Unified Past – Shifting The Equilibrium

Unified Past_RingMaster Review

The two years between previous album Spots and its successor Shifting The Equilibrium has taken US progressive rock band Unified Past to a new level. It is fair to say that previous offerings from the band have garnered acclaim and impressed, especially the excellent Spots but the band’s new album is a stirring adventure in songwriting, sound, and imagination which walks a new plateau. The time has also seen the trio of guitarist/keyboardist Steve Speelman, drummer Victor Tassone, and bassist Dave Mickleson expand with the addition of vocalist Phil Naro, another potent new breath to the Unified Past temptation.

Formed in 1984 by Speelman and Tassone, New York hailing Unified Past has increasingly garnered acclaim with their rich mix of sound and live presence. A sextet of albums over the years has earned the band the reputation of being one captivating and fiercely accomplished proposition, each release, as Spots to Shifting The Equilibrium, seeing sound and band grow in craft and invention, not forgetting success. Equally individual experiences has seen original band members working and playing with the likes of Chief Big Way, Belladonna, The Colin Tench Project, Oceans 5, and Reaching Ground Project. Naro too has a spicy pedigree behind him having worked with Peter Criss, Lou Gramm, Carmine Appice, Billy Sheehan, and Brian May amongst many. More impressively though is the creative and musical unity the foursome have developed; Spots impressed but Shifting The Equilibrium comes with a new roar of striking invention.

artwork_RingMaster Review The album begins with Erasure Principle, a flight of melodic exploration across a sinew woven landscape. From its first breath crystalline keys lay an inviting haze within which the guitar spins a web of sonic enticement. Straight away there is scent particular to Unified Past washing the track and the emerging tapestry of sound, a flowing fusion of seventies and eighties rock with a modern progressive imagination. Naro swiftly impresses as a new vibrancy from his voice hits the song and sound, his tones dramatic yet honed to sit perfectly with the music around him. Inspirations to Unified Past include artists such as Dream Theater, Rush, Yes; each open spices to the album but as here, primarily just adding rosy hues to the band’s own distinct endeavour.

It is a potent start to the release but soon eclipsed by the even more striking Smile (In the Face of Adversity). Keys again bring that colour of nostalgia to the expressive weave of guitar whilst vocals melodically seduce as a quickly bred drama stirs ears and appetite with an epic tone merging intimidation and fiery beauty into the diverse kaleidoscope of sound and craft shaping the outstanding track. Keys wise a whiff of The Stranglers’ Dave Greenfield adds to the perpetually blooming excitement and theatre, but as in all proposals within the album, everywhere you look and turn the quartet is creating an intricately involved, fiercely imaginative, and wholly contagious incitement.

Etched in Stone takes over next with an orchestral air to the creative intimacy of its persuasion, again the band skilled at mixing contrasting layers and depths of sound as Naro reveals the lyrical heart. The bass of Mickleson is seriously compelling, its dark grouchy tone a predacious edge to the captivating maze conjured by Speelman via guitar and keys. The further into its adventure the imagination goes the more cosmopolitan and mystical the song becomes, a middle eastern flavouring joining the endearing bait offered throughout and though it is an eleven minute flight, such its rich and busy invention, the track seems over in a flash.

It is a fascinating quality to all tracks, their meaty lengths more like fleeting moments as busy adventure grips ears from within the whole emprise of Shifting The Equilibrium, the slightly shorter Peace Remains in the World another example as its Tool meets Porcupine Tree meets Pink Floyd like tempestuous calm, hooks and seduces ears and appetite from start to finish. A carnivorous funk tempting from Mickleson especially hits the spot, its creative belligerence matched by the resourceful swings of Tassone as melodies, acidic and warm, entangle around them.

The instrumental majesty of Deviation from a Theme (of Harmonic Origin) transports the listener into an exotic labyrinth of suggestiveness and provocative sound, proving that it is not only the addition of Naro which has been a blossoming aspect to the Unified Past proposal.

The album is completed by the vast soundscape of Today is the Day, a bewitching enticing of melodic scenery and evocative textures in a constantly evolving experience for song and listener. Like a link-up between Yes and Voyager, it is an enthralling and gripping end to a mighty temptation.

It is weird to say after the length of the time that Unified Past has been around and frequently impressing so many, that Shifting The Equilibrium is a coming of age to the band’s sound but in some ways it is though. Bottom-line though is that it is a highly flavoursome and skilfully varied slice of progressive rock hard that even more are going to get a potent kick out of.

Shifting The Equilibrium is out now digitally and on CD via Melodic Revolution Records @ http://melodicrevolutionrecords.com/album/shifting-the-equilibrium

http://www.unifiedpast.com/Unified_Past  https://www.facebook.com/Unifiedpast

Pete RingMaster 24/11/2015

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Deadly Circus Fire – The Hydra’s Tailor

DCF_RingMaster Review

Casting a creative and impassioned roar which just gets richer and more compelling with every listen, The Hydra’s Tailor is a majestic beast of an album; a release that invasively seduces and cantankerously snarls. The second album from UK metallers Deadly Circus Fire, it has been the source of much attention and highly enthused praise already, so time we thought to get involved in its acclaimed proposal and fair to say disappointment was not on the agenda.

Fusing persistently unpredictable explorations of progressive metal and rock with just as magnetically carnivorous textures, The Hydra’s Tailor is already no stranger to drawing keen attention, just like the band’s debut album The King and the Bishop which was heartily embraced by fans and media alike. Drawing on inspirations such as Tool, Mastodon, and Deftones, the London based Deadly Circus Fire laid down a fiercely inviting teaser for this their latest emprise of sound and imagination through a couple of eagerly welcomed singles and since their release, they have signed with Musicarchy Media for the release of the crowd-funded, The Hydra’s Tailor as well as share stages with the likes of Crossfaith, Funeral For a Friend, and Bleed From Within across the UK and Europe. Right now they are lighting up European venues supporting Skindred on their Pump Up The Volume tour, just as The Hydra’s Tailor does the same to ears and speakers.

Artwork_RingMaster Review     The album starts with In Darkness We Trust, its keys spawned melancholic air embracing the immediately enticing and impressing voice of Adam Grant. The duet is bewitching, a solemn yet magnetic coaxing into the heart of the album and second track Animal. Riffs instantly begin prowling ears as it opens up predatory scenery, vocals again a potent enticement as the firm swings of drummer Paul Igoe resonate and the guitar of Save Addario spins expressive sonic enterprise around the still ravenous riffery. Grant again strikes with compelling vocals, his presence backed as resourcefully and potently by the tones of Mike Enort, whose basslines are no slouch when it comes to casting dark temptation either. Whereas the opener was a minimalistic treat its successor shows the shape of things to come with its unpredictable and seamlessly diverse landscape, it also a triumph in its own right.

The following Where It Lies expands from an acoustic flirtation into another mesh of wiry guitar tendrils and emotive flames, ebbing and flowing in aggression and intensity but relentlessly seducing in charm and adventure. As vocal craft and imagination shadows every step made by the ideation building the track, a scent of bands like Circles and Palms lay upon the fascinating encounter, Karnivool too in the song’s mellower moments but all spices to something already showing Deadly Circus Fire uniqueness.

Victim is another entering with an antagonistic glint in its creative eye, rhythms and riffs aligning their rapacious natures as Metallica-esque grooves line the emerging tempest. This time there is a whisper of bands like Bloodsimple and Lamb of God to another song which needs little prompting to evolve into new pastures of tenacious ideation and compelling craft, subsequently an air of Porcupine Tree and Tool just as suggestive across the outstanding incitement.

Another pinnacle comes with the stunning blaze of Devil’s Opera, a track as infectiously catchy as it is mouth-wateringly involved. It takes ears, emotions, and the imagination on a heady ride of united enterprise and individual exploration, a flight which twists and turns with an inventive turbulence that only ignites the appetite to greedier intent towards album and band. It is a forceful yet respectful invasion of the senses continued in Rise Again, it too aligning riffs and rhythmic rabidity with a fire of sonic invention and emotion driven melodic expression guided by the superb voice and delivery of Grant.

The brief instrumental tempting of Martyrs provides a relaxation for the senses next and a new spark for the imagination to play with before the exceptional House of Plagues groans and grinds ears with guitar endeavour around an enjoyably volatile blend of vocals. That bestial intent continues as melodies catch flame and rhythms jab with the stealth of a predator, all contrasts uniting in a scintillating emprise of emotive and provocative ingenuity, one that gets more ravenous and thrilling over each passing minute. Amongst so many within The Hydra’s Tailor that linger and relentlessly lure constant attention, as the album itself, the track is pure addictiveness as it takes best track honours.

Through the bold air and wonderfully fluid and varied tapestry of Aeden and the climatic atmosphere and soundscape of the album’s title track, The Hydra’s Tailor continues to enthral and tempt lustful reactions, its namesake another especially mesmeric blaze of dexterous songwriting and skills matched in sound. Both songs add thick layers to the epic nature of the album with the next up Turning the Tide equally as mighty with its agitated rhythms and sonic swirl of discontent. Equally within its stormy nature though, melodies brew, calm emerges, and bewitching harmonies entice to engross and excite before the turmoil returns in similarly exhilarating style.

The album is closed by the celestially lit, intensively aired Universe; a song which soars and bullies its way into ears and the psyche whilst leaving a great resonance and glow from its respective merger of harsh and tempestuous textures with absorbing beauty. The song is just masterful, repeating the major success cast before it across The Hydra’s Tailor with its own impressing adventure.

The good things heard and read about Deadly Circus Fire barely do the band justice, and now having been infected by The Hydra’s Tailor it feels safe to say if there are those yet to feel the power and prowess of the band the chance of finding reactions breeding the same kind of enthusiasm as us here, is high. There is only one way to find out of course and that is one of the heartiest recommendations made at The RR this year, go explore.

The Hydra’s Tailor is out now via Musicarchy Media @ https://www.musicarchymedia.com/project/the-hydras-tailor/

http://www.deadlycircusfire.com   https://www.facebook.com/deadlycircusfire

Pete RingMaster 17/11/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Dorje – Catalyst

Dorje _RingMaster Review

Catalyst is the perfect name for the new EP from UK rockers Dorje, its sound and songs the sure spark to major attention and a greedy appetite in a great many for the band’s inventively fiery sound. It is an offering lying somewhere sound wise between Soundgarden, Audio Slave, Alter Bridge, and Tool but with a freshness and invention which across its five tracks shows exactly why there is a rich buzz around the quartet.

Technically impressive and captivating with a sound built on rousing grooves and inflame melodic imagination, Dorje imaginatively draw on varied flavours from the likes of blues, jazz, metal, and a diverse mix of muscular rock ‘n’ roll. What emerges is a rich and enjoyable persuasion that is unafraid to merge recognisable hues and flavours into the band’s own skilful textures and magnetically resourceful enterprise. Catalyst roars with this impassioned recipe, and though it may not blow ears and the passions away, it certainly leaves a hungry appetite and intrigue for more in its wake.

DoejeCover-Bright_RingMaster Review   Written is first up upon the band’s second EP and straight away a guitar stirs up attention with its raw and slightly grizzled coaxing. In a swift breath or two, the dark throaty bass lures cast by Dave Hollingworth join the expanding flames springing from the of guitars of Rabea Massaad and Rob Chapman, with the latter’s vocals make an equally strong impression as they join the captivating sinew driven mix. The beats of Ben Minal cage it all in a restrained but potent frame as Hollingworth’s craft continues to be a dark magnet in a song blossoming an off-kilter and delicious passage of imagination soaked avant-garde adventure. It is a moment reinforcing early recognition of the great unpredictability which also lurks within the band’s potent tempting, a twist turning a strong track into something special especially as it continues to add riveting spice to the remainder of the impressive song.

The potent start continues with the EP’s title track, the song as its predecessor, making a controlled and alluring start but soon, once it has found its creative feet, brewing into and expanding into an imagination fuelled exploration. Admittedly the track never ventures as boldly as the opener but entangling familiar and fresh enterprise in a technically sculpted web of enticement only leaves ears and pleasure full; a hungry satisfaction wanting more and duly fed by Aeromancy. Encircling the senses in another maze of technical prowess and heavy rock predation as emotive as it is rapacious, the song blazes away as it takes the listener through its multitude of layers and robustly dynamic textures.

A more relaxed embrace and enticement comes with the excellent All next, the band creating an enthralling croon as provocative as it is progressively charming and holding a touch of UAE band Absolace and Porcupine Tree to its enticing flavouring. As expected, the song carries an attitude to its breath and predatory air to its invention which invigorates the warmer side of its infectious character, both sides closely colluding as the track works its way to a tempestuously compelling and exhilarating climax.

Closing track White Dove is a more formula heavy rock bait of sound which personally did not whip up the same excitement as those before it yet leaves only fill satisfaction behind with its old school meets grunge feel. It is an eager slice of the kind of rock ‘n roll which never fails to go down well though, an inflamed storm ensuring Catalyst leaves a potent last impression.

Dorje are cultivating something very flavoursome and indeed striking as the Catalyst EP powerfully reveals but equally there is open potential of broader and bolder things to come which means current rich enjoyment is leading to keen anticipation for what comes next, a reaction as ripe as the pleasure found in this new roar.

The Catalyst EP is out now via most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/dorjeband http://www.dorje.tv

Pete RingMaster 10/11/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Chainflower – The Broken & Lovely

chainflower_RingMaster Review

Earlier this year, we found ourselves treated to one ferocious blaze of compelling psyche twisting rock ‘n’ roll from US duo Chainflower, and now we have another from the same protagonist to sets ears and passions ablaze. The band’s new scorching persuasion is The Broken & Lovely EP, a thrilling successor to their outstanding and acclaimed self-titled debut EP. It is a two track offering just as impacting and gripping in its blend of varied rock flavours but has something extra to out shine its impressive predecessor. It is an indefinable essence that makes The Broken & Lovely EP eclipse a release whose songs we suspect might have been possibly written and also recorded at the same time as the new EP, but something to help Chainflower’s latest offering reach up to another plateau in songwriting and sound, not forgetting temptation.

S02_5x5.125_Sleeve.eps_RingMaster Review     Chainflower is the creation of guitarist and songwriter Kelly Wheeler, a veteran of the L.A. music scene who as well as having played with members of Jane’s Addiction and Tool in his career, uncaged his highly praised and supported bands SexTapes and Ultraject, the first which is now on hiatus, featuring long time Guns N’ Roses member Chris Pitman on lead vocals. Uniting with vocalist Erika Renee, who had ‘applied’ for the newly vacant vocalist spot in Ultraject at the time, the pair emerged as Chainflower and quickly got to work on the local live scene whilst joining producer and engineer Doug Grean (Stone Temple Pilots, Velvet Revolver, Scott Weiland, Sheryl Crow, Cyndi Lauper) to record that first EP.

A few months on and also recorded with Grean, The Broken & Lovely opens up with Lewd Blues which is instantly bewitching ears with its bluesy, almost intoxicated haze of guitar. Things only get spicier and more gripping as the distinctive tones of Renee unveil their lures and the song’s narrative, punchy beats, and a great grizzled bass tempting provided by Eliot Lorango add to the increasingly magnetic and sizzling seduction on offer. The grooves of Wheeler relentlessly wind around the senses and imagination, perpetually teasing the passions even when switching from a delta blues lined coaxing to seventies psych rock imagination, Renee all the time riding his weaves and sways like a surfer with her delivery.

Second song on the EP is Hell’s Roll; a more predatory stroll again coursing a fuzzy maze of guitar prowess covered by darker shadows conducted by the hefty but controlled swings of guest drummer Brandon Pertzborn. Never elevating from its riveting prowl, the track spins dark rock ‘n’ roll and dirty blues textures into its mystique kissed adventure of sound and vision, firmly holding ears and attention as enthralled as the imagination.

Like an endearingly twisted mix of My Baby, Karn8, and at times Morass of Molasses, both tracks just excite and inspire whilst reinforcing Chainflower as one rather thrilling proposition.

The Broken & Lovely EP is out now @ http://chainflower.bandcamp.com/album/the-broken-lovely


Pete RingMaster 22/10/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Between Waves – Paper Chain

Between  Waves Promo Shot_RingMaster Review

As debuts go in 2015, Paper Chain from Between Waves has to be one of the most enjoyable. There is also a rich fuel of potential to back up its striking introduction to suggest the South Wales quintet is not going to be a flash in the pan, indeed bringing five rousing highly accomplished tracks to awaken attention, the EP suggests it is only the first step to even bigger and bolder things ahead in its air.

Formed in 2013, Between Waves took little time in whipping up an eager local following, a support stretching further afield especially, more recently, through the video of their song Place To Fall. Now Paper Chain is ready to open up fresh lures with its national uncaging, a persuasion you can only see succeeding in stirring up new fans and appetites for Between Waves.

Paper Chain opens with its title track and swiftly has ears involved in a web of melodic and vocal tempting. The new upcoming single from the band, its first intricate coaxing is magnetic as guitar caresses blend with the swiftly apparent vocal prowess of Helen Page. It is an inviting union but with an edge which becomes more open as the darker hues of Andrew Gordon’s bass joins the crisp hits of drummer Grant Robinson and the sparkling enterprise of guitarists Richard and Lee Wood. As fascinating as it is quickly infectious with a prime central hook as delicious as the moody enticing of the bass, the track is like a body of water, sonically shimmering in melodic light whilst a more shadow rich undertow works away in the depths of its drama.

Print_RingMaster Review   It is a great captivating start that is instantly eclipsed by Revelation, and matched by the following Place To Fall. The first of this pair also opens with a tender hug of melodic and emotive warmth but is soon bringing a thicker weave of melodic metal seeded snarling and technical tenacity to the fore. Thumping beats add intimidation whilst the vocals simultaneously serenade as they roar within the song’s increasingly predatory nature. Departing on a reflective calm, the song passes the brewing greed for the release over to its successor, the third track upon Paper Chain again making its entrance in a gently resourceful manner. The current single from Between Waves, it is easy to hear why its success luring in support, the strength of Helen’s voice and delivery the perfect contrast to the simmering sounds and subsequent spark to their ascent towards a more aggressive and varied metal/rock tapestry.

The final two tracks on the EP ensure there is no dip in pleasure or impressiveness. The creative hostility of Deceiver is first, a contagion of addictive hooks and antagonistic invention incited further by Helen’s fiery tones and the great backing of Richard’s aggression thick vocals. As punchy and menacing as it is, the track equally bewitches with a melodic detour, an eye of the storm like moment as potent and suggestive as the rowdier climate around it.

Fathom brings the release to a mellower close though it too has crescendos of intensity and passion as soaring guitars and anthemic rhythms spring from the song’s atmospheric canvas. There is a familiarity to the track without any obvious reason and this only adds to the undiluted strength of its persuasion and presence, that and the individual prowess of the band and their want to be adventurous in songwriting, sound, and performance.

As you would always wish from a release, Paper Chain just sounds and feels bigger and better with every listen, at times justifying references to the likes of Lacuna Coil and Tool whilst creating their own if not yet distinct voice certainly a presence which stands away from the crowd. There could be a big future for Between Waves if they want it.

The Paper Chain EP is released October 23rd through all stores.

https://www.facebook.com/BetweenWaves  https://betweenwaves.bandcamp.com

Pete RingMaster 22/10/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Bold webs of adventure: taking a Deep Breath with One Year Delay

OYD2_RingMaster Review

A sound hard to pin down always excites the imagination more than most and equally ears it is hoped. Greek hard rockers One Year Delay have such a proposition bursting from their imagination and craft and as proven by debut album Deep Breath it does give ears and thoughts a thoroughly enjoyable time. Offering seven songs entwining flavours such as nu and alternative metal, grunge and punk rock amongst many spices, the release is a roller coaster of invention and perpetual success. Wanting to learn more about One Year Delay and their ear catching proposition, we had the pleasure of talking with the band, exploring their origins, the spark to their diverse sound, and the recording of Deep Breath along the way.

Hi and welcome to The RingMaster Review, thanks for sharing your time with us.

For newcomers to the band can you give some background to the forming and early days of One Year Delay?

(Nick) One Year Delay started as a band of a few friends with the same goal. To write some music that we love and play as many gigs as we can, to express themselves and fulfil our need for creativity! To cooperate with your friends to a purpose like this, I assure you, it is not easy. And that’s because we all have different influences of all kinds of rock and metal genres. But the result is a good mix of all those genres. And the most important thing for the listener is to understand is the social and economic circumstances that we live in, and finally inspire us to our lyrics and music.

Was there a particular spark or intent taken into the band as direction or simply attitude in those first days?

(Nick) The spark was, in a way, the difficulties that we experienced as a nation the last few years, but also the personal problems that all people have faced through their lives. But I have to mention, that the expressions of your feeling such as anger, despair, terror etc. to another person, even if it is a friend, is equally difficult as dealing with it! And that’s another spark that boned us. The expression of ourselves; not feeling vulnerable!

Apart from member changes, how has the band changed in its ideas and thoughts in regard to making music if at all over the past three or so years?

(George)The main factor of changing the course of our compositions was the realisation that we have nothing to lose if we at least try to play anything we are fond of, following no linearity. We are all attracted to bands that are not afraid to experiment. Gradually it grew in us and we decided to establish this fusion of genres. The upcoming compositions will prove this even more, you can count on that!

OYD_RingMaster ReviewWe can confirm that great diversity to your sound, the embrace of numerous styles; so this has more evolved over time or was also a vibrant element at the band’s start?

(George) Like most bands in the beginning of their venture, we started in a rather tight musical frame. If you love music in general you don’t wanna focus on a particular influence I guess. The way I personally see it, it’s like entering a buffet restaurant and picking one dish! We are probably the guys that will fill their plates with a little bit of everything! Nevertheless we try to match our variable tastes as good as we can, being aware at the same time how difficult and risky it might be.

So it is fair to say that this strong mix of flavours has organically grown with band’s members individual and varied musical tastes or is there an element of intention fuelling it too?

(Stavros) Both at the same time…All members have got different tastes, with heavy sound as the joining point. Under this point of view we wouldn’t be satisfied with, for example, a 100% thrash or 100%hard rock sound. We use the style of sound in order to achieve contradiction and we don’t restrict ourselves in terms of genres. Everything has to do with matching and we could use more extreme combinations in case we thought it blends well. This is what we like and if you consider each song as a painting we like using lots of colours in the palette…

How would you describe your music to simplify it for newcomers?

(Stavros) Our music is based on the element of surprise. Our intentions are obvious through the blend of atmospheric/melodic parts to more metal sounds. You can spot this in the genres that vary in Deep Breath. Still the most distinguished part of our intentions to surprise is the bridge part of the songs that is not borrowing any structural element of the previous parts. Surely I cannot exclude the part we picked for the introduction to the whole album (Gunpoint intro)

Are there any specific and major inspirations which you would say have particularly impacted on the One Year Delay sound or invention?

(George) The gamut is infinite…Here is an attempt to include some names, though it still won’t be very representative: Korn, Deftones, Metallica, Alice in Chains, Nirvana, Tool, Black Sabbath, Slayer, Primus, Faith No More and the list goes on and on… Now as far as the influence is concerned there can be tiny parts of songs or a musician’s particular style that inspired us. The list definitely expands to a broader musical scale.

You are of course from Greece, where to us on the outside it seems it is the extreme styles of metal which predominantly occupy the thoughts of new bands and fans there. What is the reality and how has home grown rock fans taken to your adventurous sound?

(George) That is true. Greek metal fans mostly appreciate the archetypical elements of speed, heavy sound, groove, etc., although this not a rule. Younger generations are willing to embrace newer, more radical forms of music. It is kind of early to estimate the level of approval currently since our debut album has just been released. We are feeling optimistic but we know that Greek crowd is a difficult one to please…

You went over to the US to record just released debut Album Deep Breath. How did the opportunity to travel to Nashville come about and why that decision? deep_breath_oyd_RingMaster Review

(Jack) Everything started when the band decided to record the debut album. Then Pete said “hey guys, wanna contact a very well-known producer?” We said yes, of course; after that we started sending emails and stuff until one day we received an email from Toby which said, “guys, I would love to produce your band,” so we went to Nashville! That comes out because Toby lives Nashville, but on the other hand Nashville is like the Mecca of music. It’s definitely the hottest destination for every kind of musician. That city has music exhibitions even at the airport; I personally think that this place can make you a better musician only by visiting it.

As you just mentioned you recorded the album with the legendary Toby Wright. How was that experience and how much did he help shape or maybe re-adjust your ideas for songs in the studio?

(Jack) Ok, Toby is a great person and a really, really good producer. The experience of working with a producer like him is absolutely amazing. He can make you a better musician only by telling you a simple idea; he knows his job in and out of the studio. He helped us play our own songs better and get the best possible results from us. He has the ability to approach you as a friend and a musical expert at the same time. It is not a common thing for a music star to combine these two facts, is it?

Was there anything which came out of the recording of Deep Breath which surprised you or you discovered which will be a strong help in your next recordings?

(Orestis) We managed to handle a difficult situation. For example, we are a band that made pre-production and production of an album at the same time! Pre-production procedure was very difficult for us. We were in Greece and Toby in the States so we had to work all our ideas through email so Toby could hear it and send back his remarks. It wasn’t live at the studio like “play this or change that,” but I think in the end we have done a very good job as a band and Toby as a producer and we learned our lesson; next time pre-production time will be in the studio hopefully!

As far I remember that time while we were in the studio recording Deep Breath, we were focused on the album trying for the best possible result, so the answer to the second part of the question is no. However, we had a perfect idea before production time which we thought we might have the time to develop and place it as the outro of the album, but eventually it didn’t work. Despite that, this flawless idea will develop into a whole song for our next album. I sense that the new one is a progression or an evolution of our “5m9k song.”

OYD3_RingMaster ReviewNow the album is out there will you be taking Deep Breath to ears via live shows?

(Orestis) Yes, our main objective now is to provide our sound and material live across the country, also hope to support large metal /rock acts from all around the world when they come to Greece and hope that we will have the opportunity to navigate across Europe and then maybe the world, you never know!

And next for One Year Delay?

(Sotiris) I think that the next thing for O.Y.D. is, of course, live concerts around Greece, Europe and the U.S. (we must pay our bills first). At the same time we have new ideas for our next album which we are working on already, but mostly our aim is to become better musicians in every level and I believe it’s gonna be an interesting year.

Thanks again guys for talking with us, any last words you would like to share?

(Sotiris) Thank you for the interview and your fans for reading it …Make music and love…NOT war!

https://www.facebook.com/oydofficial   http://oydband.com/    https://twitter.com/OneYearDelay

http://www.reverbnation.com/OYD oneyeardelaytheband@gmail.com

Read our review of Deep Breath @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/10/08/one-year-delay-deep-breath/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 20/10/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Exxasens – Back To Earth

cover_RingMaster Review

Sheer captivation for ears and imagination, Back To Earth is as much a rich flight of suggestion as it is a sonic portrait. It offers a persistently evolving journey within its walls which leads every single involvement in that spatial adventure breeding new and different explorations within the imagination. The new album is the new offering from Spanish rock band Exxasens who weave a revolving kaleidoscope of post and space rock which equally draws on other potent flavours immersed in ambient majesty. There is an almost exhausting richness and density to the textures and creative hues crafted within the release and it is fair to say everything together leaves ears and imagination basking.

Exxasens was originally the solo project of Barcelona guitarist/programmer Jordi Ruiz (Playmotive, Kyba) who took the inspiration of space and “particularly those that have voyaged heroically into its heart of darkness” as the spark to his compositions and explorations. That theme has continued to be the incitement across each song crafted and proposition released, starting from debut album Polaris, released by ConSouling Sounds in 2008. Its successor Beyond The Universe the following year, again via the same label, awoke greater attention as Ruiz’s predominantly instrumental soundscapes continue to grow and expand as the realm they explored. Eleven Miles came next, released in 2011 on Aloud Music Ltd who also provided the vehicle for the critically acclaimed Satellites to be devoured through two years later. Since then Exxasens has grown to a quartet with bassist Cesc Cespedes, keyboardist Sergio Ledesma, and drummer Oriol Planells linking up with Ruiz, and now unveiling the eight track absorption that is Back To Earth.

From the sultrily alluring charm of Supernova, the album bewitches and involves the listener. The opener casts a smooth yet invigorated adventure through gentle and seductive spatial caresses edged by more volatile rhythmic agitation. Endearing melodies slip from the guitars like ripe fruit from a tree whilst the keys are more mist like with an equal potency on ears and thoughts. Their lures are aligned to dramatic rhythms which just intensify as the song’s atmosphere becomes increasingly fiery. It is a thrilling and enthralling take off for the album which My Hands Are Planets hones into its own energetically ethereal insight. As across most tracks there is a loneliness echoed by the sounds but one which simultaneously welcomes attention with a warm tempting; these reassuring colours and atmospherics portrayed through rousing melodies and evocative synth cast seducing.

Comparisons to the like of Mogwai and 65daysofdstatic have been lent the band previously and indeed towards Back To Earth, easy to understand why with the masterful entwining of sounds and elements within tracks like Hugeness and Oniria’s Interlude, though all tracks certainly spin their own identity with the first of this pair courting a more rugged and rocky scenery of textures and energy where extremes embroil in each other’s beauty, often with whirlpool like tenacity and appetite. Additionally enriched by a melodic choir like array of voices at one point, the track is superb, rousing the energies before its successor calms them back down with its radiant melodies and provocative stringed beauty. Its irresistible charm leads ears and emotions into the exhilarating multi-toned depths of Your Dreams Are My Dreams and another ever changing and compelling emprise of sound and suggestiveness.

Bright Side Of The Moon has a more exotic air as Porcupine Tree like flames incite within an increasingly mercurial atmosphere. It is a tempting which becomes more aggressively arousing and in turn intoxicating with every twisting groove and fiercely expressive sonic enticement before Saturn comes forward with new provocative exploits. With vocals for the only time on the album a prominent and highly agreeable proposal and texture, the track is as fascinating as it is electrifying, its Tool meets Voyager meets God Is An Astronaut an easy immersion.

Completed by its rhythmically galvanic, melodically spellbinding, and sonically searing title track, Back To Earth just takes you to other realms and new climates with fresh awareness of sound and in one’s own thoughts. Quite simply the album is glorious and Exxasens an incitement to real musical adventure all should partake in.

Back To Earth is available now via Aloud Music Ltd in Europe, the Ricco Label in Asia (Japan, Taiwan, Indonesia), and Rock-House in Russia.

Pete RingMaster 08/09/2015

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