Riffocity – Under A Mourning Sky

As if thrash metal has not be blessed enough with some outstanding releases this year, Greek metallers Riffocity have added another mouth-watering roar with their debut album Under A Mourning Sky. Thrash bred but casting a web of inescapable hooks and incessant grooves doused in melodic fire, the ten track encounter is like a dog with a bone; seizing ears and imagination with creative jaws, gnawing and shaking the senses until absolute submission is given to its predacious prowess.

Formed in 2013 by guitarist Dimitris Kalaitzidis, Serres hailing Riffocity gave notice of their potential and invention with the Disciples of the Storm EP last year. It is fair to say though that Under A Mourning Sky has not only realised that early promise but taken it to a whole new level. Recorded with Firewind guitarist/keyboardist Bob Katsionis, who also mixed and mastered the encounter as well as provided its keys, the album instantly lays a tight grip on attention with the opening throes of first track Hail Thy Father. As imposing beats land riffs gather, guitars and bass colluding in drama and intent as melodic wires emerge to entangle the threat. Straight away an appetite for the impending explosion is ripe, increasing in anticipation as the band heads into a momentary suggestive breath and the groove woven netting which springs from it. Made up of various twists, the track’s nagging enterprise is irresistible, the guitars of Kalaitzidis and George Lezkidis casting addiction as the bass of Panos Savvas grumbles. With the rousing roar of vocalist Thomas Trabouras backed by Kalaitzidis its own anthemic incitement, the track is near on perfection and certainly one of the best starts to an album this year.

Riffocity swiftly show the dexterity of sound and imagination in their sound with next up Arnis Oblivion, its opening piano nurture elegance is soon wrapped in classic metal breath and suggestion before thrash instincts again charge ears with nostrils flared. The sudden drop into melodic calm with a great clean Greek sung croon just catches the imagination, Constantin Maris guesting alongside Trabouras across the song. The band continues to sublimely blend mellow and feverish endeavour with increasing imagination and unpredictability before the song makes way for the ferocious energy and infectious trespass of the equally outstanding Bitter Sunday. Again the fusion of thrash and groove metal, to simplify its character, is so easy to devour and get involved with, riffs and rhythms alone a virulent persuasion never allowing expectations a moment to settle.

Fortunes of Death emerges from its stormy climate with melodic tendrils wrapping ears with more poetic suggestion, their vines as captivating as Trabouras’ gentle but commanding vocal caresses. It too is an enslaving start which blossoms into a compelling theatre of sound and enterprise with Maris once more adding his vocal prowess. There is something familiar about the song once it is in full bloom yet nothing which can be defined only enjoyed as the band blends an array of metallic flavours with increasing boldness and intensity; the track at times as rabid as its predecessor.

Through the ravenous tone and exploits of This Eternal Secret Lies Above and the senses stalking tenacity of From Inside the Arrows Come, the album and pleasure just escalate, the second of the two especially invasive and riveting with Riffocity again showing they really know how to begin a song and build anticipation for its attack, and indeed how to back up that suggested potential with craft and invention.

There is no sign of a dip in adventure or enjoyment as track by track the album ravages the senses, next up Isolation open in its Testament/Exodus like breeding and bold in its own creative mature while Perished Unloved, with Savvas’ bass simply and wonderfully bestial in voice, twists and turns with dervish qualities and a devilish intent though its thrashing antics are all controlled and eagerly rapacious.

The album’s title track is another where certain elements seem recognisable yet everything is fresh and eagerly chewed upon as the song dances voraciously and trickily in the ears, setting up a new wave of greed ready for the closing raptorial grasp of Above the End. With riffs that hound ears, rhythms that pummel the senses, and an anthemic urgency that ignites the spirit the track is inescapable pleasure, and with imagination and melodic canniness blazing within those walls, a conclusion to the album as potent as its start.

As suggested, thrash has had a mighty year with impressive releases and Under a Mourning Sky just might be the best of the lot; certainly it is at the fore of the most enjoyably addictive and devoured right here.

Under A Mourning Sky is available now through Riffocity.

https://www.facebook.com/RIFFOCITYbandgr/

Pete RingMaster 21/11/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Kings Will Fall – Thrash Force.One

In a year of some particularly potent thrash bred onslaughts, the debut album from Kings Will Fall definitely stands out. It may have missed your attention as ours until now, being released earlier this year, but more than deserves devouring attention. Dealing ‘Thrash ‘n Death’ from the Alps since their emergence in 2013, the Italian quartet have hit the sweet spot with Thrash Force.One, a senses buffeting, appetite arousing onslaught which fuses old school thrash with death metal bred flavourings and individual ferocity.

Hailing from Sarntal in South Tyrol, Kings Will Fall consists of vocalist Fabian Jung, guitarist Rene Thaler, bassist Daniel Vanzo, and drummer Lukas Gross. 2015 saw the release of demo EP, Death Comes Early, a well-received appetiser for the attention grabbing release of Thrash Force.One. As its title suggests, the album is an unbridled rush on the senses, a forceful tempest of thrash metal driven in top gear from the first throes of Toxic War. This second track bursts forth from the atmospheric setting of opener In Dead & Mud & Misery, a sample laced war zone setting up the climate of things to come. Initially its successor stalks the listener, prowling with irritable intent before opening its jaws to unleash its storm. With the eager vocals of Jung surfing the tide of riffs, the track infests ears and imagination with ease, the inspirations of bands like Testament and Exodus proudly spicing the rush. Embracing fiery enterprise from Thaler too, the track simply grips body and pleasure.

Next up Shots for Glory swiftly stamps its own heavy authority on ears, sizing up its victim as bass and drums probe. It holds its restraint in place for a while as vocals and riffs harry the senses, relinquishing it a touch as new hunger hits grooves and rhythmic predation but never giving a free hand to aggression though everything about the song bites hard and relentlessly. Its infectious animosity is subsequently twisted with the band’s inventive imagination, the track an unpredictable and captivating fury before Burn All Fuel begins its determined trespass with nagging riffs and barbarous rhythms. Subsequently the track becomes a ravaging scourge with Jung’s caustic scowls magnetically backed by death bred growls, a masterful blend in the equally captivating and inhospitable contagion of sound. Vanzo’s bass is bestial, Gross swings delivered with bone splintering power and with the dexterous exploits of Thaler it all contributes to one glorious thrash roar.

Endless Pain quickly infests its riffs sculpted entrance with imagination and unpredictable revelry, the thrash bred heart of the song littered with Kings Will Fall nurtured character but never wandering from its rabid genre instincts while Damage Crown is two minutes of bullish, almost punk scented maniacal metal and quite superb. It borders on schizophrenic as it sets a new pinnacle in the lofty heights of the album, at times stomping around with Anthrax meets Biohazard like bedlam to steal the passions and trample their lustful submission under further devilment.

As mighty as both songs are, Buster soon grabs best track honours with its predatory yet addictively flirtatious savagery. Kings Will Fall again goes for the jugular but with a flair and flourish which exhilarates as they show further evidence of their own imagination and creative boldness. It’s maelstrom of grooves and riffs are pure addiction, its rhythmic assault welcomingly vicious and combined pure manna for the thrash hungry heart.

The sultry twang bringing Gängster 1948 into view is a deceptive lure but a scent of the rock ‘n’ roll lining the metallic animosity of the track.  As it ventures deeper into its soul and heavy rock instincts, song and band get more adventurous and tempting, opening up a whole new aspect to their thrash personality. There are definite essences of Motörhead within the track and there is no surprise when the album closes with a fine cover of the band’s We Are Motörhead which has limbs and pleasure bouncing with raw energy.

It is a riotous end to an album which commands a swift return time and time again. Certainly Thrash Force.One is not the most unique proposition at times yet every moment has a personality all Kings Will Fall which is as fresh and adventurous as anything out there. As we said 2017 has been a great year for thrash bred exploits, Thrash Force.One one big reason why.

Thrash Force.One is out now @ https://kingswillfall.bandcamp.com/album/thrash-force-one

https://www.facebook.com/kings.will.fall.metal/   https://twitter.com/kingswillfall_

Pete RingMaster 17/10/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Mason – Impervious

We are not going to kid you by saying that it is the most unique album you will embrace this year, though bold adventure it certainly does not lack, but you will have to go a long way to find something as seriously rousing and simply enjoyable as Impervious. The new album from Australian thrashers Mason, it surges through ears with rabid energy and unbridled aggression and proceeds to raise the ante groove by searing groove and hook by virulent hook.

Bursting from the Melbourne music scene in 2007, Mason openly embraces the Bay Area thrash scene and the obvious protagonists in the genre’s general eighties borne assault and consumption of world metal. A self-titled debut EP of 2011 was followed by the band’s first album two years later, Warhead which included guest guitarist Jeff Loomis (Arch Enemy, Nevermore) sparking far wider attention the way of the quartet. Its success was matched by that of second EP, Unmerciful last year and a live presence which over time has seen Mason share stages with the likes of Harlott, Havok, Accept, Revocation, Toxic Holocaust, Accept, Mutank, and Annihilator and play across Asia, Europe into Canada. Impervious looks and sounds like the key to the locks of the biggest spotlights and awareness, a tempest taking little time to get down to persuasive business.

The portentous lead of intro Eligos lures the listener straight into the waiting clutches of Burn. Within seconds it is careering through ears with predatory riffs and rhythms as vocalist/guitarist Jimmy Benson stirs things further with his eager snarls. Swiftly you can hear the touches of bands like Testament and Kreator in the song’s assault but only to enhance its oncoming and subsequently relentless irresistibility. Creative twists and turns come with a definite Mason identity to further entice and excite whilst the chorus amidst it all is manna for rock ‘n’ roll instincts. The track is superb, a rebel rousing, bone shaking treat setting the tone and adventure of things to come.

Tears of Tragedy is just as rapacious in energy and aggression next, the spiky tones of Benson as inspiring and tempting as his and fellow guitarist Grant Burns’ exploits. The rapier like swings of drummer Nonda T. and surly tones of Steve Montalto’s bass similarly stir spirit and appetite, their at times almost primal presence hungrily driving the sonic enterprise and assault of the song.  With fiery melodies and descriptive sonic weaves webbing the encounter, it is another stirring slice of full throttle thrash to match its predecessor.

Both tracks hint at an even bolder adventurousness and individuality in the Mason writing and imagination which is more pronounced within next up song, The Afterlife. It too has top gear in full use but wraps it in a melodic and technical prowess which is almost overwhelmed at times by the song’s ferocity but a constant impressive pleasure throughout. It too has a chorus which gets under the skin within one round of its anthemic call while pushing the album’s already lofty heights on again.

The album’s title track follows; its tone almost barbarous as it sizes up its victim before consuming the senses with ravenous riffs, biting rhythms, and sonic animosity, this all bound in a virulent contagion which infests the psyche with ease. Individual flair again is as open as the animosity within the song’s irresistible presence before Cross This Path descends like a pestilential horde upon the senses. Saliva and venom drips from Benson’s tones, violence from Nonda T swings as the track carnivorously chews on ears. It is a predation superbly tempered by the sonic dexterity of Burns and Benson, though every tendril spun and melody uncaged certainly sears the senses.

Sacrificed has plenty to live up to as successor to its mighty predecessor and with its sonic webbing and thunderous air gives it a potent shot if without quite making the last few steps. Nevertheless, the track captivates as it pushes evidence of an even bolder appetite unafraid to experiment imagination within the Mason sound and potential before Hellbent on Chaos savages and entices in equal measure. It too might lack the final sparks of earlier companions, such their heights and not its shortcomings, yet has body and spirit inescapably hooked on its creative scourge.

The album concludes with the apocalyptic mayhem of Created To Kill. With words unleashed in rapid fire to match the concentrated trespass of riffs and rhythms, the song devours the senses. The bass of Montalto is a murderous ingredient in the suggestive patterns of the guitar, its predacious intent as darkly inviting as the flying beats and rabid riffs are insatiable.

It is a stunning end to one outstanding encounter which will surely put Mason on the metal map with a forceful bang. The future of thrash metal is in good, old school inspired, but increasingly bolder and imaginative hands.

Impervious is available now

http://masonofficialmetal.com/    https://www.facebook.com/masonofficialband/    https://twitter.com/masonthrashband

Pete RingMaster 10/10/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Odium – As The World Turns Black

With next year seeing their 25th anniversary, German melodic thrashers Odium have set it up perfectly with their new album As The World Turns Black. A hungry and imposingly virulent slab of metal, the band’s eighth full length is a band at the top of its game but one still pushing their boundaries and the borders of old school meets modern thrash metal.

Formed in 10993, the Frankfurt hailing quintet has grown to be one of Europe’s most potent if not always openly recognised thrash exponents; a band unafraid to be as boldly infectious as they are aggressively adventurous. Among an increasingly impressing series of releases over the years, the word around is that As The World Turns Black is the band’s finest moment; a suggestion as the Martin Buchwalter (Tankard, SuidAkrA) recorded album roars in ears once again, hard to confidently dispute.

The album opens up with the quickly rousing The end of everything, a beast of a track which from its drone lined sonic seeds springs a web of riffs and grooves which alone has the appetite licking its lips. The rapid fire kicks and jabbing thrusts of drummer Jan Heusel leave an early welcomed impact as riffs nag and tempt; guitarists Rochus Pfaff and David Hübsch swiftly into their inescapable manipulation of neck muscles and imagination. It is stirring stuff given further impetus by the equally anthemic tones of vocalist Ralf Runkel, his swinging delivery incitement alone whilst tendrils of melodic dexterity just seals the deal.

Point of no return ensures the great start is continuous, the song winding grooves around ears straight away as riffs lurk and beats intrude with a controlled hungry edge. With the great grumble of Belinda Ann Smaka’s bass to the fore, the song rapaciously huddles around the listener before unleashing its own swagger loaded, groove veined surge. The bass continues to almost venomously grumble as the contagious exploits of the track leave their anthemic mark, together creating a glorious tapestry of attitude honed incitement.

The calmer waters of No goodbye comes next, emotive melodies wrapping the imagination as a subsequent wash of reflective vocals and restrained intensity looms. Of course things ignite with feistier intent though still the song has a reserve compared to its predecessors which adds to its magnetic and skilfully woven persuasion before Blind sets another memorable marker. The bass of Smaka again seduces instincts for irritable basslines, its grumble a persistent lure within the more tempestuous blaze of guitars. Though its chorus is maybe not as commanding as others around it, the track is just as manipulative with its devilish hooks and ravenous riffs as Runkel enticingly growls from their midst.

Every track has a contagion loaded temptation in their plans, it overcoming any possible resistance with varied tenacity across the album but no more irresistibly than within Revolution. The song is a call to arms in sound and heart, courting its arousal with just as striking invention and unpredictable twists but never detouring from its predacious core before Frozen world descends just as rapaciously on ears. Again it is impossible not to swept up in antagonistic torrents and aggressive catchiness though the track misses the more unique twists and bolder moves of surrounding songs to grab personal tastes as forcibly as others. In saying that its melodic caresses are simply tantalising and pleasure never less than full as with the more barbarous exploits of Time is a killer where riffs and rhythms alone prey on the senses. Almost carnal in nature and tone, the track is superb, another invitation for the spirit and emotions to get thickly involved.

The album’s title track follows and quickly has attention cast in a web of melodic enterprise and intrigue, every subsequent tendril a suggestion in sound explored by Riunkel. Bringing another fresh spice and aspect to the release, the song is a tenacious croon unable to keep its riotous instincts in check and only growing more compelling because of it.

Closed up by the rhythmically commanding and sonically conspiring Inside the Incubus, the track a nefarious invitation turning into a bullish stomp, As The World Turns Black leaves greed and exhaustion in its wake. It is a full-on trespass which rewards submission with a tapestry of melodic fascination. For the second time in a week we have to say, here is one of the most enjoyable and invigorating thrash encounters of recent years.

As The World Turns Black is out now via Black Sunset / MDD across most online stores.

Upcoming live shows

  1. August – Hasselroth, Rock in Schröth Open Air
  2. November – Nijmegen (NL), Rockcafe Backstage

http://odium-metal.de/     https://www.facebook.com/odium.thrashmetal/

Pete RingMaster 19/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Toxik – Breaking Class

As the number of metal bands returning after extensive breaks or simply break-ups often decades earlier keeps going up so are the amount of impressive releases emerging from these reunions. Adding to the list and almost heading it is the new EP from US thrashers Toxik. Offering three tracks of the genre in its old school breeding, Breaking Class is everything that is irresistible within thrash metal with a healthy freshness linked to experience that newcomers can only learn from and be inspired by.

Subsequently one of the most potent forces with thrash once emerging in 1985, New York hailing Toxik released a pair of increasingly recognised as classic albums in World Circus (1987) and Think This (1989) as well as built a potent live stature which included sharing stages and touring with the likes of King Diamond, Testament, Dream Theater, Exodus, Pantera, Candlemass and many more. Disbanding in 1982, interest in the band was clearly evident with the release of a pair of live DVDs in 2007 and 2010. Announcing their return three years after the second DVD with Shadows Fall’s Jason Bittner replacing original drummer Tad Leger, Toxik very successfully toured Europe and South America showing the lingering support for the band. Since then the line-up has seen James D’Maria of Generation Kill replacing Bittner and vocalist Charles Sabin (from the band’s second album, Think This) taking over from original frontman Mike Sanders as well as bassist Shane Boulos linking up with band founder and guitarist Josh Christian. It is a unit which seems to be a perfect fit as Breaking Class ravages the senses, an organic roar driving its rapacious sound and intent from the EP’s opening seconds.

Those first moments come courtesy of Stand Up, the track spiralling from an initial sample woven lure with wiry guitar swirling around senses jabbing beats. Straight away instincts for anthemic metal are awoken, vocals a rousing incitement backed by hungry riffs and a brooding bass line which almost dances with an established appetite for its flavours. There is a great Anthrax like tenacity and tone to the track around its chorus but equally a modern crossover essence bringing whiffs of bands such as Suicidal Tendencies and Municipal Waste into play but all spices assimilated in a proposal familiar, new, and distinct to Toxik.

The outstanding start is more than matched by the EP’s title track, Breaking Class a devilish surge of riffs and whipping rhythms fuelled by an energy and devilment just as evident in Sabin’s instinctively persuasive vocals and tenacity. Christian similarly has ears and imagination hooked with his aggressive and inventive web of riffs and sonic enterprise, never allowing the listener to settle without adding a new twist then another then….

As compelling as it is riotous, the track is itself more than matched by the closing Psyop; that healthy brew of flavours within the opener uncaged again within its more predatory climate and gait and again involved in an adventurous and almost challengingly unpredictable proposal. It maybe old school nurtured but the song, as its companions, show that does not mean things have to be restrained in boldness and imagination and they certainly are not in the hands of Toxik.

With hints of a new album in the works, it is as if Toxik has never been away just taking their time to create what is one of the most enjoyable thrash stomps of recent years.

The Breaking Class EP is released August 4th with re-ordering available now @ https://toxik.bandcamp.com/album/breaking-class

https://www.facebook.com/TOXIKMETAL/

Pete RingMaster 18/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Whorehouse – Corporation

Eight years ago, Polish thrashers Whorehouse sparked eager attention and broad acclaim with debut album Execution of Humanity. Just recently they unleashed its highly anticipated successor and fair to say it has not taken long for similar reactions to crowd the ferocious roar of Corporation, an album which grabs the listener by the scruff of the neck and hurls them into a brawling, rousing tide of thrash goodness.

Formed in 1995, the Cracow outfit grab the open inspiration of Bay Area thrash for their hungry, social and politically savaging sound. For a band which has been around twenty years, it is maybe a touch surprising that Corporation is only their second album though any length of wait is quickly forgotten once the accomplished tempest of sound and intent is uncaged. Recorded by Dominik Burzym (Mord’A’Stigmata, Atrophia Red Sun) at Studio 67, Corporation flies from the blocks with its title track, guitars gathering their creative thoughts and textures before sending a tide of familiar thrash nurtured but fresh riffs through ears. Rhythms punch and poke with equal hunger, the vocals solo and in band unison as arousing and anthemic as the sounds around them and in no time participation with its chorus alone is lustfully offered. With the guitars creating a web of sonic enterprise across its latter and still relentlessly contagious body, the song makes for an irresistible start.

It is a pleasure trapping success quickly emulated by The Same Old War, the following track a surge of nagging riffs and growling vocals as the bass groans and beats venomously swing. Again involvement with its antagonistic contagion is easy and full, an appetite for the melodic flames shooting across rapacious exploits unstoppable as Whorehouse again colour their sonic storm with imagination catching craft and boldness.

Toxic Dance similarly has body and thoughts bouncing; spicy grooves colluding with predacious riffs from the start before things again settle into a ravenous flow of tenacious riffs and biting rhythms nurtured in the inspirations of bands such as Exodus and Testament. In no time the track is a boiling, brawling incitement of prime thrash metal before Payback launches its own tirade of animosity and torrent of skilfully crafted thrash rabidity. As much as the core riffs, as in all songs, are soaked in genre familiarity, the guitars soon twist things up with their melodic enterprise and sonic unpredictability, a mix matched in the vocals and the uncompromising rhythms led by the magnetically snarling bass.

The virulent savagery of W.W.W.A.W.W.B (We Were, We Are, We Will Be) floods through ears soon after, its tone toxic and defiant, its sound just as incendiary with some of the most delicious hooks and grooves to be found on any thrash album in recent times while Invaders infests the senses with wiry grooves as a torrent of creative drama infects every note and twist within the best track moment within Corporation. It is a status closely challenged across the album to be honest, the following The Silent Unseen making its bid with a furious and volatile contagion so easy to get greedy over.

Anguis In Herba brings things to a powerful close, the track the most imaginative and creatively dramatic on the release. The instrumental is cinematic in its air and striking in its texture rich tapestry of sound. It provides a fine end to an album difficult to pull away from; certainly one helping at a time is not nearly enough to satisfy an appetite for one of the most enjoyable thrash proposals of recent times.

Corporation is available now through Defense Records.

https://www.facebook.com/krkareathrash/    https://www.metal-archives.com/albums/Whorehouse/Corporation/651478

Pete RingMaster 04/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Ferocious velocity: exploring the creative fuel of Crypitus

Unafraid to mix a wealth of different styles into their already multi-flavoured metal, US trio Crypitus is a force on the rise. Rising up through the Vermont music scene, the threesome of Doug Friend, Zach Patch, and Peter Snee have become an attention grabbing, mosh pit inciting proposition. 2017 is already proving their biggest and most potent yet and with their first release imminent we got down to exploring the heart of Crypitus with thanks to the trio, talking origins, music, and making opportunities….

Hi guys, thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how you got together?

Doug: We are Crypitus “The HomeGrown Vermont Metal Band” which includes myself, Doug (guitarist/vocalist), Pete (guitarist), and Zach (percussionist). Crypitus was my first project with songs that I started as early as 2011. I had an old friend that I played with through high school but we ended up going separate ways. Me and Pete moved in together in early 2016 and he picked up some of my riffs. We couldn’t find a drummer until we came across Zach’s Facebook post that he was essentially looking for a band to play with so we kicked it into gear and I cannot believe how far we’ve gone!

Zach: Well I guess Facebook brought us together if you want to get technical, but I know that, in reality, it was fate. I was desperately searching the internet for local musicians to jam with and Pete and Doug were the first clowns to respond. The rest is history.

Pete: We are Crypitus! Doug and I jammed a bit when we were roommates and decided to find a drummer together. We met Zach on Facebook and Crypitus was born as it is today.

Have you been involved in other bands before? If so has that had any impact on what you are doing now?

Doug: Crypitus is my baby, my first and only band, but as the years goes by the speed picks up, the riffs get tighter and I watch my own personal experience shape my songs, it’s actually really cool to see.

Zach: Since I was like 15, if I wasn’t actively in a band, I was working my ass off to grow as a musician. Every musician I’ve played with has influenced me in one way or another, one even tried to kill me. I can say, after playing heavy metal for so many years, I was ready to play some more groovy tunes, but, alas-fate.

Pete: I was in a blues rock band before Crypitus and while it was fun, I wanted to play heavier music. I’ve jammed with plenty of musician friends over the years but this is the first band I’ve played shows with.

What inspired the band name?

Doug: The band’s name actually was thought of by one of my old teachers. We were learning about wilderness first aid one day and he comes up to me and exclaims “You know what would be a sick metal band name?! Crepitus; it’s the sound of bones breaking” Low and behold somehow I pulled a Dave Mustaine and now we are Crypitus!

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

Doug: The idea I had was basically an old school thrash revival with a new age kick and a good blend of other bits of my favorite sub genres, creating a rounded bone crunching sound!

Zach: I was just glad to find someone to rock out with. Doug already had those ideas, but as for me, I want my drumming to sound radical enough so that when people see Crypitus play, they’ll never forget it.

Pete: Doug had a bunch of songs already written but we’ve added our own personality to them. We all had pretty similar musical tastes so after jamming together for a bit it just clicked.

Do the same things and ideas still drive the band from when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

Doug: Both are true honestly, since the songs were constructed by me the drive is still the same but since we have been play together for about a year, it’s hard not to evolve as you grow accustom to each other as musicians.

Zach: I still have the same drive as I did day one- have a blast, be unforgettable, act professional so they beg you to come back.

Pete: From the beginning we’ve all been driven by wanting to share our music and jam out in front of an audience. That definitely still drives us today, especially when we write new songs and can’t wait to play them live.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has grown and evolved?

Doug: We have definitely gained way more energy and speed!

Zach: Our music has gotten so freakin’ fast! You can hear just how much we’ve grown as a band for yourself.  Listen to one of our first live recordings on YouTube, then listen to a recent version of the same song. I did and I was like, woah!

Pete: We’ve sped up a bit but we’ve also evolved as musicians, both separately and together. When we write a new song and we’re each adding our own flavor, we build on what each other is playing as opposed to just playing our own parts.

Everything has been an organic movement, in sound etc. or more the band deliberately going out to try new things?

Doug: Definitely organic, I haven’t had anything to say about our sound besides just trying to get tighter!

Zach: our sound is 100% certified organic 😉

Pete: The new songs sound like a natural progression of the songs we played at first, I think. Crypitus sounds like, and always will, sound like Crypitus.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

Doug: I am heavily influenced by the songs of Megadeth and Death and a lot of the bands to come out of the New Wave of Thrash Metal.

Zach: Every show we play there’s a band or all the bands that absolutely blow us away. We watch and learn whenever and wherever we can.

Pete: I get bored listening to the same music over and over so I like to listen to a bit of everything. When I get stuck inspirationally, I like to listen to The Beatles or Pink Floyd…their really simplistic songs let my mind get back to the basics of chord progression and harmony.

Is there a particular process to your songwriting?

Doug: We have mostly have been catching up with a backlog of songs I’ve written in the past, although pretty soon there will be some sick new material!

Zach: I guess my process is wait ‘till they write something and then try every idea I have until I find the right one; it’s all trial and error.

Pete: Doug will come up with a riff and we’ll all play it together. After a while playing it and changing parts, we have a song. It’s a lot of in-the-moment songwriting; changing up a harmony this time we play it or how many measures we play a section that time.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

Doug: I draw my lyrical inspiration from worldly turmoil and human misdeeds. Metal has always been about bringing light to the dark for me.

Please give us some backgrounds to your latest release.

Doug: Our first/next release is our demo! Exhibit 1: Prelude to the Dead World will feature some of our favorite/hit songs Breakdown, Tundra, and Thunder. Keep your eyes peeled! It’s going to be killer!

Pete: Our upcoming release is three songs we’ve been playing from the start: Breakdown, Tundra, and Thunder. We jammed to those when we played with Zach for the first time, so it’s only fitting it’s our first release.

Would you give us some insight to the themes and premise behind it and its songs.

Doug: Breakdown is a song I wrote to portray mental conflict and insanity. Tundra is a song that portrayed the idea of transcendentalism and isolation “Into the bitter abyss, can’t get better than this, tundra tundra let me have this!” And the final song Thunder is basically a warning to the world, if you don’t respect Mother Earth, she will bite back.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

Doug: For this release we were very well prepared going in!

Zach: The songs are always finished when we record. Our shits gotta be tight.

Pete: We have all our parts pretty planned out when we record.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably the favourite aspect of the band?

Doug: Stage presence and energy is definitely what makes the show!

Zach: I think the favorite aspect of Crypitus live is the energy we bring. Doug’s running in circles around the crowd, starting the moshing, sometimes dressed as a taco. Myself, I prefer clown shenanigans.

Pete: My favorite part of playing live, besides the crowd, is watching Doug’s shenanigans. He’s always running around while playing, starting mosh pits.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods? Are there the opportunities to make a mark if the drive is there for new bands?

Doug: In our neck of the woods there aren’t a whole lot of opportunities and for the most part none of the bars in our town are allowing heavy music. But more recently than not our local record store has opened its doors to live music, I can’t wait to see what Rick and Kats Howlin’ Mouse does for the local scene! But being from Vermont I was hell bent to play anywhere new to have new people turn their heads.

Zach: I think no matter where you are, nothing is going to happen unless you make it happen. No matter the scene in what neck of the woods, if you put your best effort in, it will pay off.

Pete: We’ve had some issues playing in our town in the past. Venues are few and far between and there aren’t too many promoters in our area. If you’re willing to drive out of state though, there are plenty of shows going on always looking for new bands to book. All it takes is some social media presence, at which Doug is a master.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date?

Doug: Without social media it would have been a wicked challenge to be where we are now.

Zach: Social media is priceless. Way more effective than posting flyers, although we’ve done that recently. I also think, at least as far as promoting our band goes, social media will always be a priceless tool.

Pete: Besides a couple in-person hook ups, most of our shows are booked through social media. Having a Bandcamp or SoundCloud is very important, I think. Even if it’s just ripped from live videos, when I check out a band I like to be able to hear some of their songs.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Doug: Follow us on Facebook to keep an eye out for the demo, I also plan on uploading it to Bandcamp as well! Thanks for the interview RingMaster!

https://www.facebook.com/crypitus/    https://crypitus.bandcamp.com/

The RingMaster Review 23/06/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright