Athrox – Are You Alive?

Athrox_RingMasterReview

Athrox is an Italian metal band creating an ear grabbing roar from the heavy and thrash strains of the genre and Are You Alive? is their debut album showing plenty of reasons as to why the band is beginning to create a stir. Their sound is not particularly unique, it is probably fair to say, yet each song on their new release rewards ears with a fresh and fiery proposal easy to find a healthy appetite for.

Officially formed in the summer of 2014, Athrox was the brainchild of guitarist Sandro “Syro” Seravalle and drummer Alessandro “Aroon” Brandi who had already worked together across various musical projects since 2008. Swiftly the pair recruited guitarist Francesco “Frank” Capitoni and bassist Andrea “Lobo” Capitani with the band’s line-up completed the following year with the addition of vocalist Giancarlo “Ian” Picchianti. 2015 also saw the band settling down to hone their sound and write the songs now gracing Are You Alive?; a concept album looking at the problems that afflict humanity such as war and the suffering of children caught within and the free thought enslaving control of mass media. “Are You Alive? a rhetorical question that we send to people, all people slave of this corrupt society.”

The Grosseto hailing band opens the album up with Losing Your Gods, a short atmosphere setting instrumental as portentous as it is a potent invitation into the release.  Straight away, the thrash inspired side of the band’s sound and adventure stirs up the appetite, feeding it further with Frozen Here. The second track throws up a great incitement of hungry riffs and badgering rhythms from the start, spicy grooves and sonic enterprise entangling that robust spine of the song soon after. Vocally Picchianti is a match to the evolution and enjoyable creative moods of the sound around him; at times a growling antagonist and within a breath uncaging a more traditional heavy metal delivery.

Its varied landscape is replaced by the turbulence of battle for Warstorm; a Metallica meets Iron Maiden like confrontation as enjoyable in its aggressive animosity as it is in the melodic reflection which skilfully tempers the fury. It is a common trait of Are You Alive?, the merging of contrasting intensities, emotions, and flavours; a blend providing each song with individual yet similarly determined characters that becomes a rousing incitement and one of the album’s biggest triumphs in this particular moment.

art_RingMasterReviewGates Of Death stalks ears and imagination next. Straight away it prowls the senses with an intimidating and intriguing air as riffs and rhythms venomously collude while fiery grooves lay a web for the impressing vocals to share their narrative. As with its predecessors, there is a real drama to the sound and its presence too which as much as anything goes a long way to creating a powerful persuasion emulated once again in the suggestive melodic croon of Remember The Loneliness. Warm yet melancholic from its first breath, the track brews a more tempestuous climate over time which eventfully sparks an anthemic thrash fuelled canter easy to get a touch greedy for. This is just the first movement of the excellent encounter though, the song continuing to swing through an array of creative and emotionally fired attacks from melodic seducing to volatile ferocity.

Through the melodic serenade of Pretend You and the corrosive ferociousness of My Downfall, band and album keeps attention gripped as raw flames of balladry and senses wilting energy respectively consume ears. The second of the two is another more thrash favoured proposal and for personal tastes, they are the tracks within Are You Alive? which stir the strongest reactions of pleasure though no song leaves enjoyment a shallow pool.

A great Testament feel tones the following Waiting For The Eden as it uncages another bullish challenge of fearsome rhythms and spiky riffs within an acidic weave of juicy grooves and sonic enticing. Within this an ear pleasing vine of individual guitar prowess writhes across the song’s flavoursome canvas and a success swiftly matched by that of the feverish End Of Days which leaves the body breathless and hungry for more by its close before the album’s title track steals attention with its own raw and magnetic blaze of ravenous rock ‘n’ roll.

The album is brought to a close by the melodic tempting of Obsession, a last showing of the variety colouring songs and release as a whole within its heavy metal seeded soundscape of voice and captivating sound and a fine end to a thoroughly enjoyable proposition. As suggested Are You Alive? is woven from familiar aural threads and textures but only presents an ear pleasing proposal which might just be a game changer for Athrox in regard to wider found attention.

Are You Alive? is out now via Red Cat Records @ http://www.redcatpromotion.com/ita_store.html and across most online stores.

http://www.athroxofficial.com/   https://www.facebook.com/athroxofficial

Pete RingMaster 20/04/2016

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The Bendal Interlude – Reign of the Unblinking Eye

bendalInterlude_RingMasterReview

Attempting to build on the reputation and acclaim earned through their previous clutch of EPs, British metallers The Bendal Interlude unleash their debut album; a cauldron of sludge, stoner, and blues with psych and thrash metal to sear and ignite the senses. The release is a beast of a proposition; an attention grabber reinforcing and pushing the already firm stature of the Liverpool quartet but maybe one not quite seeing the band going far enough with the new bold elements of flavour and imagination to steer them away from similarly designed offerings over recent times. Nevertheless Reign of the Unblinking Eye is a fiercely enticing and enjoyably rousing slab of predacious riffs, salacious grooves, and thumping rhythmic aggression.

Drawing on inspirations from bands such as Melvins, Crowbar, and Cathedral, The Bendal Interlude have increasingly drawn fans and attention through a quartet of releases, starting with an early Demo followed by the Foal Recordings EP in 2010, a Self-Titled EP the following year, and the Odourama EP in 2013, as well as a ferocious live presence which has seen the band share stages with the likes of Sunn O))), Earth, Orange Goblin, COC, Church of Misery, Red Fang and more. They have also made highly successful appearances at festivals like Hammerfest, Sonisphere, and Desertfest to persistently lure keen spotlights to their emergence.

For Reign of the Unblinking Eye, The Bendal Interlude took a new tact in its creation; guitarist Stu Taylor explaining recently, “We took a shift in direction when writing for the album Reign of The Unblinking Eye. The songs are much more elaborate and have a lot more going on sound-wise than previous releases. We played with time signatures, guitar harmonies, key changes, even laying down a 10-part resonator guitar part. It is by far the heaviest but also most dynamic thing we’ve written to date.” His words are quickly backed up by the album and a collection of songs which in contrast to the “abstract collection of ideas and imagery based around loose themes” which coloured previous releases, lyrically carry a more “autobiographical approach”.

art_RingMasterReviewBuckfast For Breakfast opens the album, an easily relatable repetitive vocal sample the spark to a wall of cantankerous riffs and rapier like rhythms. It is a senses trespassing confrontation, swiftly bound and veined by wiry grooves with richly engaging toxicity to their wandering sonic hands. The raw vocal squalling of Nat Gavin adds to the intrusive hostility tempering the melodic flirtation and the instinctive swing to the track’s stalking gait. It is an ear gripping start firmly backed by the blues intoxication and fiery rock ‘n’ roll of Losing Things. With Gavin’s caustic delivery, tracks are inevitably going to challenge with attitude loaded animosity yet as proven here, The Bendal Interlude merge it skilfully with a melodic/stoner prowess and addictive sonic contagion which gives every assault a captivating and inviting personality.

Next up is The Unblinking Eye and its initial electronically atmospheric suggestiveness which the track evolves into its own individual stomp of classic/groove metal fuelled ferociousness. It recruits body and imagination with consummate ease, the virulence of the grooves and infectious swing and lead hook of the track swiftly installing it as a major highlight within the album. The Bendal Interlude are rocking like a beast on heat in song and album, sparking similar reactions in the instincts and spirit of the listener.

Efram’s Hands provides a brooding groove entangled landscape of ravenous shadows and barbarous energy straight after whilst Pint of Bodies grumbles and rumbles with sonic and rhythmic rabidity whilst infusing a scent of enterprise not too removed from glam rock. Subsequently descending on the senses with a Down meets Cathedral like animosity before shifting again into an evocative melodic calm, it and its predecessor both whip up more greed for the album’s trespass before Creeks Gigantic prowls in with a thunderous rhythmic swagger led by the bass groove of Tommy Lloyd quickly matched by the resourceful craft and adventure of Taylors’ invention on guitar strings. Given further incendiary bite by the spiky beats of Dave Archer, the track is an imposingly catchy and intrusive weave of contrasting and dynamic textures finding kinship in the tracks’ vocal irritability and tempestuous air.

Anthemic and tenaciously delivered rhythms again lead an addictive and predictably groove infested persuasion as Triumph of Fortitudo steps in with bruising intensity and Cancer Bats like punk lined antagonism before stepping aside for the more merciful but equally commanding rock ‘n roll of The Block. Drama fuels every crawling riff and the doom coated breath which soaks a track layered with acidic grooving and vocal rancor. Maybe not as striking on personal tastes as other tracks within Reign of the Unblinking Eye, it still leaves satisfaction full; success sought and easily found by the closing emotional and creative animus of R.I.P.  An at times corrosive venture through varied styles and flavours within a core heavy rock storm, the song is a fascinating and increasingly impressing end to a similarly impacting release.

As suggested earlier, The Bendal Interlude could have dared to push their imagination even further but every play of Reign of the Unblinking Eye certainly reveals new twists within the all-consuming invasion of sound. Time and attention only benefits an appreciation of an instantly pleasing album which has the psyche and passions enslaved by crucial grooves in no time; a success no one can avoid or dismiss.

Reign of the Unblinking Eye is out now via Black Bow Records @ http://blackbowrecords.bigcartel.com/product/the-bendal-interlude-the-reign-of-the-unblinking-eye

https://www.facebook.com/THEBENDALINTERLUDE   http://thebendalinterlude.bandcamp.com/

Pete RingMaster 01/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Standing before the jaws of time: talking Exumer and Raging Tides with Mem V. Stein

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Following the release of Exumer’s ferocious and thrilling new album The Raging Tides, a fearsome and virulent proposition which confirmed the US Thrashers as one inimitably uncompromising force of sound and energy, we grabbed the opportunity to steal a slab of time with band founder and vocalist Mem V. Stein. Kindly he let us in on the creation and background to the band’s latest protagonist for ears and imagination as well as providing insight into his and the band’s creative heart.

Having chatted with Mem back in 2012 around the release of previous album Fire & Damnation, we asked him to bring us up to date with all things Exumer between the two releases?

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Next we asked Mem if there was any specific aim in regard to the writing and character behind The Raging Tides

There is no escaping an evolution and movement in sound between albums, and fair to say The Raging Tides was as open in a creative leap and shift as any Exumer release to date. So we asked Mem where he most saw the differences and growth of sound between the latest albums and Fire & Damnation.

How about the edge and snarl in what is for The RingMaster Review, the band’s most venomous and compromising encounter musically, as well as lyrically, so far.

exumer_RingMasterReview

Staying with the lyrics, and what feels like a slab of unrest and defiance, as well as an raw commentary on, the injustices and sufferings dealt upon the ’common’ man today, Mem delved for us into the main inspirations to the lyrical side of tracks and to the overall theme behind The Raging Tides and whether the band has become angrier with each release and song over time, emotionally and sonically.

The Raging Tides saw Exumer link up with producer/engineer Waldemar Soychta at Waldstreet Sound in Dortmund again, so we wanted to know what about what he brings to the recording experience.

It seemed strange to say it about a band formed in 1985, but we wonder that with The Raging Tides, Exumer had truly slipped into its creative skin; its sound coming of age?

exumer2_RingMasterReview

It is fair to say that Exumer’s new encounter has lit a fuse for a highly successful and no doubt eventful 2016 and beyond for Exumer. So we had to ask what was in store for fans and band across the rest of the year.

Finally we simply left Mem to add any final thoughts which had a message for Exumer’s British fans.

Our big thanks to Mem for sharing his time with us and for letting us into the heart of band and The Raging Tides. Check out the band and all their upcoming tour and show news @

https://www.facebook.com/exumerofficial/

http://www.exumer.de/   https://twitter.com/exumerofficial

Pete RingMaster
The RingMaster Review 15/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Anger As Art – Ad Mortem Festinamus

AAA_RingMasterReview

Listening to and basking in the furious unbridled thrash spawned onslaught of Hubris, Inc. back in 2013, there was a moment where thoughts wondered where Anger As Art could go from there to eclipse the might of their acclaimed release. Quite simply it seems, the Californian quartet racked every element of their sound, from aggression and creative tenacity to adrenaline and individual imagination and come up with another inevitable crowd pleaser in Ad Mortem Festinamus.

Formed in 2004 by vocalist/guitarist Steve Gaines (Abattoir, Bloodlust, Tactics, Bitch, Dreams of Damnation, Pagan War Machine), Anger Of Art is a band unafraid of showing its roots whilst savaging ears with its own individual collusion of raw thrash and insatiable speed metal. The years and releases have seen the band becomes more creatively bestial and gripping, as proven by 2013 album Hubris, Inc. and even more imposingly now within its ravenous successor Ad Mortem Festinamus. Equally, the band’s melodic and sonic enterprise, which springs as effortlessly from the band as senses crushing ferocity, has also evolved into something as insatiable and creatively virulent to captivate like a high class hooker within a war driven landscape within their new offering. In Ad Mortem Festinamus every element of the band has hit new heights to emerge a psyche twisting irreverence of vicious rock ‘n’ roll which for us Anger As Art’s finest moment yet.

