Tender Age – Disappear Here EP

2015-tender-age_RingMasterReview

Their sound is a challenge and seduction hard to shake off; an infestation of noise and harmonic invasiveness which runs at odds with the band’s name yet has an unfussy innocence and bold outlook in thought and voice which compliments it. The Oregon hailing Tender Age are the sculptors of the bracing proposal and the Disappear Here EP, the evidence of its compelling persuasion.

The successor to the successful Get High single of last October, Disappear Here provides three new entanglements of the senses, psyche, and the band’s experimental pop alongside two startling and fascinating covers which swiftly feel as if they belong to the imagination of Tender Age. Whether you wish to describe the band’s sound as bedroom pop, caustic shoegaze, or lo-fi indie, and it is all that and more, it makes for an ears and imagination bracing incitement which feels even more sonically bullish and creatively bracing on the new EP compared to the previous single alone. Recorded, mixed and produced by the band and Eric Sabatino, Disappear Here invades with fuzz fuelled guitars whilst a near toxic scuzz of noise corrodes the air. Within that though melodies smoulder and flame whilst vocals serenade with beauty undiluted by the rawness around them.

art_RingMasterReviewIt opens with Lowers, an initially low key affair with slowly unwinding rhythms leading ears into the enchanted landscape of vocal seduction and melodic expression. As swiftly though, the abrasing fuel of the band’s sound is potently shaping song and thoughts as the guitars of vocalists Tauna Leonardo and Elaina Tardif, matched by fellow six string craftsman Christopher Klarer, entwine and evolve into darker and harsher protagonists. The track is mesmeric, an absorbing trespass which especially hits the sweet spot when the sonic animus of noise takes over and violates psyche and senses.

It is a thrilling start matched by the melodically hazy Delirium. It is easy to offer My Bloody Valentine as a hint to the infectious bond between ear and song which quickly grows, though equally a whiff of bands like Throwing Muses and Breeders comes to mind too as the lighter elements float around the rhythmic spine and shuffle of drummer Nick Ferrucci and bassist Bryan Robertson. Less demanding and no less bewitching than its predecessor, the song slips away for the outstanding devilment of NO. Discord drips from every note and syllable offered with fuzz expectantly lining the walls of the mouth-watering enslaving of ears and imagination though even that seems to wear even more disorientating off-kilter devilment . British eighties Young Marble Giants nudge thoughts as the song resonates and pulsates with its sonic toxicity, their lo-fi beauty an undercurrent to the dissonant majesty at play within this gorgeous encounter.

The best track on the EP is followed by the two covers, starting with the Bobby Darin classic Dream Lover. Tender Age twist it, turn it inside out, and dissect it again with their sonic prowess yet still retain the melancholic air and melodic embrace the song has forever endeared ears with. Its examination of the senses and igniting of lusty reactions is followed by I Love How You Love Me; the Paris Sisters gem in turn infected and explored by the band’s raw simmering sound and unique imagination. Spoken vocals collude with sonic smog, haunting and romancing the senses simultaneously whilst bringing a kiss of the original to bear on nostalgic passions for an alluring and highly enjoyable finale.

The Disappear Here EP is a beguiling and at times almost rabid tempting of body and soul from a band which continues to show itself as one of the unique voices in noise and melody bred invention. So be bold and be blessed by exploring the raw world of Tender Age is our suggestion.

The Disappear Here EP is available now digitally and on cassette and 12” vinyl @ http://tenderage.bandcamp.com/album/disappear-here-ep-11-vinyl-cassette via SINIS Recordings.

http://tenderage.tv/   https://www.facebook.com/TenderAgepdx

Pete RingMaster 20/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Orielles – Jobin EP

orielles_RingMasterReview

Following an especially successful 2015, British surf pop trio, The Orielles, are ready to bring the same romancing of ears and imagination to this year with the seriously tantalising Jobin EP. Consisting of three slices of the band’s increasingly acclaimed blend of sultry melodies, bewitching harmonies, and feverish flavours bound in lo-fi beauty, the EP beguiles and inflames the senses whilst hinting that 2016 can be just as big if not greater in the band’s emerging history as its predecessor.

The Orielles began early 2013, the result of a house party and the creative uniting of sisters Esme and Sid Hand-Halford and friend Henry Wade. It was not to be an immediate launch into active duty as the girls only began learning their instruments from that point but with inspirations coming from riot grrrl and California surf bands, the Halifax trio were soon working on songs and honing their creative exploration. Since then, well-received tracks and releases has reinforced their rising reputation as a live proposition with 2015 especially potent as The Orielles drew big doses of acclaim at festivals such as Dot To Dot, Live At Leeds, and Liverpool Sound City as well as their individual shows.

orielles art_RingMasterReviewWith a UK tour in motion and a host of other events lined up, the band is set to be as busy as ever with the strong potential of greater success and praise heading their way just taking Jobin as a cue. It opens with its title track grabbing ears with an instant bait of crisp beats from Sid and the siren-esque lure of Henry’s seductive grooves. Their winding tendrils continue to entice and vein the rhythmic potency of the song, Esme’s bassline as captivating and alluring as her magnetic vocals and the surrounding celestial harmonies. The melodic character of the song has a House Of Love hue to its tempting with a psych rock flavouring only adding to the overall richness and raw yet elegant climate of the spellbinding track.

Twin Freaks is equally as compelling as it settles into a sweltering landscape with thick shadows to its evocative tone and inventive depth. Led by the almost flirtatious stroll of bass, there is an immediate infectiousness which is keenly shared by the vines of surf rock enterprise cast by Henry and the siren-esque quality of the vocals; both resonating in ears and memory as potently as the virulent charm and touch of the song.

The EP closing Sliders is the most feisty and energetic of the three tracks with tenacious beats and a vivacious energy stoking its melodic fire and anthemic gait. There is a punk rock scent to its revelry too, a touch of eighties band the Mo-dettes joining hues reminding of bands like The Raveonettes and Throwing Muses though being organically cultured in surf rock, the song emerges as something openly distinct to The Orielles.

Robed in discord tinged melodies, equipped with vociferous guitar, and basking in soaring harmonies, Jobin is a release which truly lingers in the memory. It is the persistent bringer of great pleasure and a strong nudge to pay close attention to the continuing and enthralling emergence of The Orielles.

The Jobin EP is released April 1st via DIY label Art is Hard. It will be available @ http://artishardrecords.bandcamp.com/album/jobin-ep as a 7″ flexi-disc featuring lead track Jobin, a 20 page colouring book zine illustrated by Alex Gamsu Jenkins and a download code for the full 3 track EP.

https://www.facebook.com/theorielles   https://soundcloud.com/theorielles

The Orielles – Upcoming UK dates:

APRIL

2nd READING Oakford Social Club

3rd BRISTOL Lousiana

9th LONDON Flying Vinyl Festival

MAY

1st LIVERPOOL Festevol

AUGUST

5th TUNBRIDGE WELLS Forgotten Fields Festival

Pete RingMaster 31/01/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Heel – The Parts We Save

Heel_RingMasterReview

Amongst many eagerly anticipated offerings this year has to be the debut album from UK alternative rock quartet Heel. Having impressed with their first EP and even more so with subsequent releases as well as a striking stage presence, Heel has been one of the bands enveloped by increasing acclaim over recent times. It has put some strong expectations of The Parts We Save upon them which the London band has appeased with ease. Maybe at times the album does not quite fulfil all the potential within it but for rousing, imagination sculpted rock/pop contagiousness, the album persistently hits the spot with adventure and charm.

Formed in the winter of 2011 from guitarist Daniel and vocalist Margarita’s songwriting sessions, Heel quickly began working on their first EP once its line-up was completed by bassist Fred and drummer Nick. Produced by Justin Hill (Sikth), their opening release quickly grabbed attention and praise. Its success was subsequently pushed further by its successor Stranger Just The Same in 2014, an encounter also recorded with Hill. With video/singles luring play on the likes of Scuzz TV and Kerrang, the band set about working on an album, flying out to Japan`s legendary Geimori studio in Sapporo to record The Parts We Save with Daniel and Margarita producing.

Mixed by Ben Grosse and Paul Pavao (Marilyn Manson, Disturbed, Depeche Mode, Ben Folds, Thirty Seconds to Mars, etc.) and mastered by Tom Baker (Beastie Boys, Deftones, David Bowie, B.B. King), the album swiftly shows the growth in the band’s magnetic sound and its maturity in songwriting as opener An Apology sets to work stirring up ears. The first single from the release when uncaged last December, the song immediately consumes the senses in a sonic lure from which a bass led swagger within sultry caresses of guitar bounds. Its catchiness is instant and only strengthened by Margarita’s alluring vocals. Carrying thick drama to its rhythmic design and exotically seductive grooves, the track also develops an infectious No Doubt like charm which lies agreeably upon Heel’s own web of melody and imagination fuelled tenacity.

'The Parts We Save' Cover Artwork_RingMasterReviewThe excellent opening to the album continues with Selfish Burn which again has that Gwen Stefani and co spicing to its feisty pop ‘n’ roll. Throaty funk infused bait from Fred’s bass provides a potent spine to the song, an agitated smoulder of sonic and melodic resourcefulness laying upon it whilst Margarita’s tones again add a lusty freshness with a tinge of mischief to the temptation. Though seemingly crafted from the same template as the first and next up Yellow & Bliss, each song reveals its own individual and forcibly enticing character. The third track, and the band’s brand new video/single, is a lively shuffle with skittish rhythms and an animated gallop of chords and hooks beneath a breeze of warm harmonies and psych rock tinged enterprise, and quite irresistible.

Nothing New strolls in next with a melodic smile on its face and a devilish bassline at its heart for another inviting slice of impassioned pop rock whilst Shatter is a tender flirtation initially, which brews up into a spirited canter of jangling guitar and animated vocals aligned to mesmeric harmonies. By its close, the gentleness of the song is a near on surge of energy and passion, and increasingly bewitching.

The mellow croon of Cool allows body and emotions to settle; well at first as soon it also raises its enthusiastic agility and creative zeal to lead feet and hips on a merry dance egged on by virulent rhythms. A vibrant and catchy mix of textures and energies, the song has pleasure flowing, running right into the path of the outstanding Keep Running Back To Me. A tapestry of dynamic rock ‘n’ roll as punkish as it is bluesy, as feverishly tenacious as it is rapaciously heavy; the track is like a mix of My Baby and Spinnerette with a touch of Throwing Muses to it and quickly ignites appetite and emotions.

The dark drama of Live This Forever takes over, the track also a heavier proposal with a punk/grunge breeding to its invention and a fiery attitude to its emotive heart. It prowls, almost stalks ears as it unveils its shadow rich theatre, again grabbing eager involvement in its proposal before Fake Love twists and turns with its pop punk infused 4 Non Blondes like rock ‘n’ roll to great success.

Finishing with the tantalising melodic breeze of Streets Full Of You, a final harmonic and emotive kiss on ears with its own line in imaginative shadows, The Parts We Save is an encounter with plenty of eagerly lingering moments. Some songs are a more instant and imposing arousal than others, but each only provides rich enjoyment and an appetite for more from a band still growing into its skin of originality but establishing itself as one of Britain’s brightest propositions.

The Parts We Save is released March 4th via iTunes and Amazon.

http://www.heelband.com/   https://www.facebook.com/Heellondon   https://twitter.com/heellondon

Pete RingMaster 04/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Murder Shoes – Daydreaming

Photo Joshua Syx

Photo Joshua Syx

After three increasingly impressive and enthralling EPs, it is fair to say that the debut album from US rock/pop band Murder Shoes has been a highly anticipated proposition, and equally honest to say that now here, Daydreaming more than lives up to hopes and the potential fuelling previous encounters from the Minneapolis quintet. Once more, the band weaves tantalising songs from strands of indie, surf, and dark pop rock, evolving from them perpetually mesmeric and at times sinisterly ethereal yet tenaciously mischievous proposals. The result is an album based on sonic flirtation and rich imagination which lights ears and appetite with a sublime hand of adventure.

From the first meeting of guitarists Derek Van Gieson and Chris White, the seeds of Murder Shoes have quickly and potently blossomed into a creatively stirring proposition. Writing a thick body of songs together bred on and blending a broad array of inspirations, flavours, and styles, the pair recruited vocalist/keyboardist Tess Weinberg to their emerging project before completing its line-up with drummer Elliot Manthey and bassist Tim Heinlein. Within a year first EP Cash On Fire was unveiled, December 2014 its release with a self-titled successor arriving the May of 2015 and the Little Lost EP two months later, all through Land Ski Records who now bring us Daydreaming.

cover_RingMaster Review     Your Friend Kimmie starts the band’s new temptation off, opening on an instantly alluring bass coaxing soon embraced by surf lined caresses of guitar. The smouldering invitation is increased as the warm siren-esque harmonic tones of Weinberg gently lay upon the spreading strands of sonic enterprise and low key but pungent rhythmic bait. A sultry serenade fondling ears and imagination, the song makes a potent start for Daydreaming but is soon overshadowed by firstly the inescapable catchiness of So What May and in turn the haunting romance of Bad Reputation. The first of the pair saunters with a spicily melodic smile and infectious rhythms, its breath carrying a nineties scent which only adds to its easy pull on a keenly growing appetite for the release, whilst the second sways with a seduction of slim but quickly gripping hooks amidst a mesh of melodic tendrils cast by the guitars.

Recent single Nineteeneightyone strolls in with an energetic and creative virulence next, beats and vocals colluding to enslave ears as sonic endeavour paints the song’s canvas with evocative and fiery imagination. Both Van Gieson and White craft a fascinating picture with their invention, holding their tempting own against the ever beguiling delivery of Weinberg. Equally though, as shown further by Secrets, Heinlein and Manthey conjure an enticement of rhythms and darker shadows which simply and skilfully accentuates the melodic humidity and elegance around them. In Secrets the pair court the flames of warmth lining the surf fuzziness with a darkly provocative prowl, offering a jazzy contrast to the more fiery aspects shimmering boldly around them.

New single Girls Named Benji marks another step up in temptation and excitement within Daydreaming, its Throwing Muses meets The Only Ones like canter, an epidemic of inciting rhythms and sonic drama around a just as keenly delivered and tenacious vocal prowess and attitude. The track is as compelling as it comes and swiftly matched by the outstanding Little Lost. Once again instantly the rhythm section captivates and enslaves, and once more the guitars create a sonic and slightly scuzzy tapestry of rich enticement to seduce the firmer enticement. There is a feel of Belly and Breeders to the song but, as expected, it is twisted and woven into the rousing and here raucous ingenuity of Murder Shoes to addictive effect.

The surf fuelled beauty of Reefer And Pizza seduces ears next; it’s romancing sway like the sun on a lively sea but with a volatility that will have its thrilling say. Another major pinnacle that provokes a hint of Martha and the Muffins in thoughts, it makes ways for the album’s title track, a crystalline kiss of light with rolling beats and fields of sonic and melodic sultriness. Again there is that steely and dramatic underbelly at play, seeping along and into the textures of the song bringing a subdued and thrilling theatre of darkness with underlying intimidation.

Can You Sea Me brings its masterful stickiness of evocative enterprise and melodic intoxication next, the song maybe eclipsed by those just before but smothering the listener in celestial and earthy contrast for great pleasure before How Does It Feel closes the album with a similar weave within its own engrossing character of sound and imagination. It is a refreshing end to another excellent and thrilling offering from Murder Shoes. The album continues where the previous EPs left off but also shares new depth in sound and exploration along the way. Daydreaming is like a musical lover you will only lay back and think about for ages after tasting its creative kiss, that a success in anyone’s book.

Daydreaming is released November 6th via Land Ski Records and @ https://murdershoes.bandcamp.com/album/daydreaming

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Murder-Shoes/331873790352913  https://twitter.com/murdershoesband   http://www.murdershoesband.com/

Pete RingMaster 06/11/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Feral Kizzy – Slick Little Girl

Phote by Luke Fisher

Phote by Luke Fisher

The debut album from Californian dark poppers Feral Kizzy is simply an aural playground, a landscape of musical roundabouts spinning through modern tenacity and invention and creative swings whooshing across eighties new wave and jangle pop. Slick Little Girl is soaked in originality and nostalgia, a mix providing a riveting and thrilling treat ultimately cast as something unique to the Long Beach quintet; and something very easy to get addicted to.

Formed in 2010, Feral Kizzy consists of five musicians uniting a rich variety of inspirations in the band’s sound. References have been made to Patti Smith, Concrete Blonde, the Yeah Yeah Yeahs, and The Cure, though the one band which comes to the fore more than most, whether an influence or not, is eighties US band Pylon, especially their first album Gyrate. As suggested all spices and essences are evolved into something new but there is certainly a potent and enjoyable similarity in textures, sound, and unpredictable invention. With some guest contributions from bassist Hannah Smith Keller and Hannah Blumenfeld (Jail Weddings, White Murder) on violin and cello, the five piece of vocalist Kizzy Kirk, keyboardist/vocalist Brenda Carsey, guitarist Johnny Lim, drummer Mike Meza, and bassist Kevin Gonzalez perpetually explore their and the listener’s imaginations within Slick Little Girl, and fair to say they leave major pleasure in their wake.

Opener Lapdog Apparition needs little time to lure ears and appetite with its potent charms, a thumping initial beat casting the first hook swiftly assisted by a jangle of guitar and the saucy shimmer of keys. Quickly into a magnetic stride the song swings along with sharp twists, subsequently slipping into a more fluid and mellower enticement then just as easily coming out of it and starting the cycle again. A tinge of the Au Pairs flirts with thoughts as it continues to dangle bait and enterprise through ears, though it is the delicious B-52s like detour which seals a lustful deal with emotions through its Rock Lobster like tease.

Feral-Kizzy-Slick-Little-Girl-Cover__RingMasterReview   The track is creatively irresistible, a major flirtation matched by the band’s new video/single Community Service. A throbbing Cure like bassline sets things in motions, whispers of guitar lining the entrance of vocals with Kirk alone an enthralling invitation and in union with Carsey, inescapable tempting. The song proceeds to spin a web of tantalising vocals and hooks as its rhythms offer a shadowed prowl against the more celestial flight of the keys. It is captivating stuff, an inventive weave of textures and melodic infection, with the description of Xmal Deutschland meets Throwing Muses and indeed Pylon a canny hint.

The Way We Are has a fine line in guitar jangle and spicy melodic imagination backed by another addictive dark rhythmic baiting from Meza and Gonzalez, whilst vocally a Debbie Harry like whisper clings to the expressive roar of Kirk. Matching the invention and lures, Carsey breeds a pungent waltz of persuasion with fingers on keys too, it all colluding in a busy and thick dance of jangle pop before making way for the melodic caress of Sally and the Emcee. A gentle saunter equipped with rawer, incisive edges, the song is a provocative croon which thickens with every passing chord and beat until filling air and ear like dense melodic smoke. It persistently smothers the senses and seeps into the psyche, seducing with increasing effect over every play.

With a similarly sculpted canvas Lament comes next quickly breeding its own distinct character with a bluesy tang and citric adventure of spatial keys. The track is mesmeric but with a fire in its belly leading to a feisty rock tenacity driven by masterful riffs and hooks from Lim. Again sounds from earlier decades entwine with a modern invention and freshness, culturing something as much psyche pop as it is punk rock. From one album pinnacle to another with the scuzzier Life Associates which straight away is a more forceful and rugged proposition through the snarl of bass and guitar alone. Again there is a punkish element to the song’s roar and a sultry kiss to the melodic endeavour on offer, something like Siouxsie and the Banshees merged with Martha and The Muffins a strong reference, though as across the release, songs come with Feral Kizzy originality which argues against any comparisons as much as it sparks them.

More blues bred twangs grip the guitar enterprise in Not My Mind, the spicy coaxing quickly engulfed in the melodic poetry of keys and attention grabbing vocals. Though it does not quite light the same rich fire in ears and thoughts as its predecessors, the track reveals yet another side and depth to the songwriting and invention of the band, its body a volcanic fusion of sounds and textures which never erupts but is a constantly imposing and gripping incitement unafraid to unleash the heat of its heart.

The Dinosaur flirts and sways with sixties garage pop captivation and indie rock mischief next, flirting with body and thoughts from start to finish and never relinquishing its tight vivacious hold until passing the listener over to the just as ingeniously compelling tempting of The Skin Is Thick. A darker but no less boldly imaginative encounter, the song winds around ears like a lithe temptress, constantly stirring up shadows and deep rooted instincts through heavy seductive tones of bass and enchanted keys spilled drama. With vocals also on a resourceful intent to enthral and enslave, the song makes an impressive and exciting warm-up act for the closing show stopper What Are You Doing? All the lures and creative theatre of its predecessor is taken to a new level, every second of the song a controlled but rich blaze of skilled and impassioned endeavour. It is an epic bellow from the imagination and creative depths of the band only enhanced further by the sensational presence of Kirk and the intense incitement of the orchestral coloured strings, their spicy lure bringing echoes of Sex Gang Children back in the day.

Feral Kizzy is superb at uniting slim and often repetitive textures with thick tapestries of ingeniously woven enterprise, the last song epitomising that craft and success which flows across the whole of Slick Little Girl. The album is a thrilling adventure; one bred across the years in many ways but solely of the now, and Feral Kizzy a band surely looking at big things ahead.

Slick Little Girl is available from June 26th on LP/CD/Tape/Digital via eliterecords @ http://www.eliterecords.de/#!webshop/cst1

http://www.facebook.com/feralkizzy   http://www.feralkizzy.com

RingMaster 25/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Me, You and Thomas – Eventually

Press shot

    With a lo-fi indie rock sound energising the air as well as the senses through potent fuzzy sonic persuasion, Eventually the new and second single from UK duo Me, You and Thomas continues the impressive emergence of a fresh sound which started with their debut single Repeat. The self-released song caught the imagination of a great many and with the new Howling Owl Records released track, the band is set to step into a brighter spotlight.

Consisting of Rhianna Berarey (vocals, guitar, piano) and Joe Sherrin (drums), the Bristol two-piece cement their emerging presence in UK indie music with a trio of songs which seduce and provoke with equal strength and accomplishment. The title track Eventually Frontimmediately takes a grip with its opening salvo of rolling drum hooks and engaging guitar beckoning, their touch wrapping an inviting arm around the shoulders of the senses, luring them deeper in the focus of the song and the impending scuzz lined bluster of its heart. As it parades its impressive presence within the ear there are loud whispers of bands such as Au-Pairs and Girls At Their Best as well as the scintillating discord challenging likes of Breeders and Throwing Muses apparent. The song is as infectious as it is aurally evocative and recruits the passion with ease to its contagious cause rewarding with intense rewards in return.

The following Stop Here has a less energetic freedom but a more imposing depth to its reserved gait. Again the rhythms of Sherrin cage and lead the intent of the song whilst the guitar of Berarey brings a steely narrative to the sound whilst her soft yet sharp vocals seduce with a lyrical embrace to match her open tones. Into its stride the track has an agitated atmosphere which soaks the ear with an inviting menace to make a distinct contrast to its predecessor but a co-conspirator in securing a solid engagement of the emotions.

Closing track Boundary takes another step into a slower emotive stirring which though it lacks the more instant attraction of the previous pair emerges as an engrossing and thought forming encounter. Again the bands previously mentioned comes to mind with elements of The Passions added, but the sound even with those references to old bands has a fresh bite to its melodic excursion.

With an extremely limited run to its CD version, Eventually is a single you need to snap up quickly but more importantly it is another step for a band we feel sure we will hear a lot more of.

www.facebook.com/MeYouThomas

7.5/10

RingMaster 08/04/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Sparrow & The Workshop: Shock Shock

    sparrow.....

    2011 saw the release of Spitting Daggers, an impressive and enthralling album from Glasgow based band Sparrow & The Workshop which certainly for us triggered a lingering attraction to the imaginative indie folk sounds and invention of the trio. Now they have returned with new single Shock Shock and a new evolution of their already striking presence, the song as enthralling as anything they have produced before but with a deeper expanse and richness of ideas to fully capture the imagination.

Formed in 2008, the threesome of Jill O’Sullivan (vocals, guitar, violin), Gregor Donaldson (drums, vocals), and Nick Packer (bass guitar, electric slide guitar, basstard), soon were drawing critical acclaim with the release via Distiller Records of debut album Crystals Fall in 2010. The following Spitting Daggers elevated their reputation and recognition further with its engaging and evocative creativity whilst tours and performances alongside the likes of Brian Jonestown Massacre, British Sea Power, Idlewild, Broken Records, Sivert Hoyem, The Lemonhead, and Thee Oh Sees only further enhanced their status.

Released on Song, By Toad Records, Shock Shock is the fore taster of the third album from the band due later in the year and a compelling declaration of the new venture in sound the band is exploring. The single finds the band fusing their still vibrant folk enchantment with a feisty fuel of rock and haunting ambience. Within seconds the song offers a sinew and intensity new to previous releases though it is an evolution to their already impacting ideas and imagination which marked their previous album. From the start guitars paint an emotive fiery tapestry to wrap the melodic vocal caresses of O’Sullivan in, whilst the bass of Packer adds inciting yet inviting shadows with its throaty resonance. It is the atmospheric wash though which adds the final provocation for thoughts and senses, its passion courting sonic cloud a slightly abrasive yet golden voice to bring an additional delicious persuasion.

Inspiring loud whispers of The Pixies, Throwing Muses, and The Shangri-Las in many ways, Shock Shock is the perfect invitation and temptation to Sparrow & The Workshop and their upcoming album, a release which is sure to have much anticipation waiting for it after the single ends its own persuasion.

http://www.facebook.com/sparrowandtheworkshop

8/10

RingMaster 11/03/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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