Carnivora – The Vision EP

mkramer_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

Boston metallers Carnivora first caught our attention with an appearance on the excellent Bluntface Records compilation Operation: Underground. It featured a track from the band’s debut album Eternal, which after investigation turned out to equally be a stirring and attention exciting proposal. Now the band returns with the vicious exploits and temptations of The Vision EP, a ravenous and thrilling declaration of all the band’s skills and even bolder creative enmity.

Everything about The Vision is a step up from their impressive and acclaimed 2013 debut, the EP’s four tracks a cauldron of fierce imagination and volatile invention cast in maelstroms of diversely sculpted extreme metal. Groove and melodic metal enterprise colludes with death and thrash animosity in slabs of unpredictable and brutally irritable incitements, but furies ripe with captivating sonic adventure and melodic expression. Its release follows a successful couple of years which saw the band tearing up festivals such as the New England Metal & Hardcore Festival, Rockstar Energy Mayhem Festival, The Summer Slaughter Tour, and Rock And Shock Festival, all last year, with their merciless sound and share stages with the likes of Cannibal Corpse, Behemoth, Overkill, Trivium, Job For A Cowboy, Avenged Sevenfold, Morbid Angel, Shadows Fall, and many more. The Vision is Carnivora now snarling viciously at broader and more intensive spotlights and a global awakening to their presence sure to be on the cards such the EP’s dramatic persuasion.

CARNIVORA_VisionCover_jpegReputation Radio/RingMaster Review     It opens with A Vision In Red, a song venomously driving through ears straight away, swiftly getting under the skin and invading into the psyche. Riffs and grooves from Cody Michaud and Mike Meehan swarm maliciously over the senses, their addictive presence and prowess addictive bait to which the raw vocal squalls of M. Scott Lentine unleash a diversely delivered and magnetic hostility. It is a gripping proposition, the barbarous swings of drummer Dan DeLucia and serpentine tones cast by the bass of Cam Hunt, an addictive spine around which the guitars blossom and expand rich acidic textures bred in sonic imagination. As unpredictable as it is fascinatingly virulent, increasing in both the further it evolves its creative landscape, the song provides a tremendous start to the release.

Its success is quickly matched by Pessimist’s Tongue, its opening suggestive ambience subsequently whipped up into a tempestuous climate of blistering and rancorous intensity. The guitars lay out a melodic invitation even in the stormy climate of the song, a beckoning impossible to resist despite rhythms hailing down on them and the senses. The vocals, singularly and as the band, soon bring another shade to the encounter, offering a cancerous trespass and rally cry for thoughts and emotions. The song is a glorious violation with underlying temptations such as an understated but seductive lure of keys, solidly backed by Razors & Rust. Arguably more restrained than its predecessors, well slightly more merciful, the track stands toe to toe with the listener raging vocally and emotionally whilst guitars again entangle their enterprise around body and imagination. It does not quite have the spark of the first two tracks but easily entices ears and thoughts into exploring its rich depths and textures to a success similar to that found by those before it.

With a thrilling end to its creative ire, the track departs for EP closer The Reek Of Defeat to provide a final bracing and abrasive ravishing. It carries an almost mischievous flirtation to its melodic design and adventurous gait yet there is little about the song which not predatory or fuelled by bad blood. Its consuming maliciousness leaves ears ringing and emotions high and enjoyably completes a thrilling onslaught of a release.

Carnivora has climbed to new plateaus with The Vision EP yet you can only feel it is just the start of new and greater creative grudges, which in turn is a thought and anticipation to savour.

The Vision EP is available from 23rd June via Manshark Entertainment @ http://carnivora.bandcamp.com/ and http://carnivora.bigcartel.com/

https://www.facebook.com/carnivoramass   http://www.twitter.com/carnivoramass

RingMaster 23/06/2015

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InfiNight -The Vision

InfiNight_Band

Whether The Vision, the new EP from German heavy metallers InfiNight, is exactly offering anything new or unheard before is debatable but for straight up enjoyment and anthemic irresistibility there are no questions over its offering. The five track release is a strongly satisfying and pleasing slab of power metal fuelled enterprise, one which leaves you licking lips for more whilst it unleashes an expanse of sound which feeds appetites from numerous aspects of melodic metal.

Formed in 2001, the quintet of vocalist Martin Klein, guitarists Dominique Raber and Marco Grewenig (ex-Inner Logic, ex-Arctic Winter), bassist Kai Schmidt (ex-Inner Logic), and drummer Hendrik Reimann (ex-Inner Logic, ex-Godslave) has built and earned a loyal potent fan base and reputation for their sound and shows. Their impressive sharing of stages with the likes of Children of Bodom, Motörhead, Nevermore, Six Feet Under, and the Scorpions across gigs and festivals has enhanced their status certainly in their homeland and within Europe whilst their two albums, Sea of Knowledge (2005) and Like Puppets (2011), has brought great responses and good acclaim upon the band, InfiNight being compared to the likes of Nevermore, Queensrÿche, and Iced Earth. The Vision EP is their next exploit in gaining wide recognition and whether it will be the key to that awareness is up for discussion but it will recruit plenty more eager fans their way quite easily.

Hideaway opens up the EP and instantly seizes attention as guitars carve out a fire of compelling riffs as the drums hold court with Infinight_TheVision_Coverthumping heavy beats. Taking mere moments to hit its stride the song enthralls the senses further with an energetic stroll of predatory riffs ridden by the excellent vocals of Klein. There is a dark almost carnivorous tone to the guitars and certainly the bass which offers constant intimidation even when the melodic flames of Raber and Grewenig ignite air and passions, and it is this depth of sound which grips tightly as the smouldering charms of the excellent song flare up throughout to provide another richly appetising aspect to the song. The slip into a more hard/alternative rock aside with again Klein impresses powerfully is unexpected and thrilling, that moment alone questioning that earlier thought that there is not much new going on. In invention that can be argued for sure. As the rising crescendo of passion and intensity climbs to forge a tremendous climax, the song is simply a virulent contagion which lingers wonderfully.

The following short instrumental The Passage is a raw and abrasive post-apocalyptic like strength of evocative ambience evolving into closing seconds of orchestral colour which make way for A Loss of Love. The song opens with the vocals of Klein crooning over the melodic elegance of keys and warmth. It is an ok start soon elevated by the epically honed expulsion of melodic and symphonic lilted persuasion. Superbly crafted and presented, with guitars and vocals a tempting heat over the eighties fuelled melodic caresses of the keys, the song is a welcoming adventure that does struggle to match the heights of the opener but grasps the listener all the same in a blaze of anthemic power which is hard to turn down or resist participating in.

Transformation is another short instrumental, a piano led emotive piece with towering rhythms and a symphonic breath. To be honest as intriguing and interesting as both instrumentals are, and excellently delivered too, they are too short to make the impact the band probably wanted. They do not hang around long enough to inspire distinct thoughts and visions in the listener which really leaves them as feeling like fillers, something the composing and craft does not deserve. That is soon forgotten though when final song, the title track, explores the ear and passions with another scintillating stomp of riffs, rhythms, and sonic imagination. It makes a powerful conclusion to the release, it and the first track stirring riotous bookends to The Vision.  As the guitars scorch the song with sizzling melodic fire, their touch searing the tantalising spine of incessant rebellious drums from Reimann, it makes for a brilliant finish to an impressively decent and enjoyable release.

The EP does feels like a teaser in many ways to something bigger and whilst listening to The Vision you only hope that is the case, InfiNight having something bigger and longer in the works for the near future. An exciting thought.

https://www.facebook.com/InfiNight

8/10

RingMaster 05/08/2013

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