusions only enhanced by the spicy colour of solos and the sonic enterprise with the similarly sculpted yet individual Elder the immediate proof. Its heavy challenging entrance is an inescapable lure but hindered by stepping back in aggression for the Scott Weiland like vocals of Moots, who is at his weakest here and sounding like a fish out of the threatening waters around him.

Things take an unexpected turn next as Turning Point steps forward and the band reveals a pop punk/melodic rock adventure. It in many ways feels totally out of place on the album but is such a thumping and enjoyable fire of melodic energy and beaming enterprise it shines standing like a lighthouse in the dark landscape of Epilogue. Cynically you might say it is the band simply trying to place an open sure fire single of a doorway into the release but as it is one of the tracks which did have body and emotions fully involved there are no issues for us.

Both Stillwater and La Puerta grasp the previous heavy and at times exhausting oppressive sounds of earlier tracks, the first veining its lumbering intensity with a fine sonic toxicity whilst the second has a compelling argument to its aggression and sure swagger to its contagious stride. Each again though evades truly thrilling these maybe demanding ears, though both have varying ingredients, especially the latter, which means again we can only recommend people find out for themselves what these seriously accomplished songs offer.

Ending with the enthralling creative theatre and emotional Crowbar like turbulence of Fear And The Flame, the album leaves a potent impression and definite want to explore Weight Of The Tide closely in the future. Yes it did not get us rushing around exalting its praises but for a great many it is easy to suggest it will.

Epilogue is available now via Undergroove Records @ http://undergroove.bigcartel.com/product/epilogue

https://www.facebook.com/WeightOfTheTide

RingMaster 14/01/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.thereputationlabel.today