These Reigning Days – Opera of Love

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There has been a great many, us included, who thought that These Reigning Days could and would be the next big thing in British rock because of their exceptional parade of gripping and insatiably contagious singles. It has not quite happened yet, but now with the release of their sensational debut album Opera of Love that anticipation is back in full force. The album is sensational, pulling in all the brilliance of their singles, revitalising them, and laying them beside new creative emprises to send ears aflutter and emotions into overload. The Devon trio create rock songs which are as skilled in their textures and invention as they are virulent in their anthemic catchiness, the result an album that is one of the invigorating melodic roars of 2014.

The past couple of years have been a busy time for the band, their increasingly recognised presence seeing the band relentlessly touring and playing at numerous festivals such as Glastonbury and Hop Farm, play with the likes of Metronomy, Echo and The Bunnymen, and The Feeling, and more recently unleash their sounds before 60,000 fans at Milan’s San Siro Stadium supporting Bon Jovi. The past summer was consumed with a host of UK and European dates in support of the new album as well as an appearance at Vladivostock Rocks in Eastern Russia and Emerge in Mumbai, Dehli, and Bangalore. Now the Yoad Nevo (Goldfrapp, Moby) produced Opera of Love, with additional production and mix on the band’s previous singles by Ade Bushby (Muse, Foo Fighters), gets its moment to ignite the country and such its inescapable enticement it is hard to see it failing.

The album reveals its might and intent straight away with opener Stand Down. The song opens with the voice of guitarist Dan Steer waking up ears in the embrace of keys. It is an elegant start but even in its gentle coaxing provides the hint of something waiting to spring forth. When it comes it is not the expected surge but a dramatic stroll of thumping rhythms from drummer Joe Sansome and throaty bass tempting from Jonny Finnis. That in turn, with Steer’s expressive tones still in poetic league with the piano melancholy, leads into greater intensity and subsequently a contagious persuasion, the first anthem of the encounter. The melodies cast by the guitar and the radiance of keys only light up further the striding beauty of the song and its irrepressible march on the passions.

The impressive start is surpassed by Changes, an opening croon of bass and guitar matched by voice, luring the imagination into an ethereal flight of keys over an evocatively hued fiery landscape. As the song plays with thoughts there is a TRDfamiliarity to this and others songs which refuses detection, that is until the realisation comes that the recognisable feel is from the band itself and the impact of their sound through previous singles like the sensational Too Late, which itself follows the outstanding new single Thrones. The album’s third song erupts with a throaty tone to its energy and persuasion, the bass especially vocal in its sinew stretched address on the imagination. Harmonies equally spring at the senses with similar success and strength, whilst keys and beats make a respectful but rigorous frame for the blossoming beauty within. The song is unrelenting in its melodic charge, offering a rowdy but composed tempest of beauty and bewitchingly textured ingenuity.

Too Late just as impressively swipes its share of the passion next, riding in on a dark magnetic bassline through sultry scenery of Morricone kissed scythes of guitar. Steer is just as potent as his expels the narrative of the song, everything building to a crescendo of heady hooks across bulging bass bait and tenacious beats with a chorus only the dead could refuse joining in on. Adding a Latin hue to its climactic tone and air, the track is a seriously intensive captivation.

A brief atmospheric instrumental called simply Interlude allows a breath to be snatched before latest single and title track bounds in with melodic seduction and drama fuelled vivacity. The electronic side of the band takes centre stage across the song but with plenty of room for the tight temptation of guitar and rhythmic enterprise to enslave ears and thoughts. Again there is an infectiousness which allows no escape of its binding grip whilst the warm soar of keys apply a provocative seduction. Its triumph is swiftly emulated by I Need Time, a song which takes longer than some to get to the same lofty heights. Featuring the enticing vocals of Jazmyn Mary in duet with Steer, and soaring harmonies courted by romantic melodies, the track is a gripping and mesmeric soar across the senses.

Both the electro stroll of Smoke and Mirrors and the shimmering aural light of Fish Bowl escort an already eager appetite to new hunger The first is seeded in an eighties synth pop revelry but just as alluringly adds a torrent of feisty riffs and energetic rhythmic unpredictability to further stir up its increasingly addictive bait whilst the second sends electronic ripples around and off of a sturdier drive of guitar and rhythm bred tenacity. Though neither matches the lofty heights of say Too Late both leave ears and thoughts basking in their warmth and invention before the dynamic endeavour of Living It Up descends on the passions. Starting with Steer crooning into another subtle yet colourful caress of keys, the track soon rumbles with muscle infused rhythms which in turn sparks a rampant energy infused with snarling riffs and taunts from guitars and bass. Subsequently entwining both sides of its scintillating ingenuity, the song expands into another inimical anthem in the severe contagion of the album.

Through the emotive majesty of English Rose and the similarly evocative breath of the Brit pop like Shine On, band and album show new twists in their creative characters to keep everything fresh and vibrant. That aspect of the album is a given before the pair share their evidence to be honest and reinforced by the following cinematic escapade of Satellite. With a sinister air to keys and bass and fascination to hooks and the more aggressive hues of guitar, the track creates its own unique and pungent enslavement of body and emotions.

Opera of Love is closed by the short McCartney-esque ballad The End, Steer weaving a melancholic finale with equally emotive keys. It is a tightly enticing close to one of the year’s major highlights, and the latest confident declaration that These Reigning Days is ready to crack that intensive spotlight.

Opera of Love is available via Ecco Recordings on September 22nd @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/opera-of-love-special-edition/id911377967

www.thesereigningdays.co.uk

RingMaster 22/09/2014

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These Reigning Days: Too Late

these reigning days

    UK band These Reigning Days have an album due out later in the year but until its release seem intent to tease and torment by releasing singles which leave the listener over excited and longing for much more. The songs Changes and Living It Up have already more than wetted the appetite with their infectious and melodic powers but now the band has really ignited the touch paper of anticipation with their best single yet, the anthemic giant Too Late.

Formed by former frontman/songwriter of The Quails, Dan Steer, the band has been on a strong charge through their releases to date and live performances which since making their debut alongside Metronomy has found them supporting Echo and The Bunnymen at a festival in Rome and an impressive series of festival appearances waiting for them in 2013, as well as recording a live session on BBC Introducing in Devon.  The trio of Steer, bassist/vocalist Jonny Finnis (Numb), and drummer Joe Samsone (Morph), continue to impress and garner acclaim as well as a bulging fan base to which the new single will only inspire further.

The single opens on a feisty dark bassline which wonderfully prowls with a swagger around seductive guitar strokes which smoulder and flame within the immediately heated atmosphere of the song. Once the fine vocals of Steer open up their lyrical narrative the song opens unveils an electronic ambience to complete a full persuasion before opening up  into a rampant, eager, and wholly contagious chorus where vocals and sounds unite to leave the senses breathless. With pungent rhythms which conspire to ignite even deeper passions in league with the bass and a delicious step into a sultry dance of Latin tempered invention and melodic seduction which leaves one drooling, Too Late is a masterful and completely absorbing treat.

These Reigning Days has once more unleashed a track which knows how to incite and engage the raptures with skill and mischievous imagination. It has also made the wait for their Yoad Nevo (Pet Shop Boys, Duran Duran, Girls Aloud, Goldfrapp) produced album even more agitated and impatient but after a song this good we will forgive them.

Too Late is available as a free download for just one month from today so stop reading and find out how to grab

your own piece of irresistible fun now @ www.thesereigningdays.co.uk or www.facebook.com/thesereigningdays

8/10

RingMaster 14/02/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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These Reigning Days : Living It Up

Made up of musicians with a pedigree which places the trio on an immediate accomplished level before a note is heard, UK band These Reigning Days has in its relatively short life been on a definite and steep rise. Formed by Dan Steer the former frontman and songwriter of The Quails, the band opened up their live aspect barely six months ago by supporting Metronomy and with the acclaimed release of their debut single Changes alongside, the Devon based three piece took no time in waking up and drawing strong attentive ears their way.

Releasing second single Living It Up, the band easily concretes and improves upon the impression from their debut of a more than solid unit capable of fusing strong melodies and intelligent songwriting into one infectious atmospheric sound. The new single lights the touch paper to the belief and promise that the band is well on course to becoming a major force in UK music, whether sooner or later it seems a must and with the talk of their impending debut album confidently laying claim to brilliance it could be the former.

Completed by bassist/vocalist Jonny Finnis (Numb) and drummer Joe Samsone (Morph), These Reigning Days create sounds to energise the ear through a blend of indie rock invention flavoured by mesmeric electro touches which without standing directly out tease and bewitch within the as on Living It Up, anthemic surging heavier sounds. Produced by Yoad Nevo (Pet Shop Boys, Duran Duran, Girls Aloud, Goldfrapp) the song is an expansive and enveloping weave of passion and stirring energy which leaves a lasting welcome impression long after its departure.

The track opens with the emotive tones of Steer cupped in the hands of elegant atmospheric keys and a building expressive ambience. It soon opens its arms to offer a muscular intensity evolving into a rampant and pulse racing energy but just as your expectations steady for the crescendo the song slips into its emotional shadows again to wrap further around the senses. With beautifully crafted continual switches between the slower impassioned grace and the lively almost feisty energy the song is a deliciously unpredictable yet undemanding pleasure.

If the album has songs even more enjoyable than Living It Up then it is sure to justify the high claim coming before it, if they are simply comparable to this single it will be a release which will enchant and excite multitudes and see These Reigning Days leaping to the fore front of UK indie music.

www.thesereigningdays.co.uk

RingMaster 26/07/2012

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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