Loom – Self Titled

Photo by Kurt Fairbairn

With quite simply raw rock ‘n’ roll nurturing its heart, the debut album from UK band Loom takes ears through every shade of punk rock you can imagine within its ten track confines. It is an adventure which has the imagination fired up, ears burning with ardour, and aggressive tendencies bubbling to the surface in a striking and rousing incitement of a self-titled proposal. Each song as suggested reveals a new aspect in its furious landscape yet brews a united character distinct to a band and release which just commands attention.

Leamington Spa hailing, the trio of Tarik Badwan, Matt Marsh, and Joshua Fitzgerald took little time in attracting ears and praise with their early releases including a pair of well-received EPs within their first year. The second of 2013 featured six covers of songs from the strongest inspirations for the band in its early days, The Jesus Lizard, Bad Brains, Pixies, GG Allin, Misfits, and Warsaw. Alongside the other encounters, it sparked support from the likes of Zane Lowe and Daniel P Carter at BBC Radio 1as well as laying the first steps in a springboard for Loom live to support The Rolling Stones at Hyde Park and tour the UK and Germany with artists such as Frank Carter & The Rattlesnakes, Queen Kwong, and Turbowolf.

The band’s first album is not slow in suggesting those influences in its multi-flavoured roar, as mentioned each song distinct from the next but there is a vein of unique Loom-ness running through all which we would suggest goes beyond the cohesion of aggression suggested by its press release. It opens up with Lice, a sonic itch you just cannot scratch enough to escape from. Its initial glaze to an instantly robust sound has a gothic/indie rock spicing, coming over like a blend of Leitmotiv and The Victorian English Gentlemens Club before its grouchy rock ‘n’ roll instincts burst free. It is a glorious nagging of the senses and imagination taking magnetic twists along its contagious enmity of sound and attitude.

The great start continues as firstly Hate imposingly shimmers with electronic radiance upon grunge bred antipathy to be followed by the rousing exploits of Get A Taste. There is a whiff of Pere Ubu for these ears to the first song but a thicker Nirvana like causticity to its nature and again niggling potency. Embracing garage punk confrontation too, the track stirs ears and appetite with ease, a triumph matched by its successor with its old school punk meets seventies garage rock growl as demandingly catchy as it is openly crotchety.

Grunge colludes with post punk for the feistily prowling Leopard, guitars winding spicy tendrils lined with delicious discord around ears as rhythms reveal a rapacious nature to their drive before Salt entangles the imagination in a fusion of Joy Division post punk and the irritable punk rock of The Stooges with just a tang of psych rock bewitchment. It is an enthralling mix opening new aspects with each passing flick of a chord and sonic detour yet throughout a fluid tart snarl never deviating from its quarrel.

Seasick bawls as its stalks ears with predacious intent straight after; indie rock merging with raw hardcore ill-temper in a track which steals the passions within seconds. Vocals are as unpredictable and instinctively volatile as the sonic flames cast by the guitar and indeed the rhythmic jabbing around them. With the bass a brooding threat within the tempestuous joy crowding and seducing ears, the track makes a big play for best track glory but is quickly challenged by the muggy grunge venting of Bleed On Me and eclipsed by the glorious dark deeds of the band’s latest single, Nailbender. The latter is a compelling caliginous seduction of gothic and punk metal; like Type O Negative fused with Descendents and 1919 yet still emerging as something unique and gripping to Loom.

The punk grouse of Barbed Wire grabs something from all decades of punk since the sixties whilst in finishing up the album Slowly Freezing Heart crawls across the senses in a kaleidoscope of sonic toxicity and shadow loaded rhythms united with vocal psychosis. Both tracks are treats greed gets the better of composure over while bringing one superb album to a memorable and rousing end. Listening to Loom you get the feeling that the band creates on instinct, not searching for a sound but letting it find them and infusing their music with its own unique character. The album reminds of numerous artists across its riveting body but never comes over as anything other than the offspring of Loom, the first of many more belligerently sculpted and physically visceral gems we hope and suspect.

