Turning on the LoveSick Radio

US rockers LoveSick Radio “bring a distinctive blend of unapologetic rock guitar coupled with pop melodies and a little hip-hop swagger, creating a fresh sound all their own. “ The words of their bio are swiftly backed up by a sound which infests body and spirit and a live presence which has had halls bouncing long before the likes of All-American Rejects, Bon Jovi, Dorothy, Bobaflex, Scott Weland of Stone Temple Pilots, Justin Bieber, Blue October, Kid Rock, Steel Panther, Three Days Grace, Hinder, Twenty One Pilots, Safety Suit, Paramore, Dead Sara and New Found Glory have followed the band on stage.

A short while back we had the pleasure thanks to the guys finding out more with the band, chatting about origins, their sound, songs, and much more…

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started?

David (Guitar):  Thanks for having us! We are LoveSick Radio & we play honest rock & roll with a touch of blues/punk. This line-up started when I reached out to Troy, our singer. I asked him if he wanted to sing on a track I had & he was game. Oddly enough we have known each other forever but can’t remember how we met. That song snowballed into bringing in Glenn & the Matts. We’ve been writing & touring ever since.

Were you involved in other bands previously? If so has that had any impact on what you are doing now, in maybe style or direction?

Glenn (Bass): All of us have played in a bunch of bands prior to coming together and doing this one. We’ve all brought a lot of what we learned in the other bands, as far as what makes a band work and what doesn’t and what we want out of music, to this band. Everyone’s past musical experiences have really shaped the way this band operates. Being in a band is like a relationship: you have to go through some tough ones to discover what you want.

What inspired the band name?

Matt B. (guitar): Our previous drummer was going through a breakup. Whilst on his way to rehearsal he kept hearing all these songs about heartbreak on the radio & when he got to rehearsal he made a comment about how the radio seemed lovesick & everyone thought it sounded cool so we went with it.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

Matt S. (Drummer): I wouldn’t say there were any specific ideas about forming the band.  We are just 5 guys who vibe well with each other musically, have an almost obsessive passion for music, and the drive to write and play day in and day out.  All of us have differing backgrounds musically, but at the heart of it, we love rock and roll.  The sound is a culmination of the individual influences of all of us, but more importantly, we just want to write good songs.  A good song is a good song, regardless of the genre.  Some might sound heavier, more twangy, or more soulful than others, but that’s all of our personalities coming out.

Do the same things still drive the band from those fresh faced days or have they evolved over time?

Matt B.: Essentially writing great songs that we get off on performing & connecting with an audience has always been the driving force within the band.

As the band evolves the drive to widen our reach & get our music out to the masses becomes stronger & stronger

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

Troy (Singer): “Early days” kinda makes me laugh as I still feel like we are in our “early days”, but as far as evolution I think that honestly happens from song to song. Not just in our sound, but as a band overall…getting more comfortable with one another and for me as a vocalist pushing myself to new places. I think evolution has started since day one for us.

Are those things, that evolution, something organic or more the band deliberately setting out to try new things?

Matt S.: We aren’t afraid to try new things or experiment musically.  It just depends on the mood of the song and what makes sense.  We don’t just follow a music equation, but obviously we want our music to be accessible to everyone.  From the time that someone shares an idea, we build on it, we practice it, and we finally record it, the song could be almost completely different.  I’d like to think it happens organically.  When we get in the studio, that’s where the fun and experimentation begins.   On the current album we are working on, we have instruments which we do not have live on stage (strings, keys, horns), the band plays kazoos and sings gang vocals, we stomp, we clap, we play instruments that we have never played before, just to get the sound and vibe that we hear in our heads.. 

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

David: Yes everyone in the band love a million different things but I think the artist the inspire our approach are Aerosmith, AC/DC, The Stones, LED Zeppelin, Sex Pistols, The Rival Son & Stereophonics to name a few. These are all iconic bands & that’s what we strive to be one day. So we are constantly pushing ourselves to be the best we can be.

Is there a particular process to your songwriting?

Troy: There are always gonna be some variations, but music usually comes first…typically a killer riff. I’ll take a rough demo and live with it for a while…usually spend time driving around coming up with ideas and bring them to rehearsal where everyone chimes in. So in the beginning it’ a very “isolated” process but as we get things worked up, the band as a whole will bring in all the different influences.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

Troy: Inspiration for me is always life…either something I lived or something I am watching someone go through. The only time it would vary is if I am asked to write for a specific TV or movie thing, but even then I have to draw from personal experiences…As an introvert I spend a lot of my time just watching people. I write what I see.

Please give us some background to your latest release.

Glenn: Our latest release is a song called “Young Hurricane”. It’s written kind of like a poem in the way the vocals are structured. Basically it’s just about sticking’ to your guns and doing what you know is right (kind of a metaphor for playing rock n roll in 2019). A lot of the really cool elements of the song came together in the studio when we had a chance to really sit down and play with different ideas to build the song.

Give us some insight to the collective themes and premise behind songs.

Troy: I think it is fair to say we have some pretty universal themes with all our tracks…def some self-reflection and overcoming, some rebellious middle finger flipping and of course love and loss. I’d say our next release “Bloodshot Eyes” falls in the self-reflecting/ overcoming category but doing the reflecting in some smokey bar if those still exist…haha

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

David: It happens both ways in the studio. But a lot of time we will have the music done to a certain point & start tracking before the vocals are finished. The bed tracks might influence Troy to do something different then what we had for the rough demo. We are never married to an idea. We are always changing or rewriting trying to get the best out of the song.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably the favourite aspect of the band?

With the live show we want to sound like a freight train going a full speed. So we work on dynamics, power & energy. We want you to feel it when you come to a show.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods?

Matt S.: Like any other band, you have to put in the time.  We have played for empty rooms, we have played for packed houses, and we have played festivals where you can’t see the end of the crowd.  People seek out good music.  The hard part is introducing it to them (luckily the internet exists).  I feel that we have the sound and energy to lure people in, and to keep them coming back to shows.  It doesn’t matter if it is regionally or worldwide.  As long as you connect to the crowd, you will build a following.  Whether it is a home show or something across the country, we put on the same game face each night and try to win over every crowd we play for.  We have found that people like the resurgence of good old fashioned rock and roll everywhere we go, so everywhere feels comfortable and like our neck of the woods.

Are there the opportunities to make a mark if the drive is there for new bands and talking of the internet how has social media impacted on the band to date?

Glenn: Absolutely. It all comes down to a band’s desire and willingness to push themselves and go outside of their comfort zone to grow and do something cool and original. Social media and the internet are a great thing for bands because it allows us to reach people all over the world as independent artists. Without the internet, we might not have the opportunity to do this interview!

Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as the band grows and hopefully gets increasing success or is it more that bands struggling with it are lacking the knowledge and desire to keep it working to their advantage?

Troy: I think there will always be both negative and positives whether being the “underdog” band on the come up, or at the top trying to stay there. I think the internet and social media will always have the ugliness and trolls looking to tear you down, no matter what your status….however, the positive of how many people can be reached is hard to argue. Honestly with this band being started in the “new world” of technology, it’s really all we’ve known so is kinda our new normal.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

David: Thank you again for having us!!

If you would like to check out us & the music you can go to these links. See you on the road!

AppleMusic: https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/lovesick-radio/203509719

iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/feels-so-good-single/1436316245

Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/artist/7zca83vBdFEDg0119J8thJ?si=4bw6zx7-RL-fbpKajO1aHw

YouTube: Youtube.com/lovesickradio

Instagram: @lovesickradio

Twitter: @lovesickradio

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LoveSickRadioBand/

 & anywhere else you stream & download music

Pete RingMaster 03/04/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Jade Assembly – Got My Star

It has been pretty easy to breed a keen and energetic appetite for the sound of UK band The Jade Assembly over the past couple years due to their imagination grabbing singles; a temptation which has gone hand in hand with a rising reputation and acclaim. In a crowded market place for alternative and indie rock bands, it is hard to standout and consistently but a success the Manchester outfit has easily grabbed and accelerated. New single Got My Star can only push things on again, the track a tenacious and rousing slice of rock ‘n’ roll from a band simply commanding attention.

Embracing inspirations from the likes of The Stones, The Who, and Oasis, the Bolton hailing quartet has earned a strong reputation for writing tracks which roar with heart as they infest body and spirit; traits shaping previous plaudit grabbing singles such as One Last Time and Nothing Changes. Got My Star is more of the same goodness but undoubtedly a new flavour in the band’s maturing sound and creative imagination too.

Got My Star instantly has feet tapping as the rhythmic pulse of drummer Andy Watson colludes with the pulsating bass stroll cast by Danny Hayes. It is rich bait across which the spicy tendrils of Gareth Smedley’s guitar lay and which only grows as the striking tones of singer John Foster stroll in. There is a snarl in his delivery, a tenacious energy and power which further ignites an already highly persuasive encounter. With fiery textures from the guitar, imposingly infectious rhythms, and the vocal magnetism of Foster, the song simply sparks in the ears making a strong claim for the best song from The Jade Assembly yet with its imagination and web of addictive hooks.

Released on vinyl as well as digitally, the single offers up a B-side too in the shape of Save One For Me. It is a slice of semi-acoustic, emotionally fuelled balladry with its own lively canter and creative drama. Its organic air and touch simply captivates, the song feeling live as if the band were there by your side as it shines another light on the band’s instinctive ability to write and create heart bred songs very easy to connect with.

In a time when the UK music scene is blessed with some remarkable and seriously exciting propositions, The Jade Assembly once again reinforce their position as one of them with a single which has the body dancing and spirit bouncing like a puppeteer.

Got My Star is released on November 6th.

https://www.thejadeassembly.co.uk/    https://www.facebook.com/thejadeassembly    https://twitter.com/thejadeassembly

Pete RingMaster 27/10/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Pacers – Losing Touch

Pacers_RingMaster Review

Merging sixties garage rock and psychedelic inspirations into their own inbred punk seeded invention, UK rockers The Pacers make a rather potent introduction to themselves with their debut single Losing Touch. It is a tantalising slice of suggestiveness which shimmers in melodic colour and sonic temptation like an aural kaleidoscope. Their name feels like it is a friend before a note is heard, something familiar now backed up and pushed deeper into the psyche through the captivating Losing Touch.

The Pacers Cover_RingMaster Review     The Pacers was formed in the late summer of 2013 by vocalist/guitarist Alexander Friedl and lead guitarist Harry Stam, the pair meeting initially under “mysterious circumstances”. Uniting their shared interest in all things sixties, the duo began writing songs, subsequently enlisting bassist Jay Creswell and soon after drummer Jamie Yuan to the band. The quartet soon set about getting their sound and claws into the London live scene, playing venues primarily in north and east London and building up a quickly fevered and loyal following. Now a national appetite is about to be stoked with the release of the band’s first single, an encounter sure to catch the imagination of fans of The Stooges and The Stones amongst many more.

Losing Touch opens on a glorious eastern seducing cast by Stam, darker hues soon aligning to its fiery spicing on the senses. It is a bewitching start which becomes more eventful and resourceful as the expressive vocals of Friedl add engagingly dour textures to the quickly mesmeric and fascinating adventure. The more solemn lures of bass and beats similarly bring subtle but contrasting colour to the sonic tendrils perpetually climbing over ears and imagination with psych elegance and mystique. There is no doubting that the song enthrals from start to finish or that it relentlessly coaxes the listener into eager involvement.

In contrast to its more reserved seducing, accompanying track I’m Down is working away on feet and energy from its first breath; scythes of fuzzy guitar quickly courting the rolling rhythms of Yuan and moodier bait of Creswell’s bass. The instantaneous infectiousness of the song swiftly colludes with the rawer tone and air also enticing within its contagion, again The Pacers skilfully merging distinct flavours and tenacious endeavour in an increasingly persuasive tempting.

As relevant to modern rock ‘n’ roll as its sixties seeds, Losing Touch is a vibrant and magnetic first look at The Pacers and with a swift perusal at other songs on their Soundcloud account, the first of many we suspect.

Losing Touch is released October 22nd with a release show @ The Hawley Arms, Camden, London the same night.

https://www.facebook.com/ThePacersBand https://twitter.com/thepacersband

Pete RingMaster 21/10/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Graveltones – Love Lies Dying

The Graveltones _Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

If the Devil had his own band it would definitely be The Graveltones, though we suspect the horned one has his dark seduction running through the band’s new hellacious slab of dark rock ‘n’ roll posing as new album Love Lies Dying anyway. The thirteen track hex on ears and passions is the most virulent and incendiary roar of devilish blues rock and dirt clad rock you are likely to hear this, last, or next year, a satanic bargain promising not its but your soul to the dark side.

In a time of some exceptional rock duos, The Graveltones stand boldly to the fore thanks to the creative and musical union of the Australian bred, UK based pair of vocalist/guitarist Jimmy O. and drummer Mikey Sorbello. The band emerged in late 2011, a subsequent adventure resulting from their meeting in London’s Tin Pan Alley and a mutual love of artists as diverse as Captain Beefheart, Howlin Wolf, John Lee Hooker and Queen Of The Stone Age. 2013 debut album Don’t Wait Down stirred up greedy attention and a new wave of lustful fans for their fiery and unique sound whilst live the band was soon sharing tours and stages with the likes of Rival Sons, The Temperance Movement, Boss Hoss, Monster Truck, and Cadillac Three, as well as playing a seriously successful slot at that year’s Download. As impressive as the album was, it was just the first step to the majestic rock alchemy that is Love Lies Dying, an encounter revealing the band and its sound as the inescapable real deal.

The devilment opens with World On A String, a track emerging with a heavy stride of rhythms and a thick blues soaking of riffs. From the first breath it also has a punk belligerence to its character, an attitude which fuels vocals and adds edge to the wine of grooves igniting its anthemic canvas. Like Rocket From The Crypt meets The Black Keys at a salacious stomp hosted by US duo In The Whale, a description which closest fits the whole of Love Lies Dying, the track is pure addictive rock ‘n’ roll setting the whole intoxicating riot off in contagious style.

love-lies-dying_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review   The invigorating revelry continues just as masterfully in the following Fancy Things, its rhythmic bones bordering on predatory as they bounce on the senses as the guitar sprays flames of melodic spicing. With vocals emulating both aspects with a mix of both intimidating rapacity and infectious temptation, the song brews up an irrepressible stomp around the tangiest of grooves; a template emulated in This Love Is Gonna Break, though the song with colourful keys provided by Carl Hudson walks a more sixties garage rock kind of landscape. It is just as much punk and rock pop too, its cauldron of merciless temptation and a chorus even the dead would be unable to refuse, simply irresistible.

Things take on a slightly more shadowy turn with Running To You next, its scuzzy blues hues and catchy rhythmic bait something close to a stalking of ears, though with a mischief in those same beats and the great vocal dynamics, the song is as vivaciously light as it is menacingly toned. Once more imagination and appetite are inflamed, and four songs in it is fair to say that lustful greed is in the equation too, all swiftly encouraged and fed further by both Never Gonna Let You Go and Can’t Tell A Man. The first of the two is the band’s current single and a little fuzz pit of riffs and searing grooves badgered by another vital rhythmic trap. The song is stirring up major attention for the band and album right now and easy to see why as its creative agitation and frenetic enterprise is just punk ’n’ roll slavery. It pounds the senses as it embroils thoughts and emotions in inventive mayhem, leaving the listener exhausted and alive. Its successor is more of a smoulder in comparison; its fiery blues melodies bourbon running around jabbing beats and the ever expressive and increasingly magnetic tones of Jimmy. It is a barroom croon, sweat and liquor fumes as pungent as the emotive hues of voice and guitar, and just addictive.

In The Throes is of a similar proposal to the previous song, but less dirty and more restrained as it flirts with ears through acidic grooves and rebellious beats. Both songs bring strong variety to the album too, another good essence within Love Lies Dying, and indeed within this track alone things are a perpetual evolution as it gets heavier and darker before making way for the outstanding I’m A Ghost. Like The Stones reincarnated as Th’ Legendary Shack Shakers, the track is a maze of hypnotic beats and vocal incitement but flush with delicious surf punk imagination and garage rock resourcefulness. The song is exceptional, one of numerous pinnacles within the album but another which is sure fire manna for new ears as an introduction to release and band.

Surf seduction reeks in the haunting croon of Back To You too, the mesmeric dark balladry carrying a Nick Cave like hue to its melancholic embrace whilst Kiss And Fuck Off is psychotic brilliance shaped as a psyche/noise rock predation. Ripe with deranged imagination and masterful discordance, not forgetting rhythmic disturbance, the song forcibly hits the sweet spot which Come And Find Me stirs up even more with its aggressive and commanding rumble. Riffs snarl with alluring causticity whilst beats with a more controlled purpose prowl fuzzy air, contrasting elements uniting perfectly as the song twists and turns through varied creative scenery, including a passage of QOTSA like grooving.

Upcoming single Big Money steps forward next, slowly crawling over ears and imagination with boozy melodic vines with vocals from Jimmy to match. The relaxed percussive courting of Mikey is just as enticing, becoming punchier when the song erupts in a furnace of intensity and impassioned energy from time to time. It is not maybe the most obvious of single, compared to others within the album, but its smoulder is intensive and persuasion a lingering potency so that the song joins the major peaks of Love Lies Dying.

Together Again brings everything to a close, its low key melancholic finale a blues rock hug to drift off with until the urge to start the album all over again, which to be honest is a matter of seconds. Someone elsewhere said that The Graveltones have come of age with Love Lies Dying and you can only agree as the album song by song establishes itself as one of the thrilling irresistible proposals of 2015. There is still the feeling though that this, like its predecessor, is only a step towards even greater glories, an excitement as powerful as that bred by the album itself.

Love Lies Dying and latest single Never Gonna Let You Go are out now via Lagoon Dog Records @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/love-lies-dying/id978331780. New single Big Money will be released in July.

http://www.thegraveltones.com/  https://www.facebook.com/thegraveltones

RingMaster 11/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

The Geva Alon Interview

Photography : Adi Ofer

With a string of shows in the UK to coincide with the release of his excellent new album In The Morning Light, Israeli singer songwriter Geva Alon has lit up the summer for a great many. The artist brings freshness and passion to folk rock and with his thoroughly engaging and striking album has drawn further great acclaim his way. To find out more about the artist and his new release we had the pleasure of having Geva Alon indulge are inquisitive questions and this is what he told us.

Hello and many thanks for taking time to talk with us.

Tell us first of all about the man Geva Alon.

I’m a pretty simple guy. I enjoy the simple things and try to avoid unnecessary drama in life.

Being a musician, that’s pretty hard to achieve and that’s a conflict I always have with myself.

I believe music became an important part of your life from an early age?

Yes, music was always around in our house. I started playing piano at the age of 6 and guitar at the age of 12.

Was music an ever present and your family a musical one?

My mom used to be a classical dancer and my dad just loved music, so the radio was often playing and my parents had a nice record collection.

What were the major influences musically and personally which inspired you?

My older brothers introduced me to The Stones, CCR, Zeppelin, Queen and Neil Young, so those were my first major influences, and I took it from there.

You are generally labelled as an indie/folk singer though we see you, going by the new album, as a more rock flavoured artist. How would you describe your music?

It’s hard for me to categorize myself in a specific music style. My influences range from indie, folk, country, blues, punk, rock & roll, new wave, grunge and more. My first band, THE FLYING BABY, was all about hard rock and grunge and then my first solo album was totally acoustic and folky.

Even now rock and indie music in Israel is a mystery and unknown to most outside of the country but when you started was it very hard to be heard outside of your home borders?

I guess the life before Facebook made it hard to connect with a wider crowd outside of my country and it used to be harder to book shows abroad and reach out to different countries. Now you see young bands go and do it on their own all the time. I think Israel has a lot to offer the world as far as indie music goes.

So what has been the key in regard to yourself that has brought you to a wider audience?

I think it’s all about perseverance. I just took off to California one day at the age of 19 and have never stopped playing gigs in Israel and other countries since. I think you have to bring yourself to the audience and not wait for them to come to you.

2000, saw you found the rock band you mentioned earlier, The Flying Baby, tell us more about them.

The band was formed by me and 3 other friends. At first we were all about jamming in and out of old rock classics and played mainly for ourselves for hours in an old bomb shelter in the Kibbutz. After a while I started bringing songs that I wrote and we started experimenting with them. We were young, naive and full of dreams. Wonderful times.

The band found some success in the USA as well as Israel?

Taken by:Yiftach Belsky

 

In the states we struggled and moved from one place to the next, booking gigs wherever they let us play and counting dollar for dollar to pay rent. We shared everything. It was hard but brought our musicianship to a much higher level. We felt that we were getting better and better all the time and wrote endless amount of songs.

You next joined up with rock singer Shy Nobleman. Was this as part of his band only or also allowed you to contribute in the songwriting aspect?

I met Shy in Tel Aviv after his first album was released. He was looking to put a new band together so I offered myself as a guitarist and ended up helping him a lot with the songwriting on the second album.

I get the impression reading about you that a solo career was always going to be the destination of your music, was that your intent all along?

Not really. I always thought that The Flying Baby would be my band forever but I also wanted to try different things. I felt that my folky side needed to come out somehow, so I started playing solo acoustic shows in a small bar in Tel Aviv every Wednesday night and tried new songs in different acoustic arrangements. That’s how my first solo album was born.

How do you approach your songs when composing them, is there a firm process you go through?

There are no rules really. Sometimes I write the music first and then add lyrics to it and sometimes the opposite. Sometimes I have an unsolved chorus and it takes months or even years until I find a solution for it.

Obviously your music from those early days has evolved but from your debut solo album of 2006 Days of Hunger to your excellent new release In the Morning Light, how has it and you as a musician changed?

It’s hard to say how, but I do feel that all the records that I’ve done are very different from each other.  I try to write about more direct and personal issues in my life with every year that passes. I want to reflect something more honest and simple in my music.

What have you explored on In the Morning Light which is different to previous releases like last album Get Closer?

I think that the songs on In The Morning Light are more uplifting somehow. Get Closer was very intense for me as far as the songs and the process so I tried to take a different approach in the new album and just let things be. We didn’t do any rehearsals before the recording and everything happened in the studio.

The album has a seemingly strong personal breath to it from within; does it come from your own experiences as much as outside inspiration?

Everything I write about is from my own personal experiences. The songs on the album were written after a very intense 2 years, and I felt that I had to pause everything and see where I was at. I did try to dig in deeper and write about what really matters to me.

As with its predecessor In the Morning Light was produced with Thom Monahan (The Jayhawks, Silver Jews, Dinosaur Jr.). He is a man you have found a deep understanding to what you are looking for in?

He is. We have a lot of things in common and I feel that he gets the way I see sound and how it should connect with the songs.

Are you a writer/musician who is open to suggestive changes from others or have a clear vision to what you want without allowing strong deviation?

Working with a producer you might as well be open to suggestions. I try to be very open to every input from everyone involved in the project, but on the other hand it’s important to know how to say “no this will not work here, let’s do it this way” sometimes.

Tell us about some of the amazing talent you brought in to help bring the album to life.

Actually, Thom brought them together and I kind of trusted him with it. It was great. The chemistry was amazing in the studio and I felt a strong musical connection with everybody in the band.

Some of the guys had a lot more experience than me and recorded way more albums than me. I felt that I was learning a lot and also doing something in a totally different way.

The album was led into view by the wonderful single The Great Enlightenment, probably our favourite song on the album too. Tell us about its seeds.

This is a very old song of mine actually. I wrote it before my first solo album was released but somehow it never made it onto an album. When I sat down to finish writing before the recordings I recalled that song and felt that this was the time for it. I made a few changes in the melody and harmony, rewrote the lyrics and there it was.

You have just treated the UK to some live shows, how did those go?

I love playing in the UK. The shows were great and I got to visit some cities I’ve never played before like Oxford, Brighton and Glasgow.

They were smaller more intimate shows I believe? You are no stranger to large audiences though having toured the US and supported Paul Weller, as well as playing festivals in front of crowds of 20,000. Do you have a preference though or get a different buzz from large or small settings?

I can’t compare between the two formats because they are so different. Each one has it’s pulses on the other. I’m glad I get to see all aspects of live performances.

What is next on the horizon of Geva Alon?

Thinking about the next album and I already have some songs lined up for it. In the near future there are a lot of gigs in Israel and in Europe coming up, so I’m looking forward to that.

Once more many thanks for talking with us and good luck with the album.

Read the review of  In The Morning Light https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2012/07/08/geva-alon-in-the-morning-light/

The RingMaster Review 27/07/2012

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Beat Seeking Missiles – ‘Break My Fall’/’Dr. Strangelove’

Warm, enthusiastic and completely magnetic, the debut single from Beat Seeking Missiles jumps all over the ear to offer riotous beats, melodically curved grooves, and insistent energy.  ‘Break My Fall’/’Dr. Strangelove’ knows what it has and is unashamed in bringing it directly and openly to one’s senses. It has irrepressible blends of beat and surf rock coupled with garage and heartfelt rock ‘n’ roll to merge into a sound that brings sixties vaunt alongside punk attitude and garage rock honesty, it has unbridled dirty charisma.

Released on Dirty Water Records the single brings elements of the likes of The Stones, Bo Diddley, Link Wray and in some ways The Modern Lovers. For all the artists their music does remind of the Beat Seeking Missiles as evident on the single, has a distinctive rugged sound of their own, offering influences as spices to their thick spirited creations. The band is comprised of a pedigree many bands would drool for. There is Sir Bald Diddley (from the Wig Outs/Big Wigs/Alopecia Records), Mick Quinn (dB Band and founding member of Supergrass), Kid Wig (of the Wig Outs/Big Wigs), and Bruce Brand (Pop Rivets/Milkshakes/Thee Headcoats/Masonics), a collective that certainly with this first single combine their experience and attributes into a stimulating and very exciting proposition.

Lead track is ‘Break My Fall’, a sixties lined slice of electrified raw pop. Combining a feel of the Who and the Troggs with The Stooges and The Ramones, the track flows with spiky melodies, soaring Beatlesque harmonies and tenacious riffs. The song openly wants the ear captivated, thrusting a simple but eager driven riff through its centre to allow the guitars to bring scorched diversions and enterprise to the track. The song is an excellent introduction to the band but soon left in the shade by its partner track.

Dr. Strangelove’ or to give it the full title on the single sleeve, ‘Doctor Strangelove, or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Beat Seeking Missiles’, is a rumble upon the senses. Part rock ‘n’ roll, part rockabilly, and part sixties enthused blues, the track is monstrous. Its persistent beats are hypnotic and the vocals dogged, the mix recalling the likes of Reverend Horton Heat, Link Wray and at times Ray Campi, plus the punk essences of a Rocket From the Crypt, It is wonderful stuff that gets better with the explosive melodic crashes and cascades within the song. The track plays with an arrogance and self belief that is irresistible and easily confirms that this is a band one needs to hear more of and go see live.

Beat Seeking Missiles are an instinctive need for your musical day, simple as that. Just trust and go listen to this single for your proof.

RingMaster 08/02/2012

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