Cockroach Clan – Songs About Blunt Knives and Deep Love

Veterans of the Norwegian punk rock scene, Cockroach Clan has a rich reputation and eagerly loyal fan base but have still been pretty much a secret outside of their home borders. We are only just getting our introduction to them right now and all thanks to a certain producer, Norwegian record label Fysisk Format, and their new riotously irresistible album, Songs About Blunt Knives and Deep Love.

Formed in 1994, Cockroach Clan released debut album Roach that first year with its successor Just Say Blow! unleashed three years later with the Going Underground EP nestled in between. Equally the years have seen the band share stages with the likes of The Toy Dolls, Discharge, UK Subs, The Exploited, Cock Sparrer, Anti-Nowhere League, Vice Squad, and GBH, Cockroach Clan only drawing thick acclaim for their rousing live presence. As for their releases, all three have gained minor classic status within the Norwegian punk scene but given the chance and luck, it is very easy to see the quintet finally embraced far further afield thanks to the glorious irreverent stomp of Songs About Blunt Knives and Deep Love.

Apparently the album came about through an idea cast by producer Hugo Alvarstein (The Good the Bad and the Zugly, Raga Rockers) who told the band, “Pick some gems from your 1990s recordings and rehearse them properly. Then visit my studio and I’ll make that scrap iron shine.” That is exactly what they did, throwing in a handful of new tracks and a cover song for good measure and from the effort has emerged one of the year’s major treats.

The release opens with a cover of the Mountain Goat track, Going to Georgia. Its melodic southern drawl is soon walked through by the punk scowling of Billy Cockroach, a union which lures attention with increasing potency as the slow swing of the track infests ears. It is a great start to the album but to be honest just a healthy appetiser to the more thoroughly addictive morsels to come.

You have a Bun is next, the track almost teasing ears with its initial strum of guitars before settling into an infectious stroll already accosted by Billy’s galvanic tones. The guitars of Akke Knoff Glomstad and Simen Jeistad erupt with a grin on their strings, their craft openly sharing classic rock/metal prowess to their punk instincts. With a slither of Oi goodness to its punk ‘n’ roll, the track makes way for the rousing antics of Fantasyland. Early melodic hookery leads to contagious rioting, mischief coating every note and gravelly shod syllable as the boisterous rhythms of bassist Morten Mormone and drummer Cato Holmen pounce, the song so lively even inanimate objects share its bounce.

The immediate folkish vocal welcome of Three wishes has devilry in its deception, knowing the swift outbreak of voracious punk rock close on its heels. Nevertheless, that initial hue continues to breed a thickly alluring folk punk stomp, vocals an inescapable carousing and guitars again revelling in the skills of their holders.

If the air and exploits of the song are virulent and they are, an epidemic of temptation erupts within the following On an island and indeed its immediate successors. The track bounds in with rhythmic nostrils flared, riffs swinging their muscles as vocals roar. The keys of Hugo Alvarstein add to the incitement, the track a UK Subs-esque riot with a host of sneaky hooks and bold manipulations proving so impossible to resist.

From one of the album’s major romps to another in Crash ka-boom where punk ‘n’ roll irreverence is in full roar and hosting a galvanic vocals mix rich in its own web of hooks aligning to join those in sounds boisterously hugging their horseplay while Necktie party vigorously bobs up and down poking at its victims. Both tracks rigorously got under the skin as too the even deeper burrowing Facts on the wall where old school punk colludes with pandemic rock ‘n’ roll in a track daring you not to leap in with vocal participation and a limb swinging body.

Favourite album moment came with Gene’s got a bun too, a track originally called Barbies on Drugs on the Roach album. Its first breath brings exuberant beats, its second a groove spun hook, both irresistible and only accentuated by the tenacious sounds and rampant vocals that follow with each subsequent lungful of addiction spreading enterprise.

Dit it again with its fiery rock guitar and swinging gait gave body and pleasure another eager workout with its multi-flavoured punk romp, its successor, Believer, then springing another ridiculously persuasive and enslaving hook within its irritable prowl. Both songs just aroused the spot with the latter another which almost alone had us scurrying to acclaim the Cockroach Clan as our new punk favourite to anyone in close proximity.

