Weird Omen – Surrealistic Feast

Simultaneously offering a haunting bordering on nightmarish temptation alongside a warm seductive tonic for the senses, the rock ‘n’ roll of French trio Weird Omen has always been a magnetic lure but within new album Surrealistic Feast reveals itself a sonically perceptual anomaly as it casts the listener adrift on a purgatory sea of addictive wonder. Try pinning the band’s sound down and you will flounder on the rocks of defeat but there is no missing its instinctive fascination and rousing prowess as proven within their new adventure of captivating strangeness.

Surrealistic Feast is the third full-length from the threesome of baritone saxophonist Fred Rollercoaster (King Khan and the Shrines, Bee Dee Kay and the Roller Coaster…), guitarist/vocalist Sister Ray (Ray and the Dead Drums…), and drummer/vocalist Remi Pablo (Escobar, Anomalys…) basking in a sound which has perpetually grown and boldly explored new realms by the record. It is a proposition as raw as it is radiant, a fusion of garage rock and punk with psych and neo psych tendencies amidst dark punk ‘n’ roll inclinations but a sound which still emerges outside of that broad decades embracing suggestion. Now within Surrealistic Feast it flourishes like never before, every song an individual collusion of flavours emerging pure and unique Weird Omen.

A Place I Want To Know starts things off, immediately the growly tone of Rollercoaster’s sax infesting ears and appetite from within cavernous surroundings. Swiftly the nagging beats of Pablo eagerly pester as too the predacious jangle of guitar from which a delicious melodic siren rises. The beauty of the track is sublime, its welcome harassment irresistible and fiery nature thrillingly rapacious; the outstanding opener a mix of raw aural tocsin magnificence and similarly alluring vocal persuasion.

The following Wild Honey makes just as much of a teasing and tempting start, beats a trigger to sonic hunger and the quickly blasting flames of addiction brewing sax. Whether returning to the Weird Omen sound or making Surrealistic Feast an introduction, the husky lure of its voice is unavoidable and persistent manna to these ears but just as powerfully matched as bait by the scything rhythms of Pablo and Ray’s melodically acidic and lustrous infestations as epitomised in the second track. Its rumble is open but controlled, underpinning the virulence swirling above and channelled into a vocal incitement impossible to leave alone.

Celestial heights are ventured once more through Please Kill Me, its prowling flight a sizzling wind of psych fuzz and sinister rock ‘n’ roll. At times it merges gothic psychobilly reminding of The Orson Family and the scorched punk of The Scaners to its compelling body, all the while niggling away at the imagination before Earworm uncages its own feral swing. Echoing the grungy wildness of Escobar in its breath, the track is a cyclone of salacious garage rock as punked up as it is melodically caustic and more than living up to its moniker.

The album’s title track is next, Surrealistic Feast a devious serenade cored by a rhythmic predation which controls the underbelly of mania eager to share its psychosis. The dual vocal incitement of Ray and Pablo circumvents skin effortlessly as beats hold limbs subservient, greed and imagination instantly enthralled and ever lustful through the rasping quirts of sax. The track is pure devilment, demonic sound at its most improper.

The sixties garage rock lined Collection Of Regrets brings its own individual temptations quickly after, its mellow hunting pop catchiness aligned to earthy untamed boisterousness while successor, The Goat, swings in with an old school rock ‘n’ roll and blues nurtured swagger; a hungry strut interrupted by punk brewed ferity from time to time with every corruption leaving greater creative savagery. Both tracks had us bouncing in various states of pleasure as too did the dirt encrusted pop ‘n’ roll of Trouble In My Head, a track resembling something akin to The 13th Floor Elevators immersed in the organic infectiousness of Thee Exciters and the untamed aberrance of The Mummies.

The composed yet twisted stomp of Out Of My Brain had attention locked within seconds of its hypnotic stroll, only gripping tighter as its aggression and mania escalated before leaving album closer, I Will Write You Poetry to pick up the pieces which it does with ease with its trash coated melodic croon.

Weird Omen can pretty much be trusted to constantly provide an unpredictable escape and adventure which arouses, disturbs, and leads the listener to realms of sonic curiosity and inimitable temptation; this time it comes in one glorious escapade going by the name of Surrealistic Feast.

Surrealistic Feast is out now via Dirty Water Records; available @ https://weirdomen.bandcamp.com/album/surrealistic-feast and https://www.dirtywaterrecords.co.uk/shop/#!/Weird-Omen/c/32921273/offset=0&sort=normal

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Pete RingMaster 28/03/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Virgin Kids – Greasewheel

VK_RingMasterReview

Having more than teased with their self-titled EP in the November 2014, UK garage rockers Virgin Kids have unleashed their full sonic flirtation with debut album Greasewheel. Breeding their off kilter rock ‘n’ roll from an entangling of garage and post punk with psych and fiery pop rock, the London based trio cast an intoxicating enticement posing as an album which swiftly arouses the spirit and colludes with the imagination.

Formed as a bedroom project by Asher Preston, Virgin Kids fully emerged as a band late 2014 with childhood friend Paul Rosser and ex-Fawn Spots drummer Sean Hughes alongside the band’s frontman. Since then and the release of the aforementioned EP, the threesome has gained a potent live reputation, an adventure which has seen them share stages with the likes of whilst Jacuzzi Boys, The Coathangers, Kim and The Created, and Dirty Fences amongst others to date. Numerous comments about the band on stage talks of a “fevered intensity”, an element Virgin Kids has seemingly tried and for the main succeeded in now representing across Greasewheel.

The album opens with Bruised Knees, a kinetic jangle of guitar and contagious vocal urging from the first second. In no time, the song climbs over the senses, dark rhythms mixing with a fuzzy entrapment of ears in something which provokes thoughts of The Sonics, early Horrors, and The Hives in devilish union. A lively spark for the spirit, the track provides a great start to the revelry of the album, quickly backed by the more reserved but no less magnetic Cracks In A Colour. The band’s new single, it immediately swings with a graceful gait infused with appealing bass cast shadows. Soon that sixties seeded enterprise becomes a busier eruption of sound and energy, returning to the song’s initial melodic and controlled romancing before alternating between the two from thereon in.

art_RingMasterReviewFrom one pinnacle to another as My Alone stands tall from the off with its own individual sonic flirtation and seduction of ears. Like The Dickies meets Love Buzzard meets Asylums with a touch of Buzzcocks to its hooks and melodic grooves, the song is a glorious blaze of garage rock/pop, with a virulent harmonic invitation as inescapable as the anthemic rhythmic tenacity the track rolls along on before Never Nude slips in with a healthy whiff of seventies punk to its Thee Exciters/The Fleshtones like scent.

Both tracks on their own make Greasewheel an epic must listen, and are powerfully backed by the chaotic punk ‘n’ roll of Crook and the acidic Horrors-esque smooching of Shrink. The first of the two is another high point, its scuzzy heart and raw crescendos delicious tempering and companion to addictive grooves and melody sculpted hooks. Its successor proceeds to writhe with sonic temptation from its first breath, mellowing out into a psych pop seducing seemingly brewed from a blending of shoegaze and psychedelic pop. Equally there is a darker lining to the track which emerges more as it develops and spins a tangy web of guitar crafted suggestiveness littered with heavier rhythmic trespasses.

After the melodic lure of Shrink Wrap, a very brief epilogue like follow-up to its predecessor carrying a Teardrop Explodes air to it, the album concludes with the feisty pop jangle of Be Your Friend. Whipping up energy in body and voice to unite with its own, the song is an irresistible close to a similarly thrilling release. Greasewheel builds on the dramatic introduction of Virgin Kids’ first EP whilst creating its own unique character of sound and potential for bigger and creatively rowdier things to come. We for one cannot wait for their fruition over future releases whilst being a perpetual companion for this treat of a proposition.

Greasewheel is out now on cd, vinyl, and digitally through Fluffer Records in the UK and Burger Records in the US.

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Pete RingMaster 14/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Mobbs – Garage Punk For Boys

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Ever wondered what would happen when you mixed ’77 bred punk rock with garage rock? UK rockers The Mobbs obviously did and with additional doses of sixties beat and R&B have crafted a sound which insatiably infests body and soul. In the mischievous shape of their third album Garage Punk For Boys, this adventure it is fair to say also provides one of the releases of the year. The accompanying promo sheet for the album suggests that “The Mobbs play a Wilko Johnson infused Billy Childish explosion”, an accurately pungent description of their sound but to that we would add the unreserved devilry of Radio Stars, the raw charm of Television Personalities, and the bracing fever of Thee Exciters in its armoury. The concoction is a riveting and exhilarating stomp with a hunger as shown by Garage Punk For Boys, which infects the listener from head to toe.

Formed in 2008, the trio from Northampton has persistently lit up stages, earning a rich reputation for energy strewn live performances, a stirring presence backed up and spread further by their greedily received full-length It’s… The Mobbs of 2011 and its acclaimed successor Stiff Upper Lip & Trousers To Match last year. With a couple of singles equally stirring the passions, the band has been a live spark in the European garage rock scene, though it is easy to expect Garage Punk For Boys being the trigger to a far more ferocious spotlight upon the inimitable uniqueness of The Mobbs.

The trio of vocalist/guitarist Joe B. Humbled, drummer Cheadle, and bassist The Bishop, who is making his recording debut with the band on the album, unleash an instantly grabbing eighteen second punk brawl through Gpfb to set GPFB-FRONT-COVERthings off, following it with the magnetic grooving of Get Your Hair Cut. Bass and guitar cast the first spicy lure on the second track, before snipping scissors unlock a feisty stomp littered with a wholly seductive bassline and similarly alluring hooks. Matching the devilment of the sounds, Humbled incites ears and imagination with his raw and unfussy delivery, a boisterous and infectious enticing to misbehave or conform depending how you want to take the exceptional track.

Its bewitching bounce is followed by the tangy presence of I Am the Anticlimax, clanging riffs an easy enslavement from the first breath. With The Bishop adding another delicious velvety tempting on the bass within the crisp rhythms of Cheadle, the track entwines beat and vintage punk rock, kind of like The Rockin’ Vickers meets Leyton Buzzards. Striding with attitude and sonic enterprise, the song is an instant anthem, as so much of the album, an almost concussive and certainly inescapable treat whipped up by scything guitar and punchy rhythmic enterprise, everything lorded over by the compelling tones of Humbled.

Do the Bishop! comes next and is just the wickedest instrumental baiting possible. The skills of The Bishop seduce and rumble throughout whilst Humbled’s guitar launches its own virulent seducing as Cheadle smashes anything in arms-length resourcefully. With a tang of blues sweetness to its epidemic waltz, the song sets up further hunger in the appetite for the album before making way for the melodic causticity and intriguing narrative of Demobbed. The track is primarily garage rock but at times you can almost swear there is an element of The Undertones in its slim but impossibly potent sonic endeavour.

The hungrily vivacious ride of the album is taken to another level with We Don’t Need a God, a brilliant furnace of searing grooves and greedy hooks ridden by the punk honesty of the vocals. It is pure addictiveness, every twist and tenacious slither of bait soaked in infectiousness and anthemic irreverence, leaving feet, body, and soul blissfully exhausted and thoughts rebellious. Imagine The Masonics flirting voraciously with The Adicts and you get not only the heart of the song but arguably of the whole release.

The title track is next, romping with ears and nostalgia through jabbing beats and jangly hooks, its title summing up song, sound, and the whole garage premise which fuelled punk and garage rock at their outsets. It also has thrilling melodic warmth to its gentle uprising, everything aligning for an irresistible rousing of pleasure, taken on again by the blink and you miss shortness of second instrumental Chicken Run. Its enticing strut is swiftly pushed aside by the exceptional sonic commentary of Where’s the Punk Rock!?, angst and fury as much a part of its gripping clang and garage punk fever as creative relish.

Photo 1   It is not exaggerating to say that every song on Garage Punk for Boys is devious rascality, all instinctively and simultaneously appealing to the styles it weaves its propositions from, One Erotic Thought another fine example with its sixties spawned beat infused garage rock tromp. As here, they all keep feet and limbs as busy as ears and imagination, and whilst thoughts may not be erotic as the song reveals of itself, they are nevertheless keen to indulge in knavish practices after each encounter.

Put It in Your Pipe clunks and swings in next, riffs bulky lures courted by compelling bass craft and vocal devilment, everything framed by precise and eagerly wicked beats. Stepping out with a punk seeded swagger, the track also wears the mischief breeding charm and adventure of King Salami and the Cumberland 3 and the aforementioned Billy Childish, drawing out more lust for the album from the passions.

The final stretch sees the blues rock induced R&B stamp of Just as Bad as You light up air and ears first before the exotic swing of Mk II immerses senses and imagination in a sultry dance of the seven salacious temptresses, well in my dreams anyway. Both songs leave appetite as greedy as ever whilst closing riot of Mad! is an aggressively spirited and ferociously contagious garage punk assault, and oh so scintillating.

It is impossible not to drool from start to finish over Garage Punk for Boys, a release which if anything from punk to garage rock, beat to flirty rock ‘n’ roll gets the juices flowing, is a must. The thing with The Mobbs is they not only create sensational stomps but do it with a presence and flavour like no other, this simply makes them one of the UKs seriously exciting and innovative bands.

Garage Punk for Boys is available digitally and on CD now via Cravat Records @ http://themobbsuk.bandcamp.com/album/garage-punk-for-boys

http://www.themobbs.co.uk/

RingMaster 21/11/2014

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Kobadelta – Remain Distracted EP

kobelta

Having been enthralled by their rousing EP, The Hidden Door earlier this year, there was keen anticipation waiting for the release of its successor Remain Distracted. Both EPs come from the creative minds and resourceful imagination of UK band Kobadelta, and each provides a fascinating climate of sound and excitement to greedily immerse within. Remain Distracted takes the strengths and potency of its predecessor into new emotive and adventurous sonic flights, pushing the potential and emerging presence of the band into riveting and sultry landscapes. In some ways it is a slow burner compared to the last release but through a quartet of fiery and seductive songs, sets down the most potent and heady pinnacle from the band yet.

The release of Remain Distracted comes in a potent year for the Newcastle quintet which has seen them chosen to play Newcastle’s Evolution Emerging festival, as well as Stockton Weekender (with Happy Mondays and Public Enemy headlining) and Split Festival (with Maximo Park, The Cribs and Dizzee Rascal). Added to that there has also been a live session for BBC Introducing as well as numerous successful shows with bands like Allusondrugs. The new release adds another strong moment in the band’s year and one more irresistible enticement to develop a rich hunger over.

As soon as the sultry stroke of guitar from Alex Malliris opens up first track Siam, there is a potent temptation at work, its smouldering yet ripe lure a swift caress and announcement of the dark psychedelic invention the band is already acclaimed for. Another breath sees the hypnotic throaty basslines of Jon Marley join the evolving enticement of the guitar and the enterprising rhythmic framing of Chris Malliris. It is a glorious flame brought further to life by the mellow yet nicely raw tones of vocalist Dom Noble, all this against the already tantalising weave of melodic expression cast by the keys of Jordan Robson. It is a stunning track, elements of The Doors colluding with other whispers of bands like early The Horrors, 13th Floor Elevators, and Thee Exciters in an original fire of sound equipped with infectiously imposing hooks and grooves.

Repetition steps up next and instantly finds a heavier growl to its riffs, though that weight is not quite transferred to the crisp beats and elegant bassline. That restraint on some aspects and the mix of dark and light within the song works kobadelta epa treat all the same; its steady but feisty canter evolving through a sultry slow flight of immersive keys before breaking back with increasing tenacity in energy and attack. The Birthday Party like song is an intriguing shadow blessed proposition, not as dramatically gripping as its predecessor but growing into another absorbing and incendiary involvement of the imagination and emotions.

Its successor is less slow in gripping the passions, They Can’t Hurt Me floating in on another delicious almost sinister bassline. Its dark tone inspires a haunting essence to the minimalistic melody of the guitar and vocal croon of Noble, the merger offering a noir wrapped sultriness in presence and sound. There is a definite Cramps essence to the song as well as that of Jim Morrison and co, as well as hints of Damn Vandals and The Dropper’s Neck, but with an ingenious addiction sparking bait from bass and guitar aligned to similarly anthemic beats, the track is a slice of brilliance distinct to Kobadelta and their greatest song yet since forming.

The EP is closed by The Heretic, a sizzling sway of sonic causticity and melodic temptation driven by a swaggering rhythmic and riff crafted enterprise. As in other songs there is a prime hook which is inescapable for ears and passions, its coaxing leading the senses into the scorching haze of guitar and atmospheric heat of the keys. With the delivery of Noble again parading the song’s narrative with an unfussy but magnetically expressive texture, the song is a mesmeric consumption of the senses and a fine end to another impressive release from Kobadelta.

The band just gets better and better as evidenced by Remain Distracted ensuring whatever comes next from Kobadelta will be met with greedy anticipation.

The Remain Distracted EP is available from September 26th @ http://kobadelta.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/Kobadelta/

RingMaster 26/09/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Teamsters – Play Along With…The Teamsters

Photo by Mark Shackleton ©

Photo by Mark Shackleton ©

    A blend of sixties pop, indie, beat rock, and punk rock sounds an intriguing concept just on paper alone but in the hands of a band like British rockers The Teamsters it emerges as a frighteningly compelling recipe. The proof comes with the North London hailing trio’s new EP Play Along With…The Teamsters, a four track riotous encounter which enslaves feet and emotions to do its devilish bidding. The release is a tremendous party of precise yet organically bred sounds driven by imagination and unbridled passion, a mix which transfers its energy and incitement easily into its recipient. Simply it is one of the most exciting introductions to come along over recent years.

    Consisting of guitarist/vocalist Tom H. Wing, drummer/vocalist Bret Bolton, and bassist David Peter Jorgensen for the EP, The Teamsters grabbed the attention of Hamburg based label Moody Monkey who leapt in to release their debut. Play Along With… needs only a few seconds to steal attention and maybe a minute to fully ignite imagination and passions. From start to finish it has a wealth of enterprise to satisfy and excite fans of punk, mod, R’n’B, garage rock and plenty more. It is an excitable and insatiable stomp but one with a control which ensures it has a simultaneously clean and raucous impact.

     Diggin´ An Early Grave starts things off with a hefty roll of drums triggering a stroll through dramatically jangling riffs, a 1607057_233699483469843_267368660_nswaggering bassline, and instantly enticing vocals. The track dances across the senses with an unrelenting spring to its keen gait and near on wanton adventure to its guitar sculpted persuasion. There is a familiarity to the song too bringing forward the catchiness of sixties pop but just as strongly the track holds a modern raw causticity which only intensifies the stirring prowess of the song.

   From the excellent start, the similarly impressive Girl (How Could Ya?) takes things up a notch, its initial stabbing rhythms and guitar scythes an immediate incendiary fire for body and emotions. Like its predecessor the song has a contagiousness which flirts with the senses like a brewing epidemic, stroking and imposing upon them through two minutes of sixties beat meets rock pop, in a way like the Kinks meets Supergrass.

    The second half of the EP is even more invigorating and emotionally inflammatory. Don´t Come Back Home leaps at the ears with beats and guitars creating a magnetic web of lustful endeavour ridden by the vocals and harmonies. It is a spicy ball of voracious energy and senses searing sonic rowdiness bound to a tempest of flailing rebellion and eye balling contention. As mighty as it is, the track is surpassed by the closing A Girl Named Linda, the best song on the release. Imagine the R&B revelry of Bo Diddley in league with the garage punk rascality of The Hives aligned to that of Thee Exciters. Add a little Rocket From The Crypt in there and you edge even closer to the unique romp but still leave plenty of ingenious adventure to be imagined and discovered in song and ultimately the EP.

     Ensuring feet never have a moment to relax or emotions to settle into mere appreciation for its scintillating celebration the track is an irresistible infection on psyche and passions, a final triumph of a sensational debut. Expect to hear a lot more of and from The Teamsters, as shown by Play Along With…The Teamsters, one of the most exciting and ridiculously addictive bands to emerge so far this decade.

https://www.facebook.com/TeamstersMusic

10/10

RingMaster 18/03/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Teamsters – Digging An Early Grave

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Nat Jenkins – East & West

Nat

An exhilarating blend of sounds from the past five decades or so, East & West the riotous new single from Nat Jenkins is a scintillating brew of invigorating rock n roll. Sounding like a mix of rockabilly, punk, garage and folk rock, the track taken from his upcoming new EP riles, thrills, and excites the senses in the way only pure hearted rock n roll can.

Through previous singles and EP, Jenkins has garnered a potent following and wash of acclaim, coming to the strong notice of the likes of producer Chris Kimsey (Rolling Stones, Peter Frampton) and The Clash’s Mick Jones with whom Nat has collaborated on the track and one assumes upcoming EP. The Camouflage Recordings released single is the first of three recorded in his tiny studio flat in Paris, the song a compelling representation and result of his investigation of sounds going back to the early sixties. As the song leaps upon and enlists the passions in its dirty scuzz lined brawl of rock n roll, the description of its flavoursome presence can only be described as the result of a mutant union between the attitude soaks seeds of The Doors, The Clash, Jesus & Mary Chain, Eighties Matchbox B-Line Disaster, and Thee Exciters with essences of Birdland and Gene Vincent to the mix too. It is a sound which covers the ages yet is entrenched and bred from the caustic times around us now.

The song towers over the ear from the start with a throaty riff grazing and clawing at the ear before crisp beats and warm keys add their abrasive and inviting touches. The vocals of Jenkins wear a coat of scuzzy effect to sizzle upon the senses along with the blistering kiss of the surrounding sounds, the full union of all aspects a flame which dances before and ignites the emotions into a hungry and energised compliance. With a bassline littered with irresistible hooks, the guitars sculpting further contagious lures, and an incendiary chorus to recruit voice and heart, East & West is a delicious invitation to the new EP and instigator of immense pleasure in its own singular rampage.

The single easily shows why Jenkins has brought such impressed recognition upon his individual brand of rock n roll, and if like us is this is your introduction to his rowdy sounds then you could wish for a better welcome than East & West.

https://www.facebook.com/NatJenkinsMusic

9/10

RingMaster 19/04/2013

 

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Thirteen Shots: Vaudeville

Hear that creaking and the scraping of fingernails on wood in the dead of night? That is the sound of UK horror punk band Thirteen Shots rising from the cold earth to unleash their debut album Vaudeville. Consisting of eight crypt borne tunes the album stomps and fiddles with the senses with an eager and infectious lingering charm and mischief. The album might not be flawless but it is fresh, vibrant and thrilling, an attention seeking bundle of fun.

The Birmingham based band creates a sound that combines sixties garage rock, horror punk and rock n roll with occasional infusions of psychobilly. It grabs with an eager bony hand to lead the ear in a gravestone leaping tour through realms of the dead and superheroes, each and every detour either a mesmeric wanton skeletal dance or a dirty riled up roughage of sound. Always fun, often silly and at times leaving one wondering why, the release simply does what it says on the tin, offer a full on varied entertainment that makes no apologies in having fun, this is Vaudeville.

Miss Eerie opens up the casket of Vaudeville, a decomposed love song with throbbing bass and firm rhythms spiked with acidic guitar tones and riffs. Part Misfits, part Thee Exciters, and more Johnny Thunders the song is a solid piece of punk rock. The band do not go hell for leather at any point almost having a slight reserve in their intentions but this allows each to shine and bring a distinct part to the sound, from the crisp attack of guitarists Izzy and Joe with eager backing vocals to match, the sinister basslines of GMT (George), and the bone rapping beats of drummer Chelsea, the band find a clean yet dirty mix that brings a strength to this and each song.  With the keen punk vocals of Johnny Roxx Rose scraping up and bringing forth the lyrics there is a accomplished feel to all songs even if some are more successful than others.

This strong start steps up a gear with Inspector George. A recognisable grooved bass and guitar riffs teases the ear whilst the drums bring a metallic punch to open up the listener before the surge of punk energy. The song switches back and forth keeping things interesting and only the feeling the song wants to explode into something more vigorous at times but never does brings a slight question against it.

     Boogie Man continues in similar vein, again suggesting there is more waiting within to spring out but never realised, still it is a very agreeable track that leaves its swagger behind long after it departs. This point marks the moment the album really kicks up some dust as the next three songs prove what a current great band Thirteen Shots is and the distinct promise they have within them for the future. Danzig, and yes you know its theme without us saying, is a hypnotic slice of horror punk, bringing a flavour of the man without stepping on toes and taking the effect too far. This is rock n roll of the Devil and a thoroughly pleasing thing for us mortals.

This Looks Like A Job For Batman leaps in next with cape flying; the band twisting the legendary theme riff into a Meteors flavoured psychobilly taunting that is delicious. With added ska punk grooves and touch of The Adicts it is a gem that demands instant replay before moving on. The song is a must and sets itself up for best track on Vaudeville until the following Dead Girls Don’t Scream makes its claim. A New York Dolls wrapped rock n roll with essences of Misfits and Resurex pours out of the track, a full rounded flavoursome treat that carries a sing-a-long lure and contagious hook to ensure it cannot be denied.

The release is completed with the easy going temptress that is The Graveyard Stomp and the American Rock Song before it.  The Graveyard Stomp is all about instant bonding with very obvious hooks and riffs you have heard often elsewhere and that many bands have played with to far less fun. American Rock Song is a good garage rock/punk song but does not quite live up to the rest of the songs , its taste a little bland in comparison but taken as a separate entity works very well and is easy to return to.

Vaudeville is great fun, a strong album that sets Thirteen Shots as a band with an impressive future. Maybe right now their own distinct sound is still trying to break out but it will surely come and with this much of a pleasing release that is a promise that breeds a great anticipation.

Ringmaster 02/04/2012

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Thirteen Shots – Danzig

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Thee Gravemen – Thee Gravemen

 

You cannot get much more simple a set up than offered by trash rock ‘n’ roll band Thee Gravemen or anything as incessantly infectious. Consisting of just a senses cruising guitar and insistent primal beats the duo from the UK, now Malmo, Sweden based, with their self titled album have created a release that knows its sound, loves its sound and is determined you will too.

Thee Gravemen were formed in the autumn months of 2009 by guitarist and vocalist Sir Lee Tea and drummer Devilish Daz Trash, who initially were just doing a one off gig as a duo. Luckily they decided to continue though it was through the lack of finding a suitable stand up bass player as much as anything that tipped the decision to remain a twosome. Behind them the musicians have a good pedigree with Tea having been part of the garage rock band Thee Exciters as well as currently part of Swedish r&b band The Branded, and Trash having been part of UK psychobilly/punk band Skitzo, under the name of Strut. As Thee Gravemen the pair have unleashed a raw and uncomplicated fusion of garage punk, psychobilly and coarse surf veined fuzzed up rock ‘n’ roll, a dirty and boisterous sound that sears the flesh and resonates within the bones.

As can be imagined the songs come from the darkest shadows of the two, the lyrics borne from horror movies, wicked intent and from beneath disturbed ground. The album grabs with an icy clawed grip from the opening ‘Hey There Pretty Baby’ to squeeze and tease, resisting the urge to let go right until the last lingering note of the album passes on. The opening track is relatively subdued compared to what follows throughout the rest of the album but it is immediately noticeable that the production though unfussy and pretty straight forward gives a rich generally full sound, in a way surprising considering the scarcity of instruments.

The album buzzes and crawls over the senses through track after track and though the core of the music is a set spine each song comes from different and enticing angles. ‘Come On’ is a slightly darker track than the opener and reminds of 80’s band The Orson Family whilst the instinctive rhythm led ‘Digging Graves’ has a scuzzed up garage energy that recalls their former bands in many ways.

There is not a weak track on the album; each having their own heart of siren like appeal though it is the beat and rhythm led tracks that make the strongest connection. The pulse beat stomp of ‘Friday At The Hideout’ and the voodoo raw primal rhythms of ‘My Girlfriend Is A Werewolf’, both with a Guana Batz meets Screaming Jay Hawkins like vibe lift the excitement higher but it is when the band go into the realms of The Cramps that they really stand out. ‘My Witch’ is glorious with its distinct twang as distinctly manipulative as the song’s character and ‘Six Feet Down’ alongside the outstanding ‘Shake It’ rip through the ear with primitive ease. The band’s cover of ‘Green Fuzz’ is equally excellent; a very valiant version of The Cramps’ version that easily exceeds the Randy Alvey & Green Fuz original.

Complete with another cover in the hypnotic shape of the Sandy Nelson song ‘Let There Be Drums’ and the immensely fun outro track with after a moments breath ends with a track that sounds like a fictional nightmare when Demented Are Go’s Sparky popped his cherry with Eugene Reynolds of The Revillos, the album is simply fantastic. Released on Dirty Water Records it makes no demands or offers any unnecessary frills but just feeds the soul with inspiring, mischievous and thoroughly essential rock ‘n’ roll.

RingMaster 11/02/2012

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Thee Exciters – Perpetual Happening

From the opening pulses of its first track, Perpetual Happening the new album from Thee Exciters grabs hold of and parties on the senses.  The experience is raucous, at times very dirty, and constantly refreshing as the UK garage punk band unleash track after track of vibrant infernal rock ‘n’ roll. The second album from the Southampton based band leaves one sweaty, energised and totally fulfilled which is all one can ask of a release though Perpetual Happening satisfies far deeper than most other releases heard in recent months if not the past year.

Formed in 2003 Thee Exciters have garnered increasing acclaim and drawn more and more to their sonic sounds via their self released debut single ‘Johnny’s Too Messed Up’ in 2004 and their releases since joining Dirty Water Records of the EP Dial ‘E’ For Excitement of 2006 and impressive debut album Spending Cash, Talking Trash two years later. Their follow up album again released on Dirty Water Records brings more gutsy fuzzed up almost primal slices of rock ‘n’ roll that sound like the bastard offspring of a beer soaked union between the likes of MC5, The Stooges with The Clash and Sham  69, with added seed from the psychotic delights of The Cramps and Reverend Horton Heat. An infectious flavouring that spurs on Thee Exciters own scuzzed up garage punk sound.

The album breaks loose with opening track ‘Dinosaur Traffic’, the track throbbing with bluesy riffs, swinging basslines and group shouts behind the brazen vocal delivery of Paul Le Brock. A delicious start toned in echo that riles up the senses for the even more impressive and excitable things to come. There is an instinctive feel towards the music that Thee Exciters make, it wakes up the raw energy within as well as in some ways give that wonderful feel of reinvented nostalgia. Though it has to be said for any bands or sounds they remind of or bring in they are mere spices within the distinct Thee Exciters feast of sound.

The fuzzy title track follows to mesmerise and pulsate within the ear, the insistent yet veiled key sound sweeping across behind the acidic guitar of Justin Cunningham a teasing element. From here the album explodes into a higher intensity and pleasure. The filth coated punk rock of ‘Flower Punk Girl’ sees the band living up to its name thrusting irresistible original UK punk intent with traces of Stiff Little Fingers and Subway Sect. Its raw, dirty, and with the drums and bass urgent and forceful totally outstanding.

The album is highly consistent but certain tracks stand out more as in the again punk fuelled garage rock gem ‘Paint Me’. As with all the tracks really it is impossible to fully tag the sound fully for in this alone there are plenty of psychedelic tones, psychobilly blooded veins and more running through the punked up rock ‘n’ roll, the diverse elements combining to make the band as exhilarating as they are. The album’s two other classic tracks are the same, varied and irrepressible. ‘Hang Loose’ may not have the most original sixties sound but it is an infectious burst through the ear to sweep one up in its distorted melodic arms, and make it impossible to resist its eager hooks and intention to ignite the senses.

The best track on Perpetual Happening is easily ‘Devils Make Up’, pure hypnotic psychobilly. The track gyrates with insistent rhythms, voodoo spawn riffs, and seedy barroom piano, and with essences of The Cramps, Meteors, and Th’ Legendary Shack Shakers oozing throughout, the album is a must listen from this track alone, though it is backed up by plenty more impressive tracks like the psychotic ‘Mirrors Never Lie’ and the uncomplicated and direct glory of the blues punk ‘Killing You’.

Perpetual Happening is masterful and a deep pleasure that whips up a storm as it winds itself into the senses to incite and ignite more pleasure than can be found in a blues and spirit fuelled whorehouse. Thee Exciters are back with a bang, rejoice and enjoy yourself with Perpetual Happening.

RingMaster 31/01/2012

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