We Were Promised Jetpacks – Unravelling

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Pungent in sound and emotion, Unravelling is a proposition which simultaneously makes a big impact and worms sneakily away under the skin and into the psyche. The new and third album from Scottish rockers We Were Promised Jetpacks, it is a riveting exploration, an adventure capturing ears and imagination like there is no tomorrow. Everything about the album is thick, in rhythmic persuasion, emotive intimacy, and raging melodies, but equally there is a clarity allowing every individual drama to play out their narratives musically and emotionally. The Edinburgh band has never been low on attention grabbing enterprise and songwriting but Unravelling is a coming of age, We Were Promised Jetpacks gracing a new plateau in invention and sonic expression.

Formed in 2008 by friends and vocalist/guitarist Adam Thompson, drummer Darren Lackie, bassist Sean Smith, and guitarist Michael Palmer whilst the four were at University, We Were Promised Jetpacks soon became a potent presence on the Glasgow music scene and almost as quickly were snapped up by FatCat Records. Debut album These Four Walls was unveiled in 2009 to critical acclaim, leading the band to an intense run of shows and festival appearances as well as supporting bands like Frightened Rabbit and The Twilight Sad. After the release of The Last Place You’ll Look EP the following year, the band set about second album In the Pit of the Stomach, which was recorded at Sigur Ros’s Sundlaugin Studios in Iceland. Again fans and media devoured it keenly and with praise whilst the band’s live reach saw them hit the US to great success. Now the band is set to recharge the passions with Unravelling, a release looking lyrically at “the notion of a conflicted protagonist struggling to keep their life on course, while battling a creeping sense of uncertainty and impending doom.” The first release featuring new member and multi-instrumentalist Stuart McGachan, and recorded with Paul Savage (Teenage Fanclub, King Creosote, The Twilight Sad, Mogwai), Unravelling is a tempestuous flight for senses and thoughts. Its climate is sultry and sonically hazy, its emotion tense and tenacious, but mostly the album is simply an inescapable captivation.

Safety In Numbers opens up the release, an increasingly brewing caress of keys the first touch before melodies and shadows slip into the emerging landscape of the song. Thompson’s vocals bring a plainer but no less expressive essence, his Scottish accent adding to the colour of the unveiling narrative. Instantly it is an enthralling persuasion, the walls and intensity of the track growing and thickening as an emotive wash reminding of fellow Scots Letters, immerses the imagination. There is also an unrelenting persistence to the encounter which is almost erosive in its effect, a potency which is never far away from the heart of every song on Unravelling, but a relentless baiting unafraid to share time with flowing enterprise and inventive twists which flirt across the track.

Its successor Peaks And Troughs is the same in many ways, a seduction of even catchier endeavour and sonic ingenuity which blossoms on the muscular and intensive persistence. The bass of Smith digs into darker throatier but virulent temptation whilst the imposing beats of Lackie swing with strong and imposing relish, the combination a gripping core and driving energy upon which the evocative and colourful design of guitar and keys matched by the excellent vocals flourish. The song pushes the strong start up another level with ease, a peak swiftly matched by the shimmering warmth and melodic calm of I Keep It Composed. To that elegant side though, the song explores another almost cavernous expanse of rhythmic intimidation and contagion resulting in an absorbing and hypnotic embrace. Its texture is as thick as smog and presence as radiant as the sun’s touch, and quite scintillating.

The following Peace Sign brings a less intensive and imposing approach to ears but is similarly as chunky in its rhythmic growl and weight and as slim in its excesses. The bass of Smith again excels, swaggering and flirting with grizzled majesty whilst the guitars of Palmer and Thompson weave engrossing structures and hues around the latter’s ever potent vocal suasion. Less an epidemic than a slow infestation with its resourceful might and beauty, the song is dazzling and the perfect set up for the similarly impressing Night Terror. A heavy stroll of beats sets up a frame around electro funk revelry at first, keys and drums subsequently aligning for a bubbly and vivacious coaxing before a sultry haziness kisses the surface of all and a Josef K like causticity treats the senses. It is an intrigue drenched offering which is less urgent and compulsive than previous songs whilst giving a new aspect to the album’s expanding character and richly satisfying experience.

The dark and moody drama of Disconnecting comes next; weighty keys spawning a sinister, noir wrapped climate within which vocals shimmer and percussion dances. It is a slow haunting embrace with sinew sculpted textures and melancholic radiance, which may not quite match those tracks before it in some ways but surpasses them in menacing scenery and emotional shading. Its success is matched by both Bright Minds and A Part Of It, the first a lighter but no less emotionally attentive encounter and its successor a rawer, abrasing swamp of sonic mystique and craft around a hungry rhythmic persuasion. Again neither quite lives up to the opening clutch of songs but certainly bring new delicious twists to the flight and emotional examination of the album.

Through the darker air and almost predatory intent of the excellent Moral Compass, a song just as striking in its melodic grace as it is in its bordering on caustic breath, and the mesmeric almost stately beauty of Peace Of Mind, band and album enslave ears and thoughts majestically. The almost epic instrumental grandeur of the second of the pair is a journey all of its own, the imagination unavoidably wrapped up and sparking from its sonic emprise, before final song Ricochet provides a lasting tempest of dramatic clouds and melodic tenacity within another blistering frame of invention and emotion.

Unravelling is an album which grips from the off but makes an even greater and thrilling impression the more time it is allowed to submerge and colour the senses. It is the finest hour of We Were Promised Jetpacks with ease and surely the doorway to a new level of attention and fervour towards the band’s spellbinding sound.

Unravelling is available via FatCat Records now @ http://fatcat.sandbaghq.com/we-were-promised-jetpacks-unravelling.html

http://www.wewerepromisedjetpacks.co.uk

RingMaster 14/10/2014

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Dark Dark Horse – Centuries

Dark Dark Horse

At times deeply mesmeric and perpetually evocative, Centuries the debut album from Dark Dark Horse is a release which wraps an emotive and imagination arm around senses and thoughts from start to finish. It is an entrancing and enticing collection of songs which maybe do not light burning fires in the passions but certainly stokes them into strong satisfaction.

Dark Dark Horse is the collaboration between producer Jamie Ward (Maybeshewill/ex Kyte) and vocalist James Stafford (kids in cars), two musicians from Leicestershire, UK combining their individual creativity and invention into something evocative and aurally descriptive. Initial songs from the pair found strong responses from fans and media whilst moving to the live arena the pair enlisted Joe Norledge and Robin Southby (Maybeshewill) to the band which soon found itself supporting the likes of Mono, The Twilight Sad, Clock Opera and Fossil Collective. Approached by Japanese label Rallye (Toro Y Moi, Au Revoir Simone, The Joy Formidable), the band released debut full length Centuries in Japan in 2010, but now via Function Records it has a UK release to trigger another enthused wave of deserved attention for band and release.

Opener Sharks instantly seduces the ear with electronic teases and the wonderfully expressive and riveting vocals of Stafford. It 582009_601833463174250_2083362697_nis tantalising introduction which explores the senses as the song permeates the now shimmering air above its magnetic temptation and rhythmic intrigue. As with all the songs its gait is dreamy, slow yet bursting with an enthused breath and evocative inducements which colour thoughts and imagination. The warm ambience cultured and caressing the listener from within the song adds to the sirenesque mystique of the track, something the album as a whole creates to inspire and spark emotions and reflections which one suspects will be individual to each immersing within its call.

The following Ethics and In A Lifetime Before bring their individual melodic and plaintive designs to caress the ear, the first with rhythmic enterprise within a swarming wind of suggestive melodic palette of vibrant sonic paint and the second through its almost music box like simplicity and elegance coaxed into brighter flames by the continuing to impress vocals of Stafford, whilst keys and electro scatter their own magnetic bait. Neither lives up to the heights of the first song but both leave the listener enveloped in their own thoughts and reflection driven aural summer.

Through the likes of the sparkling Spit out Regret, the bewitching and sonically hazy Southwest of Orion, and the enchanting Midnight Mass, a song which carries winds of melodic beauty expelling mini sonic crescendos of elegance, the album raises further pinnacles to admire and greedily feast upon whilst Mercury Nevada offers an expansive journey for thoughts and emotions through an atmospheric, slightly melancholic but tension free evocative and sultry tapestry. Arguably overlong but completely enthralling, the track evolves before the ear into a new and equally compelling musical narrative halfway through to leave its criticism of its length nothing more than being picky.

Every one of the ten songs on Centuries leave an impressive if not always lingering mark but there is never a moment when you wish to move swiftly on to another track, each a delightful and distinct trait of the overall character of the album, the closing title track the final piece of the sonic jigsaw and rounding off with skilfully sculpted melodic grandeur a release which sways and weaves a fresh and fascinating musical conversation and intimacy with mind and heart.

Though it did not send passions raging or flames coursing through the veins, Centuries is a release destined to find its worthy place in the soundtracks of many lives whilst Dark Dark Horse is a project destined to even greater triumphs and recognition.

https://www.facebook.com/darkdarkhorse

8/10

RingMaster 03/07/2013

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The Trade: Fight Club

by Graeme McInnes

by Graeme McInnes

The past three years has seen UK alternative rock band The Trade earn a strong reputation and an eagerly growing fanbase through their impressive line performances which have seen the band shared stages with bands such as The Undertones, The Buzzcocks, The Twang, The Twilight Sad, The Xcerts, Chris Helm, Mark Morriss and The Underground Hero’s to name a few, and the release of their debut album Lie in the Dark in 2011. Since its well-received release the band has kept interest in them high with a series of singles of which Fight Club from the album is the latest. The enjoyable song is also another enterprising lure to strong anticipation ahead of the release of their second album later this year.

Consisting of vocalist Ross Milne, guitarists Stevie Morris and Liam Moir, bassist/backing vocalist Drew McLaren, and drummer Sean Hollowmind, the quintet from Angus in Scotland creates guitar driven music which with ease captures the imagination. The new single is a prime slice of their invention and a pleasing invitation into the band, a song which takes no time in engaging fully and bringing a vibrant stroll of fresh melodies and guitar lined craft to bear.

The track opens with firm but restrained riffs which niggle the air with a slightly agitated breath whilst the expressive vocals of Milne engage the ear with its fine gravelly texture. Soon a throaty bassline joins the affair paced by crisp drum beats and a brewing hunger to the song itself. Into its stride the track offers further sonic flames upon the solid and inviting hooks of the song as well as crescendos of energies which suggest the song is going to explode into more muscular purpose but instead remains in its boisterous stance to tease and equally disappoint and thrill.

Fight Club with its emotive lilt lyrically and to the vocals brings a certain hunger in the listener to check out the impending album from the band at the very least. The single is probably not the finest moment of the band to date but undoubtedly a perfect way to walk into their creative embrace.

www.the-trade.co.uk

www.facebook.com/thetradeoffical

7/10

RingMaster 19/03/2013

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