Abstract Rapture – Hollow Motion

Formed in 2001, Luxembourg hailing metallers Abstract Rapture especially drew praise with the release of their album Earthcrush. Now seven years after its successful release and “significant” line-up changes the band have its successor primed to re-stir attention and such the craft and enterprise within Hollow Motion it is easy to see the quintet courting the biggest spotlights and plaudits.

Woven in a tapestry of metal bred flavours courting everything from groove and nu to death and thrash metal, the band’s sound and new album is a cauldron of adventure and imagination embracing the familiar and unique. Hollow Motion is a dark melancholic proposition yet a beast with a discontent fuelled fire in its belly and attitude nurtured tension in its breath.

The album opens with A Promise from the Ghouls and immediately lured ears with its rhythmic invitation, the teasing collusion of infectious beats with a dark earthy bass grumble devious. Swiftly the predacious edge of the guitar joins the threat, it all soon sparking into a rapacious stroll further accentuated by the potent tones of Dritt. The swinging grooves and continually intimidating edge of the track made for a compelling and infectious proposal unafraid to twist and turn with further imagination and creative trespassing sparked by the melodic and sonic prowess of guitarists Alex and Nol. It is an ear and appetite grabbing start to the album which continues through next up The Cancer in Your Soul.

The second track is instantly a more predatory proposal, almost stalking the senses even as melodic and grungier hues spring forward from within its ill-intent. Individual craft joins united endeavour as the song blossoms with each adventurous move, it maybe not as strikingly manipulative as its predecessor but just as imaginatively captivating before Endless Chapter grips ears with its own wily exploits. Again the swings of Spit incite as they bite, nagging grooves entangling his tenacious strikes as vocals incite. Across the album there is an essence of Mudvayne meets Disturbed meets Machine Head and no more so than within this gripping offering.

Blood-Red Revolt brought even stronger enticement and incitement to body and pleasure, the track a definite favourite, writhing as it fingers the imagination with its boisterously manipulative and widely flavoursome antics before, following the brief chillingly haunting and increasingly threatening lead of …and Winter Comes, the predacious Inner Plague prowls and teasing the senses with its own venomous but darkly seductive threat. As ever the tenebrific yet tempting growl of Maks’ bass fuels the alluring menacing; constantly keeping the listener on their toes alongside the drums even as melodic flames and enterprise blazes away.

From one outstanding moment to another as Venom Skies descends on the senses with intrusively skittish beats to the fore before its sonic spiral springs another web of riveting and toxic conspiracy built on craft and imagination. The swing of the track is inescapable, its resourceful weave innovative even as familiar hues add to its appealing canvas.

Through the simply invigorating deeds of The Fear Industry and the calmer but similarly enticing Hollow Soul, ears were only firmly held; both tracks and especially the first of the pair offering snares of sound and touch which left us simply greedy for more before Ego Non Te Absolvo (A Drunken Conclusion) brought the album to a destructively intimate and provocative close.

It is a fascinating, tormented end to an album which is almost intense in its dark tone whilst bordering the kaleidoscopic in a sound which still embraces a particular hue that is individual to Abstract Rapture. Hollow Motion will be an introduction to a great many even being the band’s third full-length, one announcing  Abstract Rapture to all as being one striking and thrilling proposition.

Hollow Motion is out now, distributed by Black N ‘Purple Records, across most stores.

https://www.facebook.com/pg/abstractrapture/

Pete RingMaster 18/12/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Infrared – Saviours

Pic By Gord Weber

Recent times have seen a growing wealth of eighties bred metal bands rising from their assumed demise or slumber. Thrash metal especially seems to have that power of resurrection. Some of those bands are venturing into new areas, some simply continuing what they did best back in the day which lured potent attention, success and reputation. Infrared sits in the second camp, their love and hunger for classic thrash openly inspired by contemporarys like the Big 4 as well as the influence of Sabbath, Maiden and the likes. As old school thrash never dates or tires in our ears, a resourcefully woven and imaginatively delivered encounter of said genre has a welcoming place and the new album from the Canadians is that and more.

Hailing from Ottawa, Infrared grew from local legends to stirring real attention within the national metal scene. Their sound was and is rooted in 70s and early 80s metal, bands such as Accept, Scorpions, and Judas Priest alongside those already mentioned inspirations on the quartet. Their rise came to a halt as life took members down different paths until 2014 saw three of the original four reuniting; vocalist/guitarist Armin Kamal, guitarist Kirk Gidley, and drummer Alain Groulx coming together again. Original bassist Shawn Thompson had since relocated to Miami so Mike Forbes was brought in to complete the line-up. The foursome then released debut album No Peace which featured songs written all those years ago. Now successor Saviours brings eight brand new tracks to ears, songs which swiftly grabbed ours as themes of “demagogues, dictators, and religious leaders professing to be the saviours of the world but instead inflict the most brutal attacks on humanity imaginable” roared.

Saviours erupts into life with Project Karma its opening magnetic yet portentous lure, one becoming even predacious as it prowls the senses. A delicious groove spears it’s stalking, a swinging proposal aflame with sonic enterprise and rhythmic incitement. Its initial lengthy instrumental is irresistible and only accentuated once the warrior tones of Kamal backed by the band head the song’s even fuller assault. Familiar and fresh hues collude in its web, imagination blossoming across its fiery body as a tremendous start to Saviours is set.

That predatory air retains its presence within The Demagogue, the following song also a court of threat and contagion which almost swaggers around ears as the guitars spin their sonic threads and rhythms pounce. Like a fusion of bands like Testament and Slayer, it hits the spot; increasing its temptation as calmer climes are ventured and melodic intimation embraced. It’s subsequent rising heat and intensity brings it back to its original sonic inference before Saviour explores an even darker trespass of menace and seduction. As we suggested, Infrared is not set on reinventing the wheel of thrash metal or even their core sound but there is a bold lining of adventure and imagination which makes their music and especially this track stand out.

Through the melodic and melancholic elegance to tempestuous roar of The Fallen and the voracious charge of All In Favour the album just hit the spot. Across both tracks the vocals of Kamal added more incitement to an appetite already happily feasting on the individual prowess and enterprise of the band, Forbes’ bass especially dark liquor stirring our taste buds. They are all attributes just as persuasive within the predatory They Kill For Gods and Father of Lies with its intensive atmosphere over increasingly manic and ferocious entrapment around demonic character. The most adventurous of all the tracks it simply enthralled.

The album finishes off with Genocide Convention, a trash dervish of sound and aggression with spiralling sonic wires and senses blistering turbulence. Our favourite track it brings the thoroughly and increasingly enjoyable release to a mighty close.

Uniqueness might be a rarity compared to familiarity within Saviours but from an already established base it breeds fresh adventure and captivation. The album lit our pleasure from start to finish and Infrared is further proof that very good things can only get better with age.

Saviours is out now through iTunes and other stores as well as @ https://infraredmetal.bandcamp.com

http://infraredmetal.ca   https://www.facebook.com/infraredmetal   https://twitter.com/infraredmetal

Pete RingMaster 27/05/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Basement Critters – Hurt Me With The Truth

Currently working on their debut album, Belgian metallers Basement Critters recently signed a worldwide distribution deal with Wormholedeath for their first official EP, Hurt Me With The Truth. It has given their highly praised offering, originally released in 2016, a broader voice, an invitation to a host of new ears and a sure to be fresh wealth of anticipation for that first full-length.

Thrash metal bred but coming with a richer variety of flavours, the Basement Critters’ sound is a mix of crossover adventure and thrash ferocity emerging as a beast akin to a fusion of Stuck Mojo and Testament. It is familiar yet pleasingly individual and unafraid to embrace any spicing which takes the West-Vlaanderen hailing band’s imagination. It makes for a rousing roar as evidenced within Hurt Me With The Truth, an encounter deserving of a fuller landscape to tempt.

 The EP opens up with Brain Bleach and instantly prowls the listener with predacious riffs and rhythms. Guitarists Sven Caes and Glenn Labie wind their bait and emerging grooves around ears as drummer Frederik Vanwijmelbeke pounds with controlled but voracious intent. In the midst of the sizing up vocalist Thomas Marijsse brings a raw agitation which in turn is courted by the heavy grumble of Frederik Declercq’s bass. The song continues to stalk and tenderise the senses, going up a gear or two but never going for the jugular. Instead it springs a virulent groove which had the body bouncing as a swift appetite for the band’s sound erupted. That cycle repeats with greater tenacity and intensity, the track making for a tremendous start with a vocal self-diagnosis adding to its instinctive contagion.

The following Storm similarly circles its target, guitars driving its intentions before inciting a voracious assault. Again the band twists and turns in its attack, urgency varying with unpredictable adventure as the song’s ferociousness ever deviates. The vocals of Marijsse epitomise that adventure, fluidly moving through a variation of dexterity in tandem with the sounds before Nature Strikes Back raids the senses with a more expected thrash offense but one lined with irresistible hooks and anthemic tendencies. The track is superb, a galvanic incitement mixing up the old and new with fresh boisterousness and craft. Declercq’s bass unleashes a delicious rabid growl throughout the EP, though sometimes seems a touch hidden by the exploits around him, and is in full rumbling voice here as it prowls the blaze of the guitars.

Hurt Me With The Truth concludes with the pair of Book and 39:16. The first saunters through ears with an almost doom laden gait, vocals reflecting their emotional tone and defiance within the song’s own thick voracity and predatory nature while its successor is thrash savagery and heavy metal flirtation rolled up in a multi-flavoured nagging of ears and spirit. It also slips into tantalising calm as the progressive instincts of the guitars conjure, rhythms rumbling alongside before sparking a further anthemic arousal.

It is a fine end to a release which we are so glad has been given a new chance to introduce the thrash adventure of Basement Critters. Like those things in the dark corners of the lowest depths, the band’s sound lurks and prowls, often teasing before lashing out with a delicious feral bite.

The Hurt Me With The Truth EP is out on all digital stores via Wormholedeath / The Orchard.

https://www.basementcritters.be/    https://www.facebook.com/BasementCritters/

Pete RingMaster 04/04/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Crisix – Against The Odds

 

With its title representing its creators’ “hard work, dedication and friendship”, Against The Odds is the fourth album from Spanish thrashers Crisix and one of those releases which revels in all the best attributes of thrash metal whilst adding its own individual adventure. It is a mix of the familiar and the boldly fresh, an inescapably rousing old school inspired modern fired romp of an encounter and a very tasty offering indeed.

Formed in 2008, the Barcelona hailing outfit has honed their sound across a trio of increasingly well-received albums beginning with The Menace in 2011. Both the following Rise…Then Rest of 2013 and From Blue to Black three years later established the band on their homeland’s metal scene while fuelling their reputation around Europe backed by an acclaim gathering live presence. Against The Odds just might be the moment when Crisix becomes a worldly known name, certainly it will awaken a horde of new hungry fans such its accomplished and impassioned roar.

Mastered by Jens Bogren (Arch Enemy, Kreator, At The Gates, Opeth) the album rips from the speakers with opener Get Out Of My Head. Riffs and rhythms surge through ears, their recognisable hues ridden by the gruff tones of Juli Bazooka. Backing band hollers and grooved incitement add to the growing virulence, its hooks flirting with the inane cheap tricks of the pop songs it takes a swipe at but always a dexterous intimation. It is vintage and individual thrash in one spirit, chest thumping stomp and a glorious start to the album.

The following Leech Breeder has a darker more intensive character and again the guitars of B.B. Plaza and Albert Requena unleash a tide of ravenous riffs to get things going. The bone shaking beats of drummer Javi Carry resonate on impact and song throughout, his anthemic prowess matched by the great bass grumble cast by Dani Ramis. Its irritability is echoed across the song from voice to tone, an aggressive trespass which only accentuates the infectious instincts of the track before Technophiliac matches its urgency and muscle with its own challenging contemplation. Weaving textures as addictive to ears as the source of its theme is to modern society, the song embraces extreme metal brutality and melodic enterprise in its imaginative web of flavours.

Three tracks in and it is fair to say that Against The Odds had us hooked and even more so as the atmospheric opening of Perseverance glides over the imagination. Its progressively hued suggestiveness subsequently parts way for a harsher climate to surround the senses but Crisix continue to experiment and weave an imaginative adventure as metalcore and other varied metallic hues entangle. Arguably the boldest track on the album for stretching their thrash instincts it is a wholly magnetic affair suggesting exciting new exploits ahead with the band.

Not that pleasure is lacking with Against All Odds, the Alien inspired Xenomorph Blood bursting out to consume attention and inflame an already greedy appetite with its murderous throes while Prince Of Saiyans floods the senses with its thunderous thrash ferocity. Dragon Ball themed, it is also another hungrily catchy escapade as eager to have the listener bouncing as dangling on the end of its lung depleting charge. With heavy metal spicing adding rich flames to its blaze, the track is rock ‘n’ roll at its grievous captivating best.

Leave Your God Behind is technical death thrash bred pillaging which did not inflame our senses as much as those before it but only kept the forceful persuasion of the album in top gear before Cut The Shit had all and sundry around defiantly roaring at the world with fists raised along with its rabid crossover thrash incitement. There are some tracks which have you throwing yourself around like a dervish, this more than most.

With also an open passion for Game Of Thrones, Crisix venture into its world with The North Remembers, a warrior roar of a homage with no intent of hiding the band’s love of its inspiration. With the guitars weaving skilled lures and devious riffs as rhythms impose and vocals unite in raucous enthusiasm, it is a fine finale to the album if not quite challenging for best moment as other songs more acutely do. You just know though that it is going to be a fan favourite and have venues roaring in unity.

As the years pass we find ourselves becoming more entangled and enamoured with the various shades and adventures emerging within thrash metal, bands like Crisix and records such as Against The Odds give all the reasons why.

Against The Odds is available now via Listenable Records @ https://www.shop-listenable.net/fr/186_crisix

http://www.crisixband.com/    https://www.facebook.com/CrisixOfficial/    https://twitter.com/crisixofficial/

Pete RingMaster 28/03/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Animosity Kills – Severance

Pic: Tom Robert Wold

Well over two years ago, Norwegian outfit Animosity Kills stole attention with their first EP, Manipulative. It offered up a rousing mix of heavy and thrash metal, a fusion nurtured in the influence of bands such as Metallica, Iron Maiden, Pantera, and Testament but as fresh and bold as it was familiar. It was fuelled by inescapable potential and suggestion of bigger, bolder, and more individual things to come; a suggestion more than partly realised by the band’s debut album, Severance.

It is probably fair to say that the Bergen hailing quintet still has some way to go to find their truly unique sound and character but with releases like Severance there will be no irritation at the wait. The eight track release is a magnetic beast of a roar with songs which just glue to the memory as greedily as they do ears. Formed in 2013, Animosity Kills boasts a three-pronged guitar attack all geared to stir up the listener in body and spirit; an intent as forcibly and inventively matched by the band’s rhythmic enterprise. Manipulative was an ear catching introduction to Animosity Kills; Severance evidence of a band destined to be further widely embraced.

The album opens with Black Death, gently luring in the listener with an opening melody. It is soon backed by a towering wall of riff and rhythm, one still controlled but swiftly springing a ravenous charge of raw riffs and rhythmic biting. Its thrash instincts are to the fore, driving through ears as eagerly as the swinging incitement of drummer Eirik Nilsen and the brooding tone of lead vocalist Erik Lindelid’s bass. With an underlying rabidity to its charge and a predacious restraint to the invasive bait of guitarists Stephan Høgtun, Rupert Notøy Rødland, and Mats Bruland, the song tempts and teases in between ravaging the senses, promising more ferocity than it unleashes but benefitting in that manipulative suggestion.

It is a potent and enticing start Dead On Arrival continues with its bristling and irritable but fiercely infectious attack. Leading up to its virulent chorus, the song commands eager attention but grabs it like a puppeteer with a focal point which has neck muscles and fists as involved as vocal chords. Around that beast of a chorus, the guitars weave a web of enticement as rhythms again prowl and pounce with anthemic prowess, the track real evidence of the band’s growing and evolving sound whilst stirring up the senses and attitude with prime thrash volatility.

The following Lord Of Darkness looms over ears from its first breath, riffs and grooves colluding in thick enticement as rhythms firmly rap the senses beside Lindelid’s vocal growl. As it grows, the song twists and turns, the guitars weaving individual and united resourcefulness with almost lusty appetite as beats and bass continue to bring threat and intensity to the inescapably catchy challenge.

Its success is swiftly matched and eclipsed by that of Thermic Vision, a track which instantly gripped personal appetites with its snarling opening riffs and a gnarly carnivorous bassline to drool over. Captivating grooves entwine the dark intent and temptation, the rapacious edge to Lindelid’s vocals adding to the alluring menace of the song. Its thick thrash nurtured riffs are an equally predatory incursion aided by the thick slaps of Nilsen’s beats, it all together creating a track as sonically stylish as it is barbarously intrusive around a volatile heart.

The album’s title track is next, instantly pulling ears into its torrents of compelling riffery and pummelling rhythms with an addictive touch which seeps into the following Pantera scented prowl of voice and song. It is a predacious trespass broken by Metallica-esque twists and flames of metal varied rock ‘n’ roll, groove and alternative traits among many. With a mouth-watering hook which infests the psyche, the song grabs a thick urge of participation before Revolutionary Suicide saunters in with a feisty and imposing swagger. From its first breath it swings as it harries the senses, its contagious instincts complimented by a more composed but just as tempting exploration which leads to a mercurial passage of melodic and progressively scented enterprise.

The mighty Ballistic was a major treat on the band’s first EP and again hits the spot with its grooved entangled rock ‘n’ roll. With something of Grumpynators to its virulent swagger and ravenous swing, the track is a quickly addictive incitement which only escalates its individual lures and united contagion by the groove, rhythmic swipe, and vocal snarl.

Invictus completes the release, its opening riffs preying on ears and appetite with a predatory intent before taking it into its blossoming prowl of thrash discontent and heavy metal fire which in turn expands into melodically cast suggestion amid bolder adventure. Though the song did not grab as vigorously as others, its enjoyable individual endeavour suggests a sound already evolving with an imagination to really anticipate ahead.

Certainly Animosity Kills has a sound which is not the most unique but as Severance declares in a roar which leaves ears richly pleasured, it has freshness and potential which is only heading in one direction.

Severance is available now @ https://animositykills.bandcamp.com/album/severance

https://www.facebook.com/AnimosityKills/    https://twitter.com/AnimosityKills

Pete RingMaster 08/03/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Saintorment – Defective Mind

Though are not exactly knowledgeable on the state of the Latvian metal scene bands like Skyforger, Trendkill Method, Relicseed, and Ygodehwh, those we have come across, all suggest it is rather healthy and it looks like the thrash side of its fury is in good shape too going by the new album from Saintorment. A ferocious roar of old school thrash with a penchant for speed and heavy metal, the band makes a very sizeable impression with Defective Mind, the release a thoroughly enjoyable fusion of the familiar and fresh.

Formed in Daugavpils in the spring of 2013, Saintorment took little time moving from a cover band playing Metallica, Kreator, Pantera, Exodus etc. songs to writing and performing their own propositions. A quartet since 2014 unveiling their debut album, Well of Sins, the following year, there is little more we can tell you about Saintorment. Worry not though as Defective Mind has all the reasons why they deserve plenty of your metal searching time.

The album opens with Physical Force, its destructive warning a portent of the ravenous riffs and senses plundering rhythms to follow. Unashamedly wearing the band’s inspirations, the track surges through ears, the contagious horde of insatiable grooves and riffs easily devoured. Unruly impassioned vocals only add to the persuasion, their controlled rabidity riding the fury of the sounds with zeal. Skilled breakdowns and keen twists bring new identity to the recognisable but greedily welcomed traits of the track, many sourced to those bands the band embraced in their first days.

It is a great start to Defective Mind continued by its hellacious title track. As its predecessor, the song goes for the jugular, riffs and rhythms a forcibly badgering invitation led by ferocious vocals and an enterprise which entangles and twists unsurprising thrash traits with the band’s own creative character and invention. There is drama in every breath of the song, even more so than the first, which adds to its compelling trespass.

There is also a great rawness to the Saintorment sound, one which is in its prime within next up We Are, an ears savaging predator with enmity in every swing and enticement in every resourcefully crafted groove and melody. Keenly revealing the appealing variety in the band’s sound which is sometimes understated but always teasing, the track left an already forming appetite for the album greedier and ready to seize the bodies of songs like Strong Enough and Never. The first has a punkiness to its animus, a cantankerousness which fuels its magnetic scourge while its successor has a great nagging quality to its riffs and grooves, a predation brought with darker intent by the vocals; both songs also rich in sonic and melodic dexterity.

Through belligerence soaked Zerofy and heavy metal nurtured …Dies at the Black Night, the album only accentuates its tenacious nature in sound and imagination where again familiar essences collude enjoyably with the individual ideation of Saintorment; Mood Pyrexia subsequently matching them in endeavour and success while building on the theatre of the song before with its tapestry of metal diversity over thrash instincts. An instrumental for ears and imagination, it masterfully highlights the skills and energy of all band members while casting its suggestive adventure.

The album finishes with Final Hour, a track as vicious as it is alluring as the band again casts a web of multi-faceted thrash bred metal, and finally bonus track Ai, kā man patīk. A raucous punk metal version of presumably a Latvian folk song with lecherous grooves and vociferous passion to the fore, it is quite superb and the perfect end to an increasingly addictive release.

Saintorment is a band all thrash fans should take time out to explore, their album a stomp which thickly satisfies each and every time, and their open potential something to keep a close ear upon. In reference to the final song, Oh how I like it!

Defective Mind is available now via More Hate Productions @ https://saintorment.bandcamp.com/album/defective-mind

https://www.facebook.com/SaintormentSNT/

Pete RingMaster 18/01/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Riffocity – Under A Mourning Sky

As if thrash metal has not be blessed enough with some outstanding releases this year, Greek metallers Riffocity have added another mouth-watering roar with their debut album Under A Mourning Sky. Thrash bred but casting a web of inescapable hooks and incessant grooves doused in melodic fire, the ten track encounter is like a dog with a bone; seizing ears and imagination with creative jaws, gnawing and shaking the senses until absolute submission is given to its predacious prowess.

Formed in 2013 by guitarist Dimitris Kalaitzidis, Serres hailing Riffocity gave notice of their potential and invention with the Disciples of the Storm EP last year. It is fair to say though that Under A Mourning Sky has not only realised that early promise but taken it to a whole new level. Recorded with Firewind guitarist/keyboardist Bob Katsionis, who also mixed and mastered the encounter as well as provided its keys, the album instantly lays a tight grip on attention with the opening throes of first track Hail Thy Father. As imposing beats land riffs gather, guitars and bass colluding in drama and intent as melodic wires emerge to entangle the threat. Straight away an appetite for the impending explosion is ripe, increasing in anticipation as the band heads into a momentary suggestive breath and the groove woven netting which springs from it. Made up of various twists, the track’s nagging enterprise is irresistible, the guitars of Kalaitzidis and George Lezkidis casting addiction as the bass of Panos Savvas grumbles. With the rousing roar of vocalist Thomas Trabouras backed by Kalaitzidis its own anthemic incitement, the track is near on perfection and certainly one of the best starts to an album this year.

Riffocity swiftly show the dexterity of sound and imagination in their sound with next up Arnis Oblivion, its opening piano nurture elegance is soon wrapped in classic metal breath and suggestion before thrash instincts again charge ears with nostrils flared. The sudden drop into melodic calm with a great clean Greek sung croon just catches the imagination, Constantin Maris guesting alongside Trabouras across the song. The band continues to sublimely blend mellow and feverish endeavour with increasing imagination and unpredictability before the song makes way for the ferocious energy and infectious trespass of the equally outstanding Bitter Sunday. Again the fusion of thrash and groove metal, to simplify its character, is so easy to devour and get involved with, riffs and rhythms alone a virulent persuasion never allowing expectations a moment to settle.

Fortunes of Death emerges from its stormy climate with melodic tendrils wrapping ears with more poetic suggestion, their vines as captivating as Trabouras’ gentle but commanding vocal caresses. It too is an enslaving start which blossoms into a compelling theatre of sound and enterprise with Maris once more adding his vocal prowess. There is something familiar about the song once it is in full bloom yet nothing which can be defined only enjoyed as the band blends an array of metallic flavours with increasing boldness and intensity; the track at times as rabid as its predecessor.

Through the ravenous tone and exploits of This Eternal Secret Lies Above and the senses stalking tenacity of From Inside the Arrows Come, the album and pleasure just escalate, the second of the two especially invasive and riveting with Riffocity again showing they really know how to begin a song and build anticipation for its attack, and indeed how to back up that suggested potential with craft and invention.

There is no sign of a dip in adventure or enjoyment as track by track the album ravages the senses, next up Isolation open in its Testament/Exodus like breeding and bold in its own creative mature while Perished Unloved, with Savvas’ bass simply and wonderfully bestial in voice, twists and turns with dervish qualities and a devilish intent though its thrashing antics are all controlled and eagerly rapacious.

The album’s title track is another where certain elements seem recognisable yet everything is fresh and eagerly chewed upon as the song dances voraciously and trickily in the ears, setting up a new wave of greed ready for the closing raptorial grasp of Above the End. With riffs that hound ears, rhythms that pummel the senses, and an anthemic urgency that ignites the spirit the track is inescapable pleasure, and with imagination and melodic canniness blazing within those walls, a conclusion to the album as potent as its start.

As suggested, thrash has had a mighty year with impressive releases and Under a Mourning Sky just might be the best of the lot; certainly it is at the fore of the most enjoyably addictive and devoured right here.

Under A Mourning Sky is available now through Riffocity.

https://www.facebook.com/RIFFOCITYbandgr/

Pete RingMaster 21/11/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright