Magnetic reflections: looking into Black Mirrors

We were aware of the buzz building up around Belgian band Black Mirrors so eagerly anticipated checking out their new EP release with Napalm Records. Fair to say that Funky Queen more than lived up to the praise gathering around its release, revelling in the myriad of flavours behind its bluesy rock ‘n’ roll. Offered the chance to find out more about band and release we fired questions at vocalist Marcella Di Troia and guitarist Pierre Lateur.

Hi guys and thanks for talking with us.

Firstly can you give us the background to Black Mirrors; its beginnings and how you all met?

, c Nanna Dis 2016

Marcella: During summer 2013, I wanted to create a female band. I found a drummer and a bass player but found it difficult to find a female guitar player. I was looking for someone who could play like Pierre the actual guitar player. I was fond of his sound. I couldn’t find a girl who could do that. So, I asked Pierre to join the band. After some jamming, we wanted to work harder and to start to write our own songs but the girls didn’t have time to invest in the project. So we forgot the idea to have an (almost) female band and invite two old friends, Gino and Edouard to join the band as bass player and drummer. We used to play with them in other bands before Black Mirrors.

We recorded our first EP and did our first gigs with this line up late 2013.

What inspired the band name?

Marcella: The name Black Mirrors came up with the TV show Black Mirror, a really cool English series which shows how technology is progressively changing our world. People are more distant to one another by being connected to the virtual world. We do not want to judge anybody, it’s just that we are witnesses of that change in our society and it touches us.

You sound is seemingly bred in garage rock but, as your new EP Funky Queen shows, flames with much broader rock ‘n’ roll diversity. What are the kinds of inspirations which have lit your musical imaginations most prominently?

Marcella: All the bands we are listening to were influenced prominently by blues masters such as Bessie Smith, Leadbelly, Robert Johnson, BB King, Muddy Waters, Blind Willie Johnson… So I would say the blues.

Pierre: Apart from the blues, we have a lot of different influences like the stoner scene, the late 60’s and early 70’s rock music like Jimi Hendrix, Led Zep, Janis Joplin and even the early Pink Floyd, the revival scene like The White stripes, Rival Sons and The Black Keys, some elements of soul/funk music and a bit of desert-blues like Tinariwen.

The Funky Queen EP has just been released through Napalm Records; how did that link-up come about?

Marcella: During summer 2015, we were invited to play in Germany at «Out and Loud» festival. Napalm was there as they opened the festival with a Napalm label night. Some of Napalm’s bands played there and they found us a slot to play. That was our first contact. We stayed in touch with them for a year and last summer we sent them our new songs. They liked it and Napalm offered us a deal.

It is being described as the band’s debut EP but am I right in thinking it has a self-titled predecessor released in 2014 which new fans to the band will want to know about?

Marcella: Yes, you’re completely right! Three years ago, we released our very first EP. We recorded it a couple of months after having started the band because we wanted to play live shows as soon as possible. This first EP is now sold out.

How would you say the Black Mirrors’ sound has evolved over its first handful of years?

Pierre: The basic sound didn’t change that much. Since the beginning, we wanted to create a music which will be a mix of all our influences. In 2013, our songs were already a mix of blues/rock, stoner and a bit of psychedelic music with a vintage approach.

But if we speak of the sound more specifically, the guitar sound became wilder with the years and our first drummer left the band. He was replaced by another one who came with his sensibility, approach and specific sound. So these two elements influenced a bit the final result.

With all artists, there is a specific intent fuelling their first steps. What was the driving force for Black Mirrors?

Pierre: Nothing more than being happy and thankful to play together. We are friends for such a long time and we’ve started the band to enjoy creating music together. We never had a big statement like « We want to play this kind of music, like very pure blues or a specific kind of stoner. » It was always about playing anything we had in mind without thinking too much. Maybe it’s the reason why there’re a lot of different influences in our music.

Listening to the EP there feels like there is a strong collaboration between the band in its songs birth and character. How does the band’s songwriting generally work?

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Pierre: Most of the time I create basic ideas like a riff or two and show it to Marcella. We work together on a first version of the song, she composes her vocal part and we work on a basic structure. We show this draft to the band. With them we give the tune his final form. We often create new parts, remove others; jamming around the sound. Because of all this process, the song’s final version is sometimes totally different than the first idea.

Can you give the readers some insight to the background and themes to Funky Queen?

Funky Queen, which opens our EP, is about addiction. Funky Queen is the queen that confronts everyone with one’s own demons.

The second song is Kick Out The Jams, a MC5 cover. We wanted to put it on our first EP as it’s represent very well the general energy of our music.

The Mess is a song about messy feelings you get after you broke up a very bad love relationship. Sometimes, you’d rather not see things than to be destroyed for your entire life.

And finally, Canard Vengeur Masqué to end up…It is a song who talks about the missing of one of your parents after a divorce, the way you can feel forsaken in this situation as a child.

Funky Queen has a great cover to match its sounds. Who is behind the artwork and indeed the band’s excellent logo?

Pierre: It’s Sebastian Jerke, a German artist who worked with My Sleeping Karma and Colour Haze to name a few. We really like his job. We got in touch with him and he appeared to have several great ideas for the artwork.

Apart from the likes of Front 242, dEUS, Soulwax, Enthroned, Triggerfinger, Steak Number Eight, and the excellent King Hiss, I cannot say we know too much about the Belgian rock scene. It is a healthy place right now, especially in its underground?

Well, it depends if it is in the French speaking part of Belgium or the Flemish part. We think Flanders gives more chance to underground music. Just by seeing bands you named, most of them are from Flanders. We are coming from Wallonia where the rock scene is a bit shy. Unfortunately, you barely see a rock band as highlight on a festival poster in Wallonia.

What is next in the immediate future of Black Mirrors?

Going on tour with Horizont and ’77 and record our full length album.

Once again our big thanks for sharing your time with us.

Check out our review of Funky Queen @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2017/03/03/black-mirrors-funky-queen/

http://www.blackmirrorsmusic.com/   https://www.facebook.com/blackmirrorsmusic   https://twitter.com/BlackMirrorsmus

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Bluebook Project – Take Me Away EP

The Bluebook project_RingMaster Review

Having been forcibly grabbed by their single Hurricane Blues a short while back we just had to beg a copy of the EP from whence it came just to explore UK rockers The Bluebook Project that little bit more. Thanks to the band itself and Emma of Pluggin’ Baby, we are now in the position to say that if the Bedfordshire hailing quartet had you leaping and smiling with their single you will be wearing the broadest grin after the incitement of Take Me Away.

The four track release is a punk infused slab of attitude driven rock ‘n’ roll which manages to bully and seduce the senses from start to finish. Weaving in inspirations from bands such as Iggy Pop, The Who, and The Ramones through to Oasis, Arctic Monkeys, and The White Stripes, into their own rousing imagination, The Bluebook Project create an anthemic confrontation that leaves feet exhausted and passions wanting just that little bit more. Formed in late 2013, the band spent a huge chunk of last year touring the UK as well as earning shows supporting bands such as Slaves and Coasts. The tail of 2014 also saw the release of debut EP Out of the Blue, a well-received and praised offering now beginning to be surpassed in acclaim and attention by Take Me Away, and as the first track alone rouses up body and emotions, it is easy to see why the growing buzz around The Bluebook Project.

cd_RingMaster Review   It is indeed the single Hurricane Blues which opens up Take Me Away, a song which in the words of vocalist/bassist Dan Thorn is “…about someone suffering from anxiety and how through their frustration and insecurity they are overcome by anger and lose control“. From the first hefty swings from drummer Benn Davis-Gregory, his arms throwing thick addiction casting beats, the song is badgering and enticing ears, commanding real attention as scuzzy scythes of guitar align to the distinctive tones of Thorn, both reinforcing the early irresistible bait. Continuing to throw up an aggressive haze of sonic enterprise via guitarists Jordan Smith and Dan Watson, spicy grooves a seductive toxicity within, and dirty rock tenacity through bass and drums, the track growls like a mix of The Senton Bombs and The Screaming Blue Messiahs fuelled by primal punk rock ferocity.

The song still hits the sweet spot after hordes of listens and sets the EP off in mighty fashion before Anxiety Drownin’ throws its irritable rumble of antagonism and fiery tenacity into an increasingly eager attention. There are ’mellower’ textures to the song compared to its predecessor, though it still snarls like a predator and shakes like a dog in heat as it creates a two minute explosion of garage and punk rock contagion. Hooks also are maybe not as sharp as in the first song but led by the magnetic tones of Thorn, and his angsty basslines, the track takes the listener on a riveting ride of infectious adventure.

Pockets of Dirty Change steps up next, swinging its rhythmic shaped, groove clothed hips with the knowledge it is one cool protagonist certain to have feet and imagination in salacious rapture. The guitars offer a swarm of flirtatious hooks and virulent grooves but equally the more direct element of riffery and rhythms carry an inescapable catchiness which is only matched by the delivery of Thorn and the organic dirtiness of the outstanding song.

The best track on the release is followed by its closer, the fiery Regrets Gone By. It is not a song to rival top slot on the EP but alone casts a seriously appetising theatre of inventive and inflamed rock persuasion that only has ears increasingly hungry for more. It is a potent close to a real blast of old school punk meets modern rock ‘n’ roll from a band you can only feel is heading to truly big things.

The Take Me Away EP is available now via iTunes

Pete RingMaster 02/09/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Bluebook Project – Hurricane Blues

The Bluebook Project_RingMaster Review

Always carrying a ready to pounce appetite for some punk fuelled rock ‘n’ roll, UK’s The Bluebook Project quickly set our ears a buzz with their new single Hurricane Blues. Simultaneously raucous and inventively infectious, the song is a raw and magnetic slice of rousing, anthemic sound, and the most potent invitation to check out the band’s brand new EP it bursts comes.

Hailing from Bedfordshire and formed late 2013, The Bluebook Project has busily been earning a strong reputation for their presence and music over the past year through touring across the country and supporting bands such as Slaves and Coasts. Last December saw the well-received release of their debut EP Out of the Blue, and even before the dust of its unveiling had begun to settle, the quartet of vocalist/bassist Dan Thorn, guitarists Dan Watson and Jordan Smith, and drummer Benn Davis-Gregory were back in the studio conjuring up the similarly welcomed Take Me Away EP which came out this past July. Drawing on inspirations from Iggy Pop and the Arctic Monkeys through to The White Stripes, The Bluebook Project, as shown again in Hurricane Blues, casts a sound fitting any intimate or grand festivity, or indeed any passing riot.

The single opens with instantly irresistible and bulging rhythms, the swings of Davis-Gregory commanding attention even before the distinctive tones of Thorn and scythes of guitar enter the affray. Straight away there is a sense of bands like The Senton Bombs and The Screaming Blue Messiahs, as well as a seventies punk and garage rock flavouring; all spices in something still predominantly distinctive to The Bluebook Project. With spicy grooves and flowing melodic acidity entangling around its busy stroll, the single is an incitement of attitude and varied sonic colours, and quite addictive.

The Bluebook Project is a band to watch out for, their future, again using Hurricane Blues as well as their Take Me Away EP as reasoning, looking rather rosy as their sound and attention upon it evolves. We suggest not waiting though and go explore another enjoyably appetising new band on the British rock ‘n’ roll scene.

Hurricane Blues is out now as also the Take Me Away which is available @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/artist/the-bluebook-project/id1010599040

The Bluebook Project’s first EP Out of the Blue is currently available as a free download @ https://thebluebookproject.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/thebluebookproject     https://twitter.com/thebbpband

Ringmaster 02/08/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Witching Waves – Fear Of Falling Down

Witching Waves press small

Having been hooked by the band with their limited edition cassette single Concrete/Chain Of Command earlier this year, there was a fair few tingles running through anticipation with the announcement of the debut album from Witching Waves. Those urges have grown to lustful proportions now that Fear Of Falling Down has infested ears and psyche, the release confirming all the promise and thrills experienced before whilst showing a broader adventure and creative resourcefulness in songwriting and sound.

Hailing from London and formed in 2013 as the brainchild of duo Emma Wigham and Mark Jasper (Sound Savers Recording Studio), Witching Waves through their unrelenting appetite for performing live and songs swiftly drew keen attention their way. Fusing as many essences of punk as you can imagine in a noise and discord sculpted garage pop incitement, the band bridges the DIY essence of the late seventies and the voracious causticity of modern invention; kind of like Swell Maps meets The White Stripes but for a truly unique and tenaciously addictive proposition.

Released via Soft Power Records, Fear Of Falling Down sees the duo now a threesome with the addition of a bassist, though we cannot tell you the name. The band’s fourth release, after Witching Waves LP Cover Artthree cassette singles, is a master class in raw sonic temptation and primal rhythmic slavery; each song united by a certain anthemic swing and creative tenacity yet alone in warped character and discordant agitation. Recorded on to 8 track tape, the album is a minimalistic yet inventively involved incitement, a cavernously toned but intimately delivered protagonist to excite ears and imagination with ease.

The album’s title track is the first to get the juices flowing, the opening jangle of guitar just the prelude to a rhythmically driven slice of agitated pop. The excellent vocals of Wigham soon join the rampancy of drums and the scrub of guitar before Jasper takes over with his equally captivating tones. Virulently catchy with a bounce to match, the track dances with ears and emotions from start to finish; every note, beat, and vocal enterprise simple but expertly creative seduction.

The post punk kissed Cold Out comes next, the contrast of the harmonic elegance and rawer expression of Wigham and Jasper respectively, alone a gripping enticement. In some ways there is an early Siouxsie and the Banshees feel to the song but also the flowing melodic quaintness of a Morningwood, the combination an addictive proposition, though soon surpassed by the poppy endeavour of Better Run. A slight spring of surf rock runs through the garage rock bred song whilst again vocals are as broadly bewitching as the slim but pungent sounds around them. As most tracks on the album, it is hard for feet taps and vocal participation to restrain from joining the band during the progress of its gently cacophonous croon before it makes way for the post punk infused stroll of Counterpoint. With repetitious riffs and infectious rhythmic bait, the song is a more challenging persuasion with its soaking of acidic discord and off key dynamics, but another to leave ears and passions basking.

The raw charm of Concrete comes next, its opening Buzzcocks spiced hook an instant attention grabber whilst a courting stride of rhythms draw their own submissive response. The plain almost disillusioned monotone vocals of Jasper contrast perfectly with the fluid melodies of Wigham, whilst the throaty melancholic bass prowl simply adds an addictive icing to the enthralling coaxing of body and mind. Like an unhinged blend of the Yeah Yeah Yeahs and The Cramps, the song is an aurally dishevelled but controlled temptress, and the perfect appetiser for the brilliance of the following Creeping. Stalking ears with rhythmic eagerness, the song stomps with muscular and concussive beats as riffs and basslines flirt with their own rowdy enterprise. There is for not the first or last time, a similarity to Scottish duo The Creeping Ivies about the band’s sound across the album, here being a potent comparison though again Witching Waves emerge as individual and original in every sonic aspect.

Both the outstanding News, with its hypnotic rhythmic baiting and spicy garage rock keys around a creative drama, and the intrigue drenched Wait Around keeps the adventure of Fear Of Falling Down on its highest plateau. The first of the two is a web of colour rich discordance and imaginative confrontation honed into a ridiculously infectious trap which simply leaves ears, thoughts, and emotions grinning whilst its successor juggles sonic abrasion with warm pop harmonies for another song which takes longer to reach the peaks of others, but only adds to the unpredictable and captivating climate of the release.

Fear Of Falling Down closes with the excellent Barber where garage punk and eighties post punk meet for a contagion filled stamp of punchy beats and wiry hooks aligned to velvety heavy bass lures. It all of course infused with the wonderfully clashing and superbly united vocal attack of Wigham and Jasper.

If Witching Waves have impressed before with their early appetisers then the album offers a fuller and more flavoursome meal of dissonant and melody bred noise. For those new to one of the UK’s most thrilling propositions, Fear Of Falling Down is a sonic lust in the making.

Fear Of Falling Down is available via Soft Power Records as a Limited Edition Vinyl LP (250 Copies) and digital download @ http://softpowerrecords.bandcamp.com/album/fear-of-falling-down

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RingMaster 08/12/2014

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Thom Bowden – Searching The Brittle Light

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From the release of his striking and impressive The Damage EP of 2012 there has been a healthy dose of acclaim placed around UK musician Thom Bowden and keen anticipation bred for his debut album. This week sees the unveiling of Searching The Brittle Light and those hopes are sure to be satisfied with the ten track encounter. It is not a release which impacts as potently and consistently as Bowden’s previous proposition but certainly it brings another wash of the rich potential within his songwriting and highly agreeable sound.

Surrey based, Bowden takes inspirations from the likes of The White Stripes, Nick Drake, Dresden Dolls, Fugazi, and Neil Young into his imagination catching enterprise. As mentioned The Damage EP brought strong attention and responses from fans and media alike, something you can only see the album repeating and increasing. A collection of songs written when Bowden was ‘at a low point in his life’, the album was recorded with and mixed by Steve Albini (Pixies, Nirvana, Manic Street Preachers) and mastered by Steve Rooke at Abbey Road. Inspired by some advice offered whilst the artists was in Chicago by Kim Deal, the album brings a raw honest intent and beauty to the ears. There is also a slightly more adventurous variation across the songs than on the last EP, a move you can only respect and embrace even with its slightly mixed success in comparison to the consistency of the previous release.

With guitarist Richard George and drummer Steve Matthews alongside Bowden, the album opens strongly with Click!, a song taking mere seconds to seduce ears and thoughts with its opening seduction of sultry blues kissed flames. a2137786508_2The slow swipes of guitar are soon joined by punchy beats and a darkly drawing bassline before the great expressively twanged and unpredictable voice of Bowden starts revealing the lyrical narrative. His voice and a rich essence of the music has a Frank Black like temptation which only adds to the smouldering enticement, an invitation which burns increasingly brighter as the song evolves and spreads its senses sizzling charms. The feisty stride of the track is an incessant call on the passions whilst the increasingly warped vocal delivery which by this point has a more My Red Cell essence, Bowden sounding similar to frontman Russell Toomey of the defunct Welsh band, only captivates with mischievous bait. It is a strong and gripping start to the album which without lighting fires sets up a keen appetite for its offering, a hunger soon spicily fed by the second song.

So So Long makes a controlled and infectious entrance, guitars and rhythms a simple but entrancing lure to which Bowden’s grazing tones lay angst spawned invention and caustic passion. The track never lifts its gait to anything more than a slow determined canter but with expulsions of sonic heat and expressive melodic energy, the song irresistibly wins over ears, again thoughts of the previously mentioned Welsh band coming to the fore. It is a masterful slice of sonic magnetism bringing a licking of lips. Its potent presence is followed by the ballad My Arms, the song a union of voice, guitar, and emotive textures which certainly stirs up thoughts and attention but brings an unexpected and underwhelming halt to the thrust of the album. Obviously a highly personal offering, it is hard and impossible to dismiss, or not enjoy, but the song is a wrongly positioned rein on the passions for personal preference.

The following Control brings the temperature and energy back with accomplished and thrilling enterprise. Rhythms roll invitingly through the ears as guitars swerve and let fly with melodic scythes of enticement and sonic tempting which reawakens a thirsty imagination. There is a definite eighties new wave feel to the track, another shade of familiarity which in different designs attractively flirts with most of certainly the rockier numbers on the release. As it continues to tease and impress, the glorious song casts a web of inventive guitar endeavour, melodic mischief, and sonic alchemy to treat and seduce the emotions; it all aided by an emerging Pixies sounding toxicity.

Next up How About It? slips into a gentler hug of emotive intimacy and melodic caressing around a spine of shadow involving rhythmic invention from drums and bass. It is a slowly burning temptation which takes longer than certainly the previous song to persuade but emerges as a deliciously riveting and evocative highlight of the release. Its broody success is followed by the forty five second instrumental , a piece which is just there before the outstanding With Pace unleashes its grunge spawned sinews and punkish desires. As its title suggests, the track romps with swift, heavily thumping feet and fiery riffs around which rapacious grooves and fuzz encased vocals flirt and rage respectively. There is no escaping a Nirvana comparison but as elsewhere it only spices up the brawling encounter. The album and Bowden seems to wear inspirations on their sleeve, definitely more than the EP, to predominantly bring stronger aural colours to embrace.

The raucous air and exhaustive pleasure of the triumph is swiftly tempered and brought back to the ground with the folk seeded reflection of The Water Is Cold, a decent and strikingly performed song but again an underwhelming shift in scenery and suasion. Its emerging emotional stringed flight and expressive vocal coaxing does light thoughts and feelings, but there is the thought that the track would be better served elsewhere in the order or set on a separate release to find the reaction it deserves.

The bluesy plaintive cry of In The Ground comes next to stir up a nest of satisfied thoughts and emotions with its persistent tendrils of sonic imposing and fiery enticement around another roar of vocal lament and expression. It is a track which you want more of before the final elegant balladry of Sweet And Tender brings the album to a musically and lyrically rueful close. Soaked in more folk seeded melancholy it is a captivating end to a fine if inconsistent album.

     Searching The Brittle Light is an impressive next step for Bowden but because of its intent and bravery in stretching its boundaries may be fails to match its predecessor. The songs are a clear step on in craft and maturity let alone invention but the album feels like two releases in one which defuses its impact whereas separating them into EPs of rock and ballad seeded tracks might have brought the showcase and clarity they deserve. Nevertheless Thom Bowden is an exciting talent which will be creating remarkable and keenly devoured statements ahead, we for one wait eagerly.

Searching The Brittle Light is available digitally, on vinyl, and CD now via Audio Candle Records and @ http://thombowden.bandcamp.com/

http://thombowden.com/

7.5/10

RingMaster 15/07/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Ghost Wolves – Man, Woman, Beast

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Rock duos have never been an absent feature of rock ‘n’ roll across the decades, the likes of The Everleys, The Carpenters, and alongside all those which spring to your mind right now The White Stripes all notable irresistible protagonists. It feels right now though that there is a real wealth and strength in depth to two-pronged innovative rock bands. The UK has the caustic garage punk/rock ‘n’ rollers The Creeping Ivies, Canada the raw and sonically insatiable might of The Black Frame Spectacle, whilst the US can offer up the country punk of The Barnyard Stompers and the blues punk fire of In The Whale. These are just four of the savagely potent enticements within the underground to which you can forcibly add The Ghost Wolves.

Hailing from Austin, TX, the duo of husband and wife Carley and Jonathan Wolf create a delta blues/garage rock inspired storm which stirs up the imagination and steals the passions like a fully loaded dose of sonic moonshine. Its raw and addictive recipe is irresistibly unleashed in a diverse mix of flavours within the band’s debut album Man, Woman, Beast. It is a rugged yet fuzzily seductive stomp of an encounter which leaves senses sore, bloated, and desperate for more.

Formed in 2011, The Ghost Wolves has spent the years since garnering more and more acclaim and support as well as a feistily growing fan base. Released on Nashville’s Plowboy Records, Man, Woman, Beast follows the success of the band’s 12” EP In Ya Neck! of 2011 and the following year the 7” single Getchya Hip Thrust, both on Pau Wau Records. The album already acclaimed in their homeland, has all the abrasing charm and enthralling enterprise, not forgetting sheer unruly beauty, to push the band into a wider world bred spotlight,

The first slice of infection is Shotgun Pistol Grip, the opening track an immediate sizzling bait to seduce ears and emotions. The heavy throaty tones of Carley’s guitar ignites ears right away to be joined within a breath or two by the tgw-620x620similarly coaxing crisp beats of Jonathan. There is an almost cantankerous swagger to the track, its rhythmic shoulders and melodic intent as feistily imposing as they are engagingly alluring. It is rapacious bait which steels its sinews to hold is tempting as the mischievously cute and flirtatiously melodic vocals of Carley caress ears, assisted as impressively by hubby. There is also an underlying surf rock breeze to the song which embraces the senses before making way for the fiery Gonna Live. Brewed in a richer distillery of blues, the track is an instinctively alluring prime rock ‘n’ roll canter. Guitars flame and groan with scuzz kissed toxicity whilst the vocals and chorus produce a rock revelry which demands attention from feet and emotions.

The ridiculously potent and thrilling start to the album is continued with Baby Fang Thang, a song which swings its melodic scuzz wrapped hips like a lap dancer from the first sway whilst beats punctuate the seduction with their own distinct potency. As with so many of the songs, verse and build ups are siren-esque especially vocally, but it is the toxicity of the chorus which sparks lustful passion, and in no greater success than on the third song. With a temptation which is like a fusion of Daisy Chainsaw and Karn8, the song licks at the senses with the salacious wickedness of a temptress and naive charm of a sultry breeze.

Both the coarse boned Grave Dollas and Ride The Wolf keep things aflame in quality and ears, the first a anthemic romp of energised rhythms and swinging vocal lures within another squalling blaze of blues lilted guitar colour. Its successor is a slow prowl of salaciously grinning vocals and sonic beckoning, the sultry seductive air of the song again reminding strongly of Karn8 whilst the heavier garage rock predation which equally crawls over the senses has a seventies psychedelic essence which also embraces flavours to be found in artists like Hasil Adkins, The Cramps, The White Stripes, and Morass of Molasses.

I Was Wrong uncages another sinew built stomp, rhythms casting a firm net for the twin vocals and smouldering guitar attack to tease ears with devilish efficiency, before the next up Itch unveils an earthy groove to lose inhibitions to. Whereas the last couple of songs richly pleased but lacked some of the lust breeding power of earlier tracks, this song is another Devil spawned seducing which wakes up the imagination and ardour fuelled passion like popping candy in the mouth, every note and beat a frenetic but fluid croon to set passions of eager edge. A welcome easily exploited by the intoxicating I’m Yo Mudda, its winding and swerving blues filtered grooves pure sonic manna.

The riveting limb enslaving Attack, Attack, Attack hits another pinnacle for the album, its veins pumped with fevered rapaciousness and hungry suasion driven by rhythmic stabs and vocal pokes. It is a sensational stomping which leaves the body breathless and hunger burning as greedily as the passions. Ensuring that the song’s glory is pushed to the final song, Dangerous Moves stands before ears with vocal enticement blazing radiantly within waves of blues toned guitar caressing, both leading to another crazily addictive and wonderfully toxic choruses. The song is a brilliant and pungent furnace of sound and anthemically evocative hues which sums up The Ghost Wolves perfectly.

Now we said these were the last songs and they are on the download version but we suggest going for the CD which comes with an extra trio of songs, tracks recorded live which you do not want to miss. The slow lumbering almost erotic beauty of Lies I Told is alone a treat but White Lily is the big prize, the song a scuzz lined dance of captivating beats and irrepressibly magnetic grooves all under the spell of the dual vocal temptation. The hypnotic rhythmic hex which opens up Mosquito is also a massive draw whilst the song once into its heart lays down a mesh of sonic bruising which ravenously grips an unrelenting appetite for the album.

Man, Woman, Beast is one of the real triumphs and pleasures of the year and The Ghost Wolves, a band to set the primal heart and beast in us all free.

Man, Woman, Beast is available now @ http://theghostwolves.bandcamp.com/album/man-woman-beast-2014 and on CD/vinyl through Plowboy Records! @ http://plowboyrecords.com/store/the-ghost-wolves/

http://www.theghostwolves.com

9/10

RingMaster 14/07/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Pirate Sons – 233U EP

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Photography by John Kane

How to describe the sound of Pirate Sons? Well take a certain dose of The White Stripes and add it to a flavoursome vat of some The Black Keys, Dr Feelgood, and The Black Crowes and you have the core of what makes up their sound and the exciting EP 233U. The four track release is a dirt clad stomp of untainted rock ‘n’ roll, an often bruising and incendiary confrontation which always lights the touch paper to insatiable garage rock bred revelry and unbridled satisfaction.

Originally a duo based in Wellington, New Zealand, the now Scottish based trio of a Kiwi, an Englishman and a Scot, are poised to burst out from their Edinburgh setting to a wider recognition with their debut release. Already the band has earned an imposing reputation for their incendiary live performances which has seen them alongside the likes of The Fire And I and The Minutes, the band continually giving everyone a run for their money. The EP has all the elements to place the threesome in the concentrated gaze of the UK rock scene, and the band itself the confidence and swagger to keep it burning.

Opening track Dirty, Dirty Rascals barely lays down its singular riff before unleashing a full stomp of aural wantonness, the song aa0581250999_2 tidy yet lawless slab of enterprise and insatiable hunger taking the senses on a ride of riotous adventure. With a strong contagious bassline and feisty flames of sonic taunting from the guitars, the track leads the passions on a charge of boisterous mischief with crafty rhythms framing and carving the exploits for greater persuasion.

The following Foolish wraps its riffs and melodic potency in an even stronger blues seeded blaze whilst the vocals snatch at some searing heavy metal tones but save themselves with a touch of belligerence to their coaxing. It is a sizzling mix which attached to the again teasing sonic scorching of the guitar only ignites further hunger for sound and release.

The Last Days Of Robert Johnson is a explosive romp which takes its time to get up to full energy but is deliberate in its brewing of a presence which makes every second of its impending climatic exploit one to savour and feed upon. Eventually the song unloads the pent up energy and greed through intensive and riveting white hot crescendos which spark equally impacting heat in the appetite of the listener.  As throughout the release the guitars have a raw and dishevelled sound which lights the ear further whilst the melodic strokes of keys enhance the invention and thrills further.

Final song Long Gone took and is still taking time to convince, though there is nothing openly disagreeable about its persuasion. With a slow saunter across the ear and vocals which equally do not rush to find a connection, the track does not spark any strong reaction or a sense of fire inside like the other three tracks. At its heart it is a pleasing and well-crafted piece but surrounded by less successful ideas and results, though the fact that the lead in to the chorus is a dead ringer to the core hook of the Eric Idle Python featured song Always Look on the Bright Side of Life raises a broad smile and an unintended contribution by this listener.  The song still makes a more than decent end to a great debut though and has plenty to continue the promise and now in place hunger for what follows from Pirate Sons in the future.

If you have fervour for blues tinged rock ‘n’ roll made with devilry by honest hands unconcerned with clean cut and ultimately passionless presentation, than the 233U EP is a piece of devil bred pleasure just ripe for consumption.

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http://piratesons.bandcamp.com

8/10

RingMaster 03/06/2013

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