Chasing Dragons – Faction

There is no doubt there has been plenty of eager anticipation for the debut album from British rockers Chasing Dragons, especially since the release of their last EP, Faction: Prologue, a couple years back. It was a kind of teaser for the band’s first full-length, unsurprisingly called Faction, which built on their earlier offerings and successes whilst peering into a whole new landscape of sound and imagination, indeed intimation now fully explored and expanded within the new encounter where we would suggest, the Chasing Dragons sound has come of age.

The time since the last EP has also seen the Leeds outfit truly establish themselves on the UK live scene with a big reputation to match, Chasing Dragons sharing tours and stages with the likes of Stone Broken, The Qemists, Skid Row, SikTh, InMe, Diamond Head, Aaron Buchanan and The Cult Classics, Courage My Love, Skarlett Riot, Theia and many more. Featuring nine new songs along with re-recorded versions of the three tracks from the Faction: Prologue EP, the album swiftly ignites attention and imagination with opener Factionless. Part intro part full intimation, the track stretches up from its initial arousal on the ever striking tones of vocalist Tank. Like a flame within unsettled atmospherics, her potent presence is a rich lure and spark for the outstanding piece’s subsequent shadow bound predacious stroll. Portentous yet virally inviting, the track masterfully erupts before making way for the melodically inflamed How The World Went Black. Guitarist Adam quickly spins a web of metallic temptation woven with melodic rock enterprise whilst the track bites through the determined beats of Katie, they courted by the dark rumble from Murf’s bass. Progressive hues emerge as the song evolves, technical craft lining its invention as all the while Tank radiates with her powerful and impressive delivery.

Amongst the band’s influences stand artists such as Halestorm, Avenged Sevenfold, and Bullet For My Valentine, all open spices to the band’s individual recipe as proven again by the melodically vociferous roar that is Parasite and the dramatic exploits of Like Gravity. The latter is a tempest of textures and flavours carrying a volatility which accentuates its warmth and elegance rather than devours them. As many tracks, it is a proposition which grows by the minute through new twists and avenues, all unpredictable and each an imaginative turn along the track’s magnetic journey.

 Through the equally tense Bareknuckle Lover, the mercurial attack of the track as alluring as it is resourceful, and the lively emotive roar of For Kingdom For Glory, Chasing Dragons continue to add fresh adventure to their release. The second of the two in some ways promises more than it delivers, certain inventive moments not exploited as much as personal tastes wished yet is still a gripping snare of sound.

The calmer climate and croon of This Time Is Ours allowed a breath as it simply enthralled though it too has a sprightly nature which eventually catches fire with Adam casting another striking blaze veined with mazy temptation before the riveting Devil In Her Eyes wound eager attention around its tantalisingly creative fingers and in turn The Connection takes ears on a saunter through gothic lined shadows and emotionally suggestive caresses before subsequently erupting into a furnace of muscular sonic theatre. The second of the trio is especially irresistible, every moment a clever thread into the next unexpected and virulent turn of the song though then pretty much matched in glory by its successor.

As the classic seeds of the similarly impressing I’m No Devil (I’m Just A Girl) catch fire within its metal/heavy rock drama and Whitehorse teases and fascinates, the album continues to reveal new aspects in sound and craft; the latter’s haunting opening passage an especially mouth-watering incitement for ears and imagination which hints at new corners and corridors for the band to explore ahead.

We Are The Wall concludes the release, the track a ravenous onslaught of sound and intent driven by rapacious rhythms and coloured by wiry grooves and rich melodies as Tank for a final time powerfully incites thoughts as she potently roars.

It is a fine end to an equally ear-catching album which as suggested declares Chasing Dragons at a new level in songwriting, sound, and performance, a plateau teasy to suspect the metal/rock world will be unable to ignore.

Faction is available now across most online stores.

Chasing Dragons November 2018 Faction Headline Tour

 2nd – Manchester – Satan’s Hollow – support Ward XVI, Soul Desire, Fear Me December

3rd – Croydon – Croydon Rocks Fest

4th – Southampton – Joiners – support Novacrow + TBC

6th – Norwich – Brickmakers  – support The Killing Culture + TBC

7th – Birmingham – Hammer & Anvil – support Novacrow + TBC

8th – Nuneaton – Queens Hall – support Novacrow + Simai + Fleer

9th – Stamford – Mama Liz’s – support Synthetic + Black Hawk Down

10th – Wakefield – Black Mass – support Novacrow + The Sourheads + Seas Of Scarlet

https://www.chasingdragons.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/chasingdragonsuk/   https://twitter.com/xchasingdragons

Pete RingMaster 18/10/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Theia – Back In Line

There are few guarantees in music but one thing you can be sure of is having a good time with anything from UK rockers Theia, a theory proven yet again with the band’s new album Back In Line. It is not just another rousing outing with the Burton upon Trent trio though; everything about it is bigger and bolder than anything from the band, and bursting to unleash nothing less than prime meat rock ‘n’ roll.

Since emerging in 2012, Theia has laid a boisterous hand and infectious imagination on hard rock through a rousing live presence and some attention grabbing, pleasure raising releases. The success of their first two potential loaded EPs in 2013, Theia I and II, was clearly eclipsed by the potency and impact of debut album Take The Pill two years later. It was an encounter slamming the band on the national heavy rock map with a bang. Now broader horizons are in their sights with Back In Line, the album simply one of the most virulently infectious and robustly rousing encounters of recent times from a band openly raising their game on songwriting, craft, and anthemic prowess.

With drummer Jake Dalton linking up with band founders in lead vocalist/guitarist Kyle Lamley and bassist/vocalist Paul Edwards in 2016, Theia quickly reveal the new maturity and creative zeal in their music within the album’s first full track which follows the opening atmospheric intro of Keezheekoni. Scenic within a brooding southern air, its suggestive instrumental coaxes ears into the waiting jaws of My Poison. Instantly rhythms slam down their muscular intent as a Billy Talent spiced riff taunts an already keen imagination. The snarling tone of Edwards’ bass is a stirring predator within the growing hard rock blaze of the track, always there adding a threat as Lamley’s guitars lays down fiery melodic flames and vocals lead a just as swiftly imposed catchiness where familiar and fresh hues unite within a resourceful roar.

Next up Whiskey Business is a barroom romp shaped by melodic liquor and jabbing beats as vocals add their own boisterous antics. There is a touch of Extreme to the song especially in its funkier groove woven moments, virulent turns far too easy to get involved with to avoid addiction before the album’s title track prowls with an eager swagger through ears. Riffs and rhythms stalk with a contagious smile to their trespass, Lamley’s melodic vocals just as inviting as the tenacious smoulder of the Black Spiders scented song sears and seduces the senses with increasing dexterity and rigour.

The outstanding Just Go has a calmer air initially, its eighties hued climate still punched through by hungry rhythms before the fire in the song’s belly inflames subsequent melodies, wiry grooves, and the whiff of pop punk which colludes with the song’s hard rock breeding. Carrying another irresistible, incendiary chorus, the track hits the spot with relish while its successor Signed Sealed Cemented brings a similar template of sound before creating its own southern tainted rock ‘n’ roll fuelled proposal.

The swinging exploits of following Paper The House has the body back on its feet, though it never has a moment to sit across Back In Line up to this point to be honest; the track brewing up another instinctively infectious captivation with lithe grooves, throbbing veins, and invention moulded twists with inescapable temptation. The song is superb, a dirty little temptress no man, woman, or hound could resist.

The melodic croon of Sparkplug comes next, its acoustic stroking of the senses the canvas for Lamley’s impressing vocals and the tease of drama sharing strings. Sharing the band’s inspirations in artists such as Guns N’ Roses and Buckcherry, the track easily captures the imagination, only blossoming into greater persuasion with every passing minute before the acoustic balladry of Home hugs ears. Though missing the richer inventive sparks of its predecessor, the song simply enthrals, growing more essential with every listen.

Sharing a more intensive and stormier evolution of the climate in the album’s intro, Afterglow emotionally and in tone murmurs and groans before hitting its irritable rock ‘n’ roll stride where again sinewy grooves, rapacious riffs, and lead loaded rhythms demand attention; all coming with another tide of infectiousness which, as vocals anthemically entice, tempers their volatility superbly.

It is a fine end to a release impossible to ignore, get out of the head, and to find any restraint in heartily enthusing about. It is fair to say that rock ‘n roll is safe in the hands of bands like Theia and relishing the adventure certainly Back In Line offers.

Back In Line is out now through WDFD Records.

Upcoming shows:

15th July – Uttoxeter Rocks, Uttoxeter

21st July – Collop Gate Farm, Rochdale

22nd July – BurtonFest, Burton Upon Trent (afternoon)

22nd July – Sempiternal Warm-up, Cannock (evening)

26th August – Rockwich Unplugged, Northwich

27th August – Giff-fest, Wolverhampton

2nd September – B2, Norwich

3rd September – The Black Heart, London

8th September – The Hut, Corby

9th September – The Station, Cannock

http://theiauk.com/    https://www.facebook.com/THEIAofficial/    https://twitter.com/theia_uk/

Pete RingMaster 05/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Theia – Take The Pill

THEIA_RingMaster Review

The ‘medicinal’ value of the sound within Take The Pill certainly and potently represents its title, the new album from UK rockers Theia, a rousing feel good remedy of attitude loaded rock ‘n’ roll sure to energise any day of unenthused emotions. It vociferously grumbles, tenaciously rumbles, and unleashes ten hungrily blazing roars for one highly enjoyable snarl within the landscape of this year’s British rock scene. Pushing boundaries and forging unfamiliar territories may not be the biggest element of the Burton Upon Trent trio’s debut full-length, but in providing a furiously thrilling and enlivening rock ‘n’ roll, Take The Pill is nothing less than a hammering success.

Formed towards the start of 2012 and drawing on inspirations from the likes of Buckcherry, Winterville, Alter Bridge, and Black Label Society for their uncompromising, metal infused hard rock, Theia has swiftly and increasingly over these past three or so years, gained a strong following and acclaimed reputation for their voracious rock sound whether live or on releases. 2014 saw the threesome of vocalist/guitarist Kyle Lamley, drummer John Tolley, and bassist Paul Edwards come together and the band’s single Whoop-Dee-F***ing-Doo! whip up fresh and eager attention, building on that gained by earlier EPs, itself eclipsed by recent single Ride On. Now Take The Pill shows that the taste of the band’s first album they gave was rich but also only half the story, and easy to expect their success to be easily surpassed by the band’s tremendous new release.

cover_RingMaster Review     Take The Pill comes to life with opener We’re Alive, it sauntering in on a melodic coaxing alongside a boozy sonic caress, both guitar spawn and thickly enticing. They continue to entice with their intoxicating lures whilst in the background there is a sense of something fiercer brewing, this eventually honed and emerging as an ear entwining groove that instantly hits the instincts and eager swing of the body. As with all subsequent tracks, there is a just as immediate familiarity to the flavours woven into the song but also freshness and virulence which dictates the way thoughts, appetite, and pleasure go.

With fine guitar craft and a great vocal delivery from Lamley, backed by a great rhythmic shuffle from Tolley, the song is a great anthem to start things off with From The Streets backing its potency with its own rock ‘n’ roll stroll wrapped in spicy blues hued grooves, broad vocal roars, and enjoyable imagination in the tapestry of recognisable and fresh spices. Keeping ears and neck muscles keenly involved, the song passes its infectious baton onto Society On Mute, an impassioned and muscular canter rippling with metallic riffs and thumping beats alongside a lure of bass from Edwards which borders on the carnivorous in tone. Breezes of some of those earlier inspirations are an open spicing too as also the individual craft and invention which colludes to create a track that stomps and atmospherically seduces throughout its fiery presence.

Video Memories needs barely a handful of seconds to grip ears and an already bred hunger with its growling bassline and grizzled riffs, their antagonism perfectly tempered by the melodic flames and vocal harmonies colouring the track. It is stirring stuff but quickly overshadowed by the mighty Anybody Else, a swagger of southern rock equipped with the juiciest of grooving and another bestial bass sound cast by Edwards. Vocally too, the song is a mix of stylish antagonism and anthemic adventure which at times flirts with prime Pantera bait, a great tempting emulated again later in the album once Electric Witness first unveils its addictive and magnetic hard rock croon, its every element again coming together in superb creative unity. It is a track which musically gets more crotchety around melodically enticing vocals, another string to its already persuasive bow that only hits the target before the outstanding Overthrown springs another open and pleasing Pantera-esque hook within its contagious endeavour.

Take The Pill is completely in total control by this point, keen ears backed by greed for the high energy and thickly convincing adventure of the band’s sound. The album increasingly becomes more compelling as each song passes through ears into the imagination, the next up Some Days ensuring that does not change, its voracious heart and attack pure fire breathing rock ‘n’ roll; a quality similarly running through the core of Ride On and closing stomp Whoop-Dee-Fucking-Doo!

The first of the pair merges dirtily fuzzy riffs and throaty predation from the bass with the clipping of ears by Tolley’s persistent rapier swings, all imposing yet enthralling traits framing a web of infection driven by winy grooves and sonic imagination. Its successor just rocks like a dog in heat, the finest asset any slab of rock ‘n’ roll can have in our view and again grooves, hooks, and enterprise create a tasty tempting bringing the sinew swinging party to an exhaustive close.

After recent singles, we had strong hopes for Take The Pill but it still took ears and expectations by surprise, emerging as a bigger, bolder, and far more creatively boisterous incitement, even those lead songs coming over taller and broader in their bellows. Ok Theia might not be breaking moulds with Take The Pill but rock pleasure does not come much more captivating and enjoyable as this.

Take The Pill is out now on CD @ http://theiauk.com/shop/ and through most online stores digitally and physically.

http://theiauk.com   https://twitter.com/THEIA_uk https://www.facebook.com/THEIAofficial

Pete Ringmaster 26/10/215

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Theia – Ride On

Theia collage pic_RingMaster Review

Just ahead of their debut album, UK hard rockers Theia have stoked the fires of anticipation with new single Ride On. It is a blaze of anthemic power and voracity merged with bluesy melodies and an enterprise which plays like a familiar friend whilst leaving you guessing as to its next magnetic move. The release is muscle swinging rock ‘n’ roll and the juiciest taster to the band’s impending new full-length Take the Pill.

Formed in 2012, the Burton Upon Trent band draws on inspirations from bands such as Buckcherry, Winterville, Alter Bridge, Black Label Society and many more to colour their robust sound and in turn invigorating single. A couple of well-received EPs in 2013 awoke ears to the potential and rebellious nature of the band’s sound, a proposition which has just kept developing and blossoming to back their increasing reputation as one stage shaking incitement earned across gigs and festivals. Now the trio of vocalist/guitarist Kyle Lamley, bassist Paul Edwards, and drummer John Tolley are poised to make a big impact with their first album on the UK rock scene, one possibly to emulate the success of their celestial namesake, certainly if Ride On is an indication of what is to come.

A fuzzy lure of guitar starts things off, its bait soon joined by the gloriously carnivorous of bass which is instantly given a welcoming clarity from which to growl from. Thick beats add to the building drama which is fully realised with the richly spiced grooves cast by Lamley. Never quite exploding into the riot it continually hints at, the song instead places infectious layer upon infectious layer, bluesy endeavour an intoxicating hue to air and the guitar spawned enticement lighting it as rhythms craft a compelling frame to one virulent anthem.

Ride On gets the job done without unnecessary excesses and delusions of grandeur; it is hard rock with a recognisable smile and mischief but lit by a freshness which just hits the spot. As mentioned earlier it is muscular rock ‘n’ roll, a flavour to feed most appetites.

Ride On is out now.

Pete RingMaster 14/09/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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