Peter118 – Wasting

It may last not much longer than a politician’s election promise but Wasting, the new single from Peter118 offers a minute and a half of punk rock in its essential form. Bringing together the punk instincts and traits of ’77 with the antics of the genre’s current pop punk side, the track is a senses harrying, spirit rousing charge with the speed of Usain Bolt and the ravenous lungs of a hurricane.

Peter118 started out as the solo project of Peter Field, formerly of Stoke-based punk bands Senseless and Ambassadors of Shalom, and made a swift impact with the Make It Or Break It EP in 2014. Over time the British band has grown with the addition of field’s wife Janine on bass, Sam on drums, and finally more recently rhythm guitarist Alisha Palmer. Since that first attention grabbing release, the band has ignited US appetites through legendary KROQ DJ Rodney Bingenheimer who championed the lead track of 2016 EP Need You More and sealed a return to the Rainbow Rock festival in Stockholm, Sweden as well as set up a highly anticipated UK tour this coming October and November.

Having just uncaged a split EP with US punks No Lost Cause, Peter118 is out to stir up the punk scene with Wasting. Taken from that six track split In Stereo, the single grabs ears with the raw harassment of guitar, rhythms swiftly forcing their touch on ears as vocals further stir the confrontation up. Like a mix of The Adverts, Dead Kennedys, and dragSTER, the track preys upon and surges across the senses, nagging riffs and wiry hooks aligning with the infectious vocal call.

Then before you know it the track is gone but despite its tempestuous briefness there is no sense of dissatisfaction just the urge to know and hear more of a band forging a potent place in the punk scene.

Wasting is out now as too the In Stereo Split available through In Presence Records in the UK and Thumper Punk Records in the US.

http://peter118.weebly.com/    https://www.facebook.com/Peter118UK/    https://twitter.com/peter118uk

Pete RingMaster 12/09/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Old-timers – Turn It Off/Turn It Up EPs

The_Old-timers__RingMaster Review

With a sound which just seems to get more essential and invigorating with every proposition, South Africa based hardcore punk band The Old-timers release not one but two new EP’s to stir up ears and thoughts. Featuring four tracks each, Turn It Off and Turn It Up explodes in ears with the now renowned Old-timers sound and faith bred lyrical contemplations looking at today’s issues, but both and especially Turn It Off come entwined in fresh twists and captivating hooks, evidence of the band’s continual growth.

Consisting of Cape Town vocalist Dave Emerson and Port Elizabeth hailing guitarist/bassist Donovan de Necker, who live twelve hours apart, and recently new drummer Phil Harris who also plays in Boise punk band False Idle, The Old-timers have previously made a potent and increasingly attention grabbing impact on the global punk scene with their releases, debut album Soli Deo Gloria in 2012 their first thick temptation though the band had already lured ears and appetites, including those of Thumper Records with the Not Dead! Nor Are We! demo. They have been followed by even stronger encounters earning matching increases of acclaim in the shape of the Spiritus Sanctus and Be Reconciled EPs of last year. Each encounter has pushed the band’s old school inspired hardcore sound fuelling minimalistic but impassioned explosions posing as songs forward, and no surprise that both the new EPs follow suit, providing some of the best tracks to come from the band simultaneously.

The_Old-timers_TurnItOff_RingMaster Review     Turn It Off opens with the sturdy tempting of Untouchables; riffs and rhythms a nagging lure from its first breath as Emerson brawls with words. Little changes as the song broadens with tangy grooves and twisty hooks aligned to gleefully jabbing beats, that niggling quality an inescapable anthemic lure firing up voice and sound around. It is an excellent start to the EP, matched by the volatile energy and accusing nature of Televangelist. It too is ripe with gripping rhythms and delicious hooks, and a slim but open vocal variety which alone captures the imagination.

Featuring the alluring voice of The Lead’s Ninah Llopis, Homeless Friends steps forward to steal best song honours across both releases, her siren like tempering to the roar of Emerson emulated in the melodic and fiery exploits of de Necker on both guitar and the moody bass. With scything strikes from Harris adding to the drama, the song brews a stirring antagonism which never quite explodes but gets under the skin wonderfully, especially when flirting with the extra spice of Llopis. As much as the music has moved on again from the band, lyrical prowess has too, songs seeming more concise and impacting in that aspect with this a prime example.

The encounter closes with the intimidating Crowns which from its opening heavy and imposing resonance of bass, has ears and imagination in the palm of its hands, and though it subsequently breaks into a more expected hardcore like accusation and aggressive stance it carries plenty of unpredictable hooks and twists to offer something newly enticing.

Second EP Turn It Up reveals a street punk energy and tone with its first track Broken Glass, the song a more restrained but no less aggravated and energetic proposal to those upon the The_Old-timers_TurnItUp_RingMaster Reviewcompanion EP. For less than a minute and a half it ignites air and appetite before the drama fuelled Angela boldly leaps in with its almost poppy punk theatre of sound and easily devoured contagion.

No Regrets, which features Sef Idle of again False Idle, follows with its caustic stomp of punk/hardcore belligerent sound and praise to him above, whilst an extended cut of a song which first appeared on the band’s debut album brings the EP to a close. This City is the kind of punk roar The Old-timers are recognised for, and a song which still sparks greed and energy in limbs and thought even after a few years.

Whereas Turn It Off has the wealth of unpredictable adventure and invention in songs, Turn It Up has the diversity of punk flavours. Both complement each other perfectly and again provide plenty which those without the faith the band passionately infuse their music with, can also greedily devour. The Old-timers get better as they grow older and with the band donating every penny of digital and physical sales of both EPs to U-Turn Homeless Ministries in Cape Town, they are a must for all punk fans.

The Turn It Off/Turn It Up EPs are available now through Thumper Punk Records and Veritas Vinyl, as well as most digital stores.

RingMaster 18/08/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Old-timers – Be Reconciled

THe Old Timers cover

Hailing from South Africa, punk band The Old-timers has forged themselves a quite potent spotlight not only in Christian punk but the punk underground as a whole with their releases. Now the trio return with their finest moment yet, the Be Reconciled EP. With a broader sound and inventive nature, the release catches the imagination with infectious slices of raw and organic punk rock and a premise which asks questions of thoughts. The band’s fourth release, the EP is simply another open step forward in the presence and sound of The Old-timers.

The band was formed in 2011 by Cape Town vocalist Dave Emerson and Port Elizabeth guitarist/bassist Donovan de Necker, its seeds first sown when they met whilst the latter visited the home town of the former whilst on holiday. From the pair’s unplanned meeting they found plenty to connect over, punk rock being one big love for both. Writing and sharing songs over the vast distances between them through technology, the band emerged with a demo Punk’s Not Dead! Nor Are We!, which brought them to the attention of Christian Punk label Thumper Punk Records. Soon after its release the duo recruited Californian drummer Matt Lagusis whilst Thumper Records released the band’s following impressive releases, the 2012 album Soli Deo Gloria and the Spiritus Sanctus at the end of last year. Both releases showed the continuing growth in sound and songwriting, an evolution pushed again by Be Reconciled.

The new EP is a concept release, its premise following the story of a life finding the light from a dark destructive place, “from sinner to repentance to reconciliation through Jesus.” That journey can be translated into a search we all embrace at some point in our lives within or outside of religion, and in its infusing of keys, a capella harmonies, and spoken poetry within old school fuelled punk rampages, Be Reconciled is a masterfully riveting encounter which works on ears and emotions. It starts with Hole in My Heart, a track which instantly lights ears with its rising persistence of riffs and stomping rhythms. The song, as the vocals, roars with a rapacious intensity and air as the guitar of de Necker expels caustic riffs and enticing hooks whilst his bass prowls the song with a devilish intent. It is an outstanding start to the release, the song’s NOFX like raucousness and Exploited like intensity bound in grooves and hooks which simply infests the imagination, whilst the inventive pounding from Lagusis and vocal demand of Emerson round off the potent lure of the song.

The spoken poetry of Blessings Out of Buffetings is next, voice and haunting keys the protagonist accompanied by percussive taunting. It is a track which alone you would say is for those of faith but within the narrative of the EP and linking the opener and the following Hope for the Rejected, it works well in the context of the story and unimposingly. The third track flies at ears with a raw scrub of riffs and bass driven by rabid beats. With group vocals which works a treat the track at times reminds of early Shelter, its grazing breath veined by a contagious groove which simply entices the appetite further and without reserve. Another highlight of the release, the track provokes, incites, and thrills in equal urgency and strength.

The bruising sounds of Father God I Wonder excites and challenges senses next, the track recruiting the incendiary essences which grabbed attention within previous releases and loading them with a richer infectious bait and instinctive ferocity. It is one minute of prime punk rock which thrusts its sound and narrative irresistibly through ears into thoughts and emotions. Its triumph is matched by the riveting The Joy of Reconciliation. The song starts with that a capella offering mentioned before, a striking union of the band’s voices which works so well you almost throw a sigh of disappointment when the song erupts into its punk rapacity. It soon has those thoughts forgotten though as it squalls and stomps aggressively across the senses for another hunger feeding slab of punk passion.

The closing Ambassadors as the second track is a spoken word within a keys embrace, a conclusion to the narrative which also like the earlier song links in well when taken as part of the journey but for those without a feeling for the religious side of things you sense it may not get the chance too often to make its suasion in being the final track. It has to be reinforced though that as all their releases, The Old-timers presents an encounter which is for all punk fans, just this time it is the band at its most adventurous and dynamic sounding to date which is reason enough to spend plenty of time with Be Reconciled.

The Be Reconciled EP is available now through Thumper Punk Records and Veritas Vinyl as well as @ http://theold-timers.bandcamp.com/album/be-reconciled

https://www.facebook.com/theoldtimers

8.5/10

RingMaster 24/07/2014

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The Old-timers – Spiritus Sanctus

The_Old-timers_Band_Photo

    Following up their impressive and enjoyable debut 2012 album Soli Deo Gloria, South African punks The Old-timers release new EP Spiritus Sanctus, a proposition which continues where the last left off with another clutch of inventive and passionate hardcore punk encounters. As their previous release the trio fill most of the tracks on the EP with praise to God and his son, challenging wrongs and thoughts with their narratives. Lyrically there is no subtlety and reserve in the presentation as previously shown on the album but equally there is the same wealth of tasty punk endeavour to satisfy those not so interested in the lyrical contemplations, making the EP an adventurous slab of prime punk for all to enjoy.

     Consisting of Cape Town vocalist Dave Emerson, Port Elizabeth guitarist/bassist Donovan de Necker, and Californian drummer Matt Lagusis, The Old-timers seeds begin in 2011 with the meeting of Dave whilst on holiday with Don in his home town. Strong friendship led to a creative union of the two with technology providing the link over the vast distances between them and subsequently Matt (False Idle) who joined the band after the release of their first demo. That release, Punk’s Not Dead! Nor Are We! brought the band to the attention of Christian Punk label Thumper Punk Records who released the well-received full-length Soli Deo Gloria and now unleash the band’s new encounter in tandem with Veritas Vinyl.

    Opener Mammon relatively gently scraps with the ears through an opening stroking of riffs and spoken vocals, both setting up The_Old-timers_-_Spiritus_Sanctus_coverattention and appetite for the passionate rabidity to come. As the track provokes and rallies up thoughts with its intensive yet controlled assault there feels a greater intensity and voraciousness to the sound and delivery. It is not a metallic rapaciousness which hits the imagination and senses but certainly the suggested more thrash bred hardcore feel to this and other songs, as suggested to us previously by Don, makes itself pleasingly known.

    From the more than very decent start On My Knees Again deepens the tone of the sounds with a heavier darker  snarl to bass and guitar whilst the drums and vocals score the senses in fine if unsurprising style. The track still builds bait and a potent coaxing across its angry stretch which only feeds the hunger for good punk rock with its enterprise and satisfying craft. Its strong place though is soon put in the shade by the excellent and fun Goonies Never Say Die!, a riotous slab of anthemic punk with restrained but infectious hooks and potent rhythmic temptation all irresistibly luring the passions within a canvas which is less than a minute long. From its deep appeal things continue with equal success through Joe #1, a song which has essences of Shelter and the Subhumans to its stirring and evocative charge. Again hooks entrench themselves irresistibly in the imagination whilst riffs and rhythms crowd the ears with excitable and rampant enterprise as a good variation of vocals suggests the lyrical intent of the song. It is an excellent and energetically captivating encounter taking best song honours on Spiritus Sanctus.

     Love Alone Is Strength returns to a face to face eyeballing hardcore attack, vocals scowling out every note as riffs and drums barrack the ears. It maybe would be an over ripe provocation even in its again very enjoyable short presence, a minute once more barely pushed, but veined by a teasing acidic treat of a hook and that ever eager voracious energy the band craft another highlight of the EP. It’s potency is matched and surpassed by Carpe Vitae Part II, a storming blaze of old school punk  with a taste of seventies bands Crisis and Crass to it as well as that repeating flavour of Shelter though to a lesser extent than before. Both songs show an invention and evolution in the sound and songwriting which is certainly subtler in other songs but makes a promising turn in the growing of the band.

  The closing Axios provides a final feisty gallop of hardcore punk with its healthy arsenal of contagious hooks and irresistible energy for a song very easy to devour and with relish. The song is raw and accessible providing something for all punk needs as does Spiritus Sanctus as a whole. The release pushes on from the band’s excellent album, not in big strides but definitely with distinctive confident steps which makes The Old-timers a meeting all punk fans should eagerly consider.

https://www.facebook.com/theoldtimers

http://theold-timers.bandcamp.com/releases

8/10

RingMaster 19/02/2014

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Ambassadors of Shalom – Abdicate Self

Ambassadors of Shalom

     Thirteen tracks of mouthwatering old school punk with a crate load of hooks and barbed riffs to entice any appetite, Abdicate Self the new album from UK Christian punks Ambassadors of Shalom is a thrilling introduction to the band and its blaze of Evangelistic punk rock. Hailing from the North West of England, the trio of guitarist/vocalist Neil Roddy, bassist/vocalist Pete Field, and drummer Joe Wilson challenge and evoke thoughts with a hungry punk invention which just as easily ignites the imagination and emotions. The songs on the album are well seeded and versed in the ways of original punk rock, each providing a thoroughly satisfying anthemic bait, but also each comes with an individual adventure to bring an identity singular to the band.

    Ambassadors of Shalom was formed in the January of 2012 after an acoustic gig in Stoke community centre and from there took little time in grabbing the attention and passions of local fans. In August the same year, the band signed with Californian label Thumper Punk Records with Abdicate Self the new impressive offering. The album is one of those enjoyable encounters which seems familiar but just as potently finds a new intriguing presence. From the opening track Astray, the Tim Davies (Brohnis Music) recorded and produced release picks on the ears and imagination with a flurry of incisive and virulently effective hooks and riffs. The first song makes for an energetic antagonist from its first breath, guitars stirring up the air whilst the bass lays down a shadowed prowl which only recruits an immediate appetite. Crisp rhythms around the lead and backing calls of Roddy and Field respectively next engage before the song pulls all into an enthused riot of invention and contagion. It is a masterful and irresistible lure into the release, an invitation forcibly backed by the remaining vivacious body of the album.

     This Ain’t Home stokes up the hunger next with a starting anthemic bait of rhythms which the guitar subsequently crafts a 1908240_671390592925450_835805858_ncaustic sonic wash with bluesy flames onto. It is a sultry raw sound complemented by the charge of clean riffery and rhythmic enticement which splits the blaze of sonic heat. Though not as potent as its predecessor the song keeps the album rigidly in focus with ease before both Jesus Said and United We Stand offer their scuzz kissed storms of punk evocation. The first is a scowling yet warm mesh of stirring noise which crosses the senses like a mix of Angelic Upstarts and The Adicts whilst the second is an equally pleasing street punk brawl of anthemic vocals and coarse alluring riffs. Both songs have an intensity which draws attention and thoughts even if slightly lacking the richness of barbs and grooves found elsewhere upon Abdicate Self.

    Both the UK Subs/Crisis like Break ‘Em Out and the groove veined Opposite The Enemy keeps things boiling nicely, the pair forceful yet respectful slices of resourceful punk urgency and invention, before the release flicks up a gear starting with the ridiculously catchy We Don’t Need It. One of those songs you only need to hear the first line of the chorus once to be bitten and soon joining in with its declaration, it is a brief but meaty slab of punk beckoning setting up the emotions for the likes of the excellent Death By Love and equally impressive Blamethrower. The first of this pair scowls and stomps with a raw causticity to the vocals and a Sex Pistols like draw to its sound, and though arguably the song is the least unique on the album it is one of the most potent and eventful, not forgetting thrilling. Its successor loaded with the strongest imagination of the whole release is just as compelling, a Melvins like texture grazing the senses whilst hooks and seductive temptation teases like a mix of The Vibrators and Suburban Studs.

    A punk version of the hymn Nothing But The Blood follows and is an exceptional and unexpected treat before the album’s finest moments arrive, starting with the outstanding Julia. Hooks and a rhythmic dance of sinew soaked in ripe energy kicks things off before the song settles into an inciting and persistently shifting venture. Its groove and riotous hooks easily reminds of the Ruts whilst the surrounding less intensive but eager rock brew around accentuates the pull of those other incisive elements.

    The album is concluded by the exciting and rousing Victory before finally the combative and antagonist glory of the album’s best track, It Is Finished brings one impressively enjoyable encounter to a close. Abdicate Self is not only Christian punk at its best, but for anyone wary of that tag, it is punk rock at its best. Ambassadors of Shalom have unleashed a debut which sees the band closely tailing most other frontline punk provocateurs.

https://www.facebook.com/AmbassadorsOfShalom

8.5/10

RingMaster 12/02/2014

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Hippos of Doom – Road Trip

Hippos of Doom photo

    Road Trip is an EP which brawls with the ear but has more fun and mischief in mind than antagonism as it offloads its more than satisfying punk rock passion. Working with the same seeds found in the likes of NOFX, Me First and the Gimmie Gimmies, and Millencolin, Ventura County hailing Hippos of Doom is a band which arguably does not stand apart from other similarly fuelled punk bands but has a charm and character to their sound which does make them noticeable. The EP is not without flaws and moments where maybe the band should not have gone but you cannot dismiss or dislike their energy and appetite, or not find a pleasure in their vibrant release.

Released via Veritas Vinyl and Thumper Punk Records, Road Trip first lights up the ear with Old School Rocking Crew, a track which does what it says on the tin, riffs and group shouts rifling the senses whilst the bass dances around with magnetic craft and boisterous enterprise as it skirts the lead vocals which themselves offer a raw yet honest inducement to join in and rally up limbs and energy. Though it does not leave anything truly memorable once departing from its barely glimpsing two minute length, the song is an accomplished and promising slice of punk rock with pop punk whispers to its presence.

The following Wool Brigade riles up the air with sonic abrasiveness before uncaging another rush of hungry rhythms and exhausting riffs. Once more the bass impresses and the vocals add a caustic rub to the encounter whilst the guitars vein its narrative with melodic acidity. Though like its predecessor there is nothing which lingers long after such the quality and appeal of bass and drums with the guitars in close quarter, it makes satisfying company.

Holiday Road is a cover song which stampedes across the ear with enthusiasm and unbridled devilment, easily recruiting full involvement from the listener though the vocal harmonies is one thing the band might have worked on or alternatively really taken to town for comic effect. Despite there less than successful presence the track is a feisty and riotous slab of fun and opens up the devilry in the band which was only suggested within the earlier songs.

The best moments of the release come with the final two songs, firstly from Judge Not, a track which rumbles on more impressive rhythms and bass courting of the ear whilst the melodic flames leave a hunger with their heated colour and unbridled appetite to rile and ignite the passions. Like all good punk songs, it is simple yet smartly crafted with hooks and rhythmic temptation alongside quarrelsome but inviting vocals, though here there is also that riveting bass call setting the song apart from most others.

The closing The Royal Philharmonic Goes to the Bathroom moves from an opening stomp into another squalling explosion of rapacious energy driven by riffs and drums. With vocals, solo and group, at their best and a jagged guitar persuasion breaking out at times, the track makes claims for best on the release though has to play second best to its predecessor. Both songs make a strong end to the EP and ensure the band is on the horizon of ones to watch.

For good solid punk rock with energy to its fun and intent, Road Trip makes a satisfying option which maybe does not come with blazes of originality but stokes up plenty of satisfaction with its company.

https://www.facebook.com/hipposofdoom

7/10

RingMaster 07/06/2013

 

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Fear God – God Bless The World, Not Just America

FearGod_Jutras

Continuing their knack at bringing prime punk rock in many guises to the world, Thumper Punk Records have done it again with God Bless The World, Not Just America the debut album from US band Fear God. A faith driven collection of songs which will spark the appetite of any old school punks no matter their beliefs, the album is a stirring and infectious slice of sincere and rowdy punk riots.

The solo project of veteran Orange County punk rocker Doug Jutras, the album is the result of its creator making a change in his life and finding a focus to all things through faith. Having struggled and recovered from severe back injuries and the challenges brought by his punk lifestyle from his early teens, Jutras found his clarity in life and wrote the album to hopefully inspire and give hope to others. Taking influences from the likes of Social Distortion, TSOL, The Damned, and Call to Glory, he has brought forth an album which works with the theme of the title whilst unleashing a dozen brawls of punk rock to satisfy the hearts of old school punk fans. As with a great many faith driven releases the constant heart of the album does inspire a little resistance to those with different thoughts and inspirations but God Bless The World, Not Just America does not preach and offers musically plenty to bypass that aspect and for like-minded souls and those open to the ideas and possibilities portrayed, it is a release which is likely to inspire as the artist hopes.

The raw energy of He Forgets rampages through the ear first, the great infectious bassline and thumping riffs a ready and hungry companion to the coarse riffs and catchy vocals. It is punk at its simplest and best offered with extra flair and invention, with especially the bass a magnet for the senses and primal rhythms inside. The great four string lure continues into the following Love God, the instrument and song recalling the early days of The Damned, Suburban Studs, and Circle Jerks. It is an impressive start which hardly fluctuates in quality and appeal as the album continues.

The release offers up some good surprises too amongst the more expected pink bruises starting with What Am I Doing Here, a track with Jutras narrating his thoughts and experiences through spoken word upon an emotive and suggested musical ambience. The song switches to a quick fire onslaught reminding of early Skids and then switches across the rest of the track with skill and pleasing imagination. It is an intriguing and evocative track as is the equally provoking Kelly Testimony. Consisting of a retelling of her life by a female voice over acoustic and again emotive sounds, the song is a tale which shocks and reassures. It is a clever and effective song which all can draw something from whatever their circumstances in the past and now.

Tracks like Devil’s Mark with its Misfits/Dead Kennedys breath and the garage blues lilted Can’t U Be There please and light nostalgic emotions with their uncomplicated and enjoyable sounds but the highest pinnacles come with God Bless the World and Closer He Gets to You. The first is a contagious pop punk graced slice of melodic rock with a female coaxing assisting Jutras which brings essences of Honey Bane to the pop dance of the track whilst the second is a fiery abrasion of harsh riffs and stirring intent offering a mix of Social Distortion and Angelic Upstarts and giving further variation to the album as a whole. This diversity brings a breath of different times and flavours from the genre which is as refreshing as the songs itself and adds to the overwhelming pleasure of the album.

The grazing energy of Dying World is another treat before the album closes what is a pleasing and energising encounter. If good original punk has been in short supply for your ears and heart lately then Fear God is the perfect tonic to restore your faith in punk rock and maybe more besides.

http://www.thumperpunkrecords.com/

RingMaster 09/01/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright