Devils Teeth – Suki Yaki Hot!

Here to incite you to commit all the bad devilish habits your mother warned you not to is the debut album from Milwaukee trio Devils Teeth. It is an encounter which has inhibitions flying in the front of sensibility and fresh addictions forging new trespasses of ill intent. Quite simply it is a bad assed stomp sure to lead all into glorious rock ‘n’ roll wrong doings.

Out of an already in place friendship, the threesome of vocalist/guitarist Jon Hanusa, vocalist/bassist Eric Arsnow, and drummer Chuck Engel emerged in 2016 as Devils Teeth. By that October they were already sharing stages with the likes of Dick Dale, The Blind Shake, Local H, The Toxenes, and Left Lane Cruiser. Their sound is a diverse and unpredictable hybrid of punk and garage rock with surf and psych punk tendencies which song by song across their first album, Suki Yaki Hot!, shows that even those tags do not really tell the whole story of an inimitable feral proposition additionally “channeling inspiration from Brucesploitation and Herschall Gordon Lewis films as well as surf and psychedelic sounds from decades past.”

From its first breath intrigue accompanies Suki Yaki Hot!, the first sonic sigh of opener Diamond Rio a scheming lure but it is when the raw strokes of guitar kick in that ears and instinctive rock ‘n’ roll passions are ignited. The rhythmic trespass of Arsnow and Engel is as unapologetically contagious as the eager throes of Hanusa’s guitar, all colluding to bring the listener to their feet to induce uncompromising swings through their hips. A fusion of traditional garage rock, mutant rockabilly, and psych devilry, the track is undiluted contagion as magnetically raw as it is skilfully woven.

The Junction Street Eight Tigers follows, a track inspired by Bruce Lee’s gang when he was in Catholic school aged twelve years old. It enters on a rhythmic grumble awash with sonic shimmers, breaking into an infectious prowl built on attitude and temptation; threat and confidence lining its swagger as the heat of Caleb Westphal’s sax adds greater lures to the outstanding encounter.

The diversity in the band’s sound is in full expression by next up Death Is Nimble, the third song a mix of funk and psychedelic tendencies around an instinctive punk rock heartbeat. A noise rock breath springs up from time to time too as the sultry climate of the track smoulders like a mix of Rocket From The Crypt and The Bomboras; captivation held in its palms in swift time before eventually the dark climes of Dirty Tricks bound into view with predacious attitude and a hungry crawl to its lively swing. Echoing those earlier mentioned inspirations, not for the first or last time there is a great B-movie feel to the character of the song; dirty adventure veining and lining its every exploit.

The outstanding Party Shark Shake is next up, the song as the band’s actual name triggered by a book, no surprise here, about sharks by Susan Casey. You can almost feel the warm liquor soaked sand between the toes as the track stomps through ears, the swell of its melodic tides dragging the imagination and hips into the dangerous currents and depths below the biting dynamics of the song. Across the riveting attack, it builds up to rousing crescendos though at no moment is it anything less than an over powering incitement to body, spirit, and imagination. Imaging The Ghastly Ones and The Trashmen in collusion with The Damned and The Revillos and you get a whiff of the album’s greatest moment.

Every one of its ten propositions is a momentous moment within Suki Yaki Hot! to be fair though as proven by the slow slung psychotic swagger that is Understanding The Hands Of A Killer. Its swing is pure devilry accentuated by the flames of sax and the vocal rapacity of Hanusa and Eric Arsnow amidst the cries of victims while its successor, Jet Jaguar is the spark to lust fuelled movements from body and vocal chords where never being a puppet has been so much fun and exhausting.

Who’s Laughing Now? is just as deviously compelling, rhythms and guitar weaving an inescapable hook rich trap infested with the similarly and ever potent vocal incitement of the band. It was another which grabbed a loftier foot hold in the unrelenting peaks of rousing pleasures in the album’s stirring landscape continued by the grappling holds and rhythmic attack of Sakuraba, a song bred from the inspiration of the Japanese MMA fighter and wrestler.

The album is concluded by People Of Earth, calm in relation to its predecessors but a menace lined psych punk croon with mayhem in its genes and contagion in its relentless rhythmic persuasion and raw sonic toxins. It is a superb final shanghai into slavery by the Devils Teeth sound and imagination; a devious machination for salacious times and unbridled pleasure, both the rewards for letting Suki Yaki Hot! infest ears and attention.

Among some real undiluted pleasures this year, the Devils Teeth debut is there at the head of the field.

Suki Yaki Hot! is released August 24th via Triple Eye Industries; available @ https://devilsteeth.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/devilsteeth/

Pete RingMaster24/08/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Them Teeth – The Knuckledragger

TT_RingMaster Review

There is nothing like a good sonic brawl to grab attention and get the blood rushing feverishly through the body, and that is exactly what you get with The Knuckledragger EP from US noise punks Them Teeth. The three track assault is an uncompromising and galvanic incitement for ears and emotions, one so potent that within a single listen it had permanently placed itself in The RR’s favourite violation list for 2015.

Its creators, Western Michigan trio Them Teeth arose in 2013, formed from the ashes of Supercontinent, Rough Rope, and Mean Mother by vocalist/guitarist Ben Roeske and drummer Adam Tatro. The following year saw the line-up completed by bassist Jason Harris and the self-release of a well-received self-titled demo containing six songs bred on inspirations of 90s noise rock and early 2000s Hydra Head Records encounters amongst many things. As that offering and now The Knuckledragger reveal, there is plenty more to the Them Teeth sound though, plenty of diverse strains of toxicity to savage and seduce body and soul.

