Jet Noir – A Cold Day In Hell

Jet noir_RingMaster Review

Continuing her solo progressive gothic seduction on ears, Jet Noir releases new single A Cold Day In Hell, a transfixing lure on the imagination and enticing incitement for the body. The successor to previous releases, The Scarlet Woman and Like A Circle, which came out earlier this year, the new track simultaneously acts like an atmospheric predator and melodic enthralment with a potent suggestion of dark shadows and emotive escapades to captivate from start to finish.

cover_RingMaster Review Taking time away from Naked Lunch, the London based Jet Noir has increasingly grown her mix of dark trance and progressively honed gothic suggestiveness, a union at times also offering a slim but imaginative symphonic flirtation hue to get wrapped up in. Her previous EP and single mentioned above, has brought an even blend of those ingredients though often leaning more towards electronic revelry within highly suggestive shadows bred by the songs involved. With A Cold Day In Hell though, there is a heavier and more primal rock spine involved, around which the progressive enterprise of Noir’s heart and craft unveils a provocative and dramatic narrative.

Opening with an instantly enticing nag of bass alongside the alluring voice of Noir, the song is soon sending scythes of scuzzy guitar across its emerging body. That bait is quickly wrapped in the melodic prowess and ambient charm of Noir’s keys, their flowing theatre expanding the strength of word and sound on ears and imagination. Thoughts are sparked into adventures of past times, distant battles, and darkly romantic crusades yet equally the portentous elegance and imposing atmosphere of the track could soundtrack any modern physical and intimately emotional apocalypse.

The track is a bewitching play of sound and expression, easily the most imaginative and thrilling offering from Jet Noir yet. Complete with a trio of re-mixes of the song from Ruinizer, Attrition, and Dean Baker of synth pop band Cloak, A Cold Day In Hell is a tonic for the dance-floor and imagination, and only the start of bigger things from its creator we suggest.

A Cold Day In Hell is available from October 4th via https://jetnoir.bandcamp.com/album/a-cold-day-in-hell

https://www.facebook.com/TheJetNoir

Pete RingMaster 04/10/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Project Silence – One Way To Hell

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    Project Silence is a sonic and invasive scourge from Finland which ignited a lasting passion and hunger in us for their presence through the album 424 which unleashed its extreme toxicity last year. The album was brawl of intense promise which shared a brutality and bewitchment that overwhelmed and seduced the passions. The band now return on December Friday 13th with new single One Way To Hell, a two track creative fury which confirms all of the intensive promise and stature of the previous release whilst stretching the band’s imagination and abrasive qualities even further.

Hailing from Kuopio, the band was formed in 2008 as initially a solo project of Delacroix (vocals, programming, keyboards),  who began brewing up a distinct dark aggressive design from ferocious essences bred in the likes of industrial metal, dark electro, trance, aggrotech, and black metal. A demo emerged soon after the project was unveiled followed to relative success by the single Voices the following year. 2012 saw the line-up of Mr. Sanderz (guitar), J (guitar), Silve R (drums), and Sturmpanzerjäger (bass) alongside Delacroix before debut album 424 was uncaged on the world to strong responses from fans backed by equally enthused critical acclaim from within the underground press alongside radio play on shows like The Bone Orchard at Audioburger.com. The experimental muscular confrontation of the new single takes the heights set by the album not maybe to new plateaus but certainly to intriguingly different and just as impressive corrosive adventures.

One Way to Hell emerges from an enveloping sonic mist; one soaked in menace and brewing industrial toxicity speared by one way to hell coverincreasingly intimidating beats and an asylum bred laugh. As soon as it has comfortably coaxed attention and intrigue from its recipient the band expels a squall of heavy duty rhythms and equally muscular riffs stalked magnetically by the shadow dwelling keys and malevolent vocal growls bred in even darker places. The track does not go for the jugular but instead bears its full weight upon the senses to immerse the whole of the listener and thoughts within a bruising and merciless yet seductive pestilence. With a deceptively contagious chorus and a just as virulently tempting swagger to its stride, the song initially does not make the same immediate impression as many tracks on the album did but with startling imagination and twists, like the excellent full stringed almost folky lure crafted by the guitars, the encounter evolves and increases its persuasion through its first and definitely across multiple returns. It is a slow burner in many ways but soon finds the flint to spark an enthusiastically hungry appetite for its bold adventure.

The track is accompanied by Death and Madness, an onslaught which carves a swifter impact on and submission from the passions to reinforce the thrilling potential and striking evolution of sound as presented in One Way To Hell. Production is less precise and clean on the second track which only adds to the throaty lure offered by the bass and mutually predacious guitar riffs punctured by just as threatening rhythms. Coursing with infection dripping grooves and rabid hooks, as well as dangerously alluring melodic seducing from the keys, the track is an epidemic of incendiary pestilence and destructive enterprise woven with threads of wanton beauty and classical elegance. Masterful and creating an even greater creative alchemy than its impressive co-provocateur, the song is a towering predator and excuse for all newcomers to check out the uncompromising might of Project Silence.

https://www.facebook.com/projectsilenceband

8.5/10

RingMaster 11/12/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Desolation Yes!: Out of Orbit

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Reaping the essences of electro, pop, punk, and rock with many other fiery whispers of sound in the mix, Scottish / Slovakian band Desolation Yes! has released their new album, a collection of songs which rampage with a hunger and instinctive need to provoke and confront. Out of Orbit is a release which perfectly satisfies with infectious enterprise and compelling energy, though at times it struggles to truly ignite the passions. Upon it though the band is experimenting and stretching their diversity with open imagination which is never a bad thing.

The Glasgow based quartet found an escalation in interest in 2008 when the band began working on their debut album, CyberNation with Scottish independent record label Neon Tetra Records, which was released in 2010. The singles Templeton/Instinct (2007) and Future Pop (2008), which subsequently appeared on the album, found a strong reception and soon found extensive radio play to set up the album release as well as a wealth of impressive reviews whilst the band shared stages with the likes of The Whip, Crystal Castles, Alec Empire, Howling Bells, NoMeansNo, Simian Mobile Disco, Jubilee, and Mortiis. 2011 saw the current line-up of Paul Elliott (vocals/synth/programming), Jagged (guitar/programming), Miro Cuba (drummer/percussionist/synth), and Shisho (bass), begin work on Out of Orbit which easily gives evidence of the time and thought the band put into it.

The album explodes with a bang in the ear through opener Shivers and the following Atrophy, both sinewy charges of electro rock with industrial and pop teasing. The opening song initiates contact with electro pulses and taunts before stretching into a rampant surge of bulging basslines and coarse riffs loaded with the expressive vocals of Elliott. The song brings restraint to its charge at times to allow a breath to be taken before the high tempo riot resumes but by its end the listener is found breathless and enthused about the prospects of the album ahead. The following Atrophy unleashes a more electro voice though throughout the guitars and bass add a snarl and bite to the synth driven wash whilst the beats of Cuba resonate with power across bone and senses. Both songs have an over powering feel of Wall Of Voodoo about them, in sound and in inventive use of aural colours.

From such an impressive start maybe a drop in intensity and temptation was to be expected and despite the likes of One and Silence being accomplished and satisfying songs they do suffer alongside their predecessors. It was a tall order to contend with and the first with its slight Placebo/ Stan Ridgway tasting stroll and the second with its emotive lure both are pale in comparison though as stand-alone songs find a firmer hold.

Repent with its Axis Mundi like mischief and industrial/trance like rock and frantic gait lifts things once more though lyrically it passed by only raising an eyebrow at its lyrical intent. Musically the song is an urgent and forceful agitator to get the pulse rate up once again, if still adrift from previous heights, and is soon backed up by the growl of Radio. From this moment the album slips in a punk attitude vocally and bite musically which fully grabs a returning intensive attention and appetite.

Army Of Flesh is an intriguing soundscape of militant drums and dramatic keys with image evoking cinematic samples filling its suggestive air. It is an excellent track which firstly exposes further diversity in the song writing and imagination of the band whilst its climactic vocal repeat of the title offers a Theatre Of Hate inspiration which in turn ignites thoughts and emotions in the listener.

Hitting the dancefloor with a brewing tempest of electro pop and thick imposing ambience, Psychoelectrical coats the senses in a testing expanse of industrial/synth rock with rich rewards showering from its melodic skies and burly veins whilst the closing pair of Tech and America ensures the release departs with a couple of challenging and provoking slices of punk electro power.

Desolation Yes! and Out of Orbit leave strong satisfaction and enjoyment behind if also a sense it missed an opportunity to exploit greater heights and fires within the listener. Very worthy of checking out though followed by multiple returns

www.desolationyes.com

7/10

RingMaster 04/03/2013

Theatre Of Hate