Dirt, spices, and rock ‘n’ roll: getting a taste of The Sourheads

If you ever have thoughts that real rock ‘n roll is on the wane a quick listen to the new album from British rockers The Sourheads will soon make you think again. Care Plan For The Soul is a nine-track debut full-length, a skilfully and passionately woven roar of classic and fresh rock diversity which snarls as it seduces, thrills as it trespasses ears and imagination. Through our friend Garry at SaN, we had the chance to dig deeper into The Sourheads with guitarist MIK CRONE, exploring the band’s origins, digging into the heart of Care Plan For The Soul, The Sourheads live and more….

Hi Mik and big thanks for taking time to chat with us.

Can you, for those yet to be invaded by your rock ‘n’ roll, first introduce the band?

Jake on vocals, Mik on Guitar, Ben on Bass and Lamb on Drums.

We are The Sourheads and we come from Wakefield West Yorkshire. We are a rock band who take influence from the greats and add our own twist. We like to think of ourselves of somewhat multi-genre and we don’t want to be seen as just one specific style of music. A career band like The Stones or The Who dip into different things but still stay true to who they are…So yea we are a rock band who give it our all live.

The band is said to have emerged in 2016 but does its seeds go further back?

The version of The Sourheads now is the result of many years building. Like Oasis the original version was Jake [Coxon]our singer and his brother Sid who played guitar. They had a string of musicians throughout a short period of time. I first came into the picture as a producer for the band. I had been working with various bands and the early version of the band struck me as a very different but awesome set of musicians. I felt with direction the band could be massive.  Around this time I was asked to join as a second guitarist and a month later Sid left. So at this point we upped our game and decided to focus on a solid tight band and work on the debut album. The Sourheads you see now emerged in 2016.

Is The Sourheads your first ventures in a band or do you all bring various previous experiences and explored styles of music to the mix?

Everyone in The Sourheads has been in other bands before and we are all have different musical influences. This has proved a major asset in creating the sound and style of The Sourheads.. I had a small amount of success with a metal band I was in. Lamb [Chris Lambert] our drummer was in a relatively successful Indi band. Ben [Taylor] has a more Pearl Jam grunge influence and has played bass forever and grew up jamming with his brother Simon (Inme) and Jake has always been a creative person singing and painting and  as I, is more 70s inspired through bands such as The Doors, Alice Cooper, Deep Purple. The combination of these different influences creates the originality of our band. We are what we are.

What inspired the band name?

A Sourhead can be interpreted a number of ways. Bitter and twisted, hungover. There is no deep meaning behind the name.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

As a band we feel that it is easy to be stereotyped into a genre. We don’t necessarily want that as we are all influenced by different styles of music. What we want to do is wear our hearts on our sleeves and be 100% true to what we are. Our image and sound isn’t contrived, it is pure. Our front man is a character and is like that 24/7.

As a band we have evolved over time and we are now as sharp as a razor. In the last few months we have really tweaked everything so that it is the best we can offer. Little things like changing guitar sounds or what bass amp we use. We are always trying to give the best live performances we can. Through time you learn how to fine tune every aspect of the band.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

Before I joined the band the sound was more indie influenced. When I joined we rocked it up considerably. The band used to jam and have beers and chill out more. Since we started writing the debut album and got the record deal we became more focused. It is important to be professional at rehearsals. As a result we worked on emphasising certain parts of songs, making them tighter and adding dynamics.

Has it been more of an organic movement of sound or more the band deliberately wanting to try new things?

We have always tried different styles of music when we write. Some songs sound like the Rolling Stones others sound like Black Sabbath. It depends on who comes up with the first ideas, riffs etc at some point we will bring the Synths and organ back out. Everything we do usually comes from a groove, guitar riff etc

You have just released your debut album, Care Plan For The Soul. From its first breath it shares a multi-flavoured, refreshingly dirty and just a little salacious roar of sound and intent; a mix which suggests a varied range of inspirations to the band and individual members. Who particularly stands out as having an impact on your approach to making music?

We take our inspiration from different places. Jake is a massive Doors fan, Lamb is into his classic British Indi music; Ben is also a fan of different styles of music. I look up to any band that has strong songs. Stone Temple Pilots are a massive influence for me. Deftones, Queens of the Stone Age, The Cult, Shed Seven, Oasis, Clutch. We use many colours to create our art.

How would you describe your sound to newcomers?

Iggy and the Stooges mixed with the Sex Pistols thrown into a blender with The Stereophonics and Nirvana.

Classic Rock with an edge.

It feels like it just follows its nose, always prepared to embrace fresh and unpredictable flavours. Is this something you deliberately set out to purposefully develop or a sound and direction which just grew and evolved organically?

We are what we are. People either get it or don’t. One review says we are original and have rewritten the rule book of what a rock band should be. The other will say they don’t get us. Why do we look like we do and why does the artwork not match the music. Well the answer is we are totally focussed and we are 100% us. Everything is totally focused and this is what we do, our sound and direction develop naturally. Luckily our label saw this and our friends like Red Spektor saw this. So it’s better to have a loyal friendship and business partnership and have loyal listeners than to be fake and try to jump on a scene.

How long was Care Plan For The Soul in the making?

We had a lot of time rehearsing and making sure we could play the songs. We could play without vocals, with vocals, without bass or without guitar and obviously all of us together…Probably 3 months of pre-production and a week to record.

It has an instinctive snarl to its air and open rawness to its energy; at times feeling like it may have been recorded live. How did you approach its creation in the studio?

We decided early on that the band has a live energy that needed to be captured so we decided to record live and then delete the guide vocal and do a main vocal later. I also overdubbed a second guitar rhythm track to fatten the overall mix. We also added congas and cello in the overdub stage.

Can you give us an insight into the trials and pleasing surprises you found when recording the album?

We worked with a wonderful producer called Matt Knee and we used an old 70’s BBC mixing desk, this gave us a warmth that we were pleasantly surprised by. We wanted initially to record full analogue but as we wanted to play live we decided it’s may be better to do it digitally but through old analogue gear. This was due to the fact that digital is instant and we knew we had to keep in budget for our business plan to be effective. We needed to make sure everyone was comfortable and the atmosphere was good. We had incense burning and lava lamps. Pretty laid back.

It was subsequently mastered by Pete Maher (The Rolling Stones, Depeche Mode, U2) and released through German Label Kozmik Artifactz. How did those link ups come about?

Pete Maher has worked with everyone and we liked the fact that he worked within multiple genres. Katy Perry, Pink Floyd, Linkin Park are a few of his varied clientele and he had just finished mastering the LA LA Land soundtrack. We knew that attracting a big name would gain us attention and Pete does great deals for up and coming bands. It seemed like a great idea and he did an amazing job. Around this time we became close friends with Red Spektor and their manager Simon. They were saying good things about us in interviews and we were starting to get noticed. I sent a private link of the album to a number of labels and pretty much instantly Kai at Kozmik Artifactz messaged back saying ‘We don’t usually release this style but we think you would fit our sister label Oak Island perfectly so we did the deal and we are honoured to be part of the Kozmik Artifactz Oak Island family. The label is having great success with bands like Church of the Cozmic Skull and of course our brothers Red Spektor.

Can you give us the inspiration for the album title and some of the themes within its body?

We felt that the title had to reflect the song content. Our drummer Lamb came up with it. The songs are pretty intense in parts and cover lots of topics such as Demonic Possession, Marriage Breakdowns, War veterans, soul stealing creatures. When you take this into consideration and then see the album cover is a lone figure stood in the middle of the beach with his dog it’s kind of like that is the care plan for his soul. He is escaping the turmoil.

Is there a particular songwriting process within the band?

Pretty much straight forward…Ben or me write a riff or two. Lamb plays a beat. We arrange the song, record it on a phone then Jake writes the lyrics.

Apart from obvious pride and satisfaction in Care Plan For The Soul is there a particular moment within it which gives you a specific personal flush of inner pleasure?

The whole thing is a major flush of inner pleasure. We set out with a goal and we achieved it on budget and we didn’t move away from our art and vision one bit. This is amazing to us. To have a vinyl copy of the album in my hands and look at the finished product gives me goosebumps. The fact that the digital streaming numbers are good too also feels good. We want to get out to as many people as possible. From the actual recording there are a few moments I like. I think some of the vocal delivery is the best Jake has ever been.  The rush created when he shouts I am the Lotus! That’s a fan favourite moment.

Give us an insight into the live side of the band?

We are told we are extremely good live. Jake is a bare chested beast of a frontman, live truly something that has to be seen and heard. We are very tight and play as close to the album as we can get. I like the idea that we are four individual characters and that as a member of the audience you can get what you are looking for from us. We put a lot into it. I’m swinging my arm in the air and running around; Jake is in the crowd or rolling around on the floor. Ben is grooving away and lam is bashing the living daylights out of the kit.  We are an old fashioned rock band. We put on a show.

Obviously the album is in its early days inviting attention but what is next on the horizon of The Sourheads?

We are hoping to tour throughout 2018 and play some festivals. Do a couple of music videos and keep writing. We have 3 songs written for the next album already. We have also experimented with slightly different sounds. Some old school style Stones vibe.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods?

The most important thing to do is gig swap with other bands throughout the country. There are so many bands who are hometown heroes. That’s all very good if it is a hobby but not so if you want to leave a lasting impression and have your legacy respected. What we have found is the more we play the small festivals, the more the promoters share the information. There is a really healthy underground rock scene in the UK at the moment and everybody seems to be looking out for everybody else.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date; is a battle which has to be waged or a constant weapon for success?

Social media is great if the people already know about you. In the last few years the pay to get hits and advertise your band has really hurt the artist. The idea that you pay £50 to get 300 likes in Indonesia isn’t helping anybody. We have had musical instrument companies say you need so many likes on Facebook for us to consider you. This along with people not actually going on bands websites anymore means companies like Facebook and Instagram pretty much have the Monopoly on online presence. Bandcamp seems to work and I would encourage other bands to check it out if they haven’t already. Webzines like yours also help a great deal. I would say use social media but don’t let it be the basis of promoting your band.

Again many thanks for sharing your time; any last words you would like to add?

Thank you for showing interest in the band. We truly appreciate every website, magazine radio station that helps us spread our message and music. We are fans of music and do this because we love playing and creating our art. People like you keep the musical torch burning bright. There is a buzz and new found enthusiasm for rock music and we want to embrace this whole heartedly.

Check out The Sourheads further @ https://www.thesourheads.com/    https://www.facebook.com/thesourheads    https://thesourheads2.bandcamp.com/

Pete RingMaster 13/12/2017

The RingMaster Review

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Jade Assembly – Got My Star

It has been pretty easy to breed a keen and energetic appetite for the sound of UK band The Jade Assembly over the past couple years due to their imagination grabbing singles; a temptation which has gone hand in hand with a rising reputation and acclaim. In a crowded market place for alternative and indie rock bands, it is hard to standout and consistently but a success the Manchester outfit has easily grabbed and accelerated. New single Got My Star can only push things on again, the track a tenacious and rousing slice of rock ‘n’ roll from a band simply commanding attention.

Embracing inspirations from the likes of The Stones, The Who, and Oasis, the Bolton hailing quartet has earned a strong reputation for writing tracks which roar with heart as they infest body and spirit; traits shaping previous plaudit grabbing singles such as One Last Time and Nothing Changes. Got My Star is more of the same goodness but undoubtedly a new flavour in the band’s maturing sound and creative imagination too.

Got My Star instantly has feet tapping as the rhythmic pulse of drummer Andy Watson colludes with the pulsating bass stroll cast by Danny Hayes. It is rich bait across which the spicy tendrils of Gareth Smedley’s guitar lay and which only grows as the striking tones of singer John Foster stroll in. There is a snarl in his delivery, a tenacious energy and power which further ignites an already highly persuasive encounter. With fiery textures from the guitar, imposingly infectious rhythms, and the vocal magnetism of Foster, the song simply sparks in the ears making a strong claim for the best song from The Jade Assembly yet with its imagination and web of addictive hooks.

Released on vinyl as well as digitally, the single offers up a B-side too in the shape of Save One For Me. It is a slice of semi-acoustic, emotionally fuelled balladry with its own lively canter and creative drama. Its organic air and touch simply captivates, the song feeling live as if the band were there by your side as it shines another light on the band’s instinctive ability to write and create heart bred songs very easy to connect with.

In a time when the UK music scene is blessed with some remarkable and seriously exciting propositions, The Jade Assembly once again reinforce their position as one of them with a single which has the body dancing and spirit bouncing like a puppeteer.

Got My Star is released on November 6th.

https://www.thejadeassembly.co.uk/    https://www.facebook.com/thejadeassembly    https://twitter.com/thejadeassembly

Pete RingMaster 27/10/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Renegade Twelve – Self Titled

renegade-twelve-promo-shot_RingMasterReview

With a character which refuses to be pigeonholed yet openly embraces every flavour of melodic metal and heavy rock you care to mention, the self-titled debut from Renegade Twelve is oh so easy to like. Offering ten rousing slices of rock ‘n’ roll as inventive as they are seemingly familiar, the release is a formidable and increasingly captivating introduction to the British outfit.

Hailing from Suffolk, Renegade Twelve emerged in 2014, formed by long-time friends in lead guitarists Jacob Mayes and Dan Potter, bassist Josh Barnard, and drummer Jack Mcsloy. It was with the addition of vocalist Sam Robson that the jigsaw of talent was finally complete, a union driving the band through over 100 gigs in 2016 alone in support and preparation for the release of their first album.

Recording it with producer Rupert Matthews who has collaborated with the likes of Rolling Stones, Led Zeppelin, The Who, The Eagles, and Black Sabbath, Renegade Twelve quickly unleash their individual and united enterprise with opener Mad Max. It opens from afar, sonic melodies and fiery energy brewing up their engines at a distance until ready to stand toe to toe with the listener. Once in place it is an imposing yet not overtly aggressive proposition, Robson soon leading the surge of adventure with his quickly impressive tones as guitars weave their sonic tapestry around the swinging rhythms of Barnard and Mcsloy. A definite Avenged Sevenfold colouring coats the song but it also offers plenty more to get the teeth into.

Vanity follows with its own blistering weave of melodic and heavy metal, its instinctive roar equally brewed on an array of textures from alternative and groove metal to classic rock. With ease, as its predecessor, it sparks the spirit and energies before Heroes Of Mine embraces ears with its melody rich, almost folk metal spiced enterprise before settling into its muscular melodically persuasive rock ‘n’ roll canter. Though the track is eclipsed by those around it, there is no lessening of appetite and enjoyment already bred by the album especially as the technical imagination of the guitarists dance evocatively on ears.

A carnivorously toned bass growl is just one ingredient in the thickly riveting success of Bipolar, anthemic vocals and raw virulence another as it energetically and at times venomously prowls the senses. It too just misses out on matching earlier heights yet has attention solely in its inventive hands especially when the organic animosity of its heart erupts and fuels a great passage of irritability.

renegade-twelve-cover-artwork_RingMasterReviewThrough the predatory landscape and infection clad swing of the outstanding This Town the album hits a new plateau, the track a boisterous funk lined stomp with a defiant snarl on every corner. Its individual nature adds to the already open variety within release and Renegade Twelve sound, a diversity further stretched by the power balladry/classic metal blaze of War Plane and in turn the epic yet intimate bellow of Somme. The first of the two leaves nothing to be dissatisfied with but is overshadowed by its surrounding companions with the sensational second of the two pure creative theatre with no signs of indulgence or wasteful seconds.

Yeah Boi swaggers in straight after, grouchy basslines and punchy beats joining cantankerous riffs in an irresistibly compelling instrumental unafraid to reveal a Pantera inspired swing bound in spicily toxic grooves. It sets ears and pleasure up perfectly for the fiercely catchy antics of MFC, a blistering sonic ravaging of ears, and straight after the melodic hug of closing track Bill & Chief. From its gentle, acoustically nurtured start, the song catches ablaze with melodic and emotive flames to bring the album to a conclusion as impressive as its start.

Renegade Twelve is a stunning debut sure to appeal to fans of most flavours within the metal realm such its richness of styles. The fact that the band still finds a pretty distinct sound even with its familiar essences is testament to the imaginative writing and unmissable skills of its individuals.

Renegade Twelve is out 27th January.

http://renegadetwelve.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/Renegade-Twelve-1393405887586971/   https://twitter.com/renegadetwelve

Pete RingMaster 25/02/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

John Thayer – Face To Face EP

JT_RingMasterReview

Recently singer songwriter John Thayer released new EP Face To Face, a handful of songs which instinctively captivate as warm and suggestive melodies unite with emotion fuelled lyrics and vocals. There is also an intimate drama to each song which often blossoms to broader heights even as Thayer keeps it personal with his introspective exploration and reflections. The result is a release which captures ears with swift success and only lights the imagination further with subsequent listens.

The brother of Tommy Thayer, the lead guitarist in Kiss, John creates a sound inspired by the likes of Yes, Emerson, Lake and Palmer, Steely Dan, The Beatles, Led Zeppelin, and The Who and based, as suggested by his latest offering, around ear seducing melodies. 2013 saw his indie/pop rock sound quickly grab ears and support through debut album Laurel Street, released as the new EP on EON Records.

Already stirring up eager attention, latest record Face to Face was co-produced by John and singer/songwriter producer Rob Daiker (Meredith Brooks, The Fame Riot) at Commune Studios in Portland Oregon and mixed by Greg Collins (U2, Matchbox Twenty, No Doubt). Straight away it seizes ears and imagination with its title track, the opener caressing both with gentle keys and ethereal harmonies initially. That earlier mentioned drama is just as swift in working its charm, coating the emerging orchestral bred keys and vocal expression of Thayer. Equally there is an instinctive catchiness which arises through the song, riffs and hooks mellow but potent as they add inescapable infectiousness to an affair which takes little time to seduce and involve the listener while providing an impressive start to the EP.

art_RingMasterReviewNot Afraid follows and quickly eclipses its predecessor as a thick wall of dramatic rhythmic and sonic energy hits ears. The song soon relaxes as Thayer’s vocals begin sharing melodic sighs and expression though the bass continues to bring dark shadows while prowling the calmer waters, lurking and waiting to join the frequent expulsions of that initial energy with erupt. It is gripping stuff reminding of British artist Johnny Wore Black, and with great unpredictability to its twists and dark hues to its emotion easily takes best song honours upon the EP.

In many ways the song sets a plateau the release never reaches again but enjoyment and creative imagination is still a potent proposal as firstly the melancholic stroll of Really Doesn’t Matter warms the senses to be followed by the evocative serenade of Angel. As the heart bred and felt tones of Thayer slip enjoyable through ears both songs are a flame of melodic enterprise within that ever dramatic air to richly satisfy.

The EP closes with Lonely Eyes and a tapestry of string bred shadows and guitar shaped intensity entangled with suggestive vocals and poetic melodies. There is something cinematic about the song too even as again Thayer ventures into the deepest emotions of the song’s heart. With a flame of a solo and the perpetual majesty of orchestral temptation, the track provides a striking end to an increasingly captivating release.

The Face To Face EP is our first moment shared with the songwriting and sound of John Thayer and like so many others we are sure, it will not be our last.

The Face To Face EP is out now via EON Records through most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/johnthayermusic

http://www.johnthayermusic.com

Pete RingMaster 02/09/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Bluebook Project – Pockets of Dirty Change

The Bluebook Project_RingMasterReview

With appetites and bodies still rocking to their Take Me Away EP and the feistily rousing singles taken from it, UK rockers The Bluebook Project reinforce their growing reputation with Pockets of Dirty Change. As their previously powerful Hurricane Blues, the new single is one of the attention grabbing encounters within the latest EP, and as the other songs found within, a proposal which grips within seconds.

The Bluebook Project art_RingMasterReviewThe Bluebook Project hails from Bedfordshire and draw on inspirations from the likes of Iggy Pop, The Who, The Ramones, and Oasis. Formed in 2013, the quartet has gone from strength to strength as a live proposition and with releases, beginning with the 2014 unveiled debut EP Out of the Blue. Its ear pleasing introduction to the band was backed by a perpetual flow of live shows which included support slots with the likes of Slaves and Coasts before the foursome of vocalist/bassist Dan Thorn, guitarists Dan Watson and Jordan Smith, and drummer Benn Davis set about recording the Take Me Away EP. Its success is history but sure to be emulated with the unleashing of Pockets of Dirty Change.

The track is fuelled by the punk infested rock ‘n’ roll the band is becoming forcibly renowned for, guitars straight way creating a fiery wall of temptation before rhythms swing along in alignment with the infectiously bolshie delivery of Thorn’s vocals. The song becomes inescapably addictive in no time, a contagious flirtation of hard rock toned punk ‘n’ roll equipped with ear friendly yet cantankerous grooves and a pulsating rhythmic rousing of ear and spirit.

The Bluebook Project bring an edge and excitement to their sound which sets them apart from the crowd, Pockets of Dirty Change further evidence, and it is hard not to be a touch impatient to hear their next step whilst stomping around to their current treat.

Pockets of Dirty Change is available now.

https://www.facebook.com/thebluebookproject   https://twitter.com/TheBluebookBand

https://instagram.com/thebluebookproject/

Pete RingMaster 03/08/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Snarling blossoms: exploring the heart of The Bad Flowers

The Bad Flowers_RingMasterReview

Drawing on influences found in the likes of Black Sabbath, Led Zeppelin, and The Who, British rockers The Bad Flowers soon showed a sound with its own distinct character after emerging in 2014. The West Midlands trio has continued to grow and earn a potent reputation for their rousing sound and equally spirited live presence. Ahead of a new EP, we had the pleasure to throw a few questions at the band who kindly revealed more about the emerging might of The Bad Flowers.

Hello all and thanks for sparing time to talk with us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background what brought you all together?

We are The Bad Flowers from Cannock; we have Tom Leighton on lead vocals and guitar, Dale Tonks on bass and backing vocals, and Karl Selickis on drums. The band came about from projects we were working on individually that ran their course, but we all came together when we were playing on the same bill and we kept in touch from there.

So The Bad Flowers is not your first outfits? How have previous endeavours impacted, if at all, on what you are doing now; in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

We have all been in bands before and have been playing for as long as we can remember. When we came together we found that we all wanted to follow the same direction and it worked really well for us, our focus is to play music that we enjoy, that we all have input into which we hope will bring something new to the industry whilst maintaining the influences of the music and bands that have inspired us.

What inspired the band name?

It was a lyric from a song of one our previous bands that we kept going back to, and when it came to us making a fresh start it just felt right.

TBF2_RingMasterReviewWas there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and if so has it changed?

There was no specific idea it has just developed from what we enjoy playing and what we feel works well, and we are really grateful for the support we receive.

The drive to write great music and put on exciting live shows has always been there. The music itself has definitely developed as we have grown as artists, but we’ve always maintained the same sound.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

We take more time over each song; we want to make sure each element of the song is exactly how we want it to be. Before we debut a new song, we lay down hours of practice to ensure we’ve got it right.

Has any shift and movement in your sound been more organic or deliberate in wanting to try new things?

The movement has been organic. As we’ve grown up and gained more experience the sound has moved with us.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

There is no one in particular, but as individuals we all have different inspirations which when we write together gives us our sound.

Is there a general process to the band’s songwriting?

It usually happens by one us coming up with an idea and we jam it out during practice until we have a rough idea of where we want it go, then we take it away and work with it to make it tighter and it evolves from there.

How about lyrics? Where more often than not, where are they drawn from or inspired by?

The inspirations for our lyrics come from Tom; he is always thinking of lyrics at work or at home to put into the songs.

Can you give us some background to your latest release?TBF3_RingMasterReview

The next release is a four track EP which includes our most recent songs that are more powerful and slightly dirtier sound than what we have released before.

How about some insight into its themes and songs?

The songs are based on our experiences in the band and as individuals. There is a song based on a recent tour of Europe and we try to make the lyrics relatable and something people can connect with.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

We get the songs to the point where are happy with them, we practice them over and over again before we go into the studio to record. There are often times where we may make a few tweaks when we hear the recorded version to better the song.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably the favourite aspect of the band?

We really enjoy playing live and we go out to put all of our effort in no matter where we play or who we are playing to. There is nothing better for us than seeing people enjoying our music and leaving with a smile on their face.

The Bad Flowers tour dates_RingMasterReviewIt is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods?

In the midlands there is a thriving scene for new music and there are great local venues that support the industry. After playing all over the country it is still great to come back and play sold out local shows.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date?

We keep people updated on Social Media of up and coming gigs, any news we have and it’s also a great way to keep in touch with fans, as well as giving us a platform to promote ourselves to people who may not have heard of us before. Social Media is a great tool to use as long as it is used on the right respect.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Thank you for taking the time to read our interview. Keep your eyes and ears pealed for the future and we hope to as you soon.

http://thebadflowers.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/thebadflowersband

Pete RingMaster

The Ringmaster Review 16/06/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Franklys – Comedown/Long Way

The Franklys_RingMasterReview

The Franklys create a sound as enjoyably nostalgic as it is fresh and individual to modern garage rock ‘n’ roll. They also uncage releases, like new single Comedown, which demand attention whilst sharing the suggestion that its creators has the potential to be one of the provocateurs that the future direction of modern rock ‘n’ roll might just hinge upon.

The band consists of Swedish born vocalist/rhythm guitarist Jen Ahlkvist and lead guitarist Fanny Broberg, America hailing Nicole Pinto, and British bassist Zoe Biggs. London is where the quartet met and the band is based though fair to say since emerging, The Franklys has been a blur on the live scene, persistently playing shows in and touring the UK, Europe, America, and Scandinavia as well as making prise luring appearances at festivals such as the Isle of Wight Festival, Strawberry Fields, and Camden Rocks. Their rousing and raw garage rock sound brings a mix of psych and punk rock from across the decades with plenty more to spice things up whilst inspirations range from The Hives, The Strokes, and Queens Of The Stone Age to Led Zeppelin, Mando Diao, Blondie, and The Who. Their self-titled debut EP whipped up intrigue and strong interest back in 2013 which the Bad News EP stirred up to greater success last year. Now it is Comedown making the potent nudge on broader spotlights and attention, and making an easy job of it so far since being recently unveiled.

Comedown instantly has ears under welcome siege with a blaze of fiery riffs soon joined by thumping beats and a raw wind of hungry energy to its invitation. The bassline of Biggs almost groans with relish as its stalks the web of bracing sonic and melodic flames escaping the guitars with Ahlkvist’s ear catching vocals adding further bite to the snarling temptation. It is a great blend which helps the song weaves something akin to The Raincoats and The Priscillas around a character which equally refuses to be majorly compared to another. Never taking a breath within its contagious confrontation, the track has body and spirit aroused and swiftly joining its rousing tempest of incitement.

Accompanying the outstanding track is Long Way; a far more subdued encounter with just as potent and seductive lures. Its climate is surf rock bred, its sultry shimmer sixties garage rock/pop coloured, and its scuzzy touch punk seeded. It simply enthrals from the off; beguiling ears and appetite whilst revealing another flavour and twist to the songwriting and sound of The Franklys. If The Shangri-Las were Spinnerette, or The Luv’d Ones were The Breeders, the results just might sound like Long Way.

Acclaim and The Franklys have already been more friends than strangers but it feels like things are going to get hotter and more flirtatious from hereon in as first Comedown and then the band take 2016 by the scruff of the neck.

Comedown is out now via Electric Wood Records and available @ http://www.thefranklys.com/product/pre-order-single-comedown-limited-edition-7-vinyl/ and through iTunes.

http://www.thefranklys.com   http://www.facebook.com/thefranklys   http://www.twitter.com/thefranklysuk

Pete RingMaster 26/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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