New York Tourists – Call

NYT_RingMaster Review

Whether being described as Queens of The Stone Age meets Foals is a true colour to the New York Tourists sound we are still debating but it does hint at the rich flavour and textures within it, qualities ripe in the band’s new single Call.

cover_RingMaster Review    It is fair to say that the British alternative rock quartet has been garnering hefty praise in reviews and attention since the release of their debut EP, Thankyou & Goodnight late 2012, its track Chew Me Up, Spit Me Out, selected as one of BBC Introducing’s top 10 tracks of 2013. Its success helped lead New York Tourists to support slots for the likes of The Subways, The View, The Sunshine Underground, and Buzzcocks whilst also headlining the Alternative Stage at Blackburn Festival. Second EP Dead Man’s Leather was unveiled in 2014 via London based label Kittiwake Records, and more acclaim and attention flew their way as well as opportunities to play with band such as We Are Scientists, The Cribs, and Shed 7 soon after. Having begun recording their successful Kickstarter funded debut album earlier this year and playing Hogton Tower in Preston as the main support to Status Quo in front of 12,000 people, the foursome of vocalist/guitarist Gary Taylor, guitarist Carl Rutherford, bassist Adrian Mckenzie, and drummer Joe Mooney have had an exciting year, one only continuing with Call, the band whetting and inflaming the appetite for their album at the same time.

The single opens with the falsetto prowess of Taylor, his lofty tones backed by more earthbound hues, presumably also his own, as guitars cast their magnetic lure over ears and around the lively rhythmic frame of the song. With a scent of psych rock and post punk/new wave spice to its invitingly volatile climate and body, the track canters along with an engaging melodic character and busy energy around an impressive vocal tempting. Rhythmically the song reminds of fellow Brits The Sea, whilst its vocal and inventive heart offers a familiarity hard to pin down but certainly with seeds in more adventurous Brit Pop.

Leaving a certain want for more, Call is a potent tempter for the New York Tourists album whenever that comes along, and if its songs can match up to the single, more highly enjoyable times are afoot.

Call is released October 24th

Upcoming Live Dates:

30th October – Camden Barfly

13th November – Ferret, Preston

19th November – Wharf Chambers, Leeds

http://www.new-yorktourists.co.uk/    https://www.facebook.com/NEW-YORK-TOURISTS-188920262416/   https://twitter.com/newyorktourists

Pete RingMaster 23/10/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Slow Readers Club – Cavalcade

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After a clutch of increasingly impressive and fascinating singles across last year moving into this, anticipation of Cavalcade, the second album from UK indie rockers The Slow Readers Club was high and excited for a growing sea of fans, including us. Each of the quartet of songs offered was a riveting teaser and evidence of the band’s upcoming release and diversely sculpted sound respectively. Those propositions still shine like flaming beacons as they sit within the walls of Cavalcade but are matched by a collection of new to the ear tracks which simply seduce ears and imagination.

Hailing from Manchester, The Slow Readers Club have been no strangers to acclaim these past months. Their singles have drawn frequent praise and support from fans and media alike whilst their live presence has seen highly successful shows with the likes of Catfish & The Bottlemen, The Struts, Reverend and the Makers, and The Sunshine Underground as well as well-received appearances at Tramlines Festival, Party in the Pines, and the Blackthorn Festival. Journalist and frontman for Goldblade John Robb predicted that 2015 would see The Slow Readers Club breaking through to become one of the most important bands to emerge from Manchester’s music scene in recent years. Everything has backed up his suggestion and certainly Cavalcade has brought the year one of its major triumphs.

Picture 2     Creating an emotive and cinematically coloured mix of indie and electro pop, The Slow Readers Club has an embracing and immersive sound which places the listener into the scenery and heart of each song’s narrative as if physically there. Instant evidence comes with album opener Start Again. Its opening cauldron of electro temptation is an immediate potent lure, one only intensifying as a throaty bass line links with choppy guitar riffs and the equally magnetic vocals. It comes with an eighties electro pop breath, as most songs, yet creates a suggestive web of new and unique tempting which is best described as B-Movie meets Interpol but is solely The Slow Readers Club. The embracing keys of Aaron Starkie and the imaginative guitar enterprise of Kurtis Starkie weave an inescapable persuasion, their vocals similarly richly alluring though to be fair every aspect of the song is a lingering incitement, the almost dirty tones of James Ryan’s bass and the punchy beats of drummer David Whitworth equally irresistible, and when it is all united what emerges is a sublime piece of pop alchemy.

Impressive as it is though, the song is surpassed by the following I Saw a Ghost, surely the bands best song to date though it is seriously challenged by other tracks on the album. The band’s recent single, it opens with voice and beats casting a swift and dramatic proposal, one caressed by the warm evocative texture of keys. It is not long before the again wonderfully heavy voice of the bass is aligning itself to the lighter hues of guitar, each contrasting and enhancing the other and the evolving proposition. The entrance of the bass also seems to inspire a heftier energy to Whitworth’s swings, creating a captivating merger of light and dark tones and also as a physical persuasion. The track is sensational, once more seemingly bringing differing decades of pop into alignment for a seriously compelling and intoxicating slice of anthemic tempting.