The Loom album is released May 19th via Silent Cult across most stores.

https://www.facebook.com/Loomband/    https://twitter.com/loomband

Pete RingMaster 17/05/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Hercules Morse – Equine Size Comparison

hercules-morse-online-promo-shot_RingMasterReview

Last December saw British alternative rock quartet Hercules Morse impress and grab attention with the release of debut EP Edge Of Life. It was a vigorously infectious collection of songs seeded in the rousing rock ‘n’ roll of bands such as Foo Fighters and Queens Of The Stone Age. There was also an unmistakable individuality in sound and character of songwriting to the release which suggested the Southampton hailing band had something fresh to share with the British rock scene. Its successor Equine Size Comparison confirms that thought and more, offering five tracks which grab ears with their invention and again mercilessly catchy prowess. It continues from where its predecessor left off, inciting the listener in spirit and body while revelling in another step forward in the imagination of Hercules Morse.

With shows alongside the likes of Turbowolf, Band of Skulls, Brant Bjork, Tiger Cub, Orange Goblin, Black Peaks, Blaze Bayley, and Dinosaur Pile Up under their belts since forming in 2014, Hercules Morse have earned the praise and support of various UK magazines, music sites, and radio shows through their energetic live presence and that impressive first EP. As the quintet of virulence posing as songs grips ears here, it is easy to expect the same kind reactions for Equine Size Comparison but in greater eagerness and across broader spotlights.

As with previous songs, the new EP mixes the familiar with new imagination resulting in encounters which instantly feel like existing friends while venturing into fresh pastures. It all starts with Asleep At The Wheel, a proposition entangling ears in bluesy grooves and swinging rhythms from its first breath. Riffs and hooks are as quickly in the mix, all inviting the listener to take notice as melodies and the potent vocals of rhythm guitarist Steve George stroll the weave of persuasion. The growl from the bass of Paul Shott colludes devilishly with the scything swings of drummer Guillaume Redonnet-Brown, both driving the energy and heart of the song as lead guitarist Harry Gardner spins imaginative melodies while vocally backing George.

hercules_morse_-_cover_artwork-jpg_RingMasterReviewIt a powerfully infectious and anthemic start which simply continues through The Boss, a song with as many similar lures to its body as new twists and turns to get the teeth into. There is a swagger to the track which borders mischievous, rhythms at the core as it flirts and the band roars musically and vocally. As with the last EP, there is no escaping Josh Homme/ Dave Grohl led influences across Equine Size Comparison and especially this second song though at times it equally reminds of nineties UK band Skyscraper while simultaneously exploring its own adventure.

Nobody’s Fool has a slightly mellower energy though rhythmically it still has a bite and imposing charm driven by the naturally infectious craft of the band. Caressing ears with its lively melodic enterprise, the track easily captivates, if without sparking the spirit as mightily as those around it, before Do It Right strolls in on a dark almost predacious bassline aligned to matching riffs. In no time though, the band uncages another virulent saunter; hooks and grooves equipped to seduce and rhythms loaded with fiercely enticing bait as vocals swing from lure to lure with matching energy and character. Rock ‘n roll does not get much more contagious than this song and indeed the EP in general as proven by its final treat.

Offering an opening prowl of riffs and tempestuous eruptions reminding of Billy Talent, Chemical Lullabies proceeds to blend its own calmer melodic moments with fiery exploits; the Canadian band continuing to be a suitable reference to a thoroughly enjoyable and increasingly gripping proposition. It is a mighty end to a powerfully engaging and enjoyable next step from Hercules Morse, a band heading in the right direction to awakening the hungriest spotlights.

Equine Size Comparison is out now @ https://herculesmorseuk.bandcamp.com/album/equine-size-comparison

http://herculesmorse.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/herculesmorseuk   https://twitter.com/herculesmorseuk

Pete RingMaster 08/09/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Syren City – Paradise In The Dirt

Syren City Promo Shot_RingMasterReview

Almost two years ago, UK rockers Syren City laid a hefty punch on attention with the Escape EP, five tracks of multi-flavoured rock ‘n’ roll which was as compelling as it was thrilling. Now the Bristol quintet returns with its successor Paradise In The Dirt and three more encounters which leave ears ringing with pleasure and an appetite for more simply greedier.

Formed in 2011, Syren City swiftly bred a sound from essences drawn across the likes of post hardcore, punk, metal and alternative rock. The 2014 Escape EP quickly showed it was a formidable and striking mix, echoing the band’s live reputation earned through festival appearances and shows with the likes of Turbowolf, The Alarm, Mallory Knox, Max Raptor, The Hell, Roam, Black Foxxes, Futures, Young Legionnaire, Attack Attack, and Blitz Kids. The release of their new proposition shows that the band’s sound has continued to expand and indulge in greater adventurous traits, increasing in magnetism with equal measure. The first in a series of EPs which have a conceptual thread and link, Paradise In The Dirt captures ears and imagination with swift deftness of enterprise and a rousing boisterousness, never relenting upon or releasing the listener until its final note has shared its mighty bait.

Syren City Cover Artwork_RingMasterReviewIt opens up with It’s Morphine Time, a song which descends on the senses like a tempestuous challenge from its first breath, but a threat just as quickly seducing ears and appetite as riffs and rhythms launch their hungry persuasion. In no times wiry grooves are entangling song and listener while anthemic vocal roars across the band find a great Beastie Boys feel to them. As it proceeds, the scent of bands such as Rage Against The Machine and Refused also colour the encounter, with frontman Simon Roach taking vocal charge as the barbarous rhythms of bassist Sam Leworthy and drummer Mat Capper badger and incite. It is a virulent infectious affair with the enterprise and fiery grooves of guitarists Ian Chadderton and Josh Mortazavi arousing, aiding and shaping the songs twists and turns as its metal/heavy rock antagonism and inescapable catchiness fuels pleasure, the song alone surely ensuring the EP’s certain success.

It is quickly backed up by its companions though, Danielle coming next and opening on a melodic caress which inspires the following vocals and flirtatious gait of the song. Little time passes before again a volcanic quality and energy erupts, its theatre creating a My Chemical Romance like attraction before things slip back into the captivating calm and the repeat of the galvanic cycle. As within its predecessor, there is a kind of tempestuousness to ideas and intensity which only adds to the riveting drama provided before 10,000 Knives steps forward to grab its share of the plaudits. Initial riffs and lures have a slight Therapy? feel before the punk heart of band and song grips and adds a Reuben meets Taking Back Sunday hue to the outstanding encounter.

All three tracks are uniquely distinct to each other but fuelled by a sound with a character all Syren City’s. The band impressed with their last release and have only made a bigger impact with Paradise In The Dirt, a release sure to be the favourite EP of 2016 for a great many.

The Paradise In The Dirt EP is out now through all stores-

https://www.facebook.com/SyrenCity  https://twitter.com/SyrenCity  http://instagram.com/syrencitymusic

Pete RingMaster 30/06/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Hercules Morse – Edge Of Life

Hercules Morse_RingMaster Review

Creating a great blend of familiarity and predominantly fresh invention distinct to the band, UK alternative rockers Hercules Morse re-unleash their debut EP, Edge Of Life, a repackaged version of their 2014 three track encounter offering a trio of additional new tracks to get enthusiastically greedy over. The band has been compared to bands like the Foo Fighters and Queens Of The Stone Age, understandably so at times, but as Edge Of Life reveals, there is much more in adventurous sound and texture to the band rousing rock ‘n’ roll.

Rising from the demise of their previous guise, The Blue Screen Of Death, the Southampton hailing Hercules Morse emerged in 2014, quickly uncaging the original version of the Edge Of Life EP to potent reactions. In their earlier incarnation, the band had shared stages with bands such as Turbowolf, Band of Skulls, Brant Bjork, Zico Chain, Orange Goblin, and Dinosaur Pile Up; a success and live hunger just as rampant with Hercules Morse as the south of England can testify since the band stepped forward. Now national attention is getting a firm and impressive nudge with the bulkier invigorating return of Edge Of Life.

That creative poke begins with The Education, an incitement throwing thick riffs, biting rhythms, and spicy grooves at ears from its first breath. The equally potent vocal prowess of rhythm guitarist Steve George quickly joins the virulent tempting, his lead tones well supported by those of lead guitarist Harry Gardner. Already those earlier mentioned comparison make a tasty hue to the encounter but spices in a fiery and tenacious romp finding its own identity with every swinging rhythms and sonic hook.

Hercules Morse Cover Artwork_RingMaster Review   The great start is continued and eclipsed by the EP’s excellent title track, it too straight to the point with anthemic beats from drummer Guillaume Redonnet-Brown eagerly rolling in as the guitars cast a web of melodic enterprise around the again highly alluring vocals. There is a mellower air to the track even with its robust rhythmic boisterousness and the great carnivorous tone of Paul Shott’s bass, and a flavouring drawing on the melody rich essences of classic and alternative rock over past decades. For personal tastes it does ultimately lack the bite of its predecessor but more than makes up for it with a contagion of flowing melodies and harmonies tempered by an underlying tempestuousness.

Good Old Days steps up next, uncaging a bluesy groove from its first touch and an increasingly magnetic web of hooks and juicy sonic craft thereon in. Bouncing around with sinews as blatantly bold and insatiable as the melodic catchiness skilfully nurtured, the track offers a thrilling and inescapable Super Happy Fun Club meets Feud meets Squeeze proposal that has body and emotions on board within its first half minute.

That Difford and Tilbrook like essence is an on-going spicing, lighting up the previous pair of songs and again All About Me, if in a subtler way as a more Josh Homme inspired hug of sound wraps ears from within the wiry sonic and punchy rhythmic resourcefulness of the song. More reserved but no less potent in its persuasion and lingering seduction of the imagination and appetite, the song entangles its gentler incitement with fiery blues seeded guitar whilst its grunge heart simply becomes more vocal and engagingly volatile over time.

The EP comes to a close through firstly the pulsating and lively rock ‘n’ roll canter of Nowhere Left To Go and lastly the weighty energy and eventful landscape of How Do You Love Me. They are both songs which spring no major surprises in originality but defy solid comparisons to others as they sculpt more enjoyment to acclaim Hercules Morse for. The second of the two especially grips ears with its inventive twists and surging infectiousness, ensuring the EP ends on a high.

Edge of Life is one of those yet to be discovered friends that instinctively offers new fun crafted from somewhat recognisable exploits. It also reveals a brew of individuality though which comes with the potential of greater uniqueness ahead; reason enough to get involved with the band right now.

The Edge Of Life EP is available through all stores from 4th December and https://herculesmorseuk.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/herculesmorseuk   http://herculesmorse.co.uk/   https://twitter.com/herculesmorseuk

Pete RingMaster 04/12/215

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Syren City – Escape EP

Syren City Online Promo Photo

Seemingly labelled as post hardcore, UK rockers Syren City has a sound which almost defies tagging as it employs a wealth of rich flavours such as punk and metal through to alternative and hard rock, and that is still only scratching the surface. It makes for a rousing incitement as evidence by their new EP Escape, a release which is best described as one almighty roar. Consisting of five tracks which twist with the flair of a pole dancer and has more moves than a senses ravaging roller coaster, the band’s new proposition is quite simply a ferociously compelling and thrilling adventure.

Hailing from Bristol and formed in 2011, Syren City took little time to light up venues around Wales and England, supporting the likes of Turbowolf, The Alarm, Max Raptor, Futures, Young Legionnaire, Attack Attack, and Blitz Kids, whilst festival appearances has seen them share stages with bands such as Brand New, Don Broco, We Are the Ocean, Mallory Knox, Kids in Glass Houses, and Feed The Rhino. Their live performances and their impressive portion of a split EP with fellow Bristolians and metalcore band Koshiro, has led to keen anticipation for Escape, an appetite fully fed by the impressive collection of contagious anthems.

The band hits top gear straight away with opener Bleed. It is a rampage of a song, heavy hitting and rigorously coaxing rhythms from drummer Louis Catlett aligned to the throaty lure of Adam Armour’s bass, an irresistible entrance soon PromoImageenhanced by the scything riffs and chords provided by guitarists Ian Chadderton and Adam Hopton. Instantly there is a feel of Foo Fighters to the muscular persuasion which increases as vocalist Simon Roach reveals his strengths. With gripping backing vocals and shouts adding to the incendiary array of hooks lining the charge, there is also an essence of Max Raptor and the now defunct Always The Quiet Ones to the stomp though all mere spices to something openly distinctive to Syren City. The track continues to set a fire in ears and emotions, its unpredictable invention and side steps in its imaginative emprise as swiftly addictive as the face on tempest of aggression and melodic enterprise.

The stunning start is followed by Our Disease, another track taking mere seconds to seduce senses and passion with its vocal bellow. This bait leads into a punkish antagonism in voice and sound before it in turn evolves into a hard rock stride. As it predecessor, the song mixes up gait and attack with seamless and skilled resourcefulness, never relinquishing its grip on ears and imagination with its increasingly catchy and enterprising temptation. It does not quite match the opening triumph, due to the majesty of that song, but easily ensures that the EP continues to inflame body and emotions as does its successor Fire In Your Name. The third song unveils an enticing sonic groove straight away which rapidly makes way for the potent lead and backing vocal mix, before returning to bind a stroll of punchy beats and raw riffs. As with most songs, that earlier mentioned post hardcore essence is a rich colour to the canvas of the track, but as with all it comes soaked in variety and diversity, melodic hues and a metallic sonic veining adding to the pop punk seeded emotive howl of the song.

The treats keep coming as Long Way Down enters the affair next. The blend of raw and aggressive confrontation within Roach’s predominantly melodic coloured vocals alone make a rigorously enticing offering whilst grooves and hooks in the heavily swinging tempest of the song, only add to its addiction sparking tendencies. The track shows a more savage side to the band’s sound and songwriting whilst still embracing their melodic natures; providing yet another highlight before final song Asphodel brings it all to an infectious close. Revelling in a hard and melodic rock web of enterprise, the song bulges with rhythmic sinews and fiery sonic endeavour whilst vocally Roach impresses once more as does the contributions of the band in the same department. At times raging with nostrils flaring and in others an evocative croon, the track is a mighty end to a similarly impacting release.

Escape is a riveting encounter from a band easily living up to the buzz around them whilst even in its impressive presence and success, revealing the potential for much more in Syren City.

The Escape EP is available now @ http://syrencitymerch.bigcartel.com/

https://www.facebook.com/SyrenCity

9/10

RingMaster 15/09/2014

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Bury The Hatchet: It Was Never Enough EP

The bottom line to the new release from UK metalcore band Bury The Hatchet is frustration. The Chatham quintet has such promise whilst their new It Was Never Enough EP is a release which is so near to being something special but all one is left focused on is the abrasive negative effect of the vocals. Whether it is an accumulative effect of so many emerging bands simply screaming their lyrics so that this release is the straw that broke…etc it is hard to say but after continually listening to the EP we could not tell you lyrically what is going on or really care as to appreciate what is musically at times an impressive release listening was about blocking out that side of the songs. This is not meant as an attack on vocalist Ray Hughes but on the direction so many young new bands are going. For every dissenting voice there will be another basking in the vocal delivery of course but when it has the effect of nails down the blackboard maybe time for some invention?

Aside from that aspect though It Was Never Enough shows some excellent ideas and individual ability to inspire only promise for the band and especially in two songs show what a fine band Bury The Hatchet is, which obviously adds to the personal frustration. Formed in the closing weeks of 2012, the band has built a good name for themselves through sharing stages with bands such as Feed the Rhino, James Clever Quintet, Brotherhood of the Lake, TurboWolf, and Hildamay, and their debut EP For What It’s Worth. They are a name which most UK extreme metal fans are aware of which is a feat in itself for an independent band in a crowded market place. The new EP gives evidence to why with its at times imaginative creativity.

The release opens with the brief and wonderfully emotive instrumental title track. Lone piano within an orchestral breath it leads straight into the rampaging But We Still Keep Moving. Firm rhythms from Tom Davis lead the way whilst the guitars of Rich Norton and David Greenslade brew up a dusty loud of inciteful intrigue. Within a step the song erupts into a storming surge of ferocious riffs and pummelling beats before pulling back the trigger for the rasping clutches of Hughes to permeate the song. With a style to keep throat lozenges in business for decades he scores the sounds with acidic venom which at this point is not a problem, the song nicely spacing its varied aspects with intelligence and skill. Uncompromising and direct the song does not offer anything new to what they and others have before but it is more than palatable.

Protest comes next, a song with disguised progressive tendencies which unleashes a sprawling maelstrom of diverse ideas pulling away from its core but staying well within the frame work of the song to make an unpredictable and engrossing track. The bass of Casper Howes is a prowling presence which one would like to hear more from within the production but is always a formidable plus to the tracks and here he adds a great menacing depth to draw one away from the by now punishing vocals.

Next up 0411 continues the exploratory intent of the band and though it at times feels like its destination is not quite clear to the band it is an inspired and pleasing addition to the release and one of two songs with the closer, which leads one to almost expect the band to evolve into something special. It is more technical than the others and looks into new spheres for spicery which not only works but is welcome.

Broken Soul is easily the best song on It Was Never Enough and like its predecessor is unafraid to unravel sounds to twist them into new blistering invention, the sonic discordance which coats the melodic fires of the song irresistible and the bass pulses alongside the corrupting beats addictive. The track switches through technical metal essences, thrash flavoured surges, and progressive imagination within the fire of aggression to leave one eager for more from the band those not as enthused as one would wish with the continued vocal direction.

Bury The Hatchet are definitely a band to keep an eye on with the EP showing good promise, one just hopes they and many other bands reassess their thoughts on the vocals.

www.facebook.com/burythehatchet

RingMaster 09/07/2012

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