Closed up by Cockroach Fandango and its anthemic croon, Songs About Blunt Knives and Deep Love is simply glorious, a release no raw edged rocker should ignore. Whether we are talking about veterans like the Cockroach Clan or fresher aged protagonists, surely punk has rarely seen more exciting days with encounters like this thick reason.

Songs About Blunt Knives and Deep Love is out now via Fysisk Format; available @ https://cockroachclan.bandcamp.com/album/songs-about-blunt-knives-and-deep-love

https://www.facebook.com/cockroachclan

Pete RingMaster 17/09/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

4 Past Midnight – Battle Scars & Broken Hearts

Over a career expanding over a decade or more there are moments when a band openly dips below their previous heights. That blip has yet to come with Scottish punks 4 Past Midnight since raising their middle finger back in 1989 and is not on the horizon yet as their new album, Battle Scars & Broken Hearts, proudly declares. Offering fifteen slices of the band’s uncompromising yet relentlessly infectious punk rock, the album holds no major surprises in a departure from that instinctive sound but easily refreshes an already established appetite for their militant roar across its tenacious body.

The Glasgow quartet’s sixth studio album among numerous singles, EPs, and compilations, Battle Scars & Broken Hearts sets out its agenda straight away with Do it Now. An opening scuzzy chord opens the gateway to a surge of rapacious riffs and punchy rhythms through which the distinctive lead vocals of drummer Peter McCartney gravelly growl. A delicious hook adds its bait from within the roar too, reinforcing the track’s instinctive punk ‘n’ roll contagion with addition inciting traits.

From one great track to another as For Life strolls in next upon the swinging beats of McCartney, the guitars of Tam Bowman and Fred Stevenson uniting in a calmer but no less boisterous invitation. As vocal chords quickly join in with McCartney’s, hips are bound in the groove of Stevie Goldsack’s bass, its grumble a flirtatious tease within the chest beating declaration of the track before being a similarly compelling lure within the drama clad, politically scathing Politician. Bowman again weaves ear grabbing melody lined hooks as Stevenson’s riffs crawl over the senses, they and the rhythmic prowess of Goldsack and McCartney gaining in aggression and adrenaline as the song hits its finale.

Through the more controlled yet predacious growl and narrative of the UK Subs-esque Guilty and the brief instrumental shuffle of Tonight, variety and further pleasure consumes ears, both tracks anthemic in their keenly individual ways though not as imposingly as 4pm On Tour (4pm crew pt4). The fourth instalment of the band’s rebel rousing, spirit sparking anthem, it swiftly declares there is no point trying to resist its instinctive persuasion to roar your head off and physically stomp especially through its virulent chorus; the track leaving the body and heart elevated in a way only 4 Past Midnight can.

The sultry melodic hues of Bowman’s guitar immediately ignite next up Hope, Fear, Pain, Love, Desire if not lingering around long enough when seducing ears across its contagiously muscular canter for personal tastes while Survive just blisters the senses with its energy and rapacious tone. Though neither quite hits the levels of songs before them each brings hooks and invention which resourcefully leaves a smile on lips before being fully eclipsed by the chest beating might of Let’s Go. For any band, punk or not, wanting to learn about creating organic but purposeful anthems sure to whip up the hearts of their fans, this fevered soundtrack to any uprising has it all; 4 Past Midnight continuing to deliver such incitements album after album at times almost song after song.

Its bold corralling of emotions and spirit is followed by the rough and ready insight and equally tone of Alone, where a blend of old school and modern street punk with a whiff of hardcore for good creative measure is unleashed, and in turn by the Oi infested I Hate My Life. The first of the two again hits the spot without inflaming it leaving that to its ravenous successor and the magnificent Day After Day within which Goldsack’s bass brews up a primal almost carnal grizzle in its tone and virulence. The goodness does not stop there as Bowman takes the imagination into a melodic metal nurtured detour before things get salaciously punk again.

