Reckless Intentions – Lights EP

UK outfit Reckless Intentions might be primarily tagged as pop punks but as their debut EP shows, they have an instinctive devilment and creative belligerence which reveals there is much more to their aggressively magnetic sound.

Embracing inspirations from the likes of Green Day, The Clash, and Foo Fighters through to others such as All Time Low and Moose Blood, Reckless Intentions host varied flavours in their music which is clearly audible and potent within the Lights EP. Equally, the Brighton hailing quartet bring an individual character to their songs and presence which is maybe still slightly more potential than realisation but is already helping shape them into a prospect which stands out.

Formed in 2016, the band concentrated scene last year on establishing themselves on the south coast music, and successfully so, before linking up with Alex Gordon at Brighton Electric Studios to work on and record their first release in the sprightly shape of Lights. With its five boisterous tracks, the EP quickly shows it has the intent and energy to stir up richer attention the way of the foursome but more so the imagination to make Reckless Intentions a rather exciting prospect.

The EP opens with the outstanding Ghost Town, a song swiftly making a successful claim for best moment and most potent lure within Lights. With a great slightly off-kilter indie rock revelry to its punk rock tenacity, the track like a mix of Asylums and The Wildhearts, things are swiftly bold and sweaty as the swinging beats of  Josh Woolnough scythe through the nagging riffs and spiky grooves of guitarists Matty Halliwell and Lewis Horsley respectively. The energetic vocals of the former equally inject an energy and fresh identity to the encounter, it all colluding in an adventurous and unpredictable mix driven by the alluringly throbbing groan of Laurence Burkitt’s bassline. In no time body and vocal chords are enlisted by the arousing antics of the song, its dynamic and almost bitchy start the perfect introduction to Reckless Intentions.

Stitches, the band’s latest single is next, its melodic bait and harmonic enticement quickly flirting with ears. The hooks of Horsley beckon within a more familiar temptation of sound; the track openly sharing All Time Low meets Brand New like essences within its infectiously swinging exploits. Halliwell again makes a potent vocal lead, his tones giving the track something more unique than other pop punk outfits though something its enjoyable sounds arguably lack a touch. Nevertheless, the song hits the spot before evolving into the short instrumental of the EP’s title track, a piece which neither detracts or adds to the overall strength of the release but keeps an appetite for its adventure on board.

The following Outcast only enriches the fun though, its instant Smash Mouth like swagger led by the ever flirtatious bass easy to get hooked on prime bait with vocals again a strong pull at its core. Becoming more punk ‘n’ roll with every lively beat and niggling riff, the song growls at and flirts with the listener, all the time brewing a pop catchiness which has hips enlisted in quick time. The song also reveals yet another hue to the band’s songwriting and sound, a variety exposed once more by closing song Home. With his own suggestive piano melody alongside, Halliwell plaintively croons from the speakers; melancholy lining his words and fingers. Alluring ears with ease, things only become more intense and potent as the band eventfully bring their emotion and craft to the reflection; the song catching fire with pop punk catchiness caught in an emotion soaked blaze.

It is a fine end to an ear pleasing first delving into the Reckless Intentions adventure, the first of many more highly pleasurable unions if they build on the undoubted potential and fun of Lights.

The Lights EP is out now across most online stores.

http://www.recklessintentions.co.uk   https://www.facebook.com/recklessintentionsuk/    https://twitter.com/recklessband_uk

Pete RingMaster 18/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Dukes Of Bordello – Lowdown ‘N’ Dirty

To convince and prove that physical and emotional rock ‘n’ roll stomping is one of the primal instincts inside us all UK trio The Dukes Of Bordello release their debut album. Lowdown ‘N’ Dirty offers up eleven tracks of balls swinging, voracious rock ‘n’ roll which not so much lives up to its title than stamps it relentlessly into the heart. It is an encounter leaving the body and soul breathless with music which quite simply could and will seriously arouse the world around it.

Consisting of guitarist/vocalist Andy Barrott, bassist/vocalist Sion Bailey, and drummer Caradoc Tyler, The Dukes Of Bordello grab the most tenacious and infectious muscular traits from every aspect of rock music you can imagine. Rockabilly, punk rock, hard rock, and psychobilly all lay among numerous strains mixed with pure rock ‘n’ roll revealing its various decades of evolution. It results in a sound which seems familiar, like an old friend, but hits and incites with something new and bold at every twist and turn. It is dirty and trashy, inventive and skilfully resourceful like a mix of The Wildhearts, Danish outfit Grumpynators, and Canadian duo The Black Frame Spectacle and fuelling one hell of a first full-length to build on the well-received release of their 7 track self-financed Skullduggery EP/mini album of 2014.

Released physically via Death Or Glory Records and digitally by Undead Artists Records, Lowdown ‘N’ Dirty quickly shows why The Dukes Of Bordello have been firing up zealous support through gigs and festivals these past couple of years with opener All In The Name Of Rock’N’Roll. Instantly a feverish hook lays its claim to ears as the song swings into view, rhythms soon thumping their persistence as vocals incite with their own anthemic roar. Not for the last time, the twanging bass of Bailey is manna for these particular instincts and passions, it’s dulled but vibrant throb the pulsating vein around which the guitar of Barrott flames and sears the senses. The song itself is exactly as it says on the tin, seeded in and brewed with the same intent and swiftly commanding a mutual energy and involvement from body and spirit of the listener, thoughts easily imagining from the encounter alone that the band live is a dangerously commanding puppeteer of energy and stamina.

The following Hellvis is no different, a devilish infestation of ears and hips with an organic demand of both as swinging beats and biting hooks infest with a bordering on toxic infectiousness. As its predecessor, in some ways there is open familiarity to the track yet nothing about it is anything other than new and unpredictable; the same applying to next up Doing Just Enough, a slice of throbbing rockabilly nurtured romping swinging from controlled strolling to unbridled gang vocal arousal with fluid ease.

Wreckin’ Ball (Into The Pit) has a psychobilly snarl to its ballsier incitement straight after, vocals and rhythms again leading the addictive punk scented resourcefulness of the rapacious song though that steely yet almost primordial tone and character of Bailey’s bass is the prime fingering of lust sparked.

Through the addiction laying Down In The Gutter with its wiry groove woven web of boisterous hook ridden seduction and the stalking revelry of King Of The Road the album only tightens its grip. The first is an out and out stomper whilst its outstanding successor is a predacious but again relentlessly contagious compulsion on ear and heart with its dirty tarmac eating, heavy rock pounding drive. Classic and hard rock collude with more rockabilly/psycho nurtured exploits, it all coming together in a ravenous adventure before She’s My Witch shares its sultry hex like a rabidly seductive temptress with bold energy seized rhythmic hips and sonically flirtatious devilment at work. As the previous song, it quickly has a hand on best song honours, eventually having to share but never relinquishing a finger on the prize even as tracks like The Devil Rides Out feverishly serenade the imagination with its smouldering heart but forceful ingenuity. Eventually coming to its own head of ear rushing rock ‘n’ roll, the beguiling encounter has the body hooked and bouncing with increasing dexterity; the passions again in tow.

Come Back Wilko (All Is Forgiven) simply sparks with the enterprise and tenacity not forgetting the richness of rock ‘n’ roll found in its name checked inspirations; hitting and repeatedly pushing the sweet spot from start to finish while Born To Die ‘steals’ from a host of classic encounters to inspire its own distinct and individual bluesy espionage guiding body and spirit to fresh reactions and inhibition free arousals.

Bringing the album to a mighty finish, Scream If You Wanna Go Faster is a rollercoaster of virulent rock ‘n’ roll with a sizeable line in pop rock and rockabilly infectiousness which as you would rightly assume is quite irresistible leaving the lungs gasping for air and a greed for more rushing back to the play button.

In many ways it is hard to say that Lowdown ‘N’ Dirty is particularly unique yet in the same way it is impossible to say there is anything predictable or previously well-worn about it. The Dukes Of Bordello have a sound and presence which is as fresh and arousing as anything out there and now an album which will firmly slap the band on the biggest rock ‘n’ roll maps.

Lowdown ‘N’ Dirty is out now physically through Death Or Glory Records and @ http://thedukesofbordello.bigcartel.com/product/skullduggery  with its digital outing courtesy of Undead Artists Records @ https://undeadartists.bandcamp.com/album/lowdown-n-dirty

http://www.thedukesofbordello.com/    https://www.facebook.com/TheDukesBordello/

Pete RingMaster 28/06/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Hellbound Hearts – Film Noir

Like all music fans we breed real anticipation for certain and numerous releases each year but few as eagerly as that for the first album from British rockers Hellbound Hearts. Because of a pair of rousing and acclaimed EPs, the Yorkshire hailing trio has stirred a real appetite for their fervour driven rock ‘n’ roll. Now we can say that those early successes were just appetisers because without doubt Film Noir is the main meal from the band.

One of the things which could have been said about both the EP’s, Outside and The Proximity Effect and also their self-titled debut before that, was that the Hellbound Hearts sound was whilst individual not always truly unique in the crowded landscape of alternative rock, though certainly evolving with every release towards that aim. It is something the trio of vocalist/guitarist Danny Lambert, bassist Craig McLaren, and drummer Lee Brook took note of as explained by Lambert when talking about their first album and how it turned out not as originally intended. “It wasn’t working“, he recently admitted, “we’d had some changes and time to reflect, and whilst the songs were good, we strongly wanted to be our own band and not be like a 1000 others flooding the market. So we canned the album, went back to the drawing board and re-grouped, re-composed and wrote a bunch of new songs, much more fitting with our sound.”  The result of that bold move and concentrated effort is an album which comes alive from its first breath, never relaxes its energies and arousal of ears until the final note, and unmistakably provides a singular body and character of adventure.

Produced by Matt Ellis (Black Spiders, Terrorvision), Film Noir gets right down to business with its opener and recent single Suffering The Radio. Dark brooding keys hug ears initially, the melancholic air of a piano just as swift in its suggestion before from within their shadowed caress a strike of guitars sparks a rumble of riffs and rhythms. Stirring and arousing, the deluge of temptation shows restraint as it welcomes the potent tones of Lambert backed by McLaren and Brook, a union aligning with swinging hooks and a great grumbling bass groove. Inescapably infectious and boisterous, the track hooks ears and listener involvement, inhibitions dismissed for a peach of a persuasive chorus as the heart of real rock ‘n’ roll descending on the mundane and mediocrity of the modern music world above the underground.

The superb start is matched by the virulent exploits of Broken Hearted where again aggressive textures and warm melodies entangle in a contagious roar. Riffs and rhythms prowl with rapacious relish whilst hooks and vocals come littered with infectious enterprise. There is a touch of Jimmy Eat World meets The Wildhearts to the song but already the album is deep in unveiling a Hellbound Hearts only owned proposal, revealing more with every passing minute and songs like next up Poor Disguises. Taking its time to rise up, almost stalking the listener with its predacious beats and subsequent bass groan, the song stands tall with hungry riffs which in turn spark a punk fuelled charge of attitude and energy which continues to infest the song’s tenacious and grouchy rock ‘n’ roll. Lambert’s warm tones bring a fine temper as too melodies though they have a touch scorching senses like licking flames; everything adding to a stomping slice of punk ‘n’ roll.

New single The Light We Cannot See follows with its own galvanic nature and air, again rhythms and riffs carrying a heavy and heady thump as grooves entangle their menace with flirtatious and catchy endeavour. Calmer twists and suggestive textures add to the track’s lively drama and wistful emotion before the reflective Still We Wait ebbs and flows with initial emotive grace. It is a coaxing though into a far darker and tempestuous realm, surges of almost Rob Zombie like riffs and intensity bursting free whilst surf rock kissed melodies shine radiantly upon the turbulence, both contrasts merging for passages of pure ravenous rock ‘n’ roll. With the growling breath of McLaren’s bass and Brook’s dynamic rhythms, the anthemically fuelled track is quite glorious.

There is a great whiff of Therapy? to next up Blood, at times of Pitchshifter too, yet the song entangles ears and pleasure in wiry creative tendrils openly peculiar to Hellbound Hearts while Wake Up flirts with a mixture of pop punk and hard rock for its easy going and firmly captivating enticement before We Are All Alone shares its own moment of reflective honesty against an increasing gnarly bassline, rapier like beats, and metal urged sonic dexterity. The track does not quite light personal tastes as powerfully as many of those around it even with its Terrorvision spiced hues but easily leaves satisfaction greedily content.

The album is closed off by firstly the insatiable heavy rock growl of Fortunes and finally the hellacious incitement of Silent Horror Movie, both tracks in their individual ways webs of stylish temptation and instinctive infection with the former a more pop rock soaked contagion and the latter a ferociously hungry roar uncaging the primal rock ‘n’ roll.

Hellbound Hearts have been no strangers to praise and success but Film Noir leaves all before it dead in the water. It is an exhilarating slab of rock ‘n’ roll which truly only gets better and more irresistible with every listen.

Film Noir is released April 7th through https://www.hellboundhearts.com/   and digitally across most online stores.

Upcoming Hellbound Hearts Dates

8th April – LEEDS, Key Club (album launch show)

16th April – BOLTON, B-Festival (Alma Inn)

3rd June – KEIGHLEY, The Exchange

23rd June – DUNDEE, Firefly

24th June – EDINBURGH, Bannermans

8th July – WESTCLIFFE ON SEA, The Venue

11th August – LEEDS, Yorkshire Rock And Bike Show

https://www.facebook.com/wearehellboundhearts    https://twitter.com/hbhuk

Pete RingMaster 06/04/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Of Kings and Captains – Jack My Boy

of-kings-and-captains-pic_RingMasterReview

Ahead of their new EP Give ’em Hell Son, British pop rockers Of Kings and Captains have released new single Jack My Boy, a mercilessly infectious slice of robust rock ‘n’ roll lying somewhere between The Pirates, Eddie and the Hot Rods, and The Wildhearts. It is hard to imagine that the Black Country hailing band could have found a more rousing teaser for their new EP, the new single taken from it one of those proposals which instinctively grips ears, voice, and bodies easily enlisting their eager involvement in short time.

Stourbridge bred, Of Kings and Captains released their debut album in 2015 to eager reactions; its success backed up by a potent live reputation which has seen the band share stages with the likes of McFly and Kids in Glass Houses among many and recently undertake a five date stadium tour with Bon Jovi. The foursome of vocalist/rhythm guitarist Luke Wassell, lead guitarist Joshua Lomas, bassist Dean Greatbatch, and drummer Kieran Lock linked up with producer Gavin Monaghan (The Twang, Editors, Niplozi) and Joseph Murray for Give ’em Hell Son and if Jack My Boy is anything to go by, with thrilling success.

A song according to Wassell which is “…about self-confidence and defying people who doubt you! it’s all about sticking to your guns and being yourself regardless of how people might put you down. It’s about being individual and kicking back against the norm“, Jack My Boy has all attention leaning its way from the initial lure of drum enticement. Lock’s magnetic rhythms are quickly joined by an anthemic bassline and eager twang loaded riffs, they in turn turning to an array of fifties seeded hooks as Wassell’s tones whips up even more infectious bait to the already catchy encounter. From there the track continues to lead the listener, drawing them towards seriously virulent choruses, they irresistible peaks in one, from start to finish, spirit arousing stomp.

It takes just one listen to be firmly involved in the song with every encounter after drawing keen and full participation. If Jack My Body is a sign of things to come with Give ’em Hell Son, the EP is a must.

Jack My Boy is out now with the Give ’em Hell Son EP available for download from all good digital retailers September 9th.

Upcoming Gig Dates:

Sept 9th – Katie Fitzgerald’s – Stourbridge (Acoustic Show)

Sept 29th – RiverRooms – Stourbridge

Sept 30th – The Shed – Leicester

Oct 15th Wulfrun Hall ­‐ Wolverhampton

https://www.facebook.com/ofkingsandcaptains   http://ofkingsandcaptains.com/   https://twitter.com/ofkingsandcaps

Pete RingMaster 08/09/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Top Buzzer – Inside is a Room Vol. 1EP

top-buzzer-inside-is-a-room-vol-1_RingMasterReview

It has been two and a half years since British pop punk ‘n’ rollers Top Buzzer had us leaping around with the thrilling stomp of The Sprollie EP. It is a time though which has seen the band still a busy live proposition and its members, especially vocalist/bassist Andy ‘Dukey’ Duke, get involved in a horde of other projects and bands alongside the ‘day job’. Now to stir up and entertain ears at home again, the London based trio have uncaged the Inside is a Room Vol. 1 EP; four tracks of the band’s inimitable and contagious rock ‘n’ roll. It might be more recognisable prime Top Buzzer devilry but the release also reveals a broader embracing of punk and varied rock flavours within a fresh snarl and even keener hooks than ever.

Originally Jersey bred and formed in 2011, Top Buzzer has been a feisty punk proposition from day one, in sound and DIY attitude. Quickly they created their own label Back2Forward Records for first release, the Hands Up EP, and in turn the highly successful single Remission which followed. Praise and support followed across the written press, such as Kerrang, Rock Sound, and Big Cheese and on radio as UK and US shows and stations, terrestrial and online, took a shine to their mischievous pop punk revelry. Debut album Outside Is A World, again released that first year, grabbed greater and keener attention which was subsequently eclipsed by The Sprollie EP in 2013 and the band’s contribution a year earlier to the 2012 Rebel On The Underground – A Tribute To X-Ray Spex compilation.

As mentioned it has been a fair old gap between releases, but now Dukey, guitarist/vocalist Soni, and drummer/vocalist Welshy ensure the wait for something new is a quickly forgotten moan with Inside is a Room and indeed opener Trapped In The Room. Straight away ears are accosted by a swarm of riffs and rhythms, guitars and bass instantly lining that initial surge with sharp catchy hooks before expanding them further as the song settles into its tenacious stroll. Feet and hips are a swift blur to the equally animated nature and motion of the song. Dukey’s familiar tones adding to the recognisable air of the song but equally pushing the new lusty and punchy nature to the band’s sound. Like the ‘bad’ kid down the road your mother warned you about, the one destined to cause trouble and encourage develop bad habits, the track stirs up the spirit and an urge to lose inhibitions.

That same irresistible nagging arises with Meanwhile in San Francisco and its deliciously spicy melodic beckoning around Welshy’s enslaving anthemic bait. There is a touch of The Vibrators to the song as it settles and blossoms a thick lure of beats and bass temptation whilst on top Soni’s guitar uncages a blues frisked spiral of sonic enterprise. Ultimately creating a rousing proposal which at times is almost akin to Toy Dolls meets The Adicts, the track has body and voice firmly involved before allowing Denny’s Song the chance to run its grittier hard rock meets pop punk persuasion by ears for a matching success. Again resistance to getting physically and emotionally involved is futile once hooks and swinging rhythms seize hips and the imagination; the vocals across the band only stirring things up further with their boisterous encouragement.

The EP ends with the old school punk seeded Live is Blind where the three prong vocal attack alone is a riveting and thickly enjoyable incitement. Imagine The Ramones, Radio Stars, and The Wildhearts colluding for a riotous, rip-roaring stomp and Top Buzzer have that covered with the excellent closer to another thrilling incitement of ears and bold fun.

We have had a serious sweet tooth for Top Buzzer since that first EP, no denying that, and with releases like Inside is a Room EP, it only gets more acute. Pop infested punk ‘n’ roll does not get much more fun and to be honest better than this.

The Inside is a Room EP is out now via most online stores and @ http://back2forward.bigcartel.com/product/inside-is-a-room-vol-1-cd

http://www.topbuzzer.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/topbuzzermusic   https://twitter.com/topbuzzermusic

Pete RingMaster 18/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

The Wonder Stuff – 30 Goes Around The Sun

Wonder Stuff_RingMasterReview

We all have particular releases which sparked the beginnings of a lustful affair with music, encounters which provided the ignition and others which more than most re-ignited and kept the fierce flames of emotional involvement burning ever since. For us The Eight Legged Groove Machine was certainly one of the latter; an album which simply gripped ears and spirit and gave a lust for music another mighty booster shot. That was 1988, and now thirty years after taking their first creative steps, The Wonder Stuff unveil their eighth studio album in the magnetic shape of 30 Goes Around The Sun.

Some have said that the band will probably never see a hit single again to match those escaping the likes of Hup and Never Loved Elvis; more than likely not make the same kind of impact as they did in those early successful years. They might be right, time will tell, but listening to 30 Goes Around The Sun, its title a reference to the life span of the band so far, they have the potential of coming damn close. There are moments within the twelve track romp which are prime Wonder Stuff majesty and other moments which captivate like the first touches of the creative sun on a cold rock pop landscape, and fair to say from start to finish the album has ears and the imagination grooving with the band’s finest effort in a while.

30 Goes Around The Sun saw the band return to “revisit it’s old stomping ground of Stourbridge” to record the album for its making and the persuasion of renowned heavy metal and hard rock producer, Simon Efemey (Paradise Lost/Napalm Death/The Wildhearts), to come back home to produce the record too. With a welcoming acoustic Intro to first catch attention, band and album instantly leap into ears with the feisty exploits of Don’t You Ever. Straight away engaging riffs offer a smile with their bait whilst the warm lure of Erica Nockalls’ violin adds emotive suggestiveness as rhythms begin their catchy tempting. Swiftly the song becomes an infectious canter, the guitars of Miles Hunt and Dan Donnelly romping along with sonic enterprise matched in alluring kind by the darker hues of Mark McCarthy’s bass. Once the distinctive and reflective tones and words tones of Hunt join the affair, the robust attraction has commandingly gripped ears and appetite. The track does mellow out a touch as it evolves and maybe loses a spark or two of its initial blaze though that is more than compensated by the melancholic strings and backing vocals of Nockalls as well as the anthemic swing of Tony Arthy’s rhythms.

cover_RingMasterReviewThe following In Clover offers another eagerly catchy and emotionally evocative slice of rock pop with violin and melodies alone, a tapestry of folkish seducing. There is a scent of Construction For The Modern Idiot days to the enthralling song, a fresh echo within something soon revealing its own masterful character before For The Broken Hearted shares its celebratory swing and melodic sunshine with the senses. Again folk and rock pop collude to infest hips and emotions, the track one of a great many within the album which has the listener’s instincts to move and grin firmly in its contagious hands.

Good Deeds And High offers a gentler moment for a breath to be taken though the imagination is busy with its melodic smoulder and sultry temptation. The unity of guitar and violin is certainly impossible to resist with a success more than matched by the pairing of Hunt’s and Nockalls’ vocals. Helped by springy rhythms, the song’s vivacious serenade gets right under the skin with a web of persuasion matched and reshaped by One Day On as it parades its own evocative lyrical and pop prowess for ears and pleasure to indulge in.

A sturdier bulk comes with The Affirmation as bass and riffs cast an imposing incitement from the off, though it still acts as an invitation rather than a demanding proposal. Within it, Hunt as ever provides an emotion seeded lyrical exploration and reflection, another aspect of band and songwriting which has only matured and blossomed over the three decades. It is a potent and increasingly compelling track but one quickly and persistently outshone by the glorious Last Days Of The Feast. Some tracks just hit the sweet spot and this is definitely one. It has all the youthful adventure and mischief which marked early Wonder Stuff songs but equally a modern snarl and imagination that hungrily hooks ears and thoughts. Physical involvement in the track is as swift as an emotional one, its place as a pinnacle of the album certain, but quickly crowded round as tracks like The Kids From The Green treats ears to further infectious proposals, this one with a perky croon with similarly spirited melodies around vocal memories.

Swarthy hues flood the funk coated Weakened next; its mix of textures and flavours another ridiculously magnetic drama and contagiousness whilst Misunderstanding Burton Heel is one of those tracks which seems to know what personal loves in a song are and provides them wholesale with a Wonder Stuff twist. Jaunty shadows cloak rhythms and emotions whilst animated melodies and racy hooks built a kinetic trap for ears and by now a very greedy appetite. The track is superb; a rock ‘n’ roll siren which, if not matched, is potently backed by the album’s title track. The final offering from 30 Goes Around The Sun, it is a slice of English Americana, a last turn in the multi-faceted aspect of the album and a highly enjoyable end to a rousing encounter.

Past successes always means high anticipation and expectation for new propositions, something The Wonder Stuff seem to easily take in their stride and with 30 Goes Around The Sun go on to create new memorable and at times momentous experiences.

30 Goes Around The Sun is released March 19th via IRL Records across most online stores.

http://www.thewonderstuff.co.uk   http://www.thewonderstuff.co.uk   https://twitter.com/thewonder_stuff

Pete RingMaster 17/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Ginger Wildheart – The Year Of The Fanclub

 

Photo taken by Paul Harries

Photo taken by Paul Harries

Starting out as his latest and the most interactive fan-funded project, new album The Year Of The Fanclub is the outstanding ‘highlights show’ of another highly successful Ginger Wildheart offering for fans and modern rock ‘n’ roll. Always looking to increase and extend “fan connectivity”, Wildheart created G*A*S*S (Ginger Associated Secret Society) in 2014, a digital subscription based fan club platform that saw a new 3 track single released every month for a year, along with demos and previously unreleased material direct from his personal vaults for members to immerse in. Beyond the music it also gave subscribers full access into the world of Ginger Wildheart through podcasts, Q&A’s, personal diary entries, film reviews and exclusive merchandise options. Now for all, comes the irresistible tempting of The Year Of The Fanclub, a collection of Wildheart’s personally favourite tracks from the 36 song session.

The proudly diverse and rousing treat starts off with Down The Dip, a boisterous maelstrom of energy and varied eagerly entangling flavours. Like The Damned meets The Beatles with understandably The Wildhearts in on the act, the song throws its muscles and hooks around with imaginative zeal and virulence. Body and appetite are an easy submission for the track, a success just as powerfully found by Honour straight after. Featuring Courtney Love, the punk ‘n’ roll stroll instantly carries a defiant swagger whilst sharing a passions enslaving hook to get aggressively greedy over, quickly matching then eclipsing its impressive predecessor.

El Mundo (Slow Fatigue) is a carnival in the ears next, swinging into view with thick resonance and a mischievous character as company to a flowing contagion of sound and resourcefulness. There is also a dark side to its lures, an intimidating smog that erupts as the track’s volatility gets a head of steam on in certain moments before relaxing back into warm revelry.

art _RingMaster ReviewThe country rock spiced The Last Day Of Summer has feet and hips swaying with eagerness straight after, the pop rock catchiness already glimpsed in earlier songs now in full vibrancy with matching melodies and backing vocals before the outstanding Only Henry Rollins Can Save Us Now hits even greater heights. Feverish dirty rock ‘n’ roll to have you grinning whilst punching the air in defiance, the track twists and turns from start to finish. It is a roller coaster of snarling riffs and juicy hooks embracing everything from punk metal to ravenous hard rock through to jazz induced festivity and much more.

The Green Day/Flogging Molly like canter of The Pendine Incident has body and soul bouncing next, its Celtic air aural manna whilst Do You? whips up closely matching reactions with its eighties scented pop rock saunter equipped with engaging melodies and harmonic caresses. Each proposition leaves ears busily keen with the feet and imagination tightly involved, though they soon get overshadowed a touch by the inviting yet melancholic romance of If You Find Yourself In London Town where fizzing keys and vocal prowess respectively surround and fill the embrace of acoustic and electric enterprise as evocative as the words from Wildheart’s lips.

The magnetic saunter of Toxins & Tea is an increasingly galvanic slice of folkish pop rock which perpetually surprises with every passing second and turn. Imagine XTC going heavy rock without losing their melodic beauty and imagination and you have a close idea of one glorious encounter.

That eighties air returns openly again in No One Smiled At Me Today, the song bringing bands like The Cars and The Motors to thoughts before Ostracide uncages its punk fuelled rock ‘n’ roll which ears are destined to devour with relish. Both tracks in their individual ways ensnare body and emotions though each has to pass the limelight over to the irrepressible majesty of closer Don’t Lose Your Tail, Girl. That unpredictability is in full force in a song which fluidly evolves from melodic rock to electro pop mania and on to industrial rabidity, alternative rock with techno infestation, and punk ‘n’ roll confrontation, and that is just the first half of its nine minutes. Like a lifetime of musical styles tenaciously rolled up into one skilfully bedlamic and ingeniously sculpted emprise of sound, the track is a kaleidoscope of flavours which could easily have been the soundtrack to one’s personal musical journey over the past five decades.

As musically enjoyable and impressive as The Year Of The Fanclub is, so lyrically Wildheart delivers a potent and lingering punch to eagerly embrace too. The album is simply a gem and Ginger Wildheart showing why for so many, the man is rock ‘n’ roll.

Year Of The Fanclub is available now through most online stores via Round Records.

The G*A*S*S club is still available to join at http://g-a-s-s.co

https://www.facebook.com/officialginger

Pete RingMaster 17/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/