TT1600x1600_RingMaster Review   The EP seizes ears and appetite straight away with the raw, grouchy entrance of opener Hammslamm. Guitar and bass grumble with attitude and resonance first, their grudge backed by the firm handed swing of drum sticks. It is a controlled and predatory start but one becoming more volatile with every passing second, especially once the caustic vocal squall of Roeske spills animosity. Acidic infectious grooves soon vein the unrelenting stalking and pressure on the senses, the song’s raw rock ‘n’ roll constantly igniting greater hunger in ears and emotions, especially when it break outs Sex Pistols seeded riffs and hooks midway. Like Whores meets KEN mode with the sludgy venom of Nightslug but managing to be simultaneously unique, the track is a mighty start quickly matched by its successor.

Whitewash is lighter on its feet but just as aggressively imposing and energetically rebellious. Like a middleweight flitting round its opponent looking for weaknesses, the track swings hooks and rhythmic jabs before going for the jugular in raucously honed choruses. The raw rapacity of a Coilguns or Shevils comes to mind as the song continues to challenge the senses, spilling rousing contagion and rugged animosity with open relish.

The EP is closed by a thrilling cover of the Fiends track Packin’ A Rod and Them Teeth give it new life and character to dare we say actually outshine the original. It is noise soaked punk ‘n’ roll at its best with great backing roars from Debra Warren and Lara Tatro alongside additional guitar exploits from Mitch Anderson, a classic song given a face and body lift to rousing effect.

We can expect to hear plenty more of and from Them Teeth ahead, indeed they have a 7″ split with France’s brilliant Sofy Major via Detroit’s Corpse Flower Records on the horizon, and if anything matches or can actually surpass the outstanding The Knuckledragger we are all in for a thrilling bruising.

The Knuckledragger EP is available digitally and on Ltd Ed 7” vinyl from August 25 via Triple Eye Industries.

RingMaster 25/08/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Volunteer – Goner

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It might not be the most startling thing to assault your ears this year, or stalk a new vein of originality within the varied sphere of noise rock but Goner, the new 10” release from Milwaukee trio Volunteer is a thoroughly appetising and magnetic beast of a release. Consisting of four tracks which are heavier than, and delivered with the suffocating intensity of a landslide, the band’s new EP is a richly satisfying and enjoyable onslaught. No it does not leave you jaw-slacked in awe but offers plenty to spark a hungry attention towards its sculptors.

Formed in 2013, Volunteer consists of guitarist/vocalist Francisco Ramirez, bassist Martin Defatte, and drummer Mark Sheppard, formers members of bands such as Traitors and Gasoline Fight, Stock Options, and Forstella Ford. Within weeks the threesome had recorded their debut release, a self-titled 6-song EP via Chicago’s Underground Communique Records which drew potent interest and responses upon its release last October. Now the band has prepared the ground for a more focused spotlight with Goner, an accomplished and imposingly pleasing proposition which hits ears hard and holds attention tight.

Released in collaboration with Chicago label Forge Again Records and the band’s own Triple Eye Industries, Goner immediately assaults the senses with the weighty presence of Nein. From its first breath riffs offered by the baritone guitar of Ramirez snarl and awaken a greedy appetite whilst the bass of Defatte soon offers its own grizzled enticement. Punctured by the similarly heavy swings of drummer Sheppard and permeated by the grouchy gruff vocals of the guitarist, the song consumes ears with a voracious and blistering energy. Grooves are submerged in the background more than the track’s vibrant foreground, but still make a potent lure in the overall tar thick persuasion of the song. As mentioned of the Volunteer-Goner_cover1200x1200whole EP, the song does not leap out or set new templates for heavy rock but certainly provides an inescapable contagion.

The same can be said of its successor Free-er Bird, a track which emerges from a sonic call to uncage a lumbering senses smothering gait which crawls venomously over the senses. Rhythms cast a slightly more urgent bait within the sonic consumption whilst the deep throaty tone of Ramirez guitar again seduces an already in place hunger, as bred by the likes of Karn8 and Morass of Molasses, for such propositions. Though there is another infectious edge and enticement to the track it is a solid and formidable wall of noisy enterprise lacking the spark of its predecessor and definitely the remaining pair of songs on Goner.

The first of the final two songs is the release’s title track, an instantly gripping and far more adventurous sonic incitement from the band. Grooves and riffs swiftly lay a web of unpredictable and tenacious enterprise, punctuated by the constantly dramatic and hostile bait of rhythms. The song swings with an antagonistic and compelling creative ferocity, scarring and flirting with ears at every turn and through each twist of ideation. You still would not announce its proposal as anything majorly new but it is impossible not to grant its declaration of being virulently addictive and severely enjoyable, whilst setting a lofty peak for the EP.

Goner is brought to a close by I Love You So Much It’s Killing Us Both, an impressive cover of the Jawbreaker track. Lurching with a rhythmic predation and a similarly inflamed ravaging of caustic riffs, the track infests the imagination and emotions through scuzzed up effect loaded vocals, venom dripping grooves, and an irresistible baiting from the bass. It is a toxic treat which brings a fine release to intensely pleasing end.

Goner is a healthy consumption of noise and skilled resourcefulness which fans of band such as Melvins, Unsane, and Jesus Lizard will lick their lips over. It might not be a template maker or soaked in overwhelming originality but it provides a deeply enjoyable and flavoursome encounter to get greedy over and another potential fuelled powerful step in the emergence of Volunteer.

Goner is available via Forge Again Records/Triple Eye Industries digitally and on Ltd 10” vinyl (100 on black and 200 on translucent red vinyl with black swirls) now @ http://wearevolunteer.bandcamp.com/

http://wearevolunteer.com

RingMaster 15/10/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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