Accompanied by the piano elegance of someone simply called Vivian, McCartney shows his melodic vocal side to surprise and enthral as Whithered Roses next serenades.  Written by the band with Clare Bowen, it is a magnetic beckoning subsequently leading into the waiting jaws of the track with the bass again finding a bestial hue to its growl as hooks sink deep within the passions as McCartney is back to his sandy throated best with matching rhythmic dexterity. The track is superb, rock ‘n’ roll to whole heartedly give energy and zeal to.

The album is completed by firstly The Reason, a song hinting at pop punk instincts whilst roaring with a flavoursome mix of rock, and lastly through the gnarly and seriously catchy blaze of Can Anyone Hear Me; a plaintive call which grabs attention on every level. Together they provide a grand finale to another mouth-watering and increasingly thrilling encounter from 4 Past Midnight.

It is hard to pick the best album from the band, though there is no doubting that they are only increasing their impressive reputation as not only Scotland’s best punk band but one of the UK’s most essential propositions with each release, but for sure  Battle Scars & Broken Hearts is right to the fore of their biggest punk triumphs to date

Battle Scars & Broken Hearts released through Hedgerow Records (UK) on Vinyl and on CD via the band, Combat Rock Records (France), and Bosstuneage Records (UK),with its digital store @ https://4pastmidnight.bandcamp.com/

http://www.4pastmidnight.co.uk/    https://www.facebook.com/4-Past-Midnight-215468135159655/    https://twitter.com/4pastmidnight

Pete RingMaster 26/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Dirt Box Disco – Poppycock

To date every Dirt Box Disco album has been a reason to romp and stomp, to unleash the instinctive punk and rocker inside with the British band’s own devilish intent. Of course their new proposal, Poppycock, is no different, a fifth album which turns body and spirit into a mischievously brawling blur of flying limbs, riotous fun, and lustful habits.

The Burton on Trent quintet has long established its own punk ‘n’ roll sound across four voracious albums and a host of EPs and singles. Fair to say that Poppycock brings more of that belligerent rock ‘n’ roll rascality but yet again the band manages to tap into something fresh. It is not necessarily a definable essence though the STP Records released album has a pop catchiness to its attitude loaded, middle finger raised rampage, but something which just gives the album its own character and the DBD sound a new twist.

In another year seeing the band relentlessly cause live havoc across the UK and Europe, DBD set it all up perfectly an album leaping upon ears with the same hunger as opener The Bullshit Kids bursts into life. Rambunctious rhythms and voracious riffs join group calls to get things started, a wiry vine of guitar temptation from Danny Fingers escaping the roar as the track spreads its bait. With lead vocalist Weab.I.Am standing antagonistically but invitingly astride the muscular stroll, band and track barge around with contagious revelry, DBD instantly showing they are still kings of the rebel rousing, listener involving chorus.

The following Finger Blast opens up with a Stiff Little Fingers like air, Deadbeatz Chris’ burly bassline and the swinging aggression of drummer Maff Fazzo courting the spicy hook and subsequent surge of caustic riffs set loose by Fingers and Spunk Volcano. Raw pop punk relishing its inbred rowdiness and sonic enterprise, the song has the body rocking and primed for the immediate incendiary incitement of Punk Rock Riot, a track as you would expect living up to its title with virulent aggression and anthemic contagion. With a slight whiff of The Adicts to it, the track is an inescapable persuasion to raise hell.

The excellent Little White Lie romances the senses with its multi-vocal union and warm textures next, all fuelled by the wilful and headstrong energy and sound expected of the band while its successor, Working For Wankers, has vocal chords at full volume in unity with its sentiment and defiance. Blending explosive and calm pastures, choppy riffs and melodic teasing leading to ferocious expulsions, the song has ears and appetite hooked within seconds, success equally found by the snarling Fat Kid with its carnal metallic riffs and toxic grooves.

DBD show their pure rock ‘n’ roll instincts with Snorting Crack From A Girls Top Rack, a virulent and raucous UK Subs/Sham 69 meets Showaddywaddy roistering providing an almost two minute spirit stirring yell. A pinnacle amongst only peaks, the track leaves body breathless and attitude inflamed ready for the lighter but still imposing incitement and swing of Lazy Bastard, its raw captivation subsequently eclipsed by the metal infused rock of Slapdash And Haphazard. Part pub rock, part hard rock, and all punk, the third of the three roars with creative zeal as sonic tendrils offer a scorching flame within the aggravated air of vocals and song.

The tenacious and uninhibited exploits of Geronimo are a bruising addictive charm to persistently knock around, as too the bolder poppy shenanigans of Imaginary Friend; both raffish sing-a-longs that vocals chords yearn for. The vociferously grouchy and rousing Somethings Are Better Left Unsaid is no different, its lures more metal nurtured but instantly involving rock ‘n’ roll to stride through the world with.

Poppycock closes with the tantalising swing and shuffle of I Hate This City, a ska/reggae kissed stroll with a touch of The Members and Ruts to its initial saunter. Boiling up with every passing second, the track hollers and thrills, and though it is not the best song on the album it leaves an irresistible and lingering imprint just impossible to shake off.

Upon the first listen or two of Poppycock, as impressive and highly enjoyable as it was, it seemingly did not make the same immediate impact as predecessors. That suggestion was soon dispelled as songs imposed their infectious claws in thoughts far away from their home in no time, returning as they pleased. Poppycock creeps up on you as well as creating a thrilling clamour in its presence while again Dirt Box Disco create musical havoc, emotional incitement, and the kind of rock ‘n’ roll that has body and heart stomping and howling with sheer pleasure.

Poppycock is out now through STP Records @ http://www.stprecords.co.uk/page3.htm and https://dirtboxdisco.bigcartel.com digitally and on CD with its vinyl release April 5th

Upcoming live shows:

 

http://www.dirtboxdisco.co.uk    http://www.facebook.com/pages/DIRT-BOX-DISCO/129060477115572    http://twitter.com/dirtboxdisco

Pete RingMaster 16/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Spunk Volcano & The Eruptions – Ram Raid

As if the early excitement of 2017 could not get better with the release of the new Dirt Box Disco album, it undoubtedly did with news of a new EP from DBD guitarist and his cohorts, Spunk Volcano & The Eruptions. It was a year ago that the band released their acclaimed second album Shit Generation, though it seems only a couple of months back thanks to its constant airing in the offices. It and the band’s punk rock rebel rousing firmly set the band not only as a wholly different proposition to Spunk’s ‘day job’ but on the British punk scene full stop. Ram Raid cements that uniqueness whilst revealing the most aggressively raucous and virulently dirty sound from the band yet.

Ram Raid also sees new guitarist Stu Page alongside lead vocalist Spunk, fellow guitarist Tom ‘G Force’ Batterbee, bassist Deadbeatz Chris, and drummer Maff Fazzo, the latter pair also part of the DBD devilry. With the band in the midst of a run of live stomps sure to confirm the band’s reputation as one breath-taking and bruising live proposal, Ram Raid simply brings a fresh incitement and spark to the UK punk scene.

Its title track opens things up, almost stalking the listener from its first breath as its predatory riffs and imposing rhythms prowl the senses. Having sized things up it bursts into a muscular stroll with Black Flag like animosity and the infectious aggression of The Damned.  As already established over previous releases though, SV & The Eruptions embroil ears and imagination in their own unique exploits, an enslaving rather than inviting chorus demanding participation as riffs and rhythms trespass and punish the senses respectively. It is one thrilling encounter, an outstanding start to the EP which already has itself and listener all fired up.

There is no moment to calm down either as the belligerent punk rock of Stop Looking At Your Phone roars in ears, its antagonistic charge and dispute irresistible. It is a wall of sound and protestation, a torrent of violent riffs and equally uncompromising rhythms driven by the vocal antipathy of Spunk and the band. At barely a breath over a minute in length, the song is like being given the juiciest steak and only allowed one bite before it is whipped away, but what a mouthful it is.

Hanging Round The Shops is a collusion of punk and hard rock with a metallic lining and just as vociferously seductive and uncompromising as those before it.  It also has a pop punk devilry to its swinging grooves and lusty chorus; body and throat swiftly enjoying subservient participation before sharing just as much zeal with the contagion fuelled clamour of I Think Her Name Was Tracey?

The two tracks alone, but just like the EP, have something for all rock ‘n’ roll fans; whether of bands like Dead Kennedys, The Ramones or UK Subs, Turbonegro or Motorhead, indeed even New York Dolls to Gene Vincent there is plenty to relish. Ultimately it is punk rock at its voraciously ballsy best as proven one final time by EP closer Snap Backbone, a seriously catchy and tenacious slab of hook lined rip-roaring enticement.

Though only five songs running at twelve minutes, Ram Raid is the band’s most stirring and rabid yet rounded creative howl yet putting so many others and their offerings firmly in the shade.

The Ram Raid EP is out through STP Records on March 31st with pre-ordering available @ http://www.stprecords.co.uk/page3.htm

Upcoming Live Shows:

Fri March 31st – Rotherham – Cutlers Arms

Sat April 1st – Uttoxeter – The Old Star

Fri April 28th – Gateshead – Black Bull

Sat April 29th – Glasgow – O2ABC (Scotland Calling)

Sun April 30th – Wakefield – Warehouse 23

Sat July 1st – London – Tufnel Park Dome (Wonkfest)

Fri July 28th – Derby – Hairy Dog

Sun July 30th – Manchester – Star and Garter (Rebellion Warm Up)

??? August 3-6th – Blackpool – Rebellion Festival (day tbc)

Sat August 19th – Cambridge – Portland Arms

Sat September 30th – Northumbria Students’ Union (NE Calling)

Sat December 23rd – Manchester – Star & Garter (STP Xmas Show)

http://www.facebook.com/svate   http://spunkvolcanoandtheeruptions.bigcartel.com

Pete RingMaster 16/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Union Jack – Supersonic

uxj_RingMasterReview

It has been twenty years since Paris hailing Union Jack first stomped around with their anger fuelled, ska infested punk ‘n’ roll, a celebration marked by the release of a brand new slab of infectious aggression. Supersonic is the trio’s seventh full-length, a stonking riot driven by the band’s familiar yet individual sound which simply hits the spot dead centre.

Across six albums and a host of EPs, Union Jack have honed their sound into one intrusively virulent proposal, a strain of punk rock with catchiness as potent as its irritability at the world. Live it has ignited hordes of fans, earning the band a big reputation across their homeland, into Europe, and Canada while sharing stages with the likes of The Damned, DOA, UK Subs, Leftöver Crack, Swingin Utters, Subhumans, The Aggrolites, The Movement, Inner Terrestrials and many more. Even so, they still may be an unknown quality to a great many, something that Supersonic should amend.

Recorded at Sofa Studio with RomTomCat, mixed and mastered by Mike Major ( At the Drive-in, Sparta, Coheed And Cambria, Gone is Gone), and with additional contributions on certain songs by Thomas Birnbacher (upright bass/organ), Phillipe Cattafesta (piano/organ), and Joe Robinne (organ), Supersonic grabs ears from its first breath. Cynical Sound Club starts things stomping, a brief introduction urgently loaded with wicked hooks and punchy rhythms as the band gathers all its wiles ready for next up Oh Boogie. The second track bounces around with attitude and aggressive energy tempered by the warm touch of an organ. The mischievous bassline is irresistible, riffs spice for the ears while the twin vocal attack of guitarist Tom Marchal and bassist/pianist Rude Ben are intrusive ringleaders in the magnificent raw and wild melody hooked romp.

Wordaholic has an even rawer air to its character and presence, Antoine Sirven Gabiache’s swinging beats leading the way as vocals and grooves leave lingering imprints on the senses and psyche. Like a mix of  Swingin’ Utters and Faintest Idea, the song brawls and flirts with the listener, showing recognisable essences while uncaging its own antagonistic delights before Blackout unveils choppy riffs and slapping beats as again the excellent unity between the band’s contrasting vocals bring their own magnetic clamour to the catchy ire pumped mix. Both tracks use the body like a puppeteer, resistance to their swinging rhythms and wicked hooks pointless though each is over shadowed a touch by the punk rock roar of Boomerang. Stalking ears with a predacious bassline, enslaving them with the tangiest hooks as vocals entangle participation in their physical and emotional affray, the track is glorious; a Billy Talent like spicing added pleasure.

art_RingMasterReviewNext up Purple Pride offers a melodic core not too far removed from its predecessor’s and indeed the track lacks the same incendiary spark but still has pleasure and appetite greedy with its raw punk ‘n’ roll belligerence while the bubbly but sonically raw assault of Human Zoo straight, also just missing out on the heights of earlier songs, is still nothing less than fiercely enjoyable with its unpredictable nuances and twists.

Bitter Taste shows a calmer nature as keys and melodies swing with a summery energy though still Union Jack drive it with an instinctive aggression which commands attention. Another song which easily has feet and hips in tandem and the spirit railing against the world; it is one fun and impressive warm up for the album’s best track. Don’t Look Back swiftly steals favourite spot, laying the seeds with its psychobilly nurtured bass slaps and sealing the deal with its Tiger Army like groove. From there the band’s punk heart drives the thrills; ska licks and senses rapping beats as well as elements reminding of bands like The Vox Dolomites and The Peacocks treats in the track’s heady swing.

Through the raucously catchy skirmish of Summer Waves, a song with a Buzzcocks like hook to lick lips over, and the ska infested rock ‘n’ roll of The Globe, the captivating aural roughhousing only sparks new waves of pleasure. The underlying variety in the album’s sound is also further highlighted though You and I returns to the more expected Union Jack musical ruckus with no complaints offered. It still springs a smart web of melodies and hooks though to stand apart with a Biting Elbows like rock/punk invention adding extra spice to its scrap.

It is an essence which also infests the excellent Bones, a coincidental similarity to the just mentioned Russian band no bad thing as the song twists and turns with quarrelsome anthemic chest beating before slipping away for Hate To Say Goodbye to close things off, the slither of music a reprise to that first welcome by Supersonic.

The album is a real joy deserving the attention of all those with an appetite for ska punk and punk rock in any guise.

Supersonic is released February 1st on Beer Records in collaboration with Guerilla Asso, Old Town Bicyclette, and Riot Ska Records for the UK, and through https://unionjack.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/badska/

Pete RingMaster 01/02/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Cavemen – Born To Hate

TC_RingMasterReview

It did not take the release of recent single Too High To Die/I’d Kill to stir up eager anticipation for the new album from The Cavemen, that instinct bred by the band’s debut album last year, but it certainly added to the energy of the lustful welcome offered to Born To Hate. Native New Zealanders now UK based within the “grimy streets of London”, The Cavemen is one of those proposals you naturally take to or not, but for raw and uncompromising spirit stirring rock ‘n’ roll, the quartet’s punk driven garage rock takes some beating.

That previously mentioned single suggested a new primal ferocity and trashy tenacity had been bred in the band’s sound, a lascivious urgency which again fuels Born To Hate. In many ways the release is a continuation of The Cavemen’s self-titled debut album; more of the same lo-fi devilry but with this fresh impetus of sonic corruption, the band breaches a new plateau in their salaciously dirty rock ‘n’ roll.

Savage is the first assault on ears, its blues scented impurity a swift involvement of ears and appetite as sixties garage rock puts on its punk pants for a stomping trespass driven by the rhythmic slaps of drummer Jake and the moody bassline of Nick. As with most songs from the band to date, involvement with feet and vocal chords is swift and full, its ease of persuasion just a warm up for the joys to come as I’m A Mess swoops in straight after. A teasing spicy hook starts things rolling, its inescapable lure soon backed by tenacious rhythms and the scuzzy enterprise of guitarist Jack, in turn his great unpolished vocal backing to the punk attitude bred delivery of front man Paul creating a rousing union hard to resist.

swamp-cover_RingMasterReviewI Hate Art romps in next, its raucous hook littered confrontation assaulting and exciting like a fusion of The Sonics and Eddie and The Hot Rods and quickly in control of hips and feet whilst stirring up a litter of trouble before Satan Is Her Name stalks ears and imagination with the same trashy deviancy and demonic wantonness as bound in its centre of attention. Fair to say floorboards bounce when the song is around, its infectiousness enslaving and instantly matched by that uncaged by the corrosive sixties pop bawdiness of In Love With You complete with eagerly chopping riffs and fab four inspired howls.

There is a taste of Motorhead to next up Speed Of Death, its harsh ferocity and virulent antagonism as catchy as anything taunting from within Born To Hate while showing a broader diversity within the familiar Cavemen sound. That variety continues across the album as songs like I Hope They Drop The Bomb On Me bullies and flirts with its sonically befouling seventies punk/power pop inspired antagonism and straight after the crazed punk ‘n’ roll of Ain’t My Baby ignites an even greedier reaction and union between listener and release.

The band drops down a gear for the excellent Dead To Me, its meaty croon though still loaded with muscular energy as it strolls rabidly through ears with its psychobilly laced garage rock before Nasty Girl Nasty Boy whips up the passions all over again with its The Pirates meets The Flys romp. Pure rock ‘n’ roll in its most primordial punk breeding, the track is irresistible; a certain pinnacle though closely chased throughout the album by songs like the psychotic UK Subs coloured C.H.A.R.L.I.E. and the ever glorious I’d Kill (To See You Dead). One of the tracks on the last single, it is a belligerent nagging of the senses carrying a great groan of The Saints and The Lurkers to its grouchy contagion.

Born To Hate is completed by the persistent fingering of Why Won’t You; a song as seventies pop glam as it is punk in its sonically ravaged way, and an inescapable infection to bring a thrilling release to a boisterously rousing close. The band’s songs might and will draw comparisons to others at certain times but every flavour is devoured, twisted, than corrupted again until emerging as part of a riot unique to The Cavemen and right here helping create an album which simply leads you into dirty habits.

Born To Hate is available via Dirty Water Records at https://thecavemennz.bandcamp.com/album/born-to-hate  and http://www.dirtywaterrecords.co.uk/shop/#!/The-Cavemen/c/18119001/offset=0&sort=normal

 

https://www.facebook.com/thecavemennz

Pete RingMaster 29/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Spunk Volcano & The Eruptions – Shit Generation

SV_RingMasterReview

As news that the next always highly anticipated Dirt Box Disco album is scheduled for a 2017 release, thoughts eagerly reflect on the fact that we now have a whole year to bask in and romp with the new and just as eagerly awaited Spunk Volcano & The Eruptions full-length. The side but equally essential and compelling project of DBD guitarist/co-songwriter Spunk Volcano, the band has already become one of Britain’s punk favourites through their previous EP and album, but with Shit Generation they have hit a whole new plateau with a sound revealing bigger and broader rock ‘n’ roll shoulders to cast energy inciting punk rock incitements from.

Bursting into view in 2014 with a self-titled EP, Spunk Volcano & The Eruptions quickly showed a more old school punk rock tone and ferocity to the band’s music compared to the anthemic punk ‘n’ roll of his ‘day job’. It was a boisterous and bruising flavouring which later that year helped drive debut album Injection into a waiting horde of greedy hearts and appetites within the UK punk scene. It also began revealing the variation to the band’s sound which did not have quite the room to show its prowess in the EP. Within Shit Generation it is in full flow, relishing the broad landscape of the songwriting. It is still prime punk rock, but bred with an array of anthemic twists and turns loaded with the spice of many flavours.

Alongside lead vocalist Spunk, The Eruptions consists of DBD colleagues in bassist/vocalist Deadbeatz Chris and drummer/vocalist Maff Fazzo, lead guitarist/vocalist Ste Lingard (Flat Back Four), and guitarist/vocalist Tom G Force Batterbee. Together they have created a tour-de-force of rock ‘n’ roll with Shit Generation, it getting off to a rousing and compelling start with Massive Mistake Masterclass. Fair to say, the opener had these ears from its first second, a grouchy bassline and equally gnarly riff instant seduction as jabbing beats move in alongside Spunk’s vocal introduction. In short time, the track is a blaze of aggression and incitement, a Stooges like flame colluding with the predatory nature of the song and its subsequently emerging melodic shimmer of a flirtation.

SHIT GENERATION - COVER_RingMasterReviewARTIt is a storming entrance into the album which is matched by its title track straight after. Mixing strains of garage and hard rock into its seventies punk toned defiance, the song as the first, has feet and voice involved in no time, a quality all tracks present with unwavering success as shown by the outstanding XR3. This is a track all certain car owners are obliged to blast out whilst on the road. It is a web of gripping grooves and emotions arousing vocals and simply another best friend in waiting within the release. Within the first four words of its chorus, vocal participation is a given, a quality which is repeated throughout Shit Generation as shown by DNA Failure and after that Send The Boys Round. The first of the two stomps in on another virulent chorus built on band chants; that same infectiousness infesting verse and the tenacious song’s cantankerous punk ‘n’ roll confrontation whilst the second uncages even thicker aggressive sinews to sculpt a heavy rock spawned challenge.

TV God reveals a glorious nagging on the senses with its predacious riffs and rhythms, the bass alone irresistible animosity. The song relaxes its intimidation a touch as Spunk brings in the narrative, raising it again to greater toxicity for yet another enslaving roar soaked chorus within the album. Immediately installing it as a favourite amongst favourites, it still gets eclipsed in ears and emotions by X Factor and its declaration of something we have all voiced with zeal over the past decade alone. As the diversity in sound has expanded between releases, so has the potency and design of the hooks gripping attention. The band has never been lightweight in that department, but as this song shows, Spunk and co have honed their invention into something as intrusive and lingering as a virus.

Through the feisty pop punk infused romancing of Tattoo and the snarling Motorhead-esque rampancy of Fist Fights, band and album has limbs flinging and throats bursting whilst Satisfaction Guaranteed brings a crabby yet fiercely catchy punk ‘n’ roll badgering into play before Shut Up Or Fuck Off takes control. From its first breath, the track is a brawly proposition; sonically fractious and quickly backed up by quarrelsome tones from the vocals. Of course allegiance is a given by the time the contagiously pugnacious chorus arrives and imagination seized by the wiry classic rock lined sonic enterprise which spreads throughout.

For all the might of each and every song, favourite honours eventfully go to I’m Not Sure. A canvas of infection loaded hooks, sultry grooves, and again surly riffs; the song is manna for the ears. Deadbeatz’s bassline is an irritable enticement which aligns perfectly with the harmonic tone of the vocals and Maff’s ever incisive anthemic beats. Add seduction lined melodies and another flush of pop punk suggested catchiness and you have a near on perfect piece of punk rock.

The album is brought to a mighty close by firstly the equally resourceful and creatively eventful Let’s Go With Your Idea. Baiting the passions with Lemmy like spicing to an UK Subs-esque adventure, the track leaves enjoyment full to bursting and energies exhausted though no time is allowed to regroup as its successor Together Forever As Ghosts, swoops instantly on the senses with another Class-A bass lure aligned to barbarously swung beats. As the song broadens its invitation and character, keen involvement is unsurprisingly inescapable and it is hard to think of many better ways to finish up what is, from start to finish, an embracing of rock ‘n’ roll across the ages with punk passion at its core.

Shit Generation is the album that guarantees a thrilling time and proof that punk/rock ‘n’ roll is best served hard, heavy, and with adventure in its heart. We predict that 2016 will be the year of Spunk Volcano & The Eruptions.

Shit Generation is released March 17th through STP Records @ http://www.stprecords.co.uk/page4.htm

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Spunk Volcano & The Eruptions embarks on the RELEASE THE BEASTS – ALBUM LAUNCH TOUR in March alongside Born To Destruct and Skurvi.

Dates are…

Sat Mar 12th – Abertillery – Dolls House

Fri Mar 18th – Cambridge – Corner House

Sat Mar 19th – Brighton – Prince Albert

Fri Mar 25th – Rotherham – Bridge Inn

Sat Mar 26th – Gateshead – The Black Bull

Sun Apr 2nd – Nottingham – The Maze

Fri Apr 8th – Birmingham – Flapper

Sat Apr 9th – Lancaster – The Yorkshire House

Pete RingMaster 01/03/2016

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