It all starts with the album’s title track, a relatively brief incantation of voice and portentous ambience which soon breeds an imposing sinister lit tapestry of intrigue laced with a pent up hostility which is just waiting to erupt, something it does in Pissing On Your Grave. The second track initially lays down a bed of rhythmic and sonic traps before bursting with unrestrained animosity through ears, in turn marauding through emotions and sparking the imagination. Gaines’ vocals leads the looting of the senses amidst a torrent of crushing riffs and searing grooves offered by his and Dan Oliverio’s craft upon guitar strings. Rhythmically the swings of drummer Rob Alaniz are welcomingly intensive whilst the bass of Eric Bryan incites primal instincts, each adding to a tremendous and spirit rousing encounter more than matched by the following Aim For The Heart. Just as predacious and uncompromising, the track rhythmically picks at the already placed bruises whilst sizzling on the senses with sonic imagination and a great blend of vocal rapacity across the band.

art_RingMasterReviewAs expected, the pair of Tombward and L.A. State Of Mind show no mercy next, the first the most grievously enticing and volatile tempest so far upon the album whilst its successor is barbarous punk infused metal out to devour and annihilate anything in its way. Both tracks find a fresh gear for the album in their individual ways, the twists of imagination in the first a rival for the sheer irresistible and brutal rock ‘n’ roll of the second, though even so, the pair do get a touch over shaded by the similarly frenzied and venomous Unknowing, Undead. The great physically and emotionally caustic vocal pairing of Gaines and Bryan roar spitefully within the song’s blistering storm but just as easily wear the web of sonic invention which escapes the guitars to magnetic effect around them.

The album is nothing left than a series of highs but an inescapable pinnacle is the rousing anthem of Hammer, Blade, and Twisting Fire. It is a sure fire call to arms for spirit and energy driven by a relentless and deliciously nagging bassline. The track is like a brawling celebration on the eve of battle, with liquor like hooks and grooves extra intoxication before We Hurry Into Death becomes the vehicle for ears and imagination to dive headlong into a barrage of adversarial thrash fuelled rancor.

Anger As Art barely gives time for a breath to be swallowed let alone calm to approach body and emotions, Two Minutes Hate living up to an extended version of its title with its unsympathetic and combative animus of sound and intent. A moment to regroup is given by Praise Of The Firehead as it opens with a great melodic caress of guitar aligned to an earnest lure of clean vocals. In time though, its heart and underlying intensity bursts free in a mighty bellow with the song continuing to merge mellower reflective moments with angst soaked crescendos thereafter. Wrapped in volcanic melodic flames, the song, if without quite lighting personal tastes as forcibly as many of its predecessors, easily captivates as the band reveal further inventive exploration of ideas.

A final trespass of tumultuous energy and imaginative adventure is uncaged by Dim Carcosa; the track the link between the band’s unrestrained thrash intrusions and the more tenacious imagination of the last song, and ultimately another pinnacle of Ad Mortem Festinamus.

In many ways, fans know what they will get with Anger As Art, but with each release the band always surprises and provides a fresh encounter as they push themselves. There are many reasons why thrash metal excites so many of us and now Ad Mortem Festinamus provides yet another unopposed excuse to express that ardour.

Ad Mortem Festinamus is released March 11th via Old School Metal Records across most online stores.

http://www.angerasart.com   https://www.facebook.com/angerasart/   https://twitter.com/AngerAsArt1

Pete RingMaster 11/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Mefisto – 2.0.1.6

Mefisto - 2. 0. 1. 6 cover_RingMaster Review

Formed in 1984 under the name Torment, Swedish metallers Mefisto is noted along with Obscurity, as being the first Swedish extreme bands to surge through the opening made by Bathory. It was a band which quickly drew a loyal local following, with the 1986 release of a pair of demos in Megalomania and The Puzzle finding keen reactions in the metal underground, which over time has grown to the band earning cult status. Within a year of their release though, they had succumbed to the pressure of finding no real support and called it a day. Now thirty years on from those early releases, the band unleashes debut album 2.0.1.6, a thrilling and fresh proposal which suggests that Mefisto had maybe been ahead of their time first time around.

In 2014 Mefisto was reformed by band originals, guitarist/vocalist Omar Ahmed and drummer Robban Granath, the pair joined by bassist Morgan Myhrberg last year. Their return was marked by The Megalomania Puzzle, a compilation bringing the early demos together in one rousing invitation released via, as the new album, Vic Records. Mastered by Dan Swano (Opeth, Katatonia, Bloodbath), 2.0.1.6 now gives the metal world something which has been eagerly anticipated for, in many ways decades, the first Mefisto full-length.

A gentle melodic caress brings album and opener Deathrace into view, though it is just a poetic coaxing into a subsequent sinister siren-esque mesh of fiery grooves and jabbing rhythms. That as quickly becomes a tempest of thrash kilned riffs and rapier like beats as vocals crowd ears with growling antagonism. Now in full flight, the track entwines a web of metal styles with craft and invention, the grouchily wiry bass alone captivating bait to get off on.

The strong start is merely an appetiser in many ways, the following Void swiftly a more thunderous and imposing protagonist for ears and appetite. With muscles on full show, the track swings with inescapable virulence; intimidating and enticing with spite and tenacity before throwing a delicious curve ball by slipping into a melody rich passage of progressive and classic metal enterprise. Across its length, the band continues to revolve between extremes of texture and the compelling mix of aggressive and calm invention; individual craft and united imagination blossoming with every thrilling twist and turn.

The barbarous Act Dead has the job of following the first pinnacle of the album, its bracing hostility and sonic endeavour making great success of keeping enlivened ears and emotions on a firm high. Sturdy and confrontational, the track provokes and invites with unruly resourcefulness but controlled ferocity, showing why in its earlier guise in the band’s career, it was a potent incitement.

Heads in the Sand twists and turns in another web of varied metallic provocation next. Thrash and death metal is twisted into the lining of melodic tendrils and searing grooves, they offering a catchiness which itself is aligned to a more progressive exploration. A slower persuasion than the immediacy of earlier tracks, it still blossoms by the minute into another highly pleasing adventure that only lingers in the psyche.

The almost theatrical drama of Frost of Inferno involves ears and thoughts straight after, its raw and brutish canvas the landscape for a kaleidoscope of melodic expression and enterprise shared by the open skills and creative devilry of Ahmed. It is a song which enjoyably has one foot in the past and the now, whilst successor Hate Consumes Me with the same flirtatious drama to its body and narrative, is a cauldron of modern rock ‘n’ roll. Predatory in its calm and incendiary in its sonic boldness whilst being primal in energy, the track fuses death and heavy metal with essences of broader heavy rock, resulting in another major highlight.

A touch of classical guitar stirs The Puzzle into tempestuous life, which in turn breeds a constantly evolving stalking and ravaging of the senses which is very easy to get greedy over. Compelling as it invades and seduces with rousing persistence, it is eclipsed by the album’s closing title track. It too has a predatory air and nature to its melodic tempting and progressively nurtured adventure with the vocals emulating their character as Ahmed’s string craft bewitches.

It is a superb end to a thoroughly enjoyable and increasingly impressive debut album. It seems strange saying that Mefisto has a rich future ahead of them after thirty years or so since their first steps, but 2.0.1.6 suggests this is just the beginning of bigger and bolder things.

2.0.1.6 is out now via Vic Records through most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/Mefisto-234630006720804

Pete RingMaster 23/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Critical Solution – Sleepwalker

 

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If evil is looking for a new soundtrack it might not be too far from the mark to suggest that Sleepwalker might be in line for adoption. The new album from Norwegian horror thrashers Critical Solution is a glorious slab of visceral rock ‘n’ roll; a blood-letting drama and insatiable anthemic adventure rolled up into one seriously galvanic slab of ravenous metal. The band impressed with their debut full-length two or so years back, but Sleepwalker is a whole new thrilling beast from a band exploring new plateaus of imagination and flavour rich confrontation.

Formed in 2015, it is fair to say that the Helleland hailing quartet began really grabbing attention from 2011 when they, to use their bio’s words, “got serious”. It was at this point the band began working with Andy LaRocque in his Sweden based SonicTrain Studios, especially impressing fans and media with their first album Evil Never Dies in 2013, which followed the Evidence of Things Unseen EP of two years earlier. The encounter was a more thrash heavy proposition fuelled by the kind of horror storylines and sounds that helped shape the gripping presence of The Death Lament EP in 2014 and now their concept album Sleepwalker. The band has also earned a strong reputation for their ferocious stage show honed over the years and alongside bands such as Diamond Head, W.A.S.P, Marduk, and Grave over the years; an intensity and energy equally rampant within the band’s new blood show.

It opens with The Curse, the establishing of the evil coursing through the album’s character and narrative through atmospheric hauntings, intimidating tones, and a bedlamic theatre of sounds. With the imprecation in place the album unleashes its title track, Sleepwalker immediately slamming ears with meaty beats as guitars tantalise, it all the prelude to the insatiable charge of the song to come. As riffs and rhythms bound ruggedly through ears, Christer Slettebø’s guitar sends spicy slithers of bait into their midst before his vocals stir up their own kind of anthemic persuasion. It is a thumping incitement soon revealing its resourcefulness as it twists into seductive prowls and dynamic torrents of inventive tenacity. Like Metallica meets Chainfist initially and more creatively devilish with each passing minute, the track raises the ante in the album’s superb start.

Critical-Solution-Album_RingMaster ReviewWelcome To Your Nightmare ensures things are only more gripping and exhausting next, its Anthrax scented thrash tirade irresistible from the first breath and only increasing its lusty allure as it releases its devil. Driven by the slamming beats of drummer Egil Mydland, the song alternatively stalks and launches itself at the listener across its hellacious contagion. The guitars of Slettebø and Bjørnar Grøsfjell arouse as they abuse whilst the bass of Eimund Grøsfjell is aural predation at its barbarously seductive best.

Melodic and evocative caresses bring Blood Stained Hands into view next, their gentle and reflective tempting the surface to a brewing and gradually building intensity and aggression. Enjoyably even that is caught in the ebb and flow of the song’s energy, being held in check to act as a tease from within the captivating and infectious roar of the song. There is a slight taste of melodic rock aligned to grungy essences at play too, Gruntruck coming to mind in certain moments as the song leaves appetite lustful and ready to devour on the sultry haunting of Murder In The Night. It too cages listeners in a melodic embrace; warm kisses of guitar and their sonic trails of temptation a rapturous suggestiveness encased in a sinister atmosphere. There is danger and menace lurking in the shadows of the track’s slightly portentous air; a waiting incitement which bursts as the floodgates open to fiercely nagging rhythms and predacious riffs within the imagination sparking instrumental.

Ending on a news report harkening darker deeds and threats as events twist and turn, the track masterfully leads to up the barbarous revelry of Evidence Of Things Unseen, its successor swiftly a merciless assailant drenched in hostile intent and virulent persuasion. Again it is hard to escape a Metallica/Megadeth like comparison, though every swinging stick and pulled string breeds a fresh and dramatic strain of enterprise unique to Critical Solution.

The heavy lumbering Sabbath-esque entrance of LT. Elliot soon has ears surrounded and imagination enthralled as its doom soaked theatre gives a bird’s eye view of the last moments of its title victim. Crawling with insidious glee and equipped with expulsions of raw catchiness, the outstanding track is as cinematic as it is murderously compelling and swiftly matched in drama by the epic exploration in length and emotion of Dear Mother. Bringing some respite to the dark turmoil before it, its tortured reflection comes entangled in a volatile landscape of dense shadows and fiery infection loaded revelry. Through every second of its ten minutes, it is masterfully unpredictable and increasingly enthralling, like being locked in the mind and emotions of torment itself as it track spellbinds as powerfully as its predecessor.

The Death Lament just tears into ears with its rapacious horde of riffs and legion of barbarian bred rhythms next, the violation thrash fuelled anthemic metal at its primal explosive best enslaving ears before letting Back From The Grave bring the chain of bloody events to a close. Featuring guests in Michael Denner and Hank Shermann (Mercyful Fate), the final infestation of the senses and body is similarly pure thrash butchery and openly majestic in its crushing, rabid way.

There will no doubt be many voracious metal releases thrilling ears this year but already it feels safe to say few will surpass Sleepwalker and its thrash horror malediction.

Sleepwalker is out now via Punishment 18 Records across most stores.

http://www.facebook.com/CriticalSolution

Pete RingMaster 27/01/2016

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Endless Recovery – Revel in Demise

ER_RingMaster Review

Just released is the second album from Greek metallers Endless Recovery, a thrash fuelled scavenging of the senses helping to get the new year of metal off to an accomplished and highly satisfying start. Revel in Demise unleashes ten voracious roars seeded in the heavy and thrash metal scene of the eighties but just as keen to involve other extreme spices in their tenacious confrontations.

Formed in 2011, the Athens hailing Endless Recovery soon made their mark on the local underground scene with debut EP Liar Priest the following year. With their first album Thrash Rider uncaged in 2013, the band was already garnering firm interest and support, one fuelled as potently by a live presence which has seen the band over time play with the likes of Deceptor, Enforcer, and numerous Greek underground artists. The follow-up to the well-received Resistant Bangers EP of 2014, the Xmas eve released Revel in Demise makes the band’s thickest forceful nudge on the broadest attention yet.

artwork_RingMaster Review     As ripe with speed metal voracity as thrash hostility, Revel in Demise sets its stall out straight away with opener Sinister Tales, a spicy instrumental of metal diversity magnetically leading the listener into the wilder throes of the album’s title track. The heftily inviting start makes a seamless transition into the more antagonistic and primal nature of its successor, riffs and rhythms an immediate barrage of muscle and attitude driven by the blackened vocal delivery of Michalis Skliros. Group shouts add to the drama already being spun by the sonic dexterity of guitarists Tasos Papadopoulos and Apostolos Papadimitriou, that theatre of temptation courted by the dark primal tone of Panayiotis Alikaniotis’ bass and the uncompromising attack of drummer Michalis Moatsos. It is a quickly gripping beginning to the release, one arguably low on major surprises but rich in full-on incitement.

The following Reaping Fire instantly savages and entices with its torrent of riffs and tangy sonic enterprise whilst Storming Death provides a darker and more hostile environment again coloured with fiery craft and exploits from across the band straight after. Both prove to be just as barbarous as they are welcoming in grooves and hooks, the rhythms and thrash fire in their hearts insatiable provocation driven in top gear. There is plenty of twist and turns to keep predictability at bay too, the first with its spiralling guitar endeavour and varied textures and the second by the vocal scourge of Skliros crawling over the senses as wiry tendrils strikingly vein the tempestuous proposition.

Leather Militia reveals thick eighties inspiration from start to finish but within a muddy tone and air which lifts it into something more intriguing and threatening than it might have been whilst Trapped in a Vicious Circle is a maelstrom of raw fury and adventurous tenacity. At times it is a tapestry of creative clarity and in others smog like intrusiveness on the senses, contrasts working a treat throughout just as Blood Countess does with its torrential invasion of biting rhythms and smothering riffery. It too is a wall of pleasing noise and ferocity veined by searing flames of guitar and captivating grooves, and equally skilled in creating a ravaging as inviting as it is destructive.

A surface familiarity between some tracks is not a major issue when looking deeper into the openly crafted encounters. The excellent Hypnos is a great example, its start and core shape similarly related to its predecessor but quickly given its own character by the cauldron of sonic and melodic enterprise unveiled by the band.

Another lofty highlight comes with Evoke Perdition, the track a hell for leather trespass that bewitches with its nagging grooves and repetitive forcefulness in riff and rhythm, Skliros once again courting the demonic depths with his black metal spiced vocal predation. A definite favourite, the song makes way for the closing assault of Lurking Evil and a dynamically thrilling end to Revel in Demise. The track is a predator, living up to its title with an urgency and creative rabidity which not so much lurks but swarms over the senses to thick success.

The album certainly ends on its biggest high with the last trio of incursions on ears and the soul, but from start to finish Revel in Demise hits the spot perfectly. Uniqueness is maybe not as potent as the instinctive creativity and energy which definitely enriches the encounter, bands such as Kreator and Exodus often reminded, but for an invigorating and thoroughly enjoyable experience Endless Recovery masterfully gets the job done.

Revel in Demise is out now via Witches Brew @ https://endlessrecovery.bandcamp.com/album/revel-in-demise

https://www.facebook.com/endless.recovery

Pete RingMaster 05/01/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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