Forever in Your Debt has a darker emotive air to its presence, from its first breath the bass casting a solemn yet inviting tone to the song and continued by the impressive vocal expression and qualities bringing the song’s premise into ears and thoughts. Bubbly guitar and atmospheric keys add to the brewing drama, every twist revealing new shadows and corners to eagerly explore whilst sound wise there is a post punk like essence tempering the potent heat of melodies and hooks.

Three songs in and variety is as open as the connecting prowess of the band’s imagination, the mesmeric Plant the Seed giving further swift proof. Like a blend of Depeche Mode and Bronski Beat, the song is a transfixing croon of dark electro and synth pop, entrancing ears before leading them into an almost visual passage of intimate reflection and radiant persuasion. A track which impresses from the first play and only grows more potent, it is emulated by the melodically and emotionally climatic Days Like This Will Break Your Heart. It is a brooding inventive roar of an encounter which is almost volcanic in its intensity and sonic landscape. Both tracks continue the immense flight of the album perfectly but are put in the shade a touch by the outstanding Don’t Mind. It is one of those serenades which linger with unrelenting persistence, a lively and evocative caress which just connects with situations we have all been through whilst providing an absorbing soundtrack. With a touch of Black/ Colin Vearncombe to its croon, the song is seductive balladry at its most sublime.

The album’s title track is next and needs little time to bewitch as spicy guitar endeavour fuels a feel of The Smiths at its beginning. It’s reserved but potent start soon builds into a thicker and more dramatically hued theatre of emotion and sound where spices of The The and The Associates flirt with the band’s ideation. The track adds to the growing list of the major moments on the album, and there are so many, before making way for Fool for Your Philosophy to reveal its tangy electro enterprise and dark drama. The almost sinister rhythms of Ryan and Whitworth are worth the price of ‘the ticket’ alone, as too the exceptional vocals whilst the vibrant and energetic dance of keys and melodies are a fire in the enthralling darkness of the song.

Both Grace of God and Here in the Hollow hold body and emotions tight, the first a beautiful intensive flirtation with a Frankie Goes To Hollywood charm and vivacity to it whilst its successor, from an enticing simmering start, grows into one glorious anthem of sound and emotion where vocals again are the mighty instigators to the irresistible theatre of the song sculpted by colossal sounds. We mentioned some songs rival I Saw a Ghost for the pinnacle of the band’s songs to date and this is a definite contender.

The enthralling and emotively fuelled Secrets provides an excellent pungent drama next before things are brought to a close by Know the Day Will Come a song which makes a slow and decent enough start but erupts into another creatively incendiary exploration for ears and emotions. It is a thumping end to a quite exceptional album.

Expectations were high because of the band’s previous singles but The Slow Readers Club has surpassed them and themselves with Cavalcade. The bare fact is that it will be astonishing if you find a better rock pop album in 2015 then this modern classic.

Cavalcade is available now, digitally @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/cavalcade/id979245862 and on CD/vinyl via http://theslowreadersclub.bandcamp.com/merch

http://www.theslowreadersclub.co.uk     http://www.facebook.com/theslowreadersclub

RingMaster 14/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

The Slow Readers Club – I Saw a Ghost

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With just a few short weeks to the release of their second album Cavalcade, UK indie band The Slow Readers Club are releasing not only a pungent teaser to their forthcoming offering, but one of their finest moments yet in the shape of new single I Saw A Ghost. It is aural magnetism, an evocative embrace of emotional shadows and intoxicating sound reinforcing the Manchester based band as one of the most fascinating and exciting propositions on the British rock scene

The past year has seen the quartet luring increasing acclaim through a host of enticing singles, including previous single Forever In Your Debt and its predecessor Don’t Mind. They are no strangers to praise and attention it is fair to say, their live presence drawing as much eager reactions as their releases with last year seeing the band play a sold out show at Manchester’s Night and Day as well as successful appearances at Tramlines Festival, Party in the Pines and Blackthorn Festival alongside support slots with bands such as Catfish & The Bottlemen, The Struts, Reverend and the Makers, and The Sunshine Underground. They can also list Peter Hook amongst their enthusiastic fans, a following which from the release of their debut self-titled album in 2012 has perpetually and raucously increased.

Picture 66   Now The Slow Readers Club is stoking the fires of those followers and greater anticipation of their new album with I Saw a Ghost. The song is themed around depression, more specifically according to vocalist Aaron Starkie, “It’s about appearing to have a normal happy life but carrying something with you that can descend at any moment and make everything appear bleak.” It is an emotion perfectly embraced and exposed by the music within the single, its body and gait a bouncy persuasion with infectious energy and character but holding onto underlying shadows and dark thoughts just as tightly. It opens with Starkie immediately unveiling his and the songs’ heart in the embrace of his own crafted keys. Alongside them the jabbing beats of David Whitworth punctuate the emotional drama being shown, whilst the throaty tones of bass from James Ryan only add to the dark air though it is all swiftly tempered by the contagious enterprise of Kurtis Starkie’s guitar amidst that tantalising celestial breath of keys.

The song continues to blend dark and light, each entwining the other with craft and tenacity whilst providing a rigorous stroll of infectiousness amidst immersive almost suffocating dark rapture. The Slow Readers Club are usually and understandably compared to the likes of Interpol, The Killers, and The National but it is easy to also suggest moments of the track has elements of The Smiths, especially the start, and bands like Silhouettes to it. As previous songs though, it emerges as something distinct and instantly recognisable to The Slow Readers Club whilst providing the strongest suggestion that there is a new album on the horizon all sort eagerly check out.

I Saw a Ghost is available now @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/i-saw-a-ghost-single/id973544966 with Cavalcade will be released via Extenso Music on April 13th.

http://www.theslowreadersclub.co.uk     http://www.facebook.com/theslowreadersclub

RingMaster 30/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

 

Arcade Parade – Grace

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Hailing from Shropshire, UK band Arcade Parade instantly made a mark with their debut single Cave of Swimmers last year, the song taken from their recently released EP of the same name. Grace is the second single from the four track EP and again shows why there is plenty of excitement and expectations for the quartet. The song is a vibrant and enticing piece of indie rock where melodies and rhythmic temptation go hand in hand with fiery enterprise.

Consisting of brothers Ollie (guitar and vocals) and Elliot Scott (bass), Jacob Ferguson (guitar and vocals), and Dan Byrne (drums), Arcade Parade since forming a little over two years ago have made a strong and potently growing impression on fans and UK rock. As well as the releases the band has impressed with their live performances, their own shows as well as successful shows at the likes of Osfest (twice) alongside Example, Razorlight and Hard-Fi, and Shrewsbury Fields Forever Festival with The Wombats, The Sunshine Underground and Simon & Oscar from Ocan Colour Scene bringing acclaim. The band recorded the Cave of Swimmers EP with producer Gavin Monaghan with the results sure to make 2013 a landmark moment for them one feels.

A gentle brewing and underwhelming start to the song raises eyebrows slightly but soon a strong vein of sonic guitar temptation scythes through the slight distant skies of the song whilst the vocals cast their impressive narrative and delivery within the emotive atmosphere. The song is a shining example where less is more, its elements allowed to make a call of clarity before combining for an ear thrilling climatic chorus. Though arguably not as instant as their first single the song is a coaxing and devilish persuasion which gets better and more contagious with each listen. Further highlights of the song come with the emotive bass tones throughout and the unpredictable and exciting production which has the song seemingly drift around the senses which only adds to the experience.

It is fair to say whilst listening to Grace you get the feeling there is much more within the band which is either not yet discovered or held back but it only accentuates the promise which is rife as the song dances and pleasures the appetite. Arcade Parade is genuinely a band to watch out for as they evolve into an even more enterprising encounter.

http://arcadeparade.co.uk

8/10

RingMaster 29/05/2013

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Arcade Parade: Cave Of Swimmers (Radio Edit)

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Since forming in 2010, it is fair to say UK indie rock band Arcade Parade has not let any dust settle on their vibrant presence as they have performed at some of the notable venues around the UK, such as O2 Academy 2 & 3 in Birmingham and The Sugarmill in Stoke. They have also played Osfest twice matching their strong sounds to artists such as Example, Razorlight and Hard-Fi and the Shrewsbury Fields Forever Festival with The Wombats, The Sunshine Underground, and Simon & Oscar from Ocan Colour Scene. Their live reputation has certainly risen at the same time and as nationwide recognition is waiting to be persuaded, the release of their debut single should make an initial  strong impression to set things off.

The band recently recorded their first EP with acclaimed producer Gavin Monaghan, which will get its release early next year but 557768_10151140260428691_534556431_nfirst comes single and video Cave Of Swimmers. The Shropshire quartet of Ollie (guitar and vocals) and Elliot Scott (bass), Jacob Ferguson (guitar and vocals) and Dan Byrne (drums), create a sound which layers precise inviting hooks and melodies over unpredictable and inventive beats alongside rich compelling basslines. As the single proves the quartet know how to shape a song into something enticing and thoughtful without resorting to obvious lures. The track is openly infectious nevertheless and makes a strong taster for their forthcoming release. Not exactly rich in originality yet fresh in its breath and energy, the song from its opening summery caresses around sultry and a winding tight melody catches the imagination with ease. The vocals are as warm as the sounds with an expression which balances nicely with the enthused energy and sinewy melodic enterprise veining the pleasing engagement with the ear.

You can never be completely sure of a band from one song alone but certainly Cave Of Swimmers has ensured the release of the EP next year will not go without intriguing attention.

http://arcadeparade.co.uk

RingMaster 03/12/2012

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright