Creative gunslingers and seductive melodies: exploring the world of Prime

Prime has been a rising incitement of attention and pleasure within the British underground rock scene since emerging in 2014 and it is fair to say that the Nottingham outfit is only just beginning to arouse a broader and richer following and support for their multi-flavoured melody rich sound. Following the recent release of their new single and ahead of an upcoming EP we had the pleasure of finding out more about Prime with vocalist Lee Heir exploring the outfit’s origins, sound, latest single and  much more…

Hello Lee and thanks for taking time out of your day to talk with us.

My Pleasure.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all?

The band is currently myself on vocals, Kieran Hill on lead guitar, Daniel Ison on bass guitar, and Zero on drums. We’re looking to add a bad-ass guitar player over the summer so we shall see what happens.

Some of the band are recent recruits, has that had any impact on what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

It has… I think we were about to get a bit soft before Kieran and Zero bought so high-impact, flamboyant playing to the table. Every song-ending now sounds like it’s veering off the end of a cliff! And Dan is looking for a certain level of intricacy in the music, he wants to build quiet and loud song structures and tell a 4-5 minute song through those theories.

What inspired the band name?

I wanted something big, a bit like T.REX, as Marc Bolan was a massive influence on me starting out. I got the name from the Lee Marvin film Prime Cut – it was in the TV guide one day when I was flicking through the film listings.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of Prime and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

There were no grand plans. It originally started off as a studio project, we recorded a studio album in 2014, but I suppose it was more like a solo project as most of the guys didn’t end up playing live with us, guys like Dan Ryland, who was a very creative drummer. The lads who played on the early recordings were all great, I just wasn’t happy with the mixes of the production at times.

Do the same things still drive the band when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

Well Kieran is still fresh-faced, he’s only just turned 20! I think the lads are all the same as me: I’m driven by more musical challenges, I just wanted to make pure rock music originally, which in a way, we still do, but there’s more subtlety there now and more interesting songs.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

Everything is better in my eyes. Zero instantly knows where he wants to take a song as a drummer, he has such an ear for which direction he sees our songwriting. Dan, for such a cocky bastard, doesn’t rate his own abilities as highly as he should: he is an excellent songwriter. The sound was more based in garage and punk, and although I love that stuff, with the exception of The Seeds or The Clash or Gang Of Four, they were never the most musical of genres.

Across Prime it sounds like there is a wide range of inspirations so as a particular process in the songwriting emerged to generally guide the writing of songs?

No particular process, it used to be jam out in the studio, so that’s why it was maybe more punky and frenetic and less subtle. Now most songs come from me or Kieran, or sometimes me and Dan, sitting down with a pint and thinking a bit more.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

Everyday life, concepts, theories… Chris (Munton), our original bassist said to me “I try and write songs that give people direction and some meaning”, I suppose I do that to a degree, in more of a layered, subtle – or sometimes in your face! – way.

Could you give us some background to your latest release, out soon, the Bye Bye EP.

Well Bye Bye, our latest single and video are out now online on the usual places, so we’ve decided to enhance it with some tracks recorded live at the o2 Leicester and a remix by a really good electronic artist called Roger Portas who has previously remixed Donna Summer and has a project called Video Tape Machine. The track Bye Bye originally started off as a simple demo, it just sounds like pretty fuzzy rock with my vocal quite impassioned – or unlistenable I prefer to say! – I think I’ve improved on it a little bit since thank God!

What are the themes and premise behind Bye Bye?

It’s a very confused song about a broken relationship, and how people go round in circles until they just come to a dead end and realise that they are never going to be together.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

We haven’t recorded in over a year, but it’s always best to go with the most complete song possible and put finishing touches to it, such as finish lyrics off, or add nice guitar overdubs and backing vocals, done by Shirena Ingram, who is a lovely girl and a really nice singer. We road test everything we record live, for many months before recording. If it doesn’t go down well live it’s pretty silly recording it; although Bye Bye was a rare exception to that rule.

You mentioned tracks live at the o2… tell us about Prime live?

We go out there to entertain first and foremost, if you come watch Prime anywhere in the country, you’ll never get the same show twice. I don’t think you get that with bands like Arctic Monkeys, from what I hear they’re pretty boring live.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods? Are there the opportunities to make a mark if the drive is there for new bands?

We’ve had more interest and luck up North I would say, our sets have gone down a storm in venues like The Wardrobe in Leeds. Christian Carlisle on BBC Sheffield has played us and seems to like what we do, although certain stations in the East Midlands don’t seem to, they seem to be more interested in plucking fifteen-year-old girls from obscurity… that’s their prerogative. I’ve been a bit frustrated by certain venues when we have gone down clearly very well to bigger crowds, yet a lack of follow up is done – the system is definitely flawed at times, but we push on. Next stop is London.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date? Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as the band grows and hopefully gets increasing success or is it more that bands struggling with it are lacking the knowledge and desire to keep it working to their advantage?

I don’t see apart from the very poor royalties on streaming sites – virtually non-existent from sites like Soundcloud and Spotify – that the internet can be a bad thing. People from around the world can find out about Prime. That’s a great thing. Main problem is the lack of quality control, there’s a lot of shit content and bad music – from the kinds of bands you just mentioned -getting in the way of people finding us too.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

I’ll just say thank you for your time and thank you to your readers for supporting new or unsigned music. Without your support, new bands can’t exist, so keep doing it!

https://www.facebook.com/ukprime/    http://www.thepublichousebrand.com/prime

The RingMaster Review 13/06/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Introducing Las Pipas de la Paz

Since forming in April of 2012, Mexican garage rock band Las Pipas de la Paz, translated as The Pipes Of Peace, has been on a steady climb acclaim wise within their home country and are beginning to attract the attention of many further afield globally. Musically the band mesh a rich mix of garage rock and punk with sixties psychedelia, the combination resulting in a psyched abrasive yet compelling sound flush with the influences of bands such as The Sonics, The Seeds, 13th Floor Elevators, The Count Five, and of course The Doors.

The quartet from Mexico City of vocalist and guitarist Rulo Pipa, bassist Jack Pipa, drummer Pilo Pipes, and Paco Pipes with his Yamaha YC-10, has lit up stages playing with bands such as Los Derrumbes (Spain),  Los Pistones (Mex),  Bird Mad Girl (E.U.A), Murphy (Chile), and Los Esquizitos (Mex)to name just a few, each event adding weight to their growing recognition across their country and continent.

With songs inspired by personal experiences the band unleashed their debut EP Pipes of Peace August of 2011 through Kromosoma Records. It was a three track gem which instantly drew interest and attention to the band. The song Your Brain easily captivated the imagination but it was with Come Now Baby Now that there was a spark like connection, the song  a sonic teasing of the ear. It is a raw and caustic song soaked in the primes essences of sixties garage rock, the Yamaha dazzling the senses throughout with its acidic squalls whilst guitar and vocals festered only enthused appeal towards their salty melodic rub. Though arguably the sound is not the most original the song easily marks the band as one with great and inventive.

The debut is completed by Psychedelic Trek, a magnetic frying of the senses through primal beats and scorching keys once more. The track puts the senses on edge through its cutting sonics whilst ensuring one is easily and eagerly drawn to its again raw honest presence. The track takes one back to the times of its influences to offer a nostalgic but refreshing experience. The song was also the source of the first video from the band, their self-produced production bringing a complete and pleasing psyched out journey to the track.

The release took the band into view of a great many more fans, its great sound well received and leading to strong anticipation for the second release which was recorded earlier this year. Consisting of six tracks the El Mero Basilón EP sees the band with an even surer sound and touch. Songs like Dance On Fire and Like A Feeling leave one even more impressed by the band and their maturing sound. The first initially riles up the passions with a simple drum stomp and bass swagger whilst the keys taunt with fiery whispers. It eventually stalls into a pause before brewing up a storm of garage punk, its energy and attitude clad tones irresistible. The song is a deeply satisfying slab of dirty rock, the band creating a brooding and inciteful clash of sound and energy. It is arguably their best song recorded to date and leaves only sure intent to keep the band and their sounds close at hand. The second of the mentioned pair is another with a punk attitude to show a stiffer and more combative breath to the second release compared to the debut. This new trait makes the band an even more formidable proposition as they develop their own distinct sound. A great discord tone soaks the guitar throughout to play against and with the swirling acid wash of the keys whilst the brawling vocals cap the aggressively pushing energy.

With their first European tour and second video as well as latest EP fresh to the world, Las Pipas de la Paz is destined to be a name all garage rock/punk fans will be sharing around and their music a sought after pleasure.

Watch out for a full review of the El Mero Basilón EP in the coming weeks from The Ringmaster Review as well as an interview with the band.

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Las-Pipas-De-La-Paz/114979481908733

RingMaster 03/10/2012

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Thee Vicars – Every Day/Don’t Wanna Be Free

Better late than never right? Such is the case with the excellent single from UK garage rock band Thee Vicars. Released the tail end of last year the single recently swaggered into the aural gaze of the RM Review and what a joy it is. Playful, feisty and incessant, ‘Every Day’/’Don’t Wanna Be Free’ is a glorious two track gift for the heart.

Imagine you are sitting there undecided on what to listen to. On your left shoulder is the angelic and safe indie pop of say a Gotye or Mumford & Sons and on the right the devilish and mischievous Thee Vicars encouraging and tempting. There is no contest of course and once their songs unveil their wondrous sounds to captivate and inflame, they ensure there will never be any other destination than Thee Vicars considered again.

The trio from Bury St Edmunds of Mike Whittaker (bass/vocals), Chris Langeland (guitar/vocals), and Alex De Renzi (drums), have for three years used their combined disdain /hatred of modern music to fuel a vibrant mix of R&B and a raw Sixties sound veined with essences of trashy and garage punk, or if you like essential rock ‘n’ roll. Their music is the insistent rascally fusion of the likes of 13th Floor Elevators, The Seeds, The Stones and Chuck Berry with essences of Thee Mighty Caesars, The Hives and the early sound of The Horrors. The band take these and seep them into their own distinctive irrepressible sound and ideas to simply create music that shakes you out of your stride and complacency, as their previous duo of singles and two albums has already proved.

The new single released on Dirty Water Records, as their previous releases, is a refreshing and invigorating stiffener to any day, livening up staid emotions or depleted will. It bristles and oozes energy, quality and most of all fun to enhance and spoil the senses. The band is renowned for its work ethic with masses of shows and tours honing their punchy and melodic sound into the hard hitting and scalding harmonious music evident on the single.

Every Day’ starts by teasing with short bursts of the soon to be constant temptation of an infectious riff and hook. These act as a continual beckoning finger, enticing and coaxing one into the song’s expressive and caustic explosions of sound. The bass of Whittaker throbs with a knowledge and confidence that you cannot refuse its lure aided by the uncomplicated rhythms of De Renzi, her beats completely hypnotic. Langeland’s guitar at times sizzles with contempt and enthused malice but always generating only welcoming compliance from the ear. A brilliant track that alone no matter the quality of its partner would make the single a must buy.

Of course ‘Don’t Wanna Be Free’ is more than able to back it up. With an early Kinks like vibe the song sways and dances with eagerness and fine melodic grace. It has a slight Mod feel to it in the swagger the song carries into its sixties toned melodies and urgency. There is at times a fuzzy chaotic feel to the drive of the song which is impressive and gives off an unbridled energy that can only enthuse.

By the end one feels like the vocals on the single, excited, slightly strained and thoroughly contented. The single is near perfect and encapsulates what rock ‘n’ roll and punk is all about. Is it too late to make it my single of 2011?

RingMaster 08/02/2012

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