Psykokondriak – Gloomy Days

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Offering anarchic imagination and musical unpredictability is French rockers Psykokondriak, a band, to use a term in their new album’s press release, which “is a sixheaded hydra, a rock ‘n roll and hip-hop chimera.” They are also an encounter which on the evidence of Gloomy Days leaves a grin on the face and spirit as its parade of deranged adventures posing as songs spring inescapable fun fuelled incitements.

The band’s sound is like a mix of Hollywood Undead, Beastie Boys, Toumaï, and Red Hot Chili Peppers; groove infested and as funky as a swingers party and all led by a voraciously infectious hip hop devilry. Formed in 2006, Psykokondriak went through numerous line-up changes before releasing debut EP Hôpital Psykotrip six years later. Mid-2014 saw the current line-up in place, MC’s Y.B. (aka Mc Body) and Braeckman (aka Mc BOY) linking up with guitarist Tristan Florin (aka Docteur Florkin), bassist Cédric Desneulin (aka le comte Eskarfesse), drummer Aurélien Desneulin (aka L’empereur Mark Oreill), and DJ Julien Delville (aka DJ Stam Iff). Following an appearance on the Christmas compilation album Walt the Fuck last year, Gloomy Days is the sextet’s biggest nudge on attention and result of the band expanding their sound, a release with numerous familiar aspects and fiercely enjoyable and unique exploits.

Introducing the Body Boys is the short entrance into the album, the vocalists announcing themselves and the forthcoming adventure as sturdy strikes of sound engage in ear pleasing coaxing as turntables sizzle. It leads straight into Psyko Waltz, Pt. 1, a continuation in sound and style of that initial invitation. The bass instantly sets out on a funk infested grooving as vocals bounce around, a lure entangled in sonic interplay as swinging beats entice a tempest of twists and raw energy. The track easily recruits ears and appetite for its somewhat recognisable sounds yet individual character of imagination which in turn only develops and expands as the track continues to grow. By its closing, the track is as heavy and invasive as a Korn meets (Hed)p.e. proposal and as enjoyable.

The Fine Art of Terror follows, thrusting hungry riffs and funk bred grooves through ears as vocal declaration and predacious attitude drive the energy and character of the excellent encounter. Again hips and feet are swiftly gripped by the creative and contagious drama escaping Psykokondriak, the band raging and swinging with matching dexterity before Workless Dance opens up its inescapable flirtation with wiry hooks and vocal revelry. In no time the track is a festival of lean grooves and thicker expulsions, at times carrying the scent of a Primer 55 or at other moments exploring something akin to 633 meets Crazy Town, every second leading to an unexpected turn.

A similar template provides the canvas for Monstros Incorporantes next; punk rock, metal, and hip hop colliding in a jungle of swiping beats, predacious bass and guitar grooves, and vocal infectiousness. Again familiar elements entangle fresh enterprise as the track grips ears and bodies before the brief cinematic instrumental interlude of Gunfight Helicopters sets up the raucously psychotic Think It Up. Like Flea and co losing their sanity as early Faith No More interferes, the deranged engagement jumps around like its feet are burning on hot creative coals, again the imagination as hooked as ears on Psykokondriak’s fun soaked bedlam.

The album’s best track comes next, Spookadelic Fever Mansion opening with much of the classic Alfred Hitchcock TV show intro before sauntering into an aural spook fest of swaying rhythms aligned to a low slung bassline. With its cartoonish swagger and the rapacious aggression which blossoms in certain moments, it plays like a Scooby Doo meets Beetlejuice soundtrack while lyrically snarling. The track is glorious; reason enough to take a look at Psykokondriak and quickly backed up by Hot Day Hotter Night and its funk stroll with moments of climactic eruption and anthemic vocal roars; it all simply impossible not to get thickly engaged in.

Closing on the dark strains of Unherited Culture, a track reminding a little of nineties UK band Honky but exploring its own experimental and threatening shadows, Gloomy Days simply hits the spot for something fresh and exciting. Musically at times it is not the most unique yet every recognisable aspect is countered and surpassed by moments of imagination and craft masked as lunacy.  Whether Gloomy days will break Psykokondriak into new hungry spotlights time will tell but it will definitely recruit a horde of new fans with us to the fore.

Gloomy Days is out now across most online stores and streaming @ https://psykokondriak.bandcamp.com/album/gloomy-days

https://www.facebook.com/Psykokondriak

Pete RingMaster 01/09/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Law 18 – Self Titled

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There is little we can tell you about Italians Law 18 beyond that they come from Milan, were formed in 2011, and are a quintet playing “hardcore groove /crossover stoner”. Actually there is one more thing, and that is that they recently released their self-titled debut album and it is one slab of deranged rock ‘n’ roll that we for one have become increasingly fond of.

That description of their sound is lifted from the band’s Facebook page and only tells part of the story, a small clue to the off-kilter fusion of styles the band weave into their compelling creative revelry. Across the album’s nine tracks, you will find everything from groove and nu metal to thrash and hardcore, stoner and punk through to funk and plenty of other bold strains of sound.  Its songs are raw and inventive, ranging from psychotic and quarrelsome to eccentric and tenacious, very often all at the same time, and for the main compelling fun.

The album opens with Dwarfs & Cowboys and an immediate mesh of rich grooves and punkish vocals led by Alessandro ‘Ale’ Mura. Bold rhythms align with Lorenzo ‘Pero’ Perin’s riffs to add thick aggression whilst lead guitarist Davide C springs sonic tendrils into the tempest, a mix which bullies and entices like a mix of Pantera and Suicidal Tendencies as the track develops. It is a relatively straight forward offering but prone to contagious thrash bred surges of intensity amidst sonic drama, each becoming more volatile and extreme with every passing second.

The following You Blind is similarly sculpted but with a swifter eagerness to show its instincts in pushing its boundaries and infusing broader textures of sound and flavours. Hardcore and metallic voracity unite as the initially band prowls before launching a torrent of rapacious grooves and rhythmic agitation upon the senses. It subsequently eclipses its strong predecessor before being outshone itself by Hollow Earth Society. From the initial grazing of guitar and the predacious beats of drummer Luca Ferrario, the song has ears and attention gripped, more so when it slips into an unpredictable web of warped sounds and imagination from its early bout of muscular rock ‘n’ roll. The new and riveting enterprise uncaged is unmistakably System Of A Down inspired and quite irresistible, even with its familiarity to the Californian band, as Law 18 infuse their peculiar strains of heavy and anthemic textures.

art_RingMasterReview The dramatic invention continues with Dominus Caeli, a track opening with a flirtatiously seductive bassline from Lorenzo ‘Tarzan’ Colucci which then incites further jazz/funk exploits from rhythms and guitar. Like an abrasive fusion of Toumaï and Trepalium, the track grumbles and rumbles with punk lined irritability whilst creating an unstoppable and virulent contagion of grooves and raucous aggression. Further building to a hungry prowl courted by unhinged vocal teasing, the song is a thrilling slice of rabid, in sound and invention, metal fired rock ‘n’ roll.

The bass of Colucci again provides a great start to the next track; its heavy pulsing growl the lure into Dirty of Blood and spark for another hellacious assault of hardcore fuelled raging before Leather’s Wreck shares its own expectations foiling landscape of creative bedlam. Both tracks in their contrasting lengths show more of the band’s striking imagination; the brief fury of the first slipping into a mischievous discord hued swagger for a great psyche twisting moment whilst the second provides a noise rock shaped avant-garde adventure. As raw and imposing as it is sonically and melodically seductive, the harmonica skills of Mura excelling with its bluesy expression against the similarly hued guitar resourcefulness of Davide C, the track offers seven minutes plus of ear pleasing and imagination stirring incitement.

An addictive swing and stroll spines the anthemic persuasion of the following Mirror Reflections; its boisterous and pushy antagonism an uncompromising brawl of forceful punk ‘n’ roll. In time, it too evolves as rhythms spring into a demandingly infectious shuffle within post punk like scenery before returning to its tempestuous and bruising rampage of punk metal loaded rock ‘n’ roll.

Rage Against Me roars with defiance from every blues rock pore next as intrigue surrounds each turn in its bracing funk ‘n’ punk stomp. Driven by a grouchy stamping of its rhythmic feet and mass vocal irritability, there is no escaping its instinctive catchiness and highly persuasive ire or from the avalanche of riffs and crushing rhythms which shape closing track 2010. Unleashing a host of heavily spiced grooves, barbarous hooks, and a contagious energy which has bodies as involved as ears and imagination by the parade of vocal provocation across the band, the track is a maze of sonic invention.

It is a great close to an album which grabs attention from the off but really blossoms as a whole and excels in its individual elements with each subsequent venture into its frenzied rebellious world. Law 18 has sculpted something very worthy chunk of anyone’s time but especially for those with a taste for bold yet organic blurring of genre walls but still simply want unbridled rock ‘n’ roll.

Some bands and releases just seem to be on the same wavelength as personal creative adventure;

The Law 18 album is out now @ https://law18.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/Law18band/

Pete RingMaster 21/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Mercutio – Back To Nowhere

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It might not have the passions always ablaze throughout the length of its certainly compelling body, but Back To Nowhere, the debut album from Mercutio is a new acquaintance you only want to get to know better and of its creators, more about. The twelve track encounter is a tapestry of varied flavours and perpetually enticing enterprise with something for all varied tastes. At times it embraces a metal breeding, others moments a diverse rock seeding, whilst across its twelve tracks a host of other styles and flavours are zealously infused and entwined into its theatrical and fascinating adventure. The result in a collection of songs which raise the passions in varying degrees but all entice and captivate as they make up one thoroughly enjoyable proposition.

Italy hailing and now London based, the quartet of vocalist Mirko Petrini, guitarist Fabio Staffieri, bassist Emanule Nazzaro, and drummer Francesco Lucidi since forming in 2011, has increasingly garnered a potent following and reputation on the UK scene with their progressive weave of sound, earning supporters in the likes of Anna Phoebe and the Porcupine Tree’s Colin Edwin amongst a growing legion of fans along the way. Recorded with Andy Wright [Jeff Beck/Simple Minds] at the Assault & Battery Studio in London, with Gianluca Cucchiara co-producing, Back To Nowhere is the band’s strong and inviting nudge on broader attention and keener spotlights with a rich personality to back it up.

It opens up with Shed Your Skin, instantly soaking ears in drama and awakening the imagination with its opening build of sinister sound around the instantly alluring tones of Petrini. Just as quickly, the track unveils a bubbly funk underbelly to a brooding union of riffs, voice, and rhythms. Reminding of UK band Japanese Fighting Fish, it is a gripping entrance by song and release which only increases in persuasion as things get more creatively agitated and atmospherically darker, as well as virulently tempting. Within this the bass growls seductively as drums lay down anthemic bait, around both the guitar painting a suggestive proposal lit by the excellent vocals. Ravenous metal, heavy rock, avant-garde mischief, and indie enterprise is all in there with other hues equally catching ears and imagination alight.

Packshot BTN_RingMaster Review   The following album title track is as rousing and inventively exhilarating in its individual way, opening on a rock ‘n roll stomp before casting a weave of electronic and melodic rock endeavour gripped by the just as dramatic but controlled vocals. Its heart is warm and air symphonically painted with melodies that entangle the senses with emotive prowess, though shadows are always a constant flirtation too as things build to small and harmonic but potent crescendos throughout before A Part Of Me lays a calm acoustic hand on ears. Melancholic with an air of the ever present drama in songwriting and sound, the song is an increasingly bewitching offering which certainly is enjoyable on the first listen but something to get more enamoured with over every subsequent listen.

The flirtatious Anytime with its emotive breath within rugged rhythmic scenery forges a similar engagement next, its classic and melodic rock enterprise given greater potency by the rousing exploits of the rhythms, whilst Fake unleashes another ridiculously infectious and instinctively off-kilter treat to match the opener. At times Mercutio create sound and imagination that stalks the listener, a mix of flirtation and intimidating in the invention which here courts strands of alternative metal and darkly bred rock ‘n’ roll with bands like Pryapisme and Toumaï coming to mind. It is a trespass of sonic intrigue which, as in most songs, leads to catchy embraces of energy and tempting posing as a chorus.

The reflective balladry of No Compromise is a warmly engaging proposal next, its emotive hues wrapped in summery spices keeping satisfaction high even if it is still over shadowed by its predecessor. Nevertheless with a delicious stringed embrace and the ever impressing vocals of Petrini, pleasure is a sure thing and back in torrents through the voracious shuffle and invention of Hail The Night. Again Japanese Fighting Fish is the closest to describe the robust imagination and draw of the track, a dash of 6:33 and Faith No More also adequate hints to the rich and provocative rock ‘n roll courting ears.

Featuring an appearance by Colin Edwin, In Front of you romances and captivates next with a carousel of vibrant melodic invention which works its way to an even more thrilling stretch of rap/alternative metal where Skindred meets Muse might be a good comparison. The song just gets bolder and more unpredictable with each passing minute, its theatre engrossing and matched by the smouldering allure of Mother, another song growing into its skin and exciting ears more over numerous plays. In contrast the fuzzy triumph of Set Me Free has body and emotions enlisted in its volatile and invigorating stomp from the first breath, a tinge of grunge aligned to Queens Of The Stone Age spicing its boisterous nature for another pinnacle within Back To Nowhere.

Straight after The Ghost That Is You casts a more restrained and atmospheric roar of sound but one with tempestuousness to its emotion and invention which soon gets under the skin and leaves a healthy appetite just a touch more greedy before Reasons To Erase brings it all to a jazz/funk/classic rock swinging close. Some tracks hit the sweet spot straight away and others take longer to ignite a similar reaction, but ultimately all do as with the final track which despite some sensational moments steals most full admiration over a host of pleasing plays.

As suggested earlier with Back To Nowhere, Mercutio provides something for everyone with plenty of just as flavoursome sounds and moments to back each aspect up; at times they make you lustful for the album, other times just leave you fully content, but throughout the band inspire a want to hear more and more…

Back To Nowhere is out now via Diverge Records through most online stores.

http://www.mercutio.me/     https://www.facebook.com/officialmercutio/     http://twitter.com/InfoMercutio

Pete RingMaster 25/11/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

The Great Game – Self Titled

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It is a kaleidoscope of diverse sounds, a maze of unpredictable twists, and a tapestry of imagination bred adventure, but most of all, the self-titled album from The Great Game, is one captivating joy. Consisting of thirteen fascinating and invigorating celebrations of world bred sounds, the release is a delicious creative devilry which at times has the passions sighing in lustful pleasure and always has ears and imagination engrossed.

The band is the creation of Belgian composer and classical guitarist Mounzer Sarraf, and a union of musicians from across Europe, the Middle East, as well as North and South America. The band’s songs draw on the background and musical influences of each band member, entwining it all into exploits which defy precise description whilst creating aural travelogues which again embrace a myriad of flavours and styles in each individual creative emprise. Created from May 2014, when the full band came together for the first time, they make up one fun and mouth-watering introduction to The Great Game. Now released as a free download to “give as many people as possible the chance to get to know the music”, the band’s album is a fascinating and thrilling entrance by The Great Game.

The album opens with Science, and instantly has attention in its grasp with its opening electro like dance. It is a keen enticement which continues to coax ears as a warm caress of brass and the magnetic lure of rhythms unite with the instantly likeable tones of vocalist David Hastings. Its straight forward start is soon showing signs of unpredictability, warped essences teases in the background of Sarraf’s guitar enterprise and the continuing lively shimmer of Paul Chamberlain’s accordion which set it all off. Evolving through a blend of funk, jazz, and worldly sounds, to name just three of the textures, the song forcibly bewitches before making way for the rawer rock of Religionism. Crisp jabs from drummer Bruno Meeus and an understated but vocal bassline from the strings of Manuel Saez Canton shadow the scuzzier touch of Sarraf’s guitar. It is a tempting start if lacking the spark of its predecessor, but takes little time in welcoming flames of sax from Martin Fell and an animated stride into an emerging gypsy punk like proposal. Melodies and vocal causticity combine as a mellower rock croon also breaks out, it all again combining for a fluid and intriguing, not forgetting enjoyable encounter.

The Turning Of The Wheel Of Dhamma steps up next, its jazzy swing and rhythms a new twist in the album’s scenery. Vocally there is an intoxicated lilt whilst the guest trombone of César CD CoverRalleyguieb and trumpet of Jimi Garcia croon with melancholic expression within a smoky atmosphere. That sombreness is a deceit though, a creative smile and brass vivacity wrapping its charm around ears with an almost mischievous glint in their melodic eye. It is a bewitching offering, if one not quite holding its grip in the livelier finale, and matched by the folkish embrace of Television straight after. Featuring the lead vocals of Inbal Rosenblat, the entrancing song moves from a gentle sway into an energetic shuffle, ignited further by great and slightly psychotic backing vocals.

Another peak is hit with Bipolaroid next, the track initially a grunge seeded proposition bringing a feel of Tool to ears, which suddenly drifts into a second long quiet before returning with a psychotic look on its creative invention. It still roars with that grizzly rock breath and attitude but is soon discovering an agitation in its rhythms and a bedlamic character to its devilry, especially in the guitars and Fell’s blazing sax calls. Thoughts of French band Toumaï spring to mind at this point, the track an ingenious web of slightly disturbed twists and that fiery rock roar, vocally and musically.

Calm returns with the sultry Elhechizo De Hoy next, a kiss of Parisian charm blessed by the returning mesmeric vocals of Rosenblat alongside the more dour but as alluring tones of Hastings. Its endearing melodic flame brings a smile to ears and emotions whilst the fuzzier Poetry in Motion sparks another slither of greed in the appetite with its fusion of funk, reggae, and progressive pop. Featuring the also captivating voice of Medina Whiteman, the track dances with body and emotions, offering a flavoursome seventies tang to its appealing vivacity. Both songs are like melodic magnets and matched by the Eastern European spun revelry that is Hungarian Dream. Carrying a whisper of Les Négresses Vertes to its spicy melodies and especially its robust gypsy swing, the song transfixes ears and imagination whilst setting down another major moment in an already thrilling album.

There is that glimmer of real mischief in Pax Romana which sidles in next, guitar and bass a restrained devilment against the more solemn vocals. An essence of Yello also tints the swiftly riveting encounter though as the brass gently but vocally spread their heated expression, they spark a fiercer yet still controlled rock ‘n’ roll tenacity in the track’s heart. It like so many simply grips attention and emotions, though soon shaded a little by the sensational And The Blind Man Lead The Way. It opens with a reggae honed enticement, a UB40 like tempting, before digging into a fierce and raw rock sculpted bellow. It is the discord which flirts with vocals and hooks which steals the passions though, its angst fuelled derangement and the aligning raging, twisting a strong song into an inescapable favourite.

The enjoyable melodic and harmonic croon of Elemental Raven Storm comes next, another smouldering landscape of reflective melodies and brass colour over a bracing and unpredictable canvas of rhythms and enterprise. With a seriously compelling vocal climax, the track departs for Slave Magic, an enthralling mix of rock and blues colours. It might not quite light the flames as previous songs but burns away with craft and enticing endeavour to ensure ears and thoughts are fully satisfied.

Final track is The Great Game. Listed as a bonus CD track on our promo but included on the download version too, the closing is a solid shuffle of melodic and vocal invention combined with a jazzy pop crooning. It can be described as The Tom Tom Club meets Spandau Ballet in some ways, and again offers a pleasing companionship though not quite on the par with anything before it. Nevertheless it is a good end to a great release from a band already facing an eagerness to hear more from.

The Great Game has a sound with something for everyone, though arguably that might also be a hindrance in their appeal for some who want more stable offerings. Safe to say though that this is a band we will welcomingly be hearing a lot more of and easy to suspect with increasing clamours of acclaim and eagerness.

The Great Game is available now on CD and as a free download from http://www.the-great-game.com/

https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Great-Game/255555954610404

RingMaster 17/03/2-15

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

 

 

 

Trepalium – Damballa’s Voodoo Doll

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They can try to call it groove metal, progressive metal maybe, or even avant-garde death metal, but quite simply the Damballa’s Voodoo Doll EP is swing metal in all its fresh faced glory. The six track dance of voracious metal rabidity and ridiculously virulent contagion is the new hex cast by French metallers Trepalium, a band no strangers to unleashing some of the most blistering and imagination stretching extreme metal over the past decade. French metal is in the midst of an innovative heyday right now, with seemingly every corner offering a new proposition to devour. It is also producing some of the most startlingly inventive proposals, unique experimental /avant-garde offerings from the likes of 6:33 and Carnival in Coal through to Pryapsime, Hardcore Anal Hydrogen, and Toumaï. One of the most rabid and nastily inventive of them all is Trepalium and their death metal bred sonic pestilence.

The band across four albums has persistently pushed their and metal’s boundaries with a raw hunger to infest viciousness with a seductive multi-flavoured originality, an intent bearing the most compelling fruit on Damballa’s Voodoo Doll. Cloaked in the allure of arcane mysticism and bursting with the tenacity and energy of vintage New Orleans jazz and swing, the EP is a nonstop stomp through fiercely grasping shadows and insidious black-hearted temptations, commanding feet and emotions like a maniacal puppeteer.

Voodoo Moonshine sets the sorcery in motion, a violent barroom the scene for big imposing and alluring beats to tone up ears and appetite ready for the salacious flames of brass and the throaty vocal malevolence of Cédric ‘KK’ Punda. His tones, as the music comes with a swagger, a demonic confidence which even in short grunts has intimidation and temptation dripping from every sound. The guitars of Harun Demiraslan and Nicolas Amossé are soon spinning a web of grooves and swing induced revelry, every flirtation and melodic toxin embraced in the rhythmic contagion of bassist Ludovic Chauveau and drummer Sylvain Bouvier. Embraced in the seductive heat of a full complement of brass and caressing keys, the track is a festival of sound and creative devilment, like a brawling romance between Gojira and Cherry Poppin’ Daddies with Destrage and Mucho Tapioca in close attention to give some hint of its infectious alchemy.

Talking of the first of those bands, Gojira’s Joseph Duplantier appears on the following title track, another taking a mere breath to enthral with its swinging 30’s big bandUpdatedArtwork like entrance clad in a just as immediately imposing and ferocious but catchy aggression. As in its predecessor, grooves bind and vein the track like vines, creeping deep into the passions and psyche as keys conjure their own individual demons. Imagination and emotions are just as swiftly inflamed by the villainous tapestry of sound, every unpredictable note and twist as well as boozy growl, an epidemic of incitement, though it is soon over run by the dark majesty of Possessed by the Nightlife. Twenties seeded keys paint the landscape before beats and riffs prowl and lurch up on the senses, their danger and menace as inescapable as the anthemic bait provided by the increasingly punchy rhythms. The song is brutal and uncompromising. from the pestilential tone of the bass to the barbarous predation of the guitars a merciless threat but again pure viral addiction leaving feet exhausted and thoughts ignited.

     Guédé Juice provides its own enslaving irreverence next, rhythmic swings and acidic grooves the frame to dirty jazz colours and a feverishly sultry climate of enterprise and creative rapacity. By the end of the song exhaustion and bliss are in overload and the spell keeps being casted as Fire on Skin broodily appears. Offering an opening impression or certainly the spark to thoughts of Creole like prohibition and dark magic in an embrace of the Dirty Thirties, the track is a muggy affair initially before the fetid mists part and the band bursts through with a metal driven rampage. Still employing eruptions of jazz endeavour, the track roars and bellows with extreme metal hostility and melodic rock enterprise, though it is a devious savaging as again there is a swing to much of its intensity and a venom which simply seduces body and soul.

The closing Blowjob on the Rocks spills its own dangerous persuasion to being the release to a mighty conclusion. There is a shadow and underlying animosity to the track, a seeming secret which flirts with ears and imagination throughout as the fully stocked brass persuasion spreads a weave of tangy intrigue and noir lit drama. It is a dark theatre only enhanced by the spicy nature and invention of the guitars, the trapping weight of the rhythms, and the treacherous elegance of the keys.

Damballa’s Voodoo Doll is dangerous; it is bad for the health of the body with its ridiculously infectious tempting and lethal for the psyche with its serpentine seduction and mystique. Ultimately though, the EP is one of the most exhilarating and lustful things likely to be heard this year, the next, or whilst the sun still warms our souls.

Damballa’s Voodoo Doll is available now via Klonosphere @ http://www.klonosphere.com/trepalium/

https://www.facebook.com/TREPALIUMBAND/

RingMaster 10/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://www.thereputationlabel.today

 

In Love Your Mother – The Great Ape Project

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As well as holding gripping and inventive sounds, a song and release should be an adventure for ears and imagination to make the strongest connection, and they do not come more of a creative and challenging emprise than The Great Ape Project from Swizz trio In Love Your Mother. The album is a riveting and invigorating maelstrom of sound and deranged invention which leaves no stone unturned or bedlamic idea left in the shadows. Cramming eighteen songs in just over thirty minutes of creative mayhem means the album warrants and needs full attention so as not to miss any of the exhilarating drama within tracks which range from fourteen seconds to just short of four minutes in length. But the rewards are unrelenting and furiously imposing in one of the albums of the year.

Hailing from Zürich, the trio of guitarist/vocalist Valentin Baumgartner, bassist/vocalist Amedeo Mauriello, and drummer Andrea Tinner, unleash a sound which reaps the essences of mathcore and progressive metal and filters it through a vat of avant-garde, grindcore, and metalcore ingenuity. It comes out as a sound which can be best described as The Dillinger Escape Plan and System of a Down meets Destrage, Toumaï, and Kontrust yet isn’t like that either. It is a unique concoction which flirts and dances with senses as it brutalises them, and quite irresistible.

Themed by the sick and bad world our mothers warned us of, In Love Your Mother start the album and examination with The Mother Song. A thirty second tsunami of vocal causticity and rhythmic hostility speared by a sonic spite and toxic groove which all combines for a furious and concussive but appetite inflaming onslaught. Its swift assault is followed by the less intensive but no more lightweight 2116@#1916. It is immediately contagious, something alone impressive such its brevity of length, a slice of coarsely melodic and respectfully corrosive groove metal which slips agreeably before the vicious presence of We’re Gonna Dance Till Everyone Is Naked And Fallen Apart takes over. A metalcore canvas of vocals and maliciousness is soon twisted and bound in a weave of unpredictable and schizophrenic invention, the guitar of Baumgartner scything and spearing the heart of the tempest with breath-taking and psyche addling ingenuity. It is a manic endeavour matched by the swinging arms and prods of Tinner and the throaty creative predation of Mauriello. The longest song on the album, it explores and evolves with every second, bewitching and bewildering ears with almost hostile intent. The beauty of this and all songs, is the seamless and fluid transitions, one moment a bestial rampancy becomes a seductive croon and melodic embrace in another, all without a twitch of uncertainty or flex of ILYM_TGAP_albumcoverrandomness.

Johnny Rocket Is Not Dead launches its majestic uncompromising tirade next, grooves and bass temptation as eager and impacting as the vocal squalls and twisted sonic probing aligning to a rhythmic badgering. It is only one turn in the fifty second odd track though, as mentioned earlier every chord and jab of drums the detour to new and generally enthralling bliss, as evidenced no more potently than in Signs Of A Medium Life which splits the two parts of the title track. A hardcore/grind fuelled provocation, the track savages and pounds on the senses from the off. Riffs and beats show no mercy within the stalking gait of the song nor the blistering vocal roar which also has some restraint in its confrontation. Through the storm though, there are small and larger slithers of inventive majesty which enthral as much as the bruising thrust of the song.

The two bits of The Great Ape Project grab the hunger inspired already by band and album, but are swiftly surpassed by the brilliance of the also two parted Wish Me An Ocean, the first of its two scintillating movements a furnace of sonic fire and blistering psychotic beauty steered superbly by bass and drums. From the hasty senses foraging of its counterpart and the haunting piano sculpted drama of Drop The Back Of The Line, In Love Your Mother ignite another major blaze with Signs Of A Real Life. Striding forcibly with rhythmic and sonic nostrils flaring, the track soon slips into something more cantankerous and intimidating, crawling over senses and thoughts with a rabid breath and bestial intensity. It is just one border of the landscape though, an exotic melodic insanity blooming before a final fury emerges.

Through the thrillingly deranged, slightly post punk/noise rock spiced The Disco Fish, the melodically searing and perfectly crazed Inhale, and the restful and emotionally unbalanced Wish Me An Ocean Part 0, the album continues to engross and disorientate. But it is all just an appetiser for the pinnacle of the album, which is the song In Love Your Mother. With its first touch, a ridiculously addictive groove which only intensifies its lure as it is joined by rampant beats and a pleasingly varied vocal persuasion, the track is pure sonic and inventive alchemy. Demanding and infectious, imposing and wantonly accessible, it is a bargain for the soul made of the devil, a term which applies to the whole of the album.

The Hedgehog is more pure in its assault, its extreme metal rabidity direct and untethered yet still veined by a sonic enterprise to spellbind ears and thoughts. Its potent success is emulated by the inhospitable but irrepressibly catchy Ein Hase, Zwei Haese. With a swagger which only inflames its savagery and warped ingenuity equally, the track is a twisted mouth-watering blaze of unpredictability and extreme metal maliciousness to linger over.

Closed by the lo-fi folk croon of a track simply called Outro, The Great Ape Project is a sensational introduction to a band with the potential and invention to turn metal on its head at any time. The release is one of the real triumphs of the year and deserves the fullest of attention.

The Great Ape Project is available now @ http://www.cduniverse.com/productinfo.asp?pid=9357440

http://www.inloveyourmother.com

RingMaster 10/10/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://audioburger247.webs.com/

 

Expain – Just The Tip

EXPAIN - Promo Photo

With rich flavour to every unpredictable twist and imaginative exploit within feverishly inventive designs, Just The Tip, the debut album from Canadian band Expain, is one ruggedly captivating proposition. As evidenced by the release, Expain cast a sound which is a mouthwatering web of thrash cultured melodic death metal infused with everything from jazz to progressive metal. It makes for a gripping and compelling capture of the imagination though for the moment the band falls slightly short of igniting a lustful blaze of passion for its persuasion, especially when placed against recent releases from the likes of Destrage, Hardcore Anal Hydrogen, and Toumaï. Nevertheless band and album are fuelled by a potential and technical craft which simply bewitches and ensures Expain is smack bang in the middle of attention’s radar.

Hailing from Vancouver, the band has earned a strong reputation back home for their melodic ingenuity within that virulently aggressive thrash bred voracity, a blend bursting across every second of Expain’s first merciless onslaught. Their full-length actually follows an EP released under the name The Almighty Excruciating Pain in 2012, the seeds to the impressive incitement of Just The Tip. Produced by Matthew Roach, the release is a potent starting block for a suspected highly promising and fruitful horizon for the five-piece.

The instrumental Bacchus opens up the creative adventure, its melodic colour and enticing within a subdued but evident snarl a hint of EXPAIN - Just The Tip - Album Coverwhat is to come, a suggestion swiftly unleashed with the following Aggressions Progression. From its opening firm rhythmic framing around progressive hues and sonic enterprise, the song has ears and thoughts fascinated. The coarse vocal squalls of Daniel Brand entwine their venomous yet welcoming hues amongst the spellbinding weave of guitar play from Pat Peeve and Eric Morrison, a captivating emprise matched by the throaty string craft of bassist Nikko Whitworth. The track is a mighty full opening, showing everything you need and wish to know about the band’s intent and ingenuity of songwriting and performance. It is a constant evolution of ideation and at times mischievous unpredictability which is emulated almost as scintillatingly in the next up Phoenix Writhing. The core charge of thrash inspire riffery and rhythmic antagonism is a powerful bait around which guitar imagination steals the show, though its shares the honours ultimately as a jazzy breather allows the bass to be just as spellbinding.

Both tracks irresistibly impress as does The King which comes in straight after upon an elegant cast of melodies before the irrepressible rhythms of drummer Ryan Idris lead the senses into a sinewed sculpted blaze of acidic short grooves and barbed persuasion. The song slips from its exciting opening into a more expectations feeding thrust but still provides a network of inventive twists and melodic metal flaming to stir up attention and appetite. It is a strong and extremely pleasing track yet lacks the spark of its predecessors as does Don’t Worry The Worst Is Yet To Come. Again the individual invention and skill is breath-taking whilst the small turns and imagination foraging tenacity of guitars and bass are enslaving but it is the thrash spine which offers little new to chew over and lessens the impact of the songs.

The singular attack of the vocals is another element in which more variation is wished, to join the diverse creativity colouring songs, though admittedly Brand is excellent in his delivery and passionate provocation. It does mean though that at times he loses out to the sparkling and potent endeavour elsewhere, as shown with the excellent Idol Worship where guitars seize attention resourcefully supported by great bass and drum incitement. The track and its successor Allegiance To Pain also avoid providing something which is equally never offered by songs and album, and that is to really explore an avant-garde territory which certainly the second of this pair does pleasingly hints at. Song and release does flirt with that bold diversity and adventure across its impressive body but never quite goes into the heart of inventive ‘mania’ which those bands previously mentioned embrace. It is still one of the pinnacles of the album though and gives another reason to suspect that the band is going to become a big force.

Both the seductively prowling Manatee and the predacious Headbang Your Head Off keep ears and emotions employed, the first a blackened waltz of melodic revelry and rhythmic barracking whilst the second is a torrent of disorientating beats and dazzling sonic lures which never standstill or allow a breath to be taken. Vocally too the song sees Brand at his strongest and most gripping, if again diversity is scare whilst the bass of Whitworth shows its presence to be potently inspiring within the thicker mesh of beats and grooved invention.

Completed by A.T.M. with its spicy acidic veining and the contagiously rapacious Eating A Beating Heart, the album leaves a lingering and contented hunger entrenched in thoughts and emotions. Some of the songs certainly need close attention to separate them within the context of the album but singularly all present a magnetic and riveting evocation of sound and craft. Just The Tip is an easy recommendation with plenty for fans of everyone from Megadeth to Municipal Waste, Revoker to Death, as well as those more experimental propositions previously talked of to be excited by. Expain will be a major thrill in our ears and using the reasoning of their great debut, it is expected to be sooner rather than later.

The self-released Just The Tip is available now @ https://expainband.bandcamp.com/album/just-the-tip

https://www.facebook.com/Expainmetal

8/10

RingMaster 24/06/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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