Refuelling the snarl: chewing the Sonick Plague flesh with Ken Cuccaro

Ken_RingMaster Review

Already this year, many old treats and classics which were lost to the radar of the many originally, have been unleashed again on the metal scene from decades past. Many of the bands are seeing a new lease of life and one certainly looking like re-igniting a previous blaze and more is West Virginian thrashers Sonick Plague. Linking up with Pavement Music, the band has re-recorded and re-energized their 1988 debut album What’s the Purpose, breathing new ravenous breath into it as it comes now as a self-titled proposal. We as so many missed the band and record first time around and were caught by surprise by the new release because of it. Now all we want is to hear and know more, so with thanks drummer Ken Cuccaro who kindly sat down to indulge our nosiness, we explored band, album, and plenty more…

Hello Ken and many thanks for sparing time to talk with us.

The band has just re-released 1988 debut What’s the Purpose via Pavement Music; but not just set the same version free again or simply re-mastered it as so many old encounters being uncaged again are, but re-recorded it. Was there a particular reason for going down that route?

We really needed to. The first one sounded pretty bad, we lost the masters and really just wanted to start fresh again. It’s very much like giving the old stuff a shower.

SP_RingMaster ReviewDid you look at the songs any differently for the fresh recordings from first time around and they take on a new relevance for you when approaching them?

I wouldn’t say we looked at them differently, but as far as new relevance absolutely! Damn a lot’s happened in 30 years! I’m laughing my ass off right now because of how we approached them. Very carefully, like sneaking up on a gator. We had to make sure we could still play that stuff. Although we all kept playing over the years we’re older and beat up. Hell poor Sean had 2 broke feet when we first got back together.

Obviously technology has changed over the decades. Did you make particular use of modern possibilities in recording the songs or went for a more raw and organic approach to again and successfully ignite the same vital character of their first appearance?

We went for the more organic thing. We played live in the studio and really wanted to try to capture the energy again. There were definitely some modern amenities [the studio did have a great blender] we used but not too much. We didn’t want it to sound robotic and triggered, and all that shit. Not knocking anybody’s stuff, I just personally feel the metal and thrash stuff now is so electronic, click tracked, and feels the same. Some of these guys are awesome but everything sounds the same and is just so cut up. Again not knocking their musicianship there are so many great bands out. Right now there’s a guy reading this saying “these guys are so fu@#$kin old they don’t even know how to use the shit and they suck!” That’s ok; we probably could still kick your ass. I think the people that listen to this stuff want to feel that energy and little variations in the music, it makes it human. We recorded at the Carriage House Studio the place was incredible.

Apart from the obvious change in sound quality etc. did anything else brew up in songs when recording the new versions which maybe was unexpected or added something different to additionally enjoy?

I only know one way to play ‘em. Chuck and Matt put their own stink on it. I personally was shocked how well Sean’s voice held up over the years he can still belt it out. But all in all we kept it very close.

Obviously the original recording of the album was with guitarist Tony Teodoro in the band. Sadly he died a few years ago. Did you find there was some emotional intensity around the new recordings because of his passing and presence first time around?

Absolutely! Me personally whenever I get an ache or pain I think of what he went through, it kept me going. I don’t think anybody in the band didn’t think of him every day we were recording this.

It was his death, which the press release said, brought the three of you together again and talking music, the band eventually to full strength with the addition of Matt Dupre. Was that indeed the spark or were there already thoughts of maybe reuniting in maybe one or two of you?

No that was it. That got us talking about it again. It’s strange how a tragedy can change things.

The new album is simultaneously a reminder, revisit, and introduction to Sonick Plague for fans old and new. Is it also any sort of teaser to the new songs and sounds you guys are working on?album-cover-_RingMaster Review

Well sort of, we still got some tricks up our sleeves. That was kinda what we had in mind, turn some new people on to our old stuff and some of the old timers on to our new stuff. A lot depends on the listeners, if we’re lucky enough for them to like it we’ll do some more…Maybe in less than 30 years.

Can you give us any clues as to what you next release and songs will offer? Any spoilers?

I’m not going to tell you shit. It’s a surprise!! It’s definitely heavy metal rock and roll. You can get sweaty to it with your girl.

Between the two periods of the band, how musically were all your times taken up?

We all played in different bands, definitely kept playing and raising our kids. Myself I did a lot of hunting and a retreat in New Zealand where I was taught the ways of a true warrior killer. I had to do it for work. They wouldn’t use me as an extra on the Lord of the Rings set. I was sad about that.

Are these experiences you would say have impacted or certainly are spicing up the heart and nature of your new tracks?

The warrior thing yes. The guys are in constant fear of my wrath. I could snap any of their necks in a second for no reason what so ever. We all still have a lot to be pissed about and we’re broke. That’s what keeps us young and energized.

There is no denying something very familiar to the album yet that comes from the bands and releases filling ears and lighting appetites since the songs were first impacting on the thrash scene. Has it frustrated that some others have found greater recognition with a sound you all helped originate way back and which has obviously inspired them?

I’m asked that a lot. I wouldn’t say frustrated …yea let’s stick with frustrated. We worked our asses off, but it is what it is. I wouldn’t have minded making a living playing drums but things happen for a reason. I’m not pissed that other people “made it” I think it’s cool whenever anybody gets success in what they’re doing. I just find it extremely sad that nobody picked up any of the great bands in Connecticut back in the day. You had Liege Lord, Skeletal Ambitions, Disaster, Forced Reality, our old touring buddies Lost Generation, that’s not even scratching the surface. It seemed if you weren’t from the bay area they didn’t want to know you. It’s too bad there were some great music people missed out on. Maybe we should have switched to rap.

How did the link up with Pavement come about?

Chuck busted his ass hookin’ this stuff up. He’s the motor, our little energizer bunny. He never stops working at this. Pavement has been incredible, great bunch of guys.

SP2_RingMaster ReviewThe live side of Sonick Plague is as alive as the recording side?

Better! I always thought we we’re a workin’ man’s band. I love that energy you can only get from a crowd.

What have you got planned for the rest of the year?

We’ll see. It’s our middle aged crisis experiment. It really depends how the music sells. Hopefully people will dig hearing our old brand of thrash. I know we’re having fun playing again.

Once again thanks so much for chatting with us, anything you would like to add before we let you go?

YUP! Thank you so much to all the people who are still showing an interest in this band this has been really cool! I never thought in a million years people would even remember us. We wouldn’t be shit if it weren’t for all the great people in the metal community. Its guys like you who keep this stuff pumping. THANKS

https://www.facebook.com/sonickplague    http://www.sonickplague.com/

Read the review of the Sonick Plague album @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/07/28/sonick-plague-self-titled/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 30/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Prowler – From The Shadows

Prowler_RingMaster Review

Not to be confused with seemingly a handful of metal bands with a matching name, the Prowler unleashing new album From The Shadows, hail from Myrtle Beach, South Carolina and create a rousing onslaught of horror fuelled heavy/thrash metal. Theirs is a sound which is maybe low on major surprises and high on familiarity, one unafraid to wear its inspirations on its blood soaked sleeve, but equally it only provides a compelling and thoroughly enjoyable escapade that hits the undemanding sweet spot time and time again.

Prowler began in 2010, releasing a quartet of EP’s which they subsequently brought together with an additional new track for their debut album After You in 2013. The band’s inspirations seem to stem from early Metallica and Anthrax, taking From The Shadows as an example, and indeed eighties thrash in general, essences twisted into sonic echoes and offshoots from horror movies of the same era. 2013 also saw the release of The New Blood EP, a well-received attention grabber in many ways sowing the accomplished and ravenous seeds for the Roger Lian (Slayer, Overkill, Pantera, Damageplan) mastered From The Shadows. As suggested the band’s new album does not particularly reshape the landscape or scenery of thrash metal but it does join a handful of genre releases this year which simply leave ears and appetite highly satisfied whilst uncaging anthemic fun easily luring limbs, neck muscles, and voice to get fully involved.

The album opens with R.O.T.L.D and the first of the individual film samples bookending each track within the album; here a slither of Return Of the Living Dead triggering a swiftly contagious rhythmic stroll. A riff and groove sculpted swing soon adds to the dynamic theatre and persuasion of the song, whilst vocally with a whiff of Wednesday 13 to his delivery, guitarist Patrick Best opens up the cinematic narrative. It is a raw and magnetic concoction with a horror punk scent brewing up its enmity within a thrash spawned prowl, and a rousing start to the album.

cover_RingMaster Review     The excellent track makes way for Out Of The Fog, riffs and beats encasing the opening sample just as the theme of the lyrics impose within the cinematic source. Keys soon add spicy colouring to the antagonistic prowl of sound whilst the bass of Shawn Bruce and beats of drummer Jak Sumwalt cast their own sinister and rampant cage. It is a predatory mix with plenty of enjoyable and generally unpredictable twists, and knowing the films seeding each track, as here, only adds to the theatre of it all.

I Am Wolf quickly hunts down the senses and psyche next; the throaty primal tone of the bass and the rapier like beats alone inciting ears and imagination whilst vocally Best is a protagonist with barker like appeal around the continuing samples which puncture the passage of the track. As the first pair of songs, the track is undiluted full-blooded thrash metal, easy to offer comparisons too but hard to dismiss as a pale imitation of anything.

The commanding and stirring beats of Sumwalt make an inspiring impact across the whole of the album, and at the start of the following The Thing Not Seen, simply stalking ears with a tribal come demonic stance and canter. Like the bass tempting offered continually by Bruce, which is just as potent across From The Shadows, there is a primal feel and air to the rhythmic provocation, one emulated in their own raw and spiteful fashion by vocals and searing guitar enterprise of Best.

Prowler next offer a cover of The Ramones track, Pet Sematary, the song given a heavy metal make-over fuelled by another thrash cast tempest of energy and sound. It is a more than decent and pleasing version but lacks something compared to the band’s own songs, which maybe is how it should be with any cover song, always being eclipsed by a band’s own invention as shown immediately by Return To The Lot. Another entwining rabid rapacity and a more stalker like gait to its primeval hell, the Salems Lot inspired ravishing captures ears and imagination with visceral ease, again not splintering into new domains but healthily feeding any wants from a thrash/horror punk fusion.

Death On Wheels carries a similar attack and growl to its predecessor and wears arguably the strongest Metallica/Anthrax sound of any song within the album, and through those aspects does not quite match what has already lit up From The Shadows. There is no denying though that it has ears and pleasure in full swing before leaving Creature Of The Black and its atmospheric entrance to work another enthralling tempting. Eventually the song grows into a muscular and savagely predacious offering with carnivorous rhythms and caustic grooves, and a fine end to a thoroughly enjoyable album.

From The Shadows certainly offers little new but it certainly provides a festival of eighties aural and visual devilry with an attitude and snarl as nasty as the creatures central to each and every song. As mentioned earlier, it is enormous fun and that definitely works when looking for something to simply get the blood rushing through veins and emotions primed to take on the world.

From The Shadows is available digitally and on CD now via Slaney Records and @ http://prowlerhorror.bandcamp.com/album/from-the-shadows

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Prowler-Metal/151137794901489

RingMaster 21/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Cerebellion – Regeneration

Promo_Orange-Sky_RingMaster Review

It has been five years since US metallers Cerebellion gripped our attention with their excellent debut album Inalienable; a stretch of time which has not felt as long through many of the album’s tracks and subsequent 2013 single A Better Version, never being too far from our listening for pleasure playlists. Fair to say though and like for so many, there was healthy excitement when being sent their new EP Regeneration. It has proven to be an encounter rekindling an already rich appetite for the Californian quartet, and their compelling sound which has through the new offering shown itself to have grown and matured without losing the distinctive Cerebellion breath.

Formed in 2009, the Long Beach hailing foursome of vocalist Joe Arnold, guitarist John Arnold, bassist Marc Battung, and drummer Jimmy Schultz quickly earned a strong reputation for their inventive fusion of metal and heavy rock, a blend again fuelling the impressive Regeneration. It is an incitement which, as we suggested, has further blossomed, the songs within the EP more diverse within their provocative walls and embracing a sharper and fuller design of textures and flavours. The band has not lost or defused their aggressive snarl either, though it has been honed into a more skilfully provocative and rousing essence which only helps the band’s new release powerfully spark ears and imagination.

All Came to Light starts things off, an initially sultry and melancholic melody slipping from the strings of the guitar. Its potent coaxing is soon joined by a rawer but no less evocative lure of bass and darker guitar shadows, harmonies soon after also adding to the intrigue and emerging drama. With rhythms warming up until things are stirring nicely, they and every corner of song and band explode into a roar of heavy beats and rugged riffs around the dusty tones of Joe Arnold. As existing fans would expect, a spicy groove is soon in the midst of the engaging tempest too, the song a rigorous charge unafraid to slip into gentle melodic caresses with matching vocal persuasion. With a touch of Metallica to it alongside whispers of Alice in Chains, the song ebbs and flows in intensity, bellows and croons in aggression and attitude uniting to draw only a hungry attention for it and the whole release.

ReGen_Front_Cover_Final_RingMaster Review     The following Cold similarly makes a gentle entrance, though this time there is a definite intimidating shadow behind the emerging sound and vocal tempting. Soon the track is into a muscular but reflective stroll, rhythms a dark texture against the lighter but no less sorrow laced enterprise of guitar and voice. Across it the rolling and imaginative beats of Schultz are pure magnetism, their anthemic lures matched by the throaty emotion cast by Battung’s bass and the gnawing riffs of John Arnold, the latter also casting some delicious acidic enticing within his solo and imagination. Arguably the track lacks the richer originality of others, at times providing something for expectations but every time thoughts like that do arise it is fair to say that something twists and turns in the songwriting and song to argue the point.

The variety within the release continues more strongly with both Savior and Nothing Left. The first of the two explores a heavier rock spiced canvas upon which the guitar spins a melodic and groove metal seeded web. As the voice of Joe spreads the narrative with emotive expression and energy, there is an air of bands like In Flames and Avenged Sevenfold to the track, but only spices honed into something, certainly taking longer to persuade than its predecessors, but brewing up an individual and long-term captivation. Its successor is similar in that it slowly burns into the passions and also leaves one of the deepest enjoyments. The song opens with a mesmeric kiss of Spanish guitar, their flamenco spawned melodies like kisses on the senses and a tonic for the imagination. The song is an acoustic seduction, its beauty tempering and complementing the melancholy oozing from every syllable and harmony, not forgetting the bewitching strings which emerge later in the song. Eventually though, the drama has to explode and the thrilling encounter erupts into a rousing intensive finale though with one last acoustic stroke for its last touch.

Cerebellion are back in voracious swing with Thin Ice next, the track from its first breath almost predatory with its scythes of sound and beats, all colluding to forge a prowling enticing and subsequently an adrenaline driven, thrash bred onslaught. Of course the band is never one to settle into one wind of persuasion and they seamlessly and skilfully infuse melodic and calmer swerves into that the at times almost rabid intensity. The track is as anthemic as it is creatively riveting, a song which alone tells you all you need to know about band and sound, and definitely the perfect gateway for new fans into Cerebellion.

Regeneration ends with Forsaken, a fascinating and creatively tempestuous encounter again revealing everything impressive about the band and music. From individual prowess to group imagination, songwriting maturity to lyrical and melodic incitement, song and release only and increasingly impress.

The hefty time between releases has only seen Cerebellion grow into a masterful metal/rock proposition, but you know whilst listening to Regeneration, you still get the feeling there is plenty more untapped inside the band’s creativity. Hopefully we will discover that a little more swiftly ahead.

The Regeneration EP is available now through most online stores and digitally and on CD @ https://cerebellion.bandcamp.com/album/regeneration

http://www.cerebellion1.com/ http://www.facebook.com/cerebellion1

RingMaster 18/07/2015

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Animosity Kills – Manipulative

Animosity Kills Gen pub photo_RingMaster Review

The name is Animosity Kills and if the Norwegian band can realise the open potential rifling through their debut EP Manipulative, it could be a moniker you will become very aware of. The four track rumble of metal wears its influences firmly on its sleeve, inspirations from the likes of Metallica, Iron Maiden, Pantera, and Testament clear and familiar attributes, but that does not stop the introduction to the Askøy quintet being charged with fresh and tenaciously modern enterprise. It is a thoroughly enjoyable encounter making a potent nudge on ears and awareness.

Animosity Kills began in the October of 2013 and consists of rhythm guitarists Stephan Høgtun and Rupert Notøy Rødland alongside lead guitarist Mats Bruland, as well as vocalist/bassist Erik Lindelid and drummer Sindre Høgtun Gjelsvik. There is little more we can reveal about them except that on good authority they are one mighty beast live, a suggestion easy to go with going by the energy and intensity of the songs within Manipulative.

Animosity Kills Manipulative Album Cover_RingMaster Review   The EP opens up with Thermic Vision which is immediately badgering ears with a horde of rugged riffs and a wonderful carnivorously dark tone from Lindelid’s bass. With the crisp swipes of Høgtun Gjelsvik’s sticks on skin adding to the already volatile mix, the track is soon into a predatory stride bred from thrash seeds. Swiftly a busyness to the sound and songwriting of the band grabs ears, the creative web as clear as the spices sparking their sound, Pantera and Metallica the obvious references to the imposing and compelling opener. The track continues to prowl and roam over the senses, never exploding as it hints it might and thoughts hoped it would but still providing a captivating and combative persuasion sparking a keen appetite for what is on offer and yet to come.

To come is first of all Lord Of Darkness, it also tall and muscular with fiery guitars and thumping rhythms ridden by the strong vocals of Lindelid. As its predecessor, the song also keeps things turning and twisting with creative regularity, the trio of guitars creating a weave of individual and united resourcefulness which just licks at ears as the rhythmic side of the band tempers their adventure with a bordering on bestial contrast and threat. It is an accomplished and richly satisfying proposal but quickly outshone by the following Ballistic. Even with its firm tempting of riffs lined with slim hooks there is a new air of variety, and so it continues as the song expands into an enthralling stomp of rich contagion equipped with a virulent swagger. There is a touch of Volbeat and Grumpynators to it, the same kind of swinging infectiousness they are known for fuelling the addictive power of the chorus and the rousing riffs leading into it especially. With blistering melodic craft and endeavour pouring from Bruland’s guitar across the similarly gripping adventure sprung by Høgtun and Høgtun Gjelsvik, the track is a show stopper, or should that be inciter.

Manipulate concludes with its title track, a song riding thrash cultured torrents of compelling riffery and pummelling rhythms, including another hypnotic bass snarl, and twisting them into a blaze of instinctive heavy/classic metal. It has the old school air you might imagine but the fire of the track flames with touches of alternative and groove metal as well as simply a bruising and healthy dose of raw rock ‘n’ roll.

It is a fine end to an impressive first taste of Animosity Kills, a band with the promise and tools, not forgetting invention, to forge their own distinct and rich place in the metal scene sometime ahead.

The Manipulative EP is out now @ http://animositykills.bandcamp.com/releases

https://www.facebook.com/AnimosityKills   https://twitter.com/animositykills

RingMaster 17/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Dark Hound – Oceans

dark_hound__RingMaster Review

Nashville is going to have some major metal explosion to persuade people to stop thinking musically of only its country scene and heritage and you assume would be a feat too far, or maybe not if there are more bands like Dark Hound bubbling away and emerging in its underground scene. The quartet has a sound, as evidenced by their new EP Oceans, which does not yet dramatically startle or threaten the limits of originality to any of the varied metal flavours it skilfully employs yet it persistently entices with something fresh and unpredictable as it provides a thoroughly enjoyable time. The follow up to the band’s acclaimed self-titled debut album, the EP is an immediate and constant adventure of craft and imagination which maybe will not have you shouting from the rooftops but has a fair chance of making Dark Hound a band you hungrily want more of.

The 2009 formed band consists of long-time friends in vocalist/bassist ET Brown, guitarists Elliot Gordon (Clorange) and Evan Hensley (Nightfall), and drummer Josh Brown (Enfold Darkness, Nashvillbilly). Their first full-length pushed their local success into a broader attentive spotlight with accompanying critical acclaim but now with the release of the Frank Serafine recorded Oceans it is easy to expect a more forceful nudge on wider recognition and appetites.

Oceanscover_RingMaster Review     The band’s influences list the likes of Megadeth, Iron Maiden, Pantera, Arch Enemy, Testament, and Dream Theater, numerous hints which do indeed spill in varying degrees from the enterprise and imagination of EP and opening song Thread. Classic melodic enticing and drama opens it up, rhythms commanding as they stir things further and spark the song to hit an infectious and muscular stride. Already imagination is fuelling vocals and the landscape of the song, unexpected and spicy twists wrong footing expectations as the band reveals a potent almost mischievous resourcefulness to their songwriting and ambition. As suggested earlier there is a spread of many spices within the band’s sound, engaging ears here with anthemic thrash and heavy metal aligned to old school and modern creativity.

The strong start continues with To Know End, a song brewing up its magnetic persuasion from its first sonic breath with bass and beats an instant imposing flirtation quickly enhanced by wiry strands of guitar grooving. There is an early predatory swagger to the track too, one emulated in the appealing variety of ET Brown’s vocal delivery with his tones as imaginative as the sounds around him. A sense of familiarity is also, as with every song, a swift temptation but soon woven into something refreshing on the ear and impressing on thoughts. For all the variation of metal involved, again thrash and heavy metal a rich essence, there is a healthy if understated whisper of Suicidal Tendencies blowing across the tempestuous landscape at times, a probably coincidental spicing which just adds something extra to the song and release.

Just as Blind shares a grungier hue to its earthy melodic stroll next, the track more a stalking than a charge but with a volatile belly of energy and voracious shadows constantly giving depth and intimidation to the satisfaction bloating encounter. The band calls their sound metal and that is best as just trying to pin down the flavours within the third song would use a paragraph in tagging it.

The EP keeps its best two tracks for its climax starting with Rearview Mirror, a masterful and incendiary collusion of contagious endeavour and predatory textures twisted into a seriously addictive and fierce waltz of new and old ideation. The track has body and emotions enslaved, recruited to its cause early though even it has to conceive best track honours to the EP’s closing encounter. The title track toys with the imagination through its dark drama from its opening seeds, ears caught at the same time and seduced further by the flowing slip through frenetic and mellow creative scenery. Hooks and grooves are no less potent and relentless, whilst the bass of the frontman seems to get heavier and more bestial with every passing minute.

It is a tremendous end to what is a mouth-watering and severely enjoyable release. Dark Hound has a sound and presence, as mentioned earlier, which does not cause major surprises but it would be unfair not to admit each listen leaves a stronger and increasingly lingering impression. It will be interesting to see how the band continues to evolve but more of the same next time will not be a cause of disappointment.

The self-released Oceans EP is available from 10th July

http://www.dark-hound.com   https://www.facebook.com/darkhoundband

Ringmaster 10/07/2015

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27 Tons of Metal New England – Various

cover_RingMaster Review

And Bluntface Records do it again, thrusting the underground scene at the senses courtesy of another essential compilation of some of the most striking and potential drenched bands around. This time the US label is exploring the underground metal scene from New England, which on the evidence of 27 Tons of Metal New England, is simply writhing with great ravenous bands and sounds. The release is as diverse in styles as it is voracious in creativity and though with the amount of bands and metal subgenres involved personal tastes will obviously find a greater hunger for some over others, it is fair to say that the album from start to finish is a compelling treat with no weak spots, and all the more tastier for being completely free.

The encounter opens with Carnivora and a track taken from their outstanding EP, The Vision. Pessimist’s Tongue is the Danvers quintet at their full blistering best and weaving suggestive ambiences into subsequent tapestries of rabid vocals and rancorous intensity. Yet despite its almost cancerous intent and creative breath, there is anthemic energy and a web of searing adventure from the guitars involved, which in turn sparks addictively imaginative exploits from the band across the song’s corrosive landscape.

It is a scintillating start to the release pushed on by Alterius and their uncompromising melodic death metal trespass on the senses, A Citadel’s Demise. The song comes from the band’s latest EP Voyager, and merges classical overtones into its fluid brutal and seductive tempting. Like being serenaded whilst the beast tears your throat out, the track stalks ears and psyche setting in motion a keen appetite to know more, a success matched by Revere quartet Travel Amygdala and their aggressively smouldering Died by a Bullet. Entangling its inventive metal bred sound with progressive and grunge seeded imagination, the song aggressively crawls over the senses enticing and intimidating, especially as it builds in energy and tempestuous air. There is also a potent sludge feel to part of its character too, the thick prowls between forceful strides of creative and vocal drama carrying the strongest whiff, with ultimately everything uniting for one riveting proposition.

Bostonian black metal trio Ashen Wings comes next, the band’s raw and carnivorous sound a bracing magnetic scourge delivered to ears from Cancerous Bones. As insidious and ruinous as you can imagine, it also spawns a swing to its gait which only adds to the addictive proposal on offer before making way for the just as destructively virulent Scourge of the Hierophant from Sorrowseed. A blend of blackened death metal with a healthy vein of classic and melodic tenacity, the increasingly thrilling track smothers ears and appetite with pestilential persuasion whilst provoking the want to offer vocalist Lilith Astaroth some soothing for her surely shredded vocal chords.

band-contacts-page-127 Tons of Metal New England      Walk the Earth (No Longer) from sludge/doomers Conclave steps up next, the nine minute intrusion an accomplished and enthralling predation cast with rugged heavy riffs and heavily swiping rhythms, all lorded over by just as unpolished and alluring vocals. From their Breaking Ground EP, the song is as effective descending on ears in top gear or in crowding their walls with a lumbering and weighty provocation within a long but never less than thickly engaging incitement.

The same kind of hold is seized by Beneath The Burial next and their track In Memory, its fusion of hardcore ferocity and metal spawned sonic invention a fury of searing grooves, vocal animosity, and subsequently predatory imagination. As the album itself, there is a wealth of flavours emerging across the track musically and vocally, which only adds to the slow but fiercely burning persuasion of the song to inspire a want for more as it makes way for Skin Drone and God Complex. One of the few bands these ears had already come across and previously devoured, the duo of Bluntface Records founder Otto Kinzel and Erik Martin of Erik Dismembered and Critical Dismemberment unleash one of those examinations which you never know whether to fear or whole heartedly embrace, the latter always the chosen reaction of course. Like a sonic scavenger, the track vocally and musically spills its creative industrial/metal animus on to the senses within an evocative ambience which then inspires a melancholic exploration of emotive and creative expression. The song is a cauldron of inventive sound and emotional intensity, a rich picking for those with an avant-garde side to their preferred examinations.

The scorching designs and temperament of Dirty Birdy from metalcore furnace Don’t Cross the Streams is next; band and track a scarring addictiveness which without springing major surprises has ears and heavy enjoyment sealed from the first clutch of seconds. Their triumph is quickly backed by Stoughton power/progressive metallers Forevers Fallen Grace and Clarion of Regret, another song which needed warming to before its potent expanse of craft and enterprise became an inescapable hook, and after them Makavrah with the excellent Awakening The Ancients. The Peterborough hailing doomsters have a sound which is dangerously mesmeric, a senses meddling sonic bewitchment which as shown by its twelve minutes of evolving soundscape, is hex like in its ingeniously dramatic and creative exploration. With echoes of Show Of Bedlam to it, the track is one delicious incessant crawl.

The industrial endeavour of Isolated Antagonist more than lives up to its offering’s title next, Infection a contagious causticity of sound and emotion with vocals to match as it worms under the skin and into the psyche with lingering rewards, whilst the following Composted bring a carnal presence and hostility into the equation with their track OB/GYN O.G. The band’s death metal onslaught has the voracity of thrash and swagger of groove metal to it, and as hungry hues only help to create an immense and irresistible corruption.

Both Charlestown sextet Untombed and Mike Kerr Band keep the riveting roar of the album going, the first with their groove and antagonism loaded death metal antipathy, Criminal Inception. Savage and violently catchy, the track is another which is maybe not gripped by original exploits but is one spilling a fresh venom which leaves a great many of fellow emerging genre bands in the shade whilst its successor is the title track from its creators recently released new album The Truth of the Lion and features Texan vocalist Adrienne Cowan and Jim Oliveira in its classic/melodic metal lure.

Power groove metal is on the agenda next through Before the Judge and their track Bobby D. With a highly agreeable nag of riffs and grooves lining its erosive blaze, the song stirs the blood band-contacts-page-2_RingMaster Reviewwhilst pouring more diversity into the compilation, variety further expanded by The Aberration and their track Bologna Skins are the Next Big Thing. The band consists of Travis O’Connell (guitar) and Jim Cole (drums), an instrumental duo creating, on the evidence of their contribution, compelling proposals of snarling progressive metal loaded with uncompromising attitude.

Melodic death metal quartet My Missing Half scars air and ears next with The Lives I’ve Ruined, a song with essences of The Black Dahlia Murder and At the Gates to it whilst finding its own magnetically inventive nature. The track leaves emotions and senses breathless but hungry for more as so many on the release, including Seeds of Negligence and their maelstrom of varied and inhospitable metal posing as The Reaper. The song is a bruising and vicious temptation of death, groove, thrash, and progressive strains of extreme metal, an incendiary incitement sparking a lust for further confrontation.

Dover trio Cactus Hag drags the listener back into a rich immersion of sludge and doom invasiveness with Grand Lodge of the Mirage, the track an insidious erosion snuffing out light and hope whilst sparking just as strong enjoyment. Its smothering rancor is contrasted by the brighter and superbly volatile adventure of G.O.G. from Side Effects May Include, the song another entwining a mass of different styles into its individual tempest of heavy rock and creatively rabid metal, and another only leaving the urge to go explore in their wake. Which is something which also applies to Pelham’s Epicenter and the thrash fuelled insurgency of See Through. With strands of alternative and groove metal to its robust and tenacious exploits, the track is as anthemic as it is strikingly inventive, and amongst admittedly many, an instinctive favourite.

band-contacts-page-3_RingMaster Review     Fog Wizard get body and passions inflamed again with Fear the Kraken, a rapacious prowling built like Sabbath meets Motorhead with the attitude of Stuck Mojo and the combined snarl of Slayer and Black Flag. One slab of real pleasure is replaced by another and the abrasive kaleidoscope of sound unveiled by Sonic Pulse through Defenders of the Good Time. A brawling festival of power and thrash metal with a flurry of heavy and classic metal hues for greater captivation, the track is a ferocious blaze equipped with drama, familiarity, and inescapable bait.

The heavy weight slab of talent is brought to an impressive end by a trio of bands to also keep a close eye on, starting with the bestial sound of extreme metallers Graveborn. Their mercilessly hellacious and skilled Leviathan is sheer sonic and rhythmic savagery with just as brutishly varied vocals, and another big enticement before heavy/thrash metal Verscythe prove their classic seeds in the richly magnetic Land of Shells.

Completed finally by Vacant Eyes and the melody sculpted funereal death/doom exploration that is The Dim Light of Introversion, a track thick in atmosphere and haunting trespasses for a darkly compelling seducing, 27 Tons of Metal New England is an intensive journey through the depths and expanses of New England’s underground metal scene. It is one of the most extensive and rewarding compilations in a long time which from start to finish, enthrals and assaults, entices and transgresses. If any metal fan does not come away from the encounter with at least a handful of new lusts we would be amazed. So no dawdling, go and get one of the biggest and best free treats of the year,

27 Tons of Metal New England is available for free download @ http://bluntfacerecords.com/27-tons-of-metal-new-england

RingMaster 06/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Call To Arms – Invictus EP

Call To Arms_RingMaster Review

If the members of Call To Arms are as young as photos of them suggest, then it is hard not to be gripped by intrigue and excitement as to how good this band could become given the impressiveness of debut EP Invictus. Made up of five voracious and inventive metal tempests, the release hits the listeners straight between the eyes with its raw hostility cast into imaginative and confrontational anthemic persuasion.

The band began in 2013, formed by vocalist Dean Donnelly alongside original bassist Jordan Conway. Quickly the line-up was completed by guitarists Daniel Tyrell and Niall Ennis, lead and rhythm respectively, and drummer Ben Deane. Concentrating on honing their sound for the first few months, it is fair to say that the Ballymun hailing Call To Arms quickly whipped keen vocal attention and support. Making their live debut at The Academy, Dublin as part of The Blastbeat: Battle of the Bands, the band has gone on to share stages with the likes of Avatar, Fozzy, and Chelsea Grin and personnel wise seen Alex Caffrey replace Conway and recently after the recording and release of Invictus, Deane leave the band.

Produced by Joe Cleere, Invictus as suggested earlier, is an imposing and striking entrance by the band, needing very little time to make a potent impression as opener Our Salvation gets to work on ears and appetite. Featuring guest vocals from Sam Gorman of Enshrined, the track builds a thumping invitation with rhythms and spicy grooves, its lure heavy metal bred but keeping in its creative pocket for now, the subsequent rage fuelling its presence. Soon hitting a thick stride though, vocals spill antagonism and combat in their raw tone and delivery, matched in kind by the bass as the guitars spin an infectious web of hooks and abrasing riffery. It is like a mix of Biohazard and Killswitch Engage in many ways, yet has a freshness which especially hits as band and song twist in unpredictable and gripping enterprise. As it evolves and expands its imagination, a psychotic influence hits the song’s compelling bassline and vocals, their moment to stalk the psyche only leading to another ferocious assault posing as the climax.

Cover_RingMaster Review     Bullet With Your Name steps up next bullying ears with vocals and ravenous sounds though yet again there is an infectious spine and adventure to the track which has you welcoming its vicious assault. As in its predecessor and songs to come, there is as much a punk/hardcore richness to the tempest as a thrash/metal breeding, though it is the latter spawning another magnetic persuasion of emerging imaginative twists and endeavour. The individual skills and resourcefulness of the band is also in open evidence as well as an eagerness to push ideas and textures with elements of discord and unpredictability.

The release continues to impress and reveal new aspect within the band’s songwriting and sound as Imprisoned Darkness unleashes its fury next. Opening with a mesh of acidic grooves which in turn spark a delicious hook which can only be described as Dead Kennedys like, the song rallies attention and emotions. Those initial lures continue to grip within a sonic and vocal abrasion unafraid to colour its animus with elements of classic metal and metalcore like hues. It is inescapable persuasion though soon outshone by the upstanding Mirrors, its opening military in rhythmic tempting and militant in attitude. Once more metal and hardcore unite in one hellacious and infectiously alluring examination veined by skilled and flavoursome grooves amidst rich sonic exploits. The track takes top honours within Invictus and if you want a teaser before braving the Call To Arms onslaught, it tells you all you need to know about band, sound, and their stirring potential.

The EP is closed by The Core, a final uncompromising anthem you just know will have venues throbbing with bodies and attitude. Thrash and punk bred, the track is an intense and incendiary end to a tremendous first look at and feel of the Call To Arms sound and presence. Invictus is pleasingly raw and shows the band still finding its unique feet but there is no doubting that we have one rather promising and exciting protagonist in our midst which can only get big, bolder, and more fearsome.

The Invictus EP is available now @ http://calltoarmsirl.bandcamp.com/releases

https://www.facebook.com/CallToArmsIRL/   https://twitter.com/CallToArmsIRL

RingMaster 03/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net