WEAK13 – They Live

photography-by-squishflash-images

photography-by-squishflash-images

WEAK13 is a band which demands attention; through their in your face DIY attitude and a creative attack driving a sound, which in the shape of their first album, is most likely to have you rocking like a dog before a bitch in heat. Three years in the making, They Live is a prime slab of the British band’s raw and rousing rock ‘n’ roll, a lyrical and physical confrontation which takes no prisoners while confirming the Kidderminster trio as one of the most striking and creatively honest outfits within the UK underground scene.

Founded in 1999 by vocalist/guitarist/songwriter Nick J. Townsend, WEAK13 has been a constant nagging of the establishment, world and musical, backed by a multi-flavoured brew of sound as aggressively punk as it is dirtily grungy and uncompromisingly rock ‘n’ roll. With the current line-up of bassist Wesley Smith, drummer Neel Parmar, and Townsend together from 2010, WEAK13 has constantly stirred things up and continue to with a first album which infests body and spirit.

Produced by John Stewart (Eight Great Fears) and mastered by Henry Smithson (Foo Fighters, 2 Unlimited, Stereophonics), They Live opens up with the irritable My Last Summer With You, a track which seems to have a distinct crabbiness running through its creative veins. As riffs and rhythms assault and pound as Townsend plaintively roars, the song makes for a potent and steady start to the album. Things swiftly kick up a gear though as Down On Me quickly begins the trend of inescapable hooks and anthemic rhythms which continue to blossom across the album. In no time Parmar’s beats and Smith’s cantankerous basslines grip ears and appetite, being more than matched by the rebellious air of riffs and Townsend’s magnetic vocal presence; a combination creating a gripping slice of punk ‘n’ roll.

Its success is more than matched by that of Joke, the song sharing its own web of imaginative wiry hooks and grouchy riffs aligned to another great crotchety rhythmic incitement. Breeding further inventive enterprise and rousing twists, the track is pure addictive manna for a rock ‘n’ roll heart which like its predecessor lingers and returns in thought whenever it wishes.

weak13art_RingMasterReviewThe equally outstanding Sex Pest is more of the same temptation, casting its own individual creative baiting of ears and attention with a prowling stance and a character carrying a touch of Amen to itself. The predacious air of the song in word and music is as infectious as the instinctive twists and turns spun by Townsend’s songwriting and the threesome’s prowess at wringing every last tempting ill-tempered note and slap from their creative weapons. Closing with Nirvana-esque calm before a final rousing roar, the track makes way for the melodically spun Ashes In Autumn, a track just as much of a raw snarl as anything before it but showing the warmer if still invasive musical hues the band also has in its arsenal.

By now it is fair to say that band and album are in full compelling flow, the ‘poppier’ exploits of Closure coming next with its grunge spiced infectiousness to again engage and inflame an already eager appetite for the release while its successor Cameras Are Everywhere soon surrounds and trespasses the listener with its cyber toned touches and predatory manner within a more restrained stroll. Both tracks reveal more of the great variety shaping the album and the WEAK13 sound with the rhythmic imagination and virulence of Smith and Parmar as addictively riveting as the invention escaping Townsend’s throat and sonic endeavour.

The song is yet another highlight of They Live swiftly backed by the infectious quarrel of Here Come The Drones but subsequently eclipsed by the mighty persuasion of The Happiest Undertaker. The first of the pair swings and growls from the start, only increasing in potency with every passing magnetic minute while the second, strolls along with a knowing swagger which alone ensures increasingly eager ears. Fuller participation is drawn by another chorus which just lures vocal chords as rhythms take care of boisterous hips and neck muscles. Another track which seems to just become creatively broader, physically heavier, and more predatory through its bold body, it just whips up thicker pleasure in the album.

It is a pleasure which is only ignited again by the melodically bewitching, infection carrying Loyal Coward. With acoustic guitar and great harmonies arm in arm with tenacious rhythms and a bass tone bordering on bestial against the funk enterprise of the guitars, the track is sheer magnetism.

They Live closes with the fractious might and invention of Obey The Slave, the song as much of a brawl as a calling for ears and emotion, and a great end to one stirring and increasingly impressing encounter. The album shows that WEAK13 have no qualm about going for the jugular in attitude and sound yet breed something which is as catchy and galvanic as you could wish for; a release very easy to recommend.

They Live is out now and available only through http://weak13official.com/

https://www.facebook.com/weak13fanpage/

https://twitter.com/weak13

Pete RingMaster22/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Biting the hand that bleeds you: facing the Weak13 roar with Nick J Townsend

WEAK13_RingMasterReview

UK trio Weak13 is a band we have had a rich taste for over quite a few years now, and increasingly so as new songs and their gripping debut album emerged. A chance to get to the heart of the band arose recently, so in a long overdue chat we talked with band founder Nick J Townsend about the origins and subsequent years of the band, the imposingly refreshing drive of the band and its members, their latest release and much more…

Hey Nick, thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Cheers yeah I’m currently running a music festival in Wolverhampton at the moment but yeah cool fire away.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started and what brought you all together?

Well I’m Nick J Townsend; the band’s founder, I sing and play guitar; WEAK13 began in my hometown in Kidderminster in 1999; went under multiple line-up changes which was very distracting when it came to trying to do songwriting or trying to make any solid plans; eventually I moved to the Black Country around about 2008; I think that was the year; and then I revamped the band and recruited bassist Wesley Smith and drummer Neel Parmar. Since 2010 the band has remained the same and it’s ensured stability; we’ve been able to produce a professional debut studio album now titled They Live with engineer John Stewart and I know we couldn’t have tried doing anything like that with people coming in and out of a band;

Have you been in other bands before? If so has that had any impact on what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

Speaking personally WEAK13 is my creation and the main band I’ve worked in; I was for a short period in a high school band called Incision which pretty much seemed to just play Metallica songs but I made some nice friends from it; a couple of years later I joined a college band called Bamboo Puncturing; it was an experimental three piece thrash metal band, very heavy, the drummer Chris was also the singer, Stuart Smith was the bassist who behaved very metal although he would take the piss out of anyone else calling themselves metal. I just played guitar for them. The band only lasted about 9 months but for our final show we supported Strapping Young Lad during the ‘City’ album tour and it was the first time I’d played with a signed artist. Although it wasn’t a long conversation I kind of liked chatting to Devin Townsend and I think after watching his set I decided then that I wanted to do something on my own terms musically. WEAK13 began a few years later. Neel Parmar and Wesley Smith have both been in lots of bands before joining WEAK13; they’re very experienced musicians.

Photography by SquishFlash Images.

Photography by SquishFlash Images.

What inspired the band name?

I get sick of answering this one but it’s my own fault because I give multiple long answers but the main inspiration was the dangerous surgical operation on my head that I experienced when I was 13; I was born with a defect on my head, bullied constantly throughout my childhood because of the way I looked. Doctors told me at 8 years old that I could have an operation but I had to wait 5 years until I was old enough to operate on. When you are 8 years old and told that you have to wait 5 years…that’s like your entire life again! I didn’t know how I was going to last 5 days at school let alone wait 5 years. I was made to feel weak for years and the age of 13 was all I could look forward to. I was a very depressed child but I didn’t know what depression was at the time, had suicidal thoughts at the age of 8.

I was in hospital for a few months, my skin was stretched and my eye lids could not shut so I would pass out with my eyes wide open; it was a traumatic time for me. After the operation, over 100 metal staples and more stitches had to be ripped out whilst I was awake, no anaesthetic. I returned to school at 13 and I was a normal looking boy again; everyone then wanted to know me; the same people who bullied me….I thought “I haven’t changed….you have”. I had no social skills, didn’t know how to interact with others very well, didn’t understand the world; years later in 1999 my aim was that I wanted to feel the same way as I did before the operation so I shaved half of my hair off and then I named my band WEAK13. That may not fully answer your question but that’s pretty close.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

I originally wanted to have a band on my own terms that I could shape; ‘Project Mayhem’ from the film Fight Club was a great inspiration. I always wanted WEAK13 to be a three-piece like Nirvana, Cream, and the Jimi Hendrix Experience; but it took a while to get to that stage. Three musicians working together seems to make sense, it’s a bigger thing sharing ideas together. I find bands with too many musicians in them become distant from the songwriting, we sound tight because there’s a tightness in how the song is forged; it’s not just a riff, there’s a story behind it; subject matter; a feeling. I’d hate to be in a band with five people or more in it; your songs are your child and creation and it’d be like trying to raise a child with a biological father plus multiple step dads in the same house, too many voices in authority.

Do the same things still drive the band when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

There’s been a lot of change since I began but the basic original idea for the band is still there and maybe more so now; where in the Fight Club movie Project Mayhem eventually became a cult-like organisation trying to bring down modern society; WEAK13 was originally intended to be anti-consumerist and even anti-music industry because I really find the majority of signed artists bland, lifeless and harmful; they dumb down the public with their empty songs and brainwash musicians in to thinking that they are as good as it gets. The only good things that come from many of the elite bands are the watered down ideas they steal from emerging artists and claim as their own but in a more boring and less inspiring way. There has definitely been some evolution in WEAK13. We’re using our music as a weapon; lyrically and subject matter wise we do things most bands haven’t even woken up to yet. We’re currently writing about things such as crisis actors, poison in our foods, population control and the brainwashing media whilst mainstream artists are singing about whose got the biggest bottom.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

We have a very distinct sound now which is strange because we can play in different styles and it still sounds like WEAK13; learning how to be yourself is the key I believe. On the They Live album we worked with engineer John Stewart; he saw us play live and wanted to capture the rawness of the band’s sound on to a record but still make it well produced and of a high standard; he did just that. When we recorded Ashes In Autumn I think we realised that WEAK13 had evolved into a clear identifiable musical entity. People hear a WEAK13 song played and they know it’s us. A lot of bands can’t do that.

Has it been more of an organic movement of sound or more you deliberately wanting to try new things?

Photography by Mark Hopson

Photography by Mark Hopson

We have to try different things every time; why write the exact same song again? Years ago I used to buy those albums where the first three tracks were the singles and the rest were just bad clones. I remember something Michael Jackson once said which was make every song a hit; now whether or not a song becomes a hit in this current biased and fixed musical climate is beside the point but I think every song should be treated with the same passion, enthusiasm and standards; there are no unimportant WEAK13 songs now. Every song counts. There’s a natural songwriting process, often the lyrics come first or the song subject and then the music is shaped around it. Some bands have no idea what to write about; that has never been a problem for WEAK13.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

The three of us come from different backgrounds, have totally opposing influences and we shouldn’t logically fit as well as we do. I think because all three of us do what we want in WEAK13 and how we want, it all comes together nicely. I have never told Neel Parmar how to play the drums, I don’t insist on knowing exactly what the baselines are to WEAK13 songs because I enjoy hearing them played and written by Wesley Smith; if he wants to change something he’s done then I encourage it. We all can be musicians in WEAK13. Yes, I often come up with the initial starting point for a tune but it changes when we all get together. When Neel Parmar laid his incredible drums down to ‘Obey The Slave’ the tune became more epic than I could have possibly imagined.

Is there a process to the songwriting which generally guides the writing of songs?

Normally it’s the song subject that comes first or a lyric, I might then put a few guitar riffs together, I go to Wesley Smiths house and show him; Neel Parmar hears what we both come up with together and then he interprets how he thinks the drums should sound and then we have a song. It’s literally often that basic; the song has to be interesting to us, the catchier the better; I write hypnotic choruses people say; well I never want people to forget them so job done.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

Pretty easy, the world around us; there are forces of evil out there so there are plenty of things to write about. Media lies to the public every single day; governments are not for the people as they try to make out. I do a lot of research for any song subject and have to be very careful on sources of information as there is a lot of inaccurate data out there.

Can you give us some more background to your latest release?

WEAK13 began recording the They Live album back in 2012 and it took 3 years before we completed it; we all had jobs, no label, had to work a way to fund it, where and when to record, what tracks to go on it, the availability of the great engineer Mr John Stewart from the band Eight Great Fears. We didn’t want to rush this as we wanted an album that is basically better than current mainstream artists. We’re an underground band with no record label and no mainstream music industry supporting us but we wanted an album that embarrasses mainstream artists out there with a record contract. We have been getting only good reviews and it must be humiliating for some of these recording artists out there that turds like us have a superior album. People can order the album from the bands own site http://weak13official.com/ and we’ve not released it on iTunes or any of these streaming sites as we got sick of hearing how bands were getting ripped off, so we control our album at the moment; if they want it they order it from us. It’s got 11 great rock songs on there and they are professionally written and recorded, pretty much everyone that hears the They Live album is blown away and that’s how we like it. This is more than just an album, it’s a wake-up call to modern music journalists; they have a choice, either they sit back and watch their music industry go down in flames and patronise, undermine or ignore us, or do proper journalism and cover bands like WEAK13 who are growing naturally and are becoming bigger without any major corporate backing.

Give us some specific insight to the themes behind it and its songs.

Each song has its own identity and a role on the album theme; the manipulation of how most people see the world thanks to the mainstream media is a main theme to They Live. The song Sex Pest for example is not about sex but because I’m using certain codes of language the listener assumes it’s all about sexual deviance until there are certain parts of the song where I’m so obviously talking about nonsexual themes that you’d have to be brainwashed or brain dead not to notice, I even admit on the recording what the song isn’t about in the bridge section. The song is using the exact same sensationalism that newspapers do; sex themes to get your attention but there is a hidden agenda, my hidden agenda is a warning to be weary of the media with its semiotics and what it preaches as fact; do your own research. Now that is one song of many on the They Live album; I could talk more about that one song, there’s an orgasm noise at the beginning and at the end of the tune which everyone assumes is a female one; it isn’t; it’s the sound of Neel Parmar making that noise. Do not trust what you see or hear in media. The song is really too clever for its own good.

weak13art_RingMasterReviewAre you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

Structure wise I think the songs stay very close to the original demos we make before entering the studio but we find that some things don’t work as well and we have to make changes here and there; when WEAK13 recorded the song Go Away it was supposed to be for the They Live album; it was the first recording session the band had with engineer John Stewart and it was beautiful and raw as hell; by the time we recorded the rest of the album tracks the nature of the sound on the album had changed dramatically and John Stewart asked us if we could re-record Go Away so that it was more on par with the other tunes on the album. So we recorded it again and it was super, clear as hell, polished and big, but we felt it wouldn’t sound right on the album as it was too good now; the rawness of the original demo was brilliant but when it became better produced we felt it lost a lot of soul so we didn’t include it on the album. It still to this day hasn’t been released to the public because we loved the original demo so much. Our engineer wasn’t happy with the decision but we had to be honest with him which I think he respects more.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably the favourite aspect of the band?

It is the best way to hear WEAK13. We play to new fans every year and they get what we are about; it’s more than just a live show, it’s an attitude; we see bands come and go around us because they have nothing to relevant say; musically we’re tight and we’re talking about subjects which are current and important to human survival and we deliver a message with every gig we play. We have some fans thanks to the internet who still haven’t watched us live but those that have seen us understand us a lot better.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it? Are there the opportunities to make a mark if the drive is there for new bands?

I think a lot of new bands out there are bone idol and lazy because they have been programmed to believe a rock and roll lie. A young and upcoming metal band for example wants to be a great metal band and so starts trying to behave like it’s piers but stupidly they play to only one type of audience and don’t even consider anyone else or any place outside of their comfort zone. I always hear the speech “We play metal to metal fans and no one understands us but metallers”; so with that in mind they will only promote and take serious the venues which are deemed as fully metal (who often don’t take the band serious as they aren’t big), they normally only aim their music to one type of audience (often an audience that doesn’t exist because they are unknown). They avoid everyone around them who are not of a metal nature or dressed like a bat, ignoring local promoters, potential new fans, snubbing local music festivals and venues, not trying to be a part of their own community, not taking serious the time of local and real recording engineers (preferring to home record on a iPhone), being rude to bar staff and venue owners when it’s in their best interest to promote their own shows and the venue including supporting non-metal bands (networking is a great opportunity). Working together as a band means everyone involved needs to work together not “Speak to Dave as he does all the band stuff…I just play guitar”. Kids try and behave like spoilt musicians with a huge record contract and management who do everything for them and two years later their band splits up and they can’t figure out where it all went wrong. I have never had problems with working hard and I get good results.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date? Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as the band grows and hopefully gets increasing success or is it more that bands struggling with it are lacking the knowledge and desire to keep it working to their advantage?

We do have a lot of success thanks to people watching our music videos, they buy our album from the website, come to shows, grab merchandise at gigs and if someone just starting out asked me how to be a musician I’d answer “learn to use a photocopier or printer, learn social media, learn about advertising” plus a dozen other things which are often nothing to do with bashing out chords on a guitar. If you want to survive and continue to do music I think you need to learn other skills. I learned a lot about the stage by doing stage management. I watched how bands used the web for their career so I had to learn how to use the web, maybe in the case of large bands someone else was paid to do that job for them but there’s nothing wrong with having a go and trying to learn for yourself. To put it simply; a lot of members of bands have this idea that they can only do one thing in the band and that’s it, play a guitar or beat a drum; half the members of upcoming bands have no idea what their fellow musicians even do when they are not in a rehearsal room. The more skills a musician learns the better; yes I spent thousands of hours on a computer pushing WEAK13 to new places and it works. I invested my time and I got a result, I didn’t say “leave it to Leroy as he knows computers”; I had to learn a lot of boring things but they have helped the band. I fucking hate computers but I use them as a tool; that’s what they are and bands need to stop acting like rock gods who have everything done for them whist they polish their pickups and learn more about how they can help their band on the internet and most of all in the real world. There’s a downside that some bands do stuff only on the internet. WEAK13 has a physical album that you can hold in your hands, fans wear real T-shirts, we go out and play to real people; we exist away from the internet as well as be part of it and we try our best. Yes; we use the internet a lot but when you appear in the real world then people take you seriously more because it’s like a surprise to them; you’re not just a jpeg on their iPad, you can be on a physical poster for an actual show at a real venue filed with genuine critical thinking people.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Watch the Down On Me video on YouTube because it’s funny. I also direct music videos; I had to learn how to do film making, I have a University degree in film and media now and it is boring stuff but it’s for my band so it’s important.

http://weak13official.com   https://twitter.com/weak13   https://www.facebook.com/weak13fanpage

Pete RingMaster

The Ringmaster Review 16/06/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Prowling the dark side of being: exploring the corners of Invertia with Dave Coppola

Invertia4

An invasive corrosion of senses and emotions, Another Scheme of the Wicked from US band Invertia stands to the fore of psyche invading threats and violating seductions unleashed in 2014. The album is a virulently compelling incitement of senses and thoughts from a duo in guitarist/vocalist Dave Coppola and drummer/programmer Tim Winson who seem to instinctively press all the right buttons with their provocative sonic and primal explorations. With an appetite to find out more about the band and its dark depths, we had the pleasure to talk with Dave who helped us explore the new album, the creative union between the two, the art of remixes and plenty more…

Hello Dave and welcome to the site and thanks for agreeing to talk with us.

Thank you for the interview, my pleasure!

First of all can you tell us about how you both met?

We actually met thru a mutual friend.

Was there a musical connection right away and how long before thoughts of creating a band took hold?

We started working on songs right away. We basically just started tracking guitars to a beat. Those songs would eventually become Blasphemy Be My Name and Perpetual Alert from the first album. We didn’t think of it as a “band” at first. It was just a recording project that became a band! We never thought we would play live when we met, that’s for sure. It’s crazy when we think about how we started to where we have come; for example opening for Blood of Heroes with Bill Laswell, getting a remix done by Justin Broadrick from Godflesh, to putting out an album with Ohm Resistance. It’s unreal.

Did you have any specific intentions when working on your first songs or was it more of let’s play and see what evolves initially?

It was more let’s see what happens. I never thought Tim and I would still be doing this years later…I’m glad we are though.

Invertia2Though your sound seems to be tagged most often as industrial black metal we found it to be so much more and pleasingly impossible to tie down. What are the most predominate inspirations upon yourselves which you feel have spiced your writing etc.?

Thanks for the kind words! We have all kinds of inspirations whether it be bands, film, books etc. There are too many to name, especially between the two of us. I listen to a lot of metal like Mayhem and Burzum, and industrial as well, Godflesh and Ministry. Tim likes the Residents and Adam Ant. We both like the same bands like the Pixies and the Butthole Surfers. William S. Burroughs and George Carlin are huge influences as well. Also the film They Live by John Carpenter is having a huge influence on the new album which is currently underway. So that’s why we sound the way we do.

You have recently released Another Scheme of the Wicked, a captivating and intrusive hybrid of sound and enterprise. Did it in creation fulfil or your hopes and thoughts or has it evolved beyond even your expectations with its potency and might?

We did the best we could, we always do. That way no matter what anybody says about it we are still satisfied in the end. Albums are like Presidents, it takes time to see the mess you made!

It feels a much darker and more predatory encounter than your previous release, more dangerous one; does it feel like that to you and if so was that a deliberate aim from the start or an organic emergence?

I agree, it is much darker…It has a little more of a dynamic feel to it than the first one. I’m not saying it’s a dynamic album just more than the debut haha! We are fast and in your face the whole time with this album other than the remixes. When we were writing we didn’t sit down and plan it that way it just happened. I think that’s the way it goes for most artists, you never know what you’re going to get at the very beginning. It’s always a surprise at some point during the process.

How do the songs come together and evolve primarily between the pair of you?

Typically myself or Tim will write a beat, I’ll put the guitars and bass down and go from there. Tim will take the beat and make it into drum sections and the song will evolve over time. Songs can be like a photo, you have to capture the evolution at the right time or you’ll miss it.

Tell us about the intent and premise behind Another Scheme of the Wicked.

The intent was to put out a decent industrial metal record. The premise was to make it original and not your every day run of mill metal record. I think we achieved that if I may say so. The album got mixed reviews from the metal community. I knew it would, and at the end of the day I’m glad it did.

The five tracks come with another five remixes, each an interpretation of the previous quintet, was this planned from the first seeds of the release?

Not at all… That was pure luck with a sprinkle of dedication. If you would have told me this album would have those artists on it remixing our music, I would have laughed at you.invertiacoverofficial

In many ways the remixes are doppelgangers of the originals for us, though it is debateable which are the darkest and most frightening versions. Did you give free rein for the likes of Justin K. Broadrick and End.user in their take on your songs?

Absolutely…There was no way I was going to tell those guys what to do. There is no way I could have. You can’t tell Justin Broadrick or Kurt Gluck how to do their job, they just do, that’s why we chose them. That’s the element of surprise I enjoy in this art form I spoke of earlier.

It has to be admitted we have never been fans of remixes, or maybe just do not understand their function though those on Another Scheme of the Wicked have impacted far deeper than most others we have come across on our thoughts. What is it about them which inspires you and lent the idea to include them on the new release?

We are big Skinny Puppy fans and we always liked the way they remixed everything. So I guess it just comes down to demonstrating a different point of view thru a common theme. I always thought that was interesting. I think it gives an extra depth to the album when played in its entirety. The next album we may, if at all, do them separately. To be honest my thinking was it’s just cheaper for the people purchasing the album to not have to buy remixes. But this time around we will give them the choice.

I have to ask as it must happen to someone somewhere, how would you deal with a remix which you did not like and felt did not warrant a place or fitted on one of your releases?

Well, we would be pissed; we hope it would not come to that. That’s why we asked the artists we did, and of course they were very professional in sending us either a couple of versions or following up with us to make sure everything was cool.

Back to your songs; at times they seem to be alive as they ignite the imagination and emotions, feeling like they have hidden depths unrevealed to the listener. How intensively did you take sculpting and shaping the songs of the release?

We are very picky in studio. We have a simple chemistry, and it goes like this. If Tim doesn’t come out of his seat during playback of the initial arrangement, it’s not good enough and I’m back to the drawing board. That’s how I know it will ignite the imagination and emotion, because we can see it in ourselves. If it works for us it might work for the listener as well.

InvertiaWas it an on-going honing process until recording time?

Pretty much, mostly the guitars and arranging…We can bring in ideas on the spot with samples and bass parts.

How about the lyrical side of your music? Was that an intensive development and what inspires their breath predominantly?

The lyrics are inspired by just peoples wrong doing really…People’s hatred for one another and trying to get the last laugh on your own species. It’s a place I don’t like to go for too long a time. We would probably have more material if I frequented the place that inspires the lyrics more often, but it’s a creepy spot.

Tell us about the other projects you are both involved in, and were involved in a couple of the remixes on Another Scheme of the Wicked I believe?

I have another industrial project called TranZi3nT and Tim has another project call R3TRD. We use them as a break from Invertia.

What is next on the horizon of Invertia?

We just released a new single for download at http://invertia.bandcamp.com/ called Existence Exit. It won’t be on Amazon or ITunes as they called the cover “pornographic”. You can judge for yourselves.   We also a have a 7” single coming out called Forever Incision that will have a live version of Facility of the Feeble on it, which is the opening track of the debut album. That will be put out through our label Ohm Resistance, which you will be able to get at http://ohmresistance.bandcamp.com/ soon.   As for the new album we are hoping for late spring time. We are looking to play some more live shows as well. Hopefully 2015 will be a good year for Invertia!

Thanks again for chatting with us; any final thought you would like to leave us with?

Thanks Pete! It was a pleasure doing this interview, good luck to you!!!

Dave (INVERTIA)

Read the review of Another Scheme of the Wicked @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/04/10/invertia-another-scheme-of-the-wicked/

http://www.inv3rtia.com/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 08/12/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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