The DeRellas – High Rise Supersize

Pic David Newbold

Paving the way to a new album later this year, UK glam punks The DeRellas have just released brand new single High Rise Supersize. Consisting of three tracks, it is a rousing slab of punk ‘n’ roll sparking sure anticipation for the band’s forthcoming full length.

With previous mini album of 2016, Freakshow, thrusting the band’s sound to a new plateau in craft, imagination, and energy, it has been easy to hope, even expect, another elevation in prowess and adventure in any successor. Eighteen or so months on, High Rise Supersize more than offers, indeed realises, plenty of the potential of such success.

Producer by ex-Vibrator, Pat Collier, High Rise Supersize is the first release to feature new vocalist/rhythm guitarist Joey DeRella and comes as the band venture across the UK on a string of live shows including playing Rebellion in August. High Rise Supersize opens with one of those hooks you just have to take a bite of, guitarist Luca DeRella luring swiftly keen attention, leading it into the waiting rhythmic incitement of bassist Timmy DeRella and drummer Billion Dollar Bish. There is boisterousness to the track which just entangles the spirit especially once Joey’s eager tones join in the rock ‘n’ roll romp. The track is DeRellas typical yet soon shows a fresh character and intent with its animated melodies and sneaky hooks. Equally there is a touch of old school punk devilment to its roar which only adds to the fun.

The lead song is accompanied by I Got Something To Say and a great cover of The Sweet classic Fox On The Run. The first similarly lays down tasty guitar bred bait to set things going, rhythms in tandem snapping across the senses. As quickly the track shows a darker and dirtier attitude loaded nature to its predecessor, snarling as it stomps spilling open belligerence as it swings. The track is superb, for personal tastes even eclipsing the lead track, and another reason to get a touch excited about that impending album.

Its successor also carries that dirty texture in its infectious stroll, The DeRellas infesting the veins of Fox On The Run with their own creative and mischievous juices. The band does not dissect and rebuild the well-known encounter but gives it a growl and a raw layer of rock ‘n’ roll soil which works a treat.

It is set to be a very busy summer for The DeRellas and if High Rise Supersize is a sign of things to come an extremely successful end of year through the release of that new album.

High Rise Supersize is out now on the band’s own label, Rockaway Records; available on 7” vinyl, CD, and download @ https://store.cdbaby.com/cd/thederellas

https://www.derellas.com/   https://www.facebook.com/TheDeRellas/   https://twitter.com/thederellas

Pete RingMaster 03/05/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Dirt Box Disco – Immortals

UK punksters Dirt Box Disco have this enviable knack of unleashing something inescapably fresh with every record whilst retaining a trademark sound which makes the band one of punk’s most individual propositions. It is a success which is not only repeated with their new album but escalated for their finest moment to date.

Immortals is the sixth studio album from the Midlands hailing quintet and comes with more twists and turns than a swatter hunted fly in a cream cake shop. From song to song it romps with various shades in the spectrum of punk and rock ‘n’ roll; pop, old school, hardcore, and many more voracious hues embraced and given the DBD creative deviancy. It has proven near to impossible to settle on our favourite thirty DBD songs to date let alone choose a top ten but right now you can expect plenty from Immortals to feature in both.

Album opener Ready Or Not is a declaration of their return, though their ravenous live hunger ensures they are never far from a town near you and that they have more of the goodness and madness which has made the band one of punk’s essentials. It’s opening rally of beats and string of la-la-las signal prime DBD is here and eager to get us all bouncing and roaring. Manipulative catchiness has always been swift enslavement in the band’s sound and simply virulent within the first throes of the first song. The rousing incitement of vocalist WEAB.I.AM quickly works its persuasion, its ‘lock up your daughters ‘n’ hide the loot’ message a warning and promise of their insatiable sound and intent.

Its irresistible punk ‘n’ roll is followed by the just as ravenous pop punk lusting of Teenage Lovestruck Blues; a wonderful confusion of sixties, seventies, and modern punk and power pop honed into one swinging stomp ripe with riffs and hooks uncaged by Spunk Volcano and Danny Fingerz in collusion with a tangle of vocals and harmonies. As its predecessor, it unerringly hit the spot as too the melodic seducing of You’re The Only One For Me. It opens with the nervousness of a first date before hitting a confident stroll with the beats of Maff Fazzo the pump to its instinctive excitement of song and romance. Deadbeat Chris’ growling bass is a perfect contrast to the infectious double prong vocal lure, the song sharing gentle incitement fuelled caresses to stir eager involvement from those around and indeed listening.

A whiff of old school lines next up Caveman.com, the excellent feral stomp something akin to The Vibrators meets Turbonegro but distinctly DBD while Stop Shouting similarly taps into seventies punk for its core hook and riffery, draping it in the band’s inimitable anthemic rock ‘n’ roll instincts. Only the deaf could evade its physical and persuasive holler though even Fazzo’s incisive rhythms could probably stir their senses. Both tracks get body and spirit bouncing though maybe not as hungrily as 11th May or the following Mummy’s Boy. The first jabs and harries with beats and riffs, vocals commanding participation as the body throws itself around to the sounds while its successor flies through ears with seventies punk ferocity and DIY aggression to stir even greater involvement.

Done & Dusted is the kind of arousal you might expect The Pirates to come up with if starting out now, their own style of punk and rock ‘n’ roll an echo past of the contagion DBD seemingly effortlessly conjure. Like so many tracks it steps in, lays an instant creative glove on ears and has the body dancing to its whims before leaving at its height of temptation.

Box Of Tapes mixes hard rock and metal with its punk heart, the track a raucous compulsion for ears and appetite before Mirror Mirror shares its reflective croon with energy and tenacity, again hooks spun recalling some of punk’s glory days but revelling in their creator’s own modern uniqueness.

Rock ‘n’ roll comes no more masterful and incendiary than in the riotous charge of Box Set Addict; its raw urgency and attack infused with one delicious bassline and riveting sonic enterprise. The track is superb but still eclipsed by the album’s finest moment, Joyce’s Voices. The initial lure of haunted guitar is a tease of the unpredictable from which melodic infection winds around ears as WEAB.I.AM introduces the spirit guesting world of Joyce. Everything about the song is captivation, rock music which has body, voice, and appetite wrapped around its inventive fingers whilst reminding of people we have all come across in presence or legend.

Immortals leaves as sonically vociferous and rowdy as it began with firstly Pint Kamikaze Jaeger Smash, a sing-a-long bruising and stomping, and lastly through the attitude hurling Shut The Fuckin’ Door. The pair just epitomise the adventure and addiction brewed by the album, the first a lung bursting incitement with its companion a middle finger raising riot woven from various thick threads of rock ‘n’ roll and both reasons alone why DBD are so revered and greedily followed.

With every release Dirt Box Disco evolve, uncaging something new each and every time yet they never deviate from their insatiable honest sound. It is a skill and craft which sets them apart, keeping fans deliriously stomping and the band at the head table of punk rock.

Immortals is released April 27th via STP Records with an Ltd Ed vinyl version released July 28th.

http://www.dirtboxdisco.co.uk    http://www.facebook.com/pages/DIRT-BOX-DISCO/129060477115572    http://twitter.com/dirtboxdisco

Pete RingMaster 30/03/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Valensole – Make Pace EP

Just under a year ago, British punks Valensole sparked intrigue and pleasure with their debut EP, Where We Should Be. It was a potential loaded, ear grabbing introduction to the Southampton trio suggesting a band with all the right attributes and imagination to make potent strides within the UK rock scene. Now that suggestion has been reinforced and given greater strength by Make Pace, a second EP of raw and rousing punk ‘n’ roll very easy to devour.

Embracing inspirations from the likes of Nirvana, Green Day, Sum 41, and early Foo Fighters, Valensole was formed in 2016. The threesome of vocalist/guitarist Elliott Jones, guitarist Nick Jones, and bassist Dave Parker certainly had ears and praise attentive with that first EP and such the fresh character and tone to its successor, we can only expect them to find much even greater attention upon the release of Make Pace.

With Kurt Philips providing drums throughout, the EP kicks off with Giving Up, its jumbled start instantly spawning a tasty guitar hook which soon leads into a tenacious stroll through ears. Simultaneously a new richer flavouring to the band’s punk sound begins tempting, the track merging its raw traits with infectious enterprise as it increasingly stomps around. Dave’s bass has a gorgeous dark steely tone, Elliot’s vocals matching its lure in earnest attitude as his and Nick’s guitars throw their sonic wares around. As with the first EP, we found flavouring more akin to the likes of Psychedelic Furs and The Vibrators than those earlier mentioned influences but more so the band’s own voice in sound and invention emerges this time around.

The potent start is soon matched by the following M.A.D, the track immediately getting under the skin with its opening spicy hook. Both guitars tease and tempt, uniting in a fiery lure backed by the stirring swings of drums and the grumbling stroll of the bass. There is a great vintage punk lining to the Valensole sound, one especially vocal in the rousing antics of the second song even as it slips into calmer, provocative waters. It all erupts again for a tenacious finale as physically bracing as it is catchy before So Bored moves in with its ear nagging endeavour. Carrying a whiff of Buzzcocks to its melodically scored trespass of a hook, the track soon revels in its caustic rock ‘n’ roll breeding but as its predecessor is a proposition which is unafraid to explore unpredictable twists and turns before lighting its riotous touch paper once again.

The EP ends with Don’t Let Go, a song again drawing those Richard Butler and co references while uncaging its own individuality. Equally there is a garage punk meets Generation X scent to the song, a thickly flavoursome hue adding to the unrelenting pleasure the track and indeed Make Pace overall sparks.

Valensole’s sound is on a journey, one still evolving and growing. The band’s first EP hinted at its promise, the second reveals new depth and adventure to add to that potential. When it will all come to full maturity time will tell but the ride on the way is undoubtedly going to be great fun with the anticipation of many more easily devoured treats like Make Pace.

Make Pace is released February 9th.

https://www.facebook.com/valensoleband    https://twitter.com/valensole_band

Pete RingMaster 06/02/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Sourheads – Care Plan For The Soul

Since forming in the Spring of 2016, UK rockers The Sourheads has drawn increasing attention and support through their live presence, singles, and most of all their dirty, multi-flavoured rock ‘n’ roll. Now the band has added another accelerant to their emergence with the release of debut album Care Plan For The Soul. Offering nine slices of rowdy but skilfully woven incitement embracing classic and fresh rock diversity, the release thrusts the listener into a grubby cellar of salacious intent and irreverent sound; a temptation the body gets the urge to dance to and appetite the need to increasingly devour.

Hailing from Wakefield, West Yorkshire, The Sourheads embrace an array of inspirations in their sound ranging from Deep Purple, Kasabian and The Doors to Kyuss and Clutch. It is a web of punk and garage to psych and classic rock which is just as grungy as it is melodically enticing and within Care Plan For The Soul an incitement which makes a potent first impression but really grows in persuasion listen by listen. Mastered by Pete Maher (The Rolling Stones, Depeche Mode, U2), the album swiftly grabs ears and appetite with opener Demon. Straight away it is enticingly grumbling in ears, bass and riffs an irritable lure soon bound in sonic tendrils as familiar and new endeavours collude in the blossoming growl capped by the slightly gnarly tones of Jake Coxon. The bass of Ben Taylor continues to be a belligerent presence in the caustic captivation, guitarist Mik Crone and drummer Chris Lambert adding their bold touches to the ever evolving roar maybe best described as Turbonegro meets The Senton Bombs meets Guns n’ Roses.

It is a great start to proceedings which Morally High continues with its spicily grooved stroll. Carrying similar essences and flavours to its predecessor in its own individual way, the track is equally as infectious and magnetic with again classic and modern textures rubbing excitedly again each other within its controlled yet salacious swing. As the music, Coxon has a snarl to his croon, attitude dripping from every syllable and note before My Rock And Roll steps up to coax bad behaviour with its blues skinned devilry entangled in more of the great guitar enterprise which veins the whole of Care Plan For The Soul.

Power Of Addiction shares some of that psychedelic influence next; keys and melodies a sultry tempting while Rag And Bone Man has a great scruffy feel and character to its predacious gait and rhythmically rousing proposal. The song alone sums up the variety of flavours within The Sourheads sound, a host of rock bred essences embroiled in its inescapable command of body and imagination. It all adds up to one of the biggest highlights of the release, one quickly matched by the voracious punk ‘n’ roll of Don’t Get Caught (I Am The Lotus). Like The Stooges and Eddie and The Hot Rods caught in the act by The Vibrators as AC/DC hold the camera, the track is superb, taking best song honours with its manipulative temptations and craft.

Both Secret Cigarette and Warbird take a firm grip of release and listener next, the first an invasive but seductive fire of blues and classic grooves with punk bred kindling while its successor merges sullied rock ‘n’ roll with some of the most addictive melodic hooks and enterprise within the album for another pinnacle. As with many songs, it openly draws on some classic punk hooks and teases but equally shares psych rock imagination for the album’s most imaginative moment to stand alongside its best.

Care Plan For The Soul concludes with Mad Dog, a song rising from an initial Queen/Skid Row like invitation into an invasive and volatile ballad which becomes more captivating by the minute and listen, much as the album itself.  Indeed just as many will take to the release within seconds many others will need time to explore and discover its qualities; the big rewards for the attention we can vouch for as too the finding of a potential of even greater fun and adventure ahead with the Sourheads.

Care Plan For The Soul is available now through Oak Island Records on CD, Vinyl and Digitally.

https://www.thesourheads.com/    https://www.facebook.com/thesourheads    https://thesourheads2.bandcamp.com/

 Pete RingMaster 23/11/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Bronsons – Girl from Outer Space

Coming together again a handful of years ago after first emerging in the early eighties, The Bronsons sow their music in the pub/garage rock sounds which laid the seeds for many of the punk bands crashing 1976/77. It is a style which they continue to embrace and nurture their own individual character of enticement from as evidenced by new single Girl from Outer Space.

The song is a cover of a track by Barrence Whitfield and the Savages which made its first appearance on their 1987 UK EP Call Of The Wild, the release expanded with additional tracks and released in the US as the album Ow! Ow! Ow! the same year. It was a track which vocalist Stefan Ball came across in the early nineties, a song he found impossible to find again since renting the aforementioned EP from a local library but one he never forgot. Hearing it again when Boston’s Four Piece Suit released their own version he brought the song to the band and subsequently they now our ears in the inimitable Bronsons style.

The current line-up of guitarist Ball, Tony ‘Chas’ Talman, drummer Phil ‘Chas’ Dourado, and bassist Jorge Polverinos backed by Zara Cannon and Giselle Nicholson aka The Bronsonettes, has evolved the blues rock toning of the original with a rich dose of their forcibly catchy rock ‘n’ roll, a blend which swiftly grips the appetite as Girl from Outer Space launches itself on ears. Like a mix of The Pirates, Dave Edmunds, and The Vibrators, the track infests the imagination. Guitars make the first raucous lure, the swagger of bass and beats quickly lining up alongside as Ball’s vocals share their own confident stroll. Together it makes for a fuzzy mischievous slice of rock ‘n’ roll, The Revillos like harmonic lure of The Bronsonettes icing on the contagion as eager involvement in its antics is inescapable.

The best rock ‘n’ roll has the face smiling, spirit rolling, and body rocking; Girl from Outer Space ticks all boxes.

Girl from Outer Space is available now @ https://bronsons.bandcamp.com/track/girl-from-outer-space

http://www.bronsons.uk/    https://www.facebook.com/BronsonsLive    https://twitter.com/BronsonsLive

Pete RingMaster 12/09/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Rotten Mind – Self Titled

photo_by_Mikael_Lindqvist

Talking about the band’s new self-titled album, Rotten Mind vocalist/guitarist Jakob Arvidsson stated that, “Our main idea was to work in a new way. We had no rush and the songs were written during a period that lasted for over a year.” Whether that intent and process was the reason or the spark, the Swedish quartet’s second album has emerged with new maturity and creative roundedness in sound and songwriting. Without losing the punk snarl of its predecessor, it is a proposition which has attention on board within a handful of seconds and firmly held until its final breath.

The album sees Rotten Mind uncage their distinctive fusion of punk, garage rock, and post punk, a sound which simultaneously feels familiar yet forcibly fresh. It is a mix which saw their debut full-length, I’m Alone Even With You, eagerly received and praised upon its release in 2015, its success followed by a torrent of live shows and two tours across Europe. Indeed the writing of its successor, taking over a year, simultaneously occurred as shows came thick and fast; songs relishing the experiences and inspiring sights found to push on in all aspects from its predecessor.

As evidenced from its opener alone, the album flings physically gripping hooks and imagination inciting melodies at will; all keener and more powerful than anything the band has conjured before while rhythmically the release is a cauldron of anthemic temptation. It is fuelled by the scuzzy almost suffocating Rotten Mind sound which marked the first album and the Uppsala hailing band’s potent live presence; Wish You Were Gone starting things off revealing all of those established  attributes and plenty of new ones.

Dangling bait sonic initially, one soon entwined with a spicy melody, the first song soon bursts into a virulent stroll, the album’s first essential hook from Johan’s guitar wagging an irresistible finger as the rhythms of bassist Rune and drummer Victor collude in rolling infectious bait. The temptation only increases as the track boils, Jakob’s vocals just as magnetic as that first strand of piercing persuasion continues to persist while revealing psychobilly tendencies against the track’s intensifying punk punch.

There is a touch of Psychedelic Furs to song and release, nothing concrete just a scent which continues in the more irritable rock ‘n’ roll of Things I Can’t See. At times, as beats jab and riffs bite, the song feels like it is slamming its fists down on the table temperament wise but discontent aligned to a catchy restraint ensuring great volatility in the rousing incitement of sound and enterprise. The track is one of two singles laying down potent teasers for the album earlier this year, the second following straight after.  Still Searching sonically shimmers before laying down a trail of rhythmic manna, the brooding voice of the bass courting rapacious beats. The track’s post punk persuasion makes swift slavery of ears and appetite, its bait only accentuated by the subsequent acidic hook and swinging groove loaded gait of the song. Kind like a mix of The Jesus and Mary Chain and Sex Gang Children, the track, as the album, simply seizes ears and appetite with relish second by second.

Dark Intentions bounds along with contagious energy and rhythmic dexterity next, its atmospheric and emotional shadows just as potent as its melodic suggestiveness before Got Me Numbered reveals a seventies inspired punkiness recalling the likes of Buzzcocks and The Vibrators. Both tracks have the body bouncing and spirit ignited while When You Come Back meanders along in a web of wiry melodies as rhythms grumble. Infectious vocals especially within the potent chorus only add to its lure, its tapestry of flirtatious strums and inventive persistence demanding inevitable and lustful listener involvement.

Through the creatively and emotionally agitated Real Lies and Out Of Use with its darker predatory hues,  enjoyment is an eager torrent, the first captivating with robust rhythmic incitement and hard rock infused melodic jangle while the second prowls the senses with a union of primal and fiery contrasts. There is a surface similarity to many tracks within the album, but a deception greater attention defuses with both tracks showing potent diversity, with the second especially bold.

The rock ‘n’ roll clash and holler of Safer Place keeps things feverishly lively, its dark haunting textures surrounding a sonic blaze of invention before I Need To Know brings things to a richly satisfying close with its boisterous croon.

It is a fine end to an album which brings greater individuality to the Rotten Mind sound though there still feels like there is plenty of room for greater uniqueness to blossom which on the thick enjoyment of their album only adds further excitement for the future.

The Rotten Mind album is out now through Lövely Records @ https://lovelyrecords.bandcamp.com/album/rotten-mind-rotten-mind

https://www.facebook.com/rottenmindua/

Pete RingMaster 27/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Target Renegades – Gallows Humour EP

tr-band_RingMasterReview

With their previous acclaim luring Dark Sounds EP pushing the band’s sound to another level, UK rockers Target:Renegades ended 2016 with another proposition revelling in new growth in their fiery mix of alternative and hard rock loaded with punk belligerence. The Gallows Humour EP provides a quartet of songs which roar and command attention whilst showing new variety in the Warrington outfit’s writing and sound. Compared to its predecessor and its immediate explosive grip of ears and imagination, Gallows Humour is more of a smouldering tempting but one working its way to the same kind of success and persuasion .

Following their 2012 released debut EP Corruption For Beginners, Target:Renegades really courted awareness with first album [Press Start] two years later. Its impressive collection of songs eagerly pleased ears yet suggested that there was plenty left in the creative tank for the band to discover and explore. With an explosive live presence earning them further praise and support and seeing the band sharing stages with the likes of The Vibrators, Sumo Cyco, and I Am Giant among many over time, Target:Renegades realised much of that potential with Dark Sounds and have tapped into even more imagination and variety with Gallows Humour, an encounter ready to ignite a new flood of plaudits and followers.

The EP opens with the instantly compelling Jump Overboard, its initial nagging groove alone enough to grip ears and appetite as the lures of Dan Fido’s guitar squirrel themselves into the psyche. With the beats of Matt Reid just as eager as the bass of Jack Hamnett magnetically groans, the song soon hits a controlled yet fiery stride with vocalist Adam Hulse commanding further attention. Its chorus is simple but as catchy as anything the band has sculpted while its surrounding saunter is muscle and menace bound in a composed groove layered air. With hooks which drive the song further under the skin, it is a masterful and addictive start to the release.

tr_RingMasterReviewA heavy bass groan opens up the following A Curse Ensues, melodic strands from Fido soon wrapping the senses as the track grows and blossoms into a proposal distinct to the band. The second track reinforces the thought that the band has discovered a sound which roars only Target:Renegades though inspirations from the likes of Deftones and Karnivool are additional hues in its canvas of imagination. Hulse excels as he shares the song’s landscape with earnest prowls and emotional roars, both backed by Fido’s potent tones and inventive guitar spun enterprise.

I Concede steps up next, coaxing ears with a melodic caress as rhythms gather in the background before shaping the track’s subsequent melancholic stroll. Its low key gait and touch is a suggestive proposition as vocals potently share an emotion bred heart; an alluring offering ignited further by ferocious bursts of fiery sound and raw intensity. Whether guttural vocal growls work as well as they could have can be argued but the song only reinforces the potency of the release so far with strength and invention.

The EP is concluded by This Isn’t Revenge, another instantly recognisable to the band which backs the suggestion of real distinctiveness in their writing and music breached by Target:Renegades. The song maybe lacks some of the sparks of its predecessors but hones a melodic prowess and beauty which leads it to be as tempting as anything else within Gallows Humour.

The new EP is a different beast to Dark Sounds but an equal in adventure and energy with a new blossoming of maturity breeding the most rounded songs from Target:Renegades yet and inescapable evidence of a band ready to embrace bigger and more imposing spotlights.

Gallows Humour is out now across most online stores.

http://www.targetrenegades.co.uk/    https://www.facebook.com/TR.UKMusic   https://twitter.com/TargetRenegades

Pete RingMaster 24